Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

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p 102-1476 volleyball Forks 1999

 

TRINITY text 1939 35T tanker T-R-I-N-I-T-Y,Fred Holmes,Rickover, nipa shack 1096 p 56 35T TRINITY [beginning of Chapter] In the Spring of l938 Jack was named Executive Officer of the tanker TRINITY, which was being recommissioned at Philadelphia Navy Yard. Jack received a letter of commendation from Commandant Fourth Naval District for "high spirit of cooperation which has greatly facilitated and expedited the execution of the work by the Yard. The work done by the ship's force materially reduced the cost of reconditioning and has been expeditiously and efficiently performed." (Fitness report USS TRINITY June 21, l938 to September 30, l938) (p. 515 letters and papers). While Jack was working on recommissioning the tanker, he received a friendly letter from a 1912 Revenue Cutter School classmate David Marvin, who was retired in Southern California after many years of coast Guard service: [SMB Notebook 5- pp. 160-1] "To Lt. Cdr. J.B. Barrett USN, Fourth Naval district, Navy Yard, Philadelphia, PA.3354 Dumas St. San Diego CA 14 April 1938 Dear Jack, That duty on the new TRINITY will be very fine- except that tankers do not in the merchant service at least stay in port much of any. But it is just possible that this one will stay in port at San Diego. In some ways that duty will be very interesting, though you will have a tough time not lighting that pipe whenever you want, Jack. = Some years ago I was approached by a Britisher, Mr. Holtzapfel, with the suggestion that we go to work to establish a kind of nitrocellulose paint for the insides of oil tanks. It seems that at present there is no method for the preservation of steel of such tanks, so that bulk tank vessels just naturally rust through in about fifteen or twenty years. Holtzapfel had a paint something chemically like Duco, that was totally insoluble in fuel or crude oils or gasoline. He had owned the International Paint Company and was thoroughly used to selling all kinds of paints. I held back, and have never heard any more of the stuff, except that Holtzapfel had died. Privately, I do not think that any paint known to man will stand the acid, sand, and mechanical action of oil in the tanks of a ship. Perhaps the solution will be found in stainless steels of some kind. = How fast is the TRINITY? The Japs have eighteen knot ships on this coast, running from [San] Pedro [p. 5--161] to Japan, they are H.I.J.M.N vessels [??His Imperial Japanese Majesty's Navy?] , and I see their crews on liberty at times. = We are all getting along pretty well; just now the excitement is that our cat has five black kittens. Does your boy want one? They were born yesterday. We would like to have you establish your family in Loma Portal, the best and handiest of the residence stations- though there are no apartments here. Have you your own furniture? = You are indeed to be congratulated about not being retired; these are hard days for the ex-temporary officers, in both the Navy and the Coast Guard. Probably,- with the possibility of a large increase in personnel, there will be little danger of early retirement. = Please let me know if there if any re-connoitering I can do for you. - Very sincerely yours, Dave Marvin {Revenue Cutter School 1912 classmate] P.S. Clement J. Todd, -resigned {USCG] about ten years ago, lives in Corona California about eighty miles north of here. He has a very large house and four or five children - one a year old." [end Dave MARVIN letter] [Note by Sophie Barrett-:] Jack, John and I visited Marvin's home very late in 1938 - November or December. WE met his wife and saw his workshop in the garage but did not settle in Loma Point as it was too isolated for us- no apartments, and Jack was away almost all the time. Our furniture was in storage in San Diego, but we stayed at the Betsy Ross apartments in Coronado. I do not remember seeing any of the children at the Marvins', but he had a daughter. = Clement Todd came to Los Angeles to see us off when we left on the LURLINE for Hawaii in July 1941. Shortly before the TRINITY was ready to go to sea, her home port was changed to San Diego, and Jack began planning to move me and John. Jack wrote to our friends Clarence and Mary Boyd in Coronado, who offered to house John and me until we found other living arrangements.He also asked Sue and Frank Delahanty to meet our train in Los Angeles,where we were scheduled to change for a noon train to San Diego.Sue wrote that Frank would not be available, but she and a woman friend would take care of John and me as we changed trains.Very late in August the packer arrived, and Jack's father "Pa" Barrett came over from New York, where he was visiting his other son, Bill. As the packers pushed a big bookcase away from the dining room wall, Pa Barrett found Jack's Revenue Cutter School Cadet ring,which had been missing for a long time.Both Pa Barrett and Jack were delighted to recover the ring. After lunch Pa Barrett returned to New York city.Our faithful Irish maid Nellie Kelly got into the taxi with us along with the radio we gave her and her bag. She went on to her new job with a Marine family at the Philadelphia Navy Yard after Jack, John and I went into the railroad station to board the train for Chicago.In Chicago Jack took us to the zoo, then put us on a special fare train for Los Angeles as he bought space after carefully investigating the milk and food situation for a boy two years and four months of age.Then to John's distress, Jack left us for his trip back to Philadelphia where he took leave to drive to New York city, visit with his brother and father and then drive his father home to Boston, before he returned to live aboard the TRINITY, scheduled to sail shortly with his friend"Freddie " Holmes then commander USN as Captain. I took John to the dining car which was far from our car, but I could find very little on the menu he could eat,and the train had no milk. It was an extra fare very fast train that catered to business men- not families and certainly not to a young child.John became sick for the rest of the journey. Sue Delahanty held John's hand in the railroad station in Los Angeles while I sat on a stool in the station lunch room to try to get a little food before Sue put us on the train for San Diego.The Boyds met us in San Diego for the ferry trip to Coronado. Mary Boyd immediately called a doctor for John. With good milk and food fit for a child John soon recovered but sadly missed Jack, who always made up wonderful bedtime stories in Philadelphia.The Boyds had a daughter Peggy about four years old and were most hospitable. They also had a lovely wire=haired terrier " Mischief."With Clarence Boyd's help we found an expensive but nice furnished apartment at the Betsy Ross- not an easy accomplishment as much of the Fleet was then concentrated in San Diego,and landlords charged Navy families all that the traffic would bear. When my furniture arrived, I had it put in storage until Jack could find a suitable apartment or house for us. As it turned out the furniture remained in storage as we were very comfortable in the Betsy Ross, and Jack was ordered to shore duty in New York City less than ten mmonths after we arrived in Coronado. There were many hummingbirds around the Betsy Ross apartments. INSERT from NOTEBOOK FOUR: train for San Diego where we were met by Lieutenant and Mrs. Clarence E. and Mary Boyd who took us to their home on D Avenue in Coronado. Mary Boyd's sister Margery Mrs. James Haley lived right across the street. We enjoyed the swimming pool on North Island where we spent Labor Day. We soon found a furnished apartment at the Betsy Ross at 756 D Avenue and spent a great deal of time in a small park right on D Avenue.within easy walking distance of the Betsy Ross. Soon after our arrival Jack's brother William Joseph Barrett- who had flown to the West Coast on business for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York, came to see us late on Saturday night and stayed till Sunday noon. He swam in the pool with us and the Boyds on Sunday morning.He told me he expected to be married in October to Miss Virginia Brady of the Bronx. They went to Europe for their honeymoon, sent French books to John and a mechanical rocking horse for Christmas. Jack was out in the Pacific and Orient most of the time on the tanker TRINITY. Our next door neighbor supplied a small Christmas tree and the decorations. Mrs. Wardrop, mother of the wife of Captain Frederick Holmes, was most generous in giving toys to John. When the TRINITY was in port, Jack drove us around Coronado and east along the Mexican border, where we had to stop and wait for herds of cattle on the road.-- The story of the TRINITY while Jack was aboard can best be seen through the letters to us written by the ship's Navigator, Haskell C. Todd, who was a Navy Captain living in Belfast,Maine, when he wrote three letters to us:""3 December l969 Dear Mr. Barrett, Your letter regarding your father and the days of the TRINITY was received Saturday.I have very little data on the TRINITY except my memory and a chart on which I laid out all the trips the TRINITY made, ports visited, etc. I will dig that out in the next few days and with that data as a base I will try to give you a resume of the first two voyages to the Orient and also our trip from Philadelphia to San Diego after commissioning." (These are the periods Jack was aboard)....The USS TRINITY was a World War I tanker & in l938 was hauled out of the back channel in Philadelphia Navy Yard & reconditioned for service & put in full commission September l938 at Phiadelphia, Pennsylvania.She was 489 feet long,60foot beam,single screw,speed ten knots, draft,loaded approximately 25 feet,capacity 55,000 barrels plus the wing tanks above the bulk tanks for carying case oil -25-gallon tins in a wooden box.Her forward bulk tank was fitted with, a water replacement balanced system for carrying aviation gasoline.The cargo tanks ere fitted with a CO2 carbon dioxide gas smothering system for safety.At commissioning the following officers were aboard.Commanding officer:Comander Frederick Holmes Executive Officer Lt. Commander J.B. Barrett Engineer officer Lt.Blaisiar.First Lietenant Lt.Eisenhart Navigation Officer Lieutenant Haskell C. Todd Supply Officer Lt.Hathaway Medical Officer Lt. Robert Cooper & boatswain & pay clerk plus three or four ensigns as watch standees.Samuel Crofut Keeler CWOI John Pugliese CWOI chief warrant officers/1. When the USS TRINITY sailed from Philadelphia Navy Yard in September l938 we may have stopped at Norfork Virginia for a day or two to pick up stores & equipment.-then,Houston Texas,where we loaded fuel oil for delivery at the Panama Canal-then we proceeded up the West Coast to San Diego,California,where we arrived the latter part of October,l938.We did not go into Galveston or Guantanamo as I remember.One of the highlights of loading at Houston was the blowing up of a ten inch oil hose on deck when somebody closed a tank valve too soon-spewing oil fifty feet in the air & all over the main deck of the ship. First trip:We left San Diego about the second week of November l938 for San Pedro California,where we took on a full load of fuel oil.(Note by Sophie M. Barrett Jack's close friend Commander Frank Delahanty of the Supply Corps wanted Jack to go to his home in San Pedro's outskirts to he his wife Sue & have dinner with them,but Jack would not leave the ship while it as taking on fuel oil-it was supplied by the USS Pecos for Guam,Manila & Cavite storage tanks for Asiatic Fleet)..We departed San Pedro l8 November l938,discharged some fuel at Guam,& the remainder at Manila,P.I. Late in December l938 we proceeded to Tandjong Oeban "West Point" in the Rian archipelago about thirty miles south of Singapore.-picked up a load of fuel oil & returned to Manila for discharge.We departed Manila early in February l939 for the return trip to San Diego via the Hawaiian Islands,passing south (north?) of Oahu through the Kauai channel-but did not go into port.We arrived San Diego,California 28 February l939.Second trip:Departed San Diego 5 April l939-took northern route discharging twenty thousand barrels fuel oil in storage tank Dutch Harbor, Aleutian Islands, Alaska about April 20th,l939-proceeded to Manila, discharged remaining cargo-then to Tandjong Oeban= returned to Manila-discharged cargo-& proceeded to Yokohama(Tokyo) for liberty & recreation=remained four days in Yokohama & then returned to San Diego via northern route (great circle) arriving 28 June,l939.On this trip en route to Tandjong Oeban we went East of the Rian archipelago on a southerly course until we had crossed the Equator-& then turned & proceeded northwesterly throught the Rian Straits to Tandjong Oeban.This was at Captain Holmes's behest,as he had never before crossed the equator.It was also on this trip that Captain Holmes bought a 'nipa shack"-native Philippine house made of bamboo & palm leaves for $700.It was made up in sections,so that it could be dismantled & stowed in our dry cargo hold for transportation to the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania (Freddy's home was in Eagle's Mere).However,he discovered before leaving Manila that the shack would have to be fumigated before landing in the United States.That is when he 'discovered' the ship was badly rat-infested (?!) & had to be fumigated immediately before leaving Manila.He directed your father to go ashore & make necessary arrangements for the fumigating,& that is when your father met (a young Engineer Lieutenant now General Hyman) Rickover & had quite a job to convince him a tanker was rat-infested.If there is any type of ship that is comparatively rat-free it is a tanker.Anyway we were fumigated (R.H.I.P.-Rank Has Its Privileges) & hauled the nipa shack to San Diego- it was later put aboard the USS VEGA for transportation to Norfolk,Virginia,where it was unloaded, condemned,& burned by the Department of Agriculture.(( NOTE))Freddy intended the shack as a gift for his wife,who was our neighbor in California along with her mother Mrs. Wardrup. Freddy used to say,"You can fall in love with a rich girl as well as a poor one." One of his many sea stories concerned a time when the young watch officer asked him,"Captain, what's that green thing down there in front of us?" -"That's a rock,son," Freddy replied, & they immediately reversed their engines & course just in time.Tankers were hazardous in those days,& there was a "no smoking" policy on board,but Captain Holmes sometimes pulled out his cigar on the bridge, until Jack Barrett persudaded him the oil didn't know his cigar from anyone else's.Despite many amusing eccentricities & a sick spell one time near Dutch Harbor Alaska, Captain Holmes was a very capable & popular officer, who believed loyalty ran both ways & supported & encouraged subordinates, including Jack Barrett,his executive officer.Captain Holmes was grateful for Jack's good work while in active command during his illness, & gave him one of the best fitness reports of his career,leading to his promotion in June l940 to full Commander. At the time Jack thought it would be an 'Irish promotion', as he was scheduled for retirement, but all retirements were canceled because of the War emergency. We located Captain & Mrs. Holmes in retirement in l969-70 in Newport Rhode Island. They took great pride in their son's outstanding record at West Point Miliary Academy & distinguished Army career) Continuing Captain Todd's letter:"Your information about Captain Holmes is correct.His wife was an heir of the Columbia Record Company.I know that Captain Holmes once told me that he had never contributed one cent of his income toward the support of his family.The call at Yokohama-Tokyo was for liberty & recreation. (note by Sophie M. Barrett-While Jack was in Tokyo he bought cultivated pearl earrings for SMB-also a white gold pin with a cultured pearl& two lovely Japanese silk flowered kimonos-one for SMB & one for John junior.) Letter"We tied up at a pier in Yokohama & worked through the Consul General's office there for communications.The crew spent most of (p.284) the time in Yokohama & chartered a small hotel there.The officers went to Tokyo by train (about twenty-five minutes) or by car & were entertained or steered around by Embassey personnel.We were always trailed by Japanese intelligence officers from the time we left the ship until we returned,but it wasn't an unmixed blessing- one of their approaches was to ask us if they could guide us around without any fee other than speaking English-so in many cases we took them right along with us,made it easy for everybody,-& I think we saw a lot of places that the average tourist didn't get to -such as real sukiyaki dinner served where we werethe only foreigners present. I remained on the USS TRINITY until December, l940 making four more trips,stopping at Guam,Manila,Tandjong Oeban each trip & into Singapore one trip for liberty & recreation-&one trip up the China coast to Tsingtao, Shantung peninsula to fuel the fleet in September, l939. Rode out a one-hundred-mile-an-hour typhoon while at anchor there- we dragged anchor about four hundred yards- but three ships & one Navy minesweeper went aground. The center passed over us,& it was dead calm for almost twenty minutes,-then the hundred-mile windhit again in the opposite direction.A large German freighter got under way & stood out during the calm,& we wondered why,until the next day the news of the declaration of war came out.Evidently the German shipper got news ahead of time,& as there was an English cruiser present,he took no chance of being captured.-..any further questions,ask-Haskell C. Todd." On 13 January 1970 Captain Todd wrote, "Dear Mr. Barrett: In regard to the duties of the USS TRINITY she was under the direction of the Naval Transportation Service. There was an NTS Director in each Naval District Headquarters and they handled the routing, cargoes and passengers of Naval transports, cargo, and bulk tankers, such as the USS HENDERSON, VEGA, and TRINITY.We were not a fleet tanker- fueling combat ships in port or at sea- such as the KANAWHA in the Pacific Fleet and the PECOS with the Asiatic Fleet based at Manila.We delivered our cargo into shore tanks at so-called Naval Fueling Stations.On arriving at Manila after discharging a comparatively small amount at Guam,we would go to Pier I, discharge about twenty thousand barrels,in Navy shore tanks there and then proceed across Manila Bay to the Naval Fuel Depot and Sangley Point, Cavite, adjacent to the Cavite Navy Yard and discharge the rest of the cargo.The reason for this was that the channel to Sangley Point was only twenty-five feet depth, and we had to get up to about twenty feet draft to get in there. On return from Tandjong Oeban to Manila we would repeat the same routine so that actually we put in two full loads one hundred ten thousand barrels of oil in Manila on each trip. As to handling of the USS TRINITY she was a comparatively low-powered single screw vessel with very little backing power. When fully loaded her cargo of oil weighed in the vicinity of ten thousand tons plus the ship itself, and even moving at ten knots she would carry her way for a long distance even with the engine in reverse. I remember one trip we tried out her turning circle- way carried with engine stopped and way carried with engine reversed -286- and as I remember making a speed of ten knots and stopping the engine she traveled over a mile and a quarter before becoming dead in the water. With engines reversed when going ahead at ten knots it was about eight hundred yards before she lost headway. I hope the information I have given you will be of some help and wish you the best of luck in putting together an account of your father's Naval career." In June of l971 John went to Captain Todd's home in Belfast, Maine, where he enjoyed a delightful visit with captain and Mrs. Todd.Mrs. Todd's father Herbert Robinson was in the Lighthouse Service for over thirty years in Maine, and she recalls many instances of the tender ZIZANIA on which Jack served in the Lighthouse Service in 1912 bringing coal, oil, and hay to her father's station when she was a little girl prior to World War I.Captain Sterling of Peakes Island, Portland Maine was Captain of the ZIZANIA in the early l900's - then Herman Ingalls when Jack was on the crew l9l2. In April 1971 William J. Pugliese of California who was a petty officer on the TRINITY wrote:" Dear Mrs. Barrett, The USS TRINITY was put in commission in Philadelphia on June 30, l938. Fred Holmes was her Captain. I was chief machinist mate, helped put her in commission. I left the ship at Fremantle,Western Austalia on March 1, l943. After the ship was commissioned, we went to Houston, Texas, from there to Guantanamo Bay Cuba then on to the West Coast to San Diego. I remember the run we made to Dutch Harbor to bring supplies to the radio station there. We r--oadg to Manila, Cavite and did go to Tandjong Oeban, Netherlands East Indies. and to S---b for more oil. Incidentally the captain,and your husband could have smoked in certain sections of the ship when "the smoking lamp is lit" was announced. The USS TRINITY was the last US naval vessel to visit Japan before December 7, l941, We were in Yokohama, Japan two weeks previous to that date. During the War years the USS TRINITY ran all over the South Pacific delivering oil and loading oil. Our longest run was to Bahrein,Arabia, to Albany and Fremantle Western Australia for delivery to British warships." At Christmas time in Coronado l938 I sent a Christmas card to our President PIERCE friends Mr. amd Mrs. Harry Pardee of Saticoy, Ventura county California tellling them we were in Coronado. in Coronado. Immediately they sent us an invitation to visit, as we had been close friends on the President PIERCE from Kobe, Japan to Naples, Italy,and had seen them again in Rome and in Venice. But at first I refused to impose upon them with a three year old boy. They persisted, and when Jack was ordered to New York City in the summer of l939, we gave up the apartment at the Betsy Ross and went to their lemon ranch at Saticoy, which is not far from Los Angeles - about ninety miles northwest. I was amazed to see the really modern, expensive. beautifully furnished 287 ranch house in the extensive lemon,orange and walnut ranch even though I surmised the Pardees were wealthy as they had taken the luxury Cook's tour of the world in 1932 in the effort toovercome Mr. Pardee's circulatory difficulties.The first evening we were there they cook luscious steaks outdoors on the large patio porch and served vegetables picked fresh from the garden. But as I recall that was the only meal we had there except breakfast, for the rest of our considerable visit. They drove us out to restaurants and hotels in all the small well-known towns surrounding Saticoy where everyone seemed to know Lizzie and Harry Pardee.Mr. Pardee took Jack to see the lemon processing plant while I stayed home with John.He got pretty dirty on the dusty ground of the ranch, and I tried to keep him clean by doing his washing in the bowl in my private bathroom. This took a lot of water,and of course I tried to do some of my own washing and Jack's too, as we were going to duty in New York City, where we then had no home and might have to stay in a hotel where personal laundry would be a probelm. But Mrs. Pardee asked me to do no washing and bathe John as infrequently as possible because water on the ranch was in very short supply, and their tank water at that moment was dangerously low.So amidst all the luxury of meals and surroundings, I had the awful problem of the accumulation of soiled clothes, as I could not take John to lunch and dinner in swank restaurants in other than immaculate clothes.It was very difficult for me, and I now understood why we ate out so often- it saved water for cooking and washing dishes and for table linen and napkins. I never saw Mrs. Pardee do any laundry and never saw clothes on the line. Perhaps it was done at the home of their tenant farmer since his wife did the cleaning at the ranch. Maybe she knew how to get clothes clean by using soaps and bleaches but very little water.I must admit I did not envy the Pardees their lovely house as I would not want to live where I couldn't wash and bathe as frequently as I wanted to. When we finally left I had quite a bundle of soiled clothes and very few fresh ones.Since we had cross-country reservations from Los Angeles, we had to remain on the ranch until our planned day of departure. As Jack shipped his car ahead, the Pardees drove us approximately ninety miles to Los Angeles to make our train to Boston, Masachusetts at one o'clock. About noon they left us at the railroad station to avoid hunting for a parking place, and we went to the station restaurant, where the service was maddeningly slow.In spite of leaving our dessert untouched, Jack, John, and I had to run full speed behind the red cap and got aboard the last car just as the train started to move. The red cap dropped the baggage, jumped off the train in motion. Later in New York we contacted that red cap and sent his tip by mail.The poor red cap had to jump off the moving train without waiting for the tip Jack was trying to get out of his pocket. I waw very worried lest we miss that train and have to stay at a hotel until we could get new reservations as we had found the Betsy Ross in Coronado very expensive, had always had a full time maid there and also had to pay to store our furniture.But we made our way to our compartment while the train was under way. Eventually I found the name and address of the Red Cap through the Station Master at Los Angeles and sent a thank=you note as well as a generous tip. I sent Mrs. Pardee a piece of gold and red silk chinese embroidery and a most sincere thank-you letter. In July l941 Mr and Mrs. Pardee came to Los Angeles to see us off for Honolulu when we boarded the Matson line LURLINE .We had a three week visit in South Boston with Jack's eighty-four year old father and his sister Mollie in very hot August weather. Finally Jack rented an apartment at 9615 Shore Road in Brooklyn apartment 2A on sec ond floor &68 After being settled in Brooklyn I wrote a letter to the Head Red Cap,LosAngeles Railroad Station telling him the exact time & date when our train left Los Angeles & explaining why we failed to tip a most helpful red cap,who had to jump off a moving train.I asked him to try to locate the red cap so that I could pay him. Very soon after we received a letter telling us the name & address of the red cap.I sent him a letter of appreciation & apology & sent him a check for five dollars.We received a thank-you note from him.The stores in Brooklyn on Third, Fourth & Fifth Streets were about five blocks walk up 97th Street from Shore Road.This was also the route to the subway Jack rode to work at the Custom House tower.There was a good meat market on Third Avenue where we bought rib roasts & chopped sirloin.We soon made the acquaintance of the George Rooney family on the first floor & became very good friends.For recreation we would walk to Fort Hamilton, drive to Prospect Park or Owls Head park to see the squirrels.Later on we made more ambitious trips to Jones Beach, Coney Island,& the l939-40 World's Fair at Flushing.Not long after Billy Barrett was born, Bill & Virginia had trouble getting help & we glad to get Miss Caffey's name from Jack as a nurse for Billy.She was working for them in Darien Connecticut when we visited them at suppertime one day in October l939.Since Virginia expected us early in the afternoon & didn't expect us to have dinner there, I am afraid we ate Miss Caffey's hamburger- but she was mostgracious & happy to see John again.If she happens to read this, I hope she'll send her address.In l940 Bill called up to give me my first news of Jack's promotion to Commander.He also had been the first one to read the news when Jack made Lieutenant Commander early in l932.At Thanksgiving we drove to Overbrook Pennsylvania near Philadelphia to see my sister Bee. Sam Pollack worked for LaRoux liquers making cordials, & theirtwo children Jason & Thalia were somewhat older than John.Jen & Pete Meranski drove up from Baltimore for a fine Thanksgiving dinner.John was quite interested in the snow in the back courtyard at 96l5 Shore Road after the mild winter the year before in the San Diego area.The paved courtyard used to have curious little whirlwinds producedby the shape of the building- his father would point them out& talk about low pressure systems.Jack explained the terms "transparent, translucent, opaque" as we has a translucent frosted bathroom window. There was a small patch of poison ivy on our back fence downstairs, & Jack would tell how his father once in autumn met some tourists who ignored his advice & collected bright-red bunches of three-leaved poison ivy, with a little stem on the middle leaf.Jack grew & photographed many amaryllis, ranunculus, anemones,tuberous begonias & other potted plants. He never had any luck with freesias.Both Christmases at Brooklyn l939-40 we devoted considerable energy to decorating small Christmas trees.One year there was a considerable problem with a leak in a tub of water that was used toprevent the tree fromdrying out. We have photos from both Christmases, & JoanRooney age five from downstairs appears in the l940 Christmas photos.We still have l970 much of the Chinese furniture which appears in pictures in the Brooklyn apartment.Jack fashioned clothesline swings on the roof for John. In February l940 there was a spectacular display of the five planets Mercury,Venus,Mars,Jupiter & Saturn all visible shortly after sunset in the western sky over the Narrows, where there was a big red illuminated Wrigley's chewing gum advertising neon sign.We used to say we hoped Venus would't get stuck in the chewing gum.Sometimes whenJack was tired he would say he "wouldn't go across the street to see the Statue of Liberty do a dance."We began to accumulate the Beatrix Potter series of illustatrated books Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny,the Flopsy Bunnies, Mrs. Tittlemouse, the Tailor of Gloucester,Timmy Tiptoes, Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, Tom Kitten, the Roly-Poly Pudding, Jeremy Fisher, the Two Bad Mice, Johnny Townmouse, and the rest.Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories.A little child's story


 

1477.
p 102-1477 sub- + GIANT STARS within hundred light years.

 

11 a CanisMinor F5 IVProcyon 17 a Aql A7 IV Altair 21 b HYI G2 IV 77south 28 m Her G5 IV 29 e CAR K3 III Avior 59s 30 d ERI K0 IV 32 z HER F9 IV 32 Eta BOO G0 IV Muphrid 36 a BOO K2 III Arcturus 36 b GEM K0 III Pollux 42 b TrA F2 III 46 Eta Cep K0 IV 46 b CAS F2 III 46 a AUR G5 III Capella 49 d Aql F0 IV 49 i UMa A7 IV Talitha 52 z HYA G8 III 55 b CAR A2 IV Miaplacidus 55 Theta CEN K0 III Menkent 59 a Oph A5 III Rasalhague 59 s LIB M3.5 III 59 Eta SCO F3 III 62 Eta Ser K0 III 62 b CET G9.5 III Deneb Kaitos 62 theta UMa F6 IV 65 a2 LIB A3 IV Zubenelgenubi 65 e SCO K2 III 65 a TRI F6 IV 65 x GEM F5 IV 65 a HYA K3 III Alphard 68 a TAU K5 III Aldebaran 72 L SGR K0 III Kaus Borealis 72 a SER K2 III Unukalhai 72 a PIC A7 IV 75 e Cygni K0 III 75 Eta DRA G8 III 75 b AND M0 III Mirach 75 a ARI K2 III Hamal 78 a HYI Fo III 78 b ERI A3 III Cursa 85 z Sgr A3 IV Ascella 85 x Ser F0 IV 85 g GEM A0 IV Alhena 88 B PavonisA5-IV 88 a PHE K0 III Ankaa 88 g LEO K0 III Algieba 95 p SGR F3 III 95 g PER G5 III 95 t PUP K0 III 98 g CEN A1 IV 100p PUP K4 III


 

1478.
p 102-1478 Forks High School football practice 1999

 

#89 After the war in late May l947 (I was a patient at Jack's beautiful Aiea Hospital, operated on by Dr. Robert Cooper, whom I knew as a young doctor aboard the TRINITY in l938-l939 in San Diego when Jack was Executive Officer. The day after major abdominal surgery when I was suffering agonizing gas pains, Dr. Cooper asked me if I was lying perfectly still. I assured him I wasn't moving an inch. Whereupon he ordered me to get up. I thought he was joking or had lost his mind and asked him which of the two it was.But he just laughed and told me to get up at once and walk to my bathroom.-which I did with no ill effects- as a matter of fact I lost the gas pain, and Dr. Cooper explained they learned in the War to make patients walk soon after operations to avoid adhesions. Late in May, l947 I entered the Aiea hospital on Saturday noon after Jack telephoned to the Dispensary that I was sick and bleeding, and the Dispensary physician and Dr. Cooper were already there to see me when I arived with Jack and John.Dr. Cooper told me to keep an ice bag on my stomach.constantly and under n0 circumstances to get out of bed.He ordered medicine for me and said he would do exploratory surgery for me Monday morning, and then left. I had a room to myself at that point.Soon a young nurse came in to take my medical history.When I gave her the name of my brother-in-=law Dr. Geetter, she told me that she had taken her nurse's training at the New Britain General Hospital where he was Chief Resident doctor. that evening abut five o'clock a nurse gave me an envelope containing quite a few pills.She put them in the drawer of my table stand, telling me to take one every four hours. I told her I was not wearing my watch and that there was no clock in the room, but she just shrugged her shoulders and told me to estimate the time (day and night!). So I just lay there, very uncomfortable with the icebag on my stomach, and about six o'clock I rang for a nurse to please bring a wash cloth, warm water, and soap and towel, as I was very much in need of washing up.Although the nurse was friendly and sympathetic, she said it was going to be a moonlight Saturday night in the Tropics, and that she was going off duty to dress and date a hospital doctor.She told me that all the young nurses were primarily interested in catching an eligible doctor- their real reason for being way out there. So I remained unwashed. Saturday night there was a great deal of commotion about midnight in the room across from mine. A nurse told me a young enlisted man's wife and the man himself-parents of a very young child- had been badly injured in an automobile accident.The nurse had no ice for me. It was Sunday - most of the help were gone, and I could get no ice Sunday or Sunday night, and of course that worried me as the doctor had told me to keep an ice bag on my abdomen constantly. A Navy Captain's elderly mother was put in my room Sunday noon. She was confused and got out of bed every few minutes to go to the nurses' station. Soon my bed was pushed out into the room across from mine =p.119BR- occupied by the young woman who had been in the automobile accident the previous night.She was in traction- all kinds of mechanical contraptions were on her bed, and she was wired for a broken jaw. Her husband was a patient in the hospital, and she was worried about her two month old baby daughter who had been left with a baby sitter the night before.My pills had ben left in the other room, and there was no ice for me.The exploratory surgery disclosed the need for major surgery performed Tuesday for benign (non-cancerous) bleeding tumor of the uterus, and by Wednesday afternoon I was out of bed for a few minutes.No one seemed to have the responsibility for our food, and when I asked for supper Wednesday evening a hospital corpsman brought a tough hunk of meat and some mashed turnips which I couldn't eat. The girl in the other bed couldm't eat any of it, because she was flat on her back and had her jaw wired. a young corpsman brought in breakfast Thursday morning- a near-green banana and some shredded wheat with milk. When I asked for eggs and toast,he told me in no uncertain terms that he was a volunteer- it was not part of his duty to feed me, and that he never knew anyone to eat as much as I did. I made no complaint to Dr. Cooper, but Jack='s beautiful Aiea Hospital was no place for a sick woman. While I was in the hospital, Jack had to take care of our eleven year old son, who was to appear in a piano recital at the Punahou School. He had to attend to all the details of our transportation to the mainland to the packing of our personal belongings, and had to arrange to give up our house and ship his car to the mainland, because we planned to drive across the country after touring the Western National Parks.Every day he took the long trip to Aiea Hospital bringing flowers from the garden a few small tomatoes, and even a bit of cold roast beef. They were badly frightened by the seriousness of my illness, but it turned out well, and we were able to keep our original schedule of leaving Hawaii June 4. Dr, Cooper's wife, whom I knew very slightly, was among those who came to the hospital to see me, as were Captain Frank and Sue Delahanty and Mimi and Harry Bronson.Captain and Mrs. Ascherfeld friends from the HANNIBAL brought a gardenia lei. Harry and Mimi Bronson lent Jack their car for a week as his had to be shipped to the mainland.My hospital roommate couldn't read flat on her back. One sympathetic doctor had a small stand built across her chest, thinking her food could be put on the stand so she could feed herself, but it wasn't satisfactory.The boy who brought her food usually left it on the chair near her bed and darted off- or if he placed it on the stand he didn't return for hours to remove the tray or the stand.I tried to brush her hair and wash her hairbrush, but I was too weak to handle the stand or the tray. She remained worried about the baby and the fact her injured husband would have to face a court-martial.,=. When I left, she was still helpless. I had her name and address, but failed to write as there was little opportunity while we were crossing the country and on the road most of the day. #90 Captain Ceres Navy medicine: from p. 119Ai Since Jack had to evacuate the wounded after Pearl Harbor, he was most interested in the Navy hospital. Soon after the attack a new hospital was started at Aiea, and Jack watched its progress with great interest, telling me that the Commanding officer wanted the hospital to be attractive, to have room and wards colorful- not just bleak white.Captain J.A. McMullin (*Medical Corps)USN assumed comand of the Pearl Harbor hospital in February, l942 two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor.In addition he supervised the construction of the new hospital on Aiea Heights with a capacity of eighteen hundred beds, which was commissioned on 11 November 1942. Dr. McMullin invited Jack to attend its dedication. He was greatly impressed with the new hospital and said he was only a lowly Commander with three stripes whereas most of the other invited guests were Captains and Admirals, including Chester Nimitz. From Captain Frederick Ceres (pronounced "Sears") I received a letter from hancock, NewHampshire on 4 August l970, "Dear Mrs. Barrett: I relieved Captain McMullan on 3 August l943, assuming command of both Pearl Harbor and Aiea Heights Hospitals. Later the Command separated, and I continued to command at Aiea Heights. Admiral Ghormley was Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District (Pearl Harbor) and either Admiral Furlong or Admiral calhoun commanded the Navy Yard.During my command the Aiea Hospital underwent major construction to increase the bed capacity from eighteen hundred to five thousand beds, completed in the spring of l944.It was ready and of service to care for the Navy and Marine wounded from the Western Pacific battles such as Tarawa,Guam, tinian, Saipan etc. The addition of the thirty-two hundred beds were constructed by civilian contractors awarded other contracts in the Pacific area.During these campaigns, the evacuation of the wounded and sick from ships and planes was effected through the resources of the personnel of the hospital in cooperation with the command of the Aiea Naval Barracks. the evacuation of the sick and wounded to the mainland USA was effected through the services of the district Medical office.- Captain Johnson and Admiral Chambers. evidently there must have been a board convened at the Navy Yard consisting of heads of departments in conjunction with district Medical Office and Commander Barrett as head of the overseas Transportation Office Pearl Harbor during the years 1941-l945. Chances are that through his expert planning and organization the evacuation of the sick and wounded was carried to a successful conclusion.I was relieved of my commandby Captain W.W. Hargrove MC USN on 3 August 1944.I remember quite well Dr. (James B.) moloney, (Dr.) Julius Neuberger, Father (William ) Maguire and others that you mention.I am most iinterested in your undertaking and just wish that I could have been more helpful. However, I hope that the above may be of some assitance in your project, Sincerely, Dr. Frederick Ceres." Walter Lord in his book "Day of Infamy" wrote about our friend chaplain Willaim Maguire, "Father Maguire on the dock at Pearl Harbor waiting to go out to the ARIZONA which blew up to conduct Church services on sunday morning December 7, l94l, looked at the warm sun, the high clouds and thought all things considered, the day was perfect.Turning to his assistant, Seaman joseph Workman, Maguire burst out, 'Joe this is one for the tourists'" Jack knew the Navy's unofficial photographer Tai Sing Loe. He was a colorful Chinese who took his pictures while wearing a huge elephant hunter's hat. He always seemed able to get his subjects in his shots. Rear Admiral Wiilliam F. Fitzgerald, Executive director of the US Naval Academy Alumni Association Annapolis Maryland wrote on 12 August l970,"Dear Mrs. Barrett Thank you fior your interesting letter oif 7 August The mention of so many of my old friends and shipmates brought back many pleasant memories.I do indeed remember Jack from the TULSAA and from Pearl Harbor.There was that short time over on the TULSA (l93l) and then our paths crossed again when he was at Pearl after the attack, and I was Operations Officer on the staff of Commander Battleships. Actually I had the staff duty on the MARYLAND during the attack.My brief contacts with Jack were always pleasant - I found him a most cooperative colleague- and that was so important during those hectic days in Pearl Harbor. All good wishes to you and the very best fof luck in your research concerning the Navy and Jack's outstanding career.-Adm. Fitgerald."On March 4, l945 the Navy sponsored a swimnming meet at Pearl Harbor at which we saw the famous native Hawaiian swimming champion Duke Kahanamoke. Jack had contacts with him when he was Honolulu sheriff and Jack was supervising Shore Patrols from the MARBLEHEAD, Duke Kahanamoku made improvements in the breathing ands timing of the Australian crawl stroke, which became the fastest stroke for longer distances.He discussed these with our friend Dr. Paul Withington, active in Honoulu sports manmy years.Jack arranged transportation for retired boxing champion GeneTunney, who toured forward areas fior the Navy in demonstrations and athletic programs, and for Yankee catcher Bill Dickey and Giants slugger Johnny Mize and the sons of Bing Crosby.We saw Joe DiMaggio and other major league players in exhibition baseball and prominent tennis players., including Don Budge.


 

1479.
p 102-1479 Forks football September 1999

 

45 e Per 3h 57' 51.2" +40 00 37 V 2.9 B-V -0.2 MsubV -4.1 -B0.5 V- =680 s ;JUNE 1984 Transposable Genetic Elements in Maize Nina Fedoroff. Atomic Preference between left and right Marie-Anne Bouchard + Lionel Pottier(Glashow Weinberg Abdes Salam Trieste]. Structure + Evolution of Interstellar Grains core and mantle structure J Mayo Greenberg. Mass Extinctions in the Ocean Steven Stanley Feb 1987 Giant Ocean cataracts .Gene for color vision Jeremy Nathans. April 1987 Mcmenamin Emergence of Animals. Moons ofUranus Torrence Johnson,Robert Hamilton Brown,Lau Soderblom. July 1987 Cold Nuclear fusion Steve jones Johann Rafelsky muons Sep 1987 Dressler Large scale Streaming of Galaxies Rubin Ford 1975 Carnegie Hydra-Centaurus Cluster + beyond. Cozzi? Esposito Rings of Uranus. Feb 1988 Kasting, Toon, Pollack, How Climate Evolved n the Terretrial Planets. [p 82] Gottlieb GABA-ergic neurons inhibitory Purkinje of cerebellum. Robert Adair Flaws in Universal Mirror charge conjugates Parity Dirac -Lee + Yang 1956 Wu MILLIWEAK? SUPERWEAK Mar 1988 Gravity + antimatter Goldman Hughes Nieto. June 1988 Robert Hazen perovskites David Schramm Gary Steigman Particle accelerators Test Cosmological Theory photons scattered at three thousand Ko. = 10-5 - 3x10-5 yr. electroweak @ 10-minus- 11 sec neutrons, protons @ 10 minus5 sec. neutrinos uncouple a one-to-ten seconds, at hundred seconds@ He4 He3 H2 Li7 . At billion degrees p/n ratio 7/1 after He4 need to combine 3 He4 to C12. Jan 1990 Ice Age eccentricity of orbit 100,000 years, tilt of axis 41,000 precession 26,000.April 1989Turnover in MRNA Jeffrey Ross. Astrocytes Kimelberg Norenberg May 1989 Henry Norris Russell by David DeVorkin HR diagram Pickering Cecilia Payne 1925 hydrogen main gas of solar surface spectrum. Aug 1989 Supernova 1987A LMC stan Woosley + Tom Weaver. Oldstone viral alteration of cell function Middle Ear Muscles Erik borg + S. Allen Counter . Lau Baldase Age of the earth Debate. Oc 1989 Mitotic spindle J Ri McIntosh Kent McDonald . Stanford LinearAccelerator John rees . Cycling of Calcium as an Intracellular Messenger Howard Rasmussen. Waterweed invasions Spencer Barrett . scanned probe microscopes Wickramasinghe . Heavy Ion fusion Lawrence berkeley lab [Denis Keefe] lead inertial v. sandia lithium light ions Darmstadt Rubbia school of plasma physics at varenna ROBERT O HUNTER DOE director of Energy Research [note by "J.H." Nov. 1989 world's Oldest road 6000 yr.peat somerset by John Coles. Neptune JuneKinoshta . Mammalian choroid plexus Reynold Spector, Comrad johanson . Grey,Sette,Buus How T Cells Recognize Antigen. Double Beta Decay michael moe,Simon Rosen. R Despain Yellowstone fires June 1990 Pluto Richard Binzel , Olli Lounasmaa + Geo Pickett Helium Three Superfluids compare neutron star. Kenneth Macdonald + Paul Fox mid ocean ridge. bat biosonar Nobuo Suga. Feb 1991 Number of families of Matter Gary Feldman + Jack Steinberg n/p ratio crucial depending on rate of expansion and cooling ratio of photons Each light neutrino family contributes to energy density and cooling rate. Weight of Zo around 91-100 protons.July 1991 Early Life of Stars Steven Stahler. Stroke therapy justin Zivin + Dennis Choi glutamate cascade. June 1992 Repetto Accounting for environmental Assets . Erci Chaisson Early Results from the Hubble Space Telescope beta Pictoris 54 light years March 1994 The Earth's Mantle below the oceans Enrico bonatii primordial Helium 3 Hawaii hotspot July 1994 moon Fabre Aug 1994 EUVE Extreme Ultraviolet Cappella six million degree corona Stuart Bowyer. JAN 1996 The Evolution of Continental Crust S. Ross Taylor Scott McLennan . Mukerjee Explaining everything-strings. Feb 1996 telomere Greider Blackburn Col Galactic Explosion Veilleux Cecil Bland-Hawthorn .Quarks by computer Weingarten glueball .Boulder Bose-einstein condensate rubidium . Kristin Leutwyler cingulate lack GABA Feb 1997 Ghostliest Galaxies Gregory Bothun Low Surface Brightness


 

1480.
p 102-1480 FORKS VOLLEYBALL 1999

 

Year: 1989 VISSER transfer to HANNIBAL photo p. 103 postmark August 30 1989 Rear Admiral and Mrs. Richard Gerben Visser United States Navy Retired : Madrid Sunday 27 August '89 Dear John, Thank you for sending the pictures of Captain Hinckley's farewell party,- they bring back treasured memories. Except for commanding the SS DALY (DD519) during World War II, I think my tour on survey duty in the HANNIBAL was the most interesting and self satisfying of my naval career.As young officers we were given the responsibility we wanted, and we could see the results of our work. I reported to the ship just after New Years Day in 1934 and served nearly two years until October, 1935,before being transferred. To identify some of the people:- (1)standing in the aisle holding up his drink is Lieutenant jg "Red" Akin US Naval Academy 1929 a classmate; (2) beside him on his right is Mervin Halstead USNA 1930;(3) I am standing just behind Akin. I don't see Dr. Smith in the picture.4 Commander Gresham with the swollen left arm is Hinckley's relief and sitting between Commander and Mrs. Hinckley. (5) Sitting beside Mrs. Hinckley is Helen Akin, Red's wife; next (6) is Lieutenant C.B. Peake the Supply Officer. I forget the name of the attractive girl next. I dated her, and she was the sister of a flyer (Army Air Corps) at Albrook Field. Jean Nelson is the last girl seated, and her husband Paul is standing behind her. He is a classmate also. I hope you sent these pictures to Halstead, too, for he will appreciate them as do I. This year is the sixtieth anniversary of my USNA class of 1929, and we are celebrating our reunion on 25 and 26 October in Annapolis with homecoming following on the 27th and 28th.We're meeting with our daughter and grandson and cousins, so it should be a great reunion. Many thanks again for sending the pictures.I shall write to the Halsteads.I'm sorry they live out in California - too far to visit. Joanna joins in sending best regards.-- Dick Visser. 1932- .a #61 Tangku Pagsanjan ___ Pagsanhan canyon l932 #61 Our day of departure from Tientsin was after Christmas Day l93l - we stood on a platform of the railroad waiting for a train to take us to Taku bar,where the TULSA was docked beacause there was not enough water in the Hai Ho river at Tientsin for the ship at that time in an unusually dry year. In spite of my god fur coat & Jack's heavy blue uniform coat,we were very cold, as the train was late & there was no closed railroad station in which to wait comfortably.As the wind howled about me, Captain & Mrs. Rice appeared to see us off & waited with us for some time- wonderful of the Captain and his wife to appear to say farewell to us,who were junior in rank to them as Paul was the senior Naval officer in north China.I finally prevailed upon them to leave when the train as usual in Tientsin was very late, & it was bitter cold.But soon after they left the traihn arrived in time to get us to the TULSA for dinner- in lonesome state, as the only officer aboard was Benny Crosser,who had the duty.All the rest had been invited to homes in Tientsin for holiday season dinner..Around New Year's we loaded our bags onto several rickshaws & went to Tangku to board the Japanese ship Chowan Maru which was to take us to Kobe where we were to sail on the SS President Pierce about January 3, l932 for our trip to Europe.Several Chinese boys from the ship went with us to handle our baggage,but when we arrived at Tangku it was so cold with the wind coming in off the water that I didn't wait for the baggage or for Jack & the boys - I walked along briskly & started to enter a gate where I saw a Japanese ship in the distance.To my horror two Japanese soldiers crossed their bayonets across my chest & spoke angrily in Japanese,which I could not understand.I was frozen with fear.Finally Jack came up with the Chinese boys & the baggage & with English & gestures tried to get them to remove their bayonets,but the soldiers p31-persisted. During the commotion a Japanese appeared,who could speak English & told us I was trying to enter the gate leading to a Japanese warship that was unloading soldiers for duty in China & that his men had orders to kill anyone trying to spy on the operation. Was I scared! But he ordered me released & pointed out the gate I should enter to board the Chowan Maru not far away.Our Chinese boys were pleased to see the Japanese soldiers lose face.I boarded the President Pierce as soon as she docked at Kobe.From Kobe we sailed to Shanghai where we spent one full day.Jack hired two rickshaws & we called first at the store of Ah Sing, whose luncheon guest we were the previous summer.Then we proceeded up Bubbling Well Road to the store of Cockeye the tailor.Cockeye's son told us he had retired,but he took us to his father's house, where we were greeted as honored guests.Before we left,Cockeye gave Jack a pongee kimono with an exotic peacock embroidered on the back-& gave me one too.About dusk the ship set out for Hong Kong.We spent only a few hours in the colorful markets before leaving for Manila.It was very hot, so I decided to go to the trunk room to get some of the summer clothes I -p33-had collected in Shanghai in the summer of l93l.After much investigation I learned that my trunk with all my summer clothes & evening dresses had been erroneously put off on the dock in Hong Kong- & there was no way the trunk could reach me untill I arrived in Marseilles, France in March to sail to New York.We had signed up to ride the rapids in canoes at Pagsanhan canyon in southeast Luzon,(Philippines),& we were not willing to give up that unique experience just to hunt for summer clothes.So I lived day & night in two identical cheap cotton frocks that we found in a shop in Manila just before sailing for Singapore.While other women sparkled in lovely gowns,I appeared constantly in a cheap cotton creation.I refused to let my predicament spoil our trip. Pagsanjan was one of the top moments.Much of the time in the Orient we were accompanied by a Swedish American from Minnesota,who generously allowed me to wear one of his sun helmets during the heat of the day.We have a good picture of me wearing that helmet in the garden of the Sultan of Johore.Jack got honorable mention for the picture later at a photo competition in Boston.We ate at the well-known Raffles Hotel in Singapore.After Ceylon, we made an unscheduled stop at Bombay & watched men in white caps peacefully demonstrating for Mahatma Gandhi,who was in jail.In Cairo Egypt we stayed at Sheppheard's Hotel where the violinist Jascha Heifetz & his wife movie actress Florence Vidor were having breakfast the same time we did.One morning wto passengers, Mrs. Vosburg & Mrs. Dora Conover of Ossining New York joined Jack & me in hiring a car to take us to the Sphinx & the Pyramids.It was bitter cold crossing the desert,but we managed to crawl all over the inside of the Great Pyramid.Jack took some good pictures of me riding a camel.Jack always use to mention the song "Till the sands of the desert grow cold" - "And it was cold," he would remark.I was reminded my father had learned tailoring in Cairo in the l880's before coming to Hartford.My Mount Holyoke l923 class had the Sphinx as its class symbol, and our class song by archaeologist Marion Nosser with music my Ruth King Dunne was entitled "The Sphinx" with the Sphinx's motto "NON SIBI SED OMNIBUS" -" not for oneself but for everyone." p. 36 Touring Europe -As we approached Naples on the President Pierce, my clothes were mopre appropriate as it was February, & even sunny Italy was cold at that time of year.At the hotel I inquired about the cost of a double room & two meals daily on a weekly basis & when the man quoted the rate I thought it was expensive but accepted. We did go to Pompeii although it was too cold for Capri. We enjoyed looking at Vesuvius.After dinner the waiter questioned me,"Coffee, madame?" Although the coffee was too thick & too sweet I accepted it each evening but left most of it untouched.When we were ready to leave we asked for our bill and were stunned to find it seven times what we expected to pay.He quoted a daily rate instead of a wekkly rate I had carefully inquired azbout.And the coffee was an extra charge- more than a bottle of red wine.The manager just shrugged it off as a misunderstanding on our part.We learned an expensive lesson.In Rome we found a fine pension with good food & reasonable lodging.Everything about our stay in rome was pleasant- the Colisum, the Vatican,the art galleries 7 all the usual tourist attractions.One noon we met a couple we had known on the S>S Pierce- Mr. & Mrs. Harry Pardee of Saticoy,California.who were going around the world on a Cook's tour.They invited us to attend the opera with them that evening & to be their dinner guests at a nearby hotel.They said they we getting the best possible ticket & asked us to wear evening clothes. We set off for the opera dress in high style. The usher waved us upstairs. Mr. Pardee gave the tickets to the usher in the first balcony,but he waved us upstairs. This was repeated until we had reched the highest gallery & we were shown seats among people in street clothes.We had no opera glasses. The actors looked like pygmies.Mr. Pardee thought he had paid for orchestra seats & was incredulous -(p37 end) #71 President Pierce and Europe 1932 #73 When we arrived in Florence, we went to a pension near the Uffizi Gallery.The Uffizi was really an old palace- drafty & uncomfortable in an unusually cold February..Very few people were there.Jack took a great interest in the great works, but the marble floors were so cold that my feet actually hurt- Jack says I began asking, "Can we please go home?"In the Florence dining room one man always gave the Mussolini salute when he entered & left.Eventually we got to Venice, where we would not take a room until we felt the radiator- we were traveling by gondola, and our gondola waited while we inspected the room.As it tuned out we were very comfortable in Venice, with a warm room, good food & excellent cheap white wine. Jack knew Venice well from his l909 visit with the Revenue Cutter School ship ITASCA, & we enjoyed all our sightseeing.One afternoon we were feeding the pigeons in Saint Mark's square when we met our friend Mr. Pardee, who was blue with the cold.This was serious as he was travelling for his health because of a circulatory disorder. He was staying in the expensive Royal Danielli hotel,but there was no heat there.Jack invited him to go with him to a shop where he bought long woolen underwear.Mr. Pardee put on the woolen underwear right in the shop.Then we got Mrs. Pardee,& they came to our pension to enjoy our heat & our white wine. Mr. Pardee sat right on our radiator.From Venice we went to Vienna, Austria. As my mother was born in Austria & I believe had spent some time in Vienna, I wanted to see the city & the Blue Danube river she had told me about.We found an excellent pension where many young Americans studying medicine lived.The food was ample & good & all the people were friendly.One morning we decided to look for the Danube.It was a gray day - we failed to find any river.Finally we stopped a woman who could speak no English & didn't know what I meant when I asked where the Danube was - in my college German- my mother had spoken a Galician Austro-German dialect at home.Finally I told her in German I was looking for the "Fluss Danube" & she suddenly understood & exclaimed, "Och- der DONAU!" She told us where to look, & I was disappointed to see a muddy slow stream that dull day in February.It was no BLUE Danube compared with the wonderfully BLUE Mediterranean we had seen on the Amalfi Drive outside Naples.We went to the opera in Vienna & sat in the first balcony among people in street clothes- people were munching sandwiches while waiting for the performance.We enjoyed Vienna and stayed as long as we could. In Munich we lived at the Pension Zenz for a most reasonable rate & were able to hire a car to Oberamagau out of season, where they showed us the costumes worn in the Christmas play.. We were in Munich at the tme of the Stark beer festival. People sat at the long tables eating sausages. They were very friendly & one couple wanted us to stay with them.People called Jack, "Herr doktor."The Museum of Science interested us greatly.A taxi driver who had been in the German Air Force l9l7-l9l8 took us about at greatly reduced cost because we allowed him to take his teen-aged son on our trips daily.We took the train to Paris-where we lived in a good hotel & took most of our meals at the hotel.I tried frogs'legs, but Jack passed them up because he never ate anything with butter.He knew Paris well & showed me points of interest, especially paintings & sculpture in the Louvre Museum.We sat many hours on the banks of the Seine River just absorbing the atmosphere of Paris.We economized avoiding theaters & night clubs,saving for a trip to the Riviera, where we spent happy days in Nice &Mentone.We visited the Maritime Museum at Monaco, where a pursesnatcher grabbed my bag on a high sdtariway, but I held on firmly, & he gave up & ran away downstairs. We crossed into the Italian Riviera briefly- our passports werestamped going in, but we had to hurry back when the bus was leaving, so we were never properly stamped out again.Reluctantly we went to Marseilles on the day we were scheduled to sail for New York on the President Van Buren.Before we left, we enjoyed the famous fish soup boulabaise spelling? which Jack had enjoyed in l9l9 when aboard the USS SEATTLE bring American soldiers home to New York from Brest, Brittany end page 40


 

1481.
p102-1481 Forks volleyball 1999 with duplicate captions of Meranski family from web p 37

 

Duplicate of caption texts of Meranski family 1911 from web page 37 to guard against loss while editing. -He is believed born Brest l865, spent time in Odessa near Black Sea, was photographed wearing few in Turkey, left home at age seventeen because of respressive persuction and probably militasry draft, learned tailoring Cairo Egypt l880s, was married to Thalia Goldfeld August 8, 1890 at Germania Hall Hartford -had eight children Harry l891 Ben 1892,Esther 1894, Abe 1896 Bertha l889 (l899?) Sophie 1901 Israel Peter l903 +Rebekah l906. After his first wife died of cancer September 8, l925, he married Mrs. Adelman, a recent immigrant from Lithuania with four young children.The youngest Rachel Shulman was very friendly with Sophioe Barrett in later years, and her son Mark visited Sophie's l923 Mount Holyoke classmate Betty Giles (Mrs. Howard) at NIH Washington DC l974 when her incurable motor neuron disease was being studied there. Rachel and Albert Shulman of Hartford have three daughters also - the youngest Amy is Mrs. Robert Weinberg in Brooklione - wife of noted MIT cancer geneticist. David Meranski was a tailor on Portland St l909- ran restaurant at 25 Morgan St l9l90-1915 -grocety at 4 Wooster St Hartford after autumn l9l6. He was active helping new immigrants in Moses Montefiore society and in Capital City Lodge helping Hartford Jewish families plan burial arrangements.He attended Sophie's l923 Mount Holyoke graduation. Israel Peter Meranski born October 1903 on Orchard St. Hartford Edit Sophie's youngest brother graduated from Hartford Public High School 1921 and Trinity College 1925 - for some reason his photo appears in l926 Trinity Year Book.His future wife Jeaneete Goldberg of Baltimore and her parents greatly assisted him during four years at University of Maryland Medical School, where he graduated l929 and was married June 9, l929 - Sophie attended in Baltimore. He became a pediatrician and served in U.S.Army World War II in Georgia and France - daughter Deborah Meranski (Mrs. Sonnenstrahl) was born l935 and son Daniel Meranski was born l951. In 1925 "Pete" escorted one of Sophie's students to her Mount Holyoke Senior Prom when her fiance was too far away to be able to attend the prom. InJune l957, Sophie and Jack Barrett traveled to Baltimore to attend the wedding of "Pete's" daughter Deborah. They had a very happy reunion - a photo of Sophie and Jack dancing at the Baltimore wedding reception appears on this photo website. Pete was active in Trinity college alumni. Dr. Israel Peter Meranski born Oct l903 Orchard St. Hartford CT p 37 Edit Youngest of four sons of David Meranski and Thalia Goldfeld Meranski ,married Jeanette Goldberg of Baltimore who helped him during medical school University of Maryland l925-l929, as did her father and mother, who lived with the family on Dolfield Avenue through l960 or later along with an aunt. Two other photos are now on website- one as US Army Officer in Georgia - Pete also served in France in World War II where he saw his nephew Arthur Meranski who served in tanks in Normandy invasion under General Patton. There are also photo of Pete and his wife Jen spring l948 (in separate groups) in back yard of Geetter home 92 Fern St., Hartford afternoon of his nephew Albert Geetter;s bar mitvah.Pete was a pediatrician. A fourth photo of him appears in l926 Trinity College Year Book, although he graduated in l925 (as did Isadore Geetter, who married Pete's youngest sister Rebekah. They both were active in debating and glee club. If anyone has an opportunity to make copies of the TRINITY Year Book on file at the College, I would like to obtain copies for website, for my own collection and for his chiuldren and grandchildren Debby, Danny, Sam Beth, Diane, and the four great-granchildren. Thalia Godfeld Meranski - Sophie's mother p 37 Edit Probably born 1869 or l870 Brody in Lemberg province then Austrian Galicia later in Poland, Russia and now Ukraine.She was friendly with the Meisselman and Witkower families of Hartford, also believed to originate from Brody. Her youngest daughter Rebekah Geetter stated her mother traveled though Hamburg Germany. She was married to Daivd Meranski in Hartford August 8, l890. A younger brother Jacob had some sort of speech or hearing problem - was unmarried - worked as tailor.Many neighbors whose mothers had died lived with the Meranski family including Julius Aronson and his brother. Both parents spoke many languages including German, Yiddish, and Polish, and Pa Meranski spoke Russian. At home Sophie often used an Austrian German dialect with her mother and took German at Hartford Public High School and three years of college German at Mount Holyoke reading Goethe and Schiller with Professor Grace Bacon after World War I, when enrollment in German-l;anguage courses was low. Babe recounted that when three sons got Army draft notices in l9l8, her mother was so nervous she used salt instead of sugar by mistake in jelly she was making.Her gallstones became cancerous when improperly diatgnosed. He had an operation in l925 - was well enough to attend Sophie's Mount Holyoke grandaution May l923 but died September 8, l925 aged about 55 years. Her sonBen furnished "Abel and Bertha Goldfeld" as names of her parents. A family named Goldfield were neighbors of the Meranskis on Portalnd St. Hartofrd l909 - possibly relatives? Sophie Ruth Meranski Mount Holyoke College AB 1923 MA l925 Mrs. John B. Barrett p 37 Edit earliest known photo of Sophie Ruth Meranski, born October 4, l901 at 189 Front St, Hartford CT from September 1911 group with her father and mother David Meranski and Thalia Goldfeld and four brothers Harry,Ben, Abe, andIsrael Peter and three sisters Esther, Bertha, Rebekah.Sophie is principal author of "Red Headed Stepchild" biography of Commander John Berchmans Barrett US Navy 1888-l969, whom she married 2 pm Friday June 21, l929 at New York City Hall during her lunch hour as Director of Personnel Research at Macy's Stores (34th St. NY), one hour before he left for destroyer TRUXTUN duty based at Cavite, Philippines. Sophie traveled to Tientsin China l930 on large navy transport HENDERSON - sent first report to Navy of Japanese capture of Mukden, Manchuria September l9, l931, traveled round world with Jack l932 via Philippines, Malaya, Ceylon, Egypt and Europe - lived in Boston l932-3, Panama l934-5 Norfolk,Virginia 1936, Philadelphia (Bala Cynwyd) l937 -Coronado near San Diego part of l938-l939 -9615 Shore Road near Narrows, Brooklyn September l939-June l941, 2415 Ala Wai Boulevard Waikiki July 1941-June 1947 toured San Francisco, Yosemite redwoods Crater Lake Mount Rainier Glacier-Montana Yellowstone-Grand Tewton-Wyoming GreaT LAKES-NIAGAra summer l947 -spent autumn 1947 at home of sister-in-law Mollie Barrett 640 East Seventh Street South Boston, and moved Thanksgiving Day to 52 Emmonsdale Road, West Roxbury, where she resided over 39 years. Sophie Ruth Meranski 1911 38-932 Edit Fro0m 1911 family group. Her mother;s shoulder appears. Sophie born October 4, l901 was about to celebrate her tenth birthday. Photo was probably at time of September holidays. Sophie married John Berchmans Barrett then a naval Lieutenant at New York City Hall about 2 pm Friday June 21, l929 an hour before he left by train for Chicago and the Orient and duty in the Asiatic Fleet aboard destroyer TRUXTUN based at Cavite, Philippines. A mole or birthmark on Sophie's left wrist was removed early l930s, not known to be cancerous - visible in photo.ESTHER TEXT to be TRANSFERRED:As Esther's birthday approaches on the nineteenth of November it occurs to me that I have neglected her shamefully in my accounts of the four sisters in my family. That is unfaiur as she was as interesting as any of us-taller than the other three with jet black hair like my mother, jet black eyes and with a better figure than Bee, Babe or me.- and from an early age she mothered us as we were eight by birth and more than fourteen by additions of motherless children who actually lived with us.Esther had more close girl friends and boy friends than we did, and with the first money she earned she bought a piano for the family as well as a record player and many records - and paid for a telephone when so few people we knew had telephones that ours rarely rang.She did well professionally because she was smart and went to a fine business college for bookkeeping, typing, and shorthand- at which she was a whiz.But her first job was at Vogel and son,a Hartford wholesale grocer. To preserve their stock there was no heat in the place - not even in her office as the men wore overcoats and sweaters at worlk and warm gloves. It was a big, profitable business that Esther enjoyed,but because she had to do bookkeeping,typing and stenography, she couldn't wear gloves while working and got frostbitten hands as well as feet! He boss liked her, so she stayed despite the cold, but when she confided to her best girl friend that her married boss was trying to make love to her- that friend told my father, who would not let her rtrun to that job- not even to collect her pay and her sweater!Soon the business college got her a job at the H.L. Handy Company,-wholesale dealer in meats, poultry and eggs. In the (p.2) office was Charles Bardous the head bookkeeper, one other male bookkeeper, and Esther.She really liked that job, was a happy girl with a piano record player, telephone,and always treated us to "college ices" -sundaes of chocolate sauce and nuts and always had a pound box of chocolates in her bureau drawer.I used to steal a few candies, which she never complained about if she knew they were gone.One night Pete was reading in bed at age fifteen, and I said to him,"Don't drop those apple cores on the floor- throw them out."-And as he chewed Esther's candies, he replied with a gleam in his eye,"Sis, there are no cores in these apples!"Esther must have known we were eating her candies, but she never stopped us or let us know she realized we were at her drawer.And when I could not see how I could pay the colllege fees, Esther and Al told me to go ahead - they would meet the expenses! Esther gave me her suitcase, her winter coat, and a lot more , and Al took me right to my room at the college (September l9l9). =And Esther was at the station to see me off in HER best clothes I was wearing. In my freshman year she came to visit and won the hearts of my classmates, who gave supper parties in their rooms for her, and the house mother invited Esther to sit with her at the head table while I waited on that table for one hundred dollars that year.Esther was so proud of me as very few women from Hartford went to the five best women's colleges in those days- certainly none of our friends except one older one who went to Brown University in Providence (earlier) but was working in Washington when I was growing up. And when I came home, Esther had a grand job for me (l921) for the summer in HER office- so we walked to and from work together every day and across the street near the lad I eventually invited to my junior prom (p 3) for a fabulously delightful weekend- a prom date with a car and a tux of his own!I was blind to the charms of Esther because she never seemed to have men come to the house for a date but yet she went out every evening, and I thought she was walking with her girl friends - who by then had telephones.One night I went to an outdoor summer dance with a girl Esther's age and was startled when she told me she was sorry for Esther. Only then did I learn that Esther and her young boss in the office were deeply in love and had been for years, but Esther would not marry him.What I did not know is that my father REFUSED to allow it and would not let Charlie come to the house, so she met him every evening on Main Street - had no place to entertain himin any weather, and that bothered Esther's close friend, as Esther told her it would be Charlie Bardous or no one. My father objected to Charles only because he was not Jewish. This went on for years while Esther saw me through college after Al married, and then Esther began to see Pete through college and medical school and mother Babe when I was away and when my mother died.Even then my father would not see Charlie.H.L. Handy sold out to Swift and Company, so Esther and Charlie were transferred to a big office force where they were never alone. Charlie then lived w8ith his aged mother, who was as opposed to a Jewish daughter-in-law (beautiful and generous and wise and kind and musical and in love with Charlie to the exclusion )(p.4) of all other men) Julius Aronson loved her for years before he finally married Mollie at an advanced age.So it went on.My father died in l933, so Esther was free to follow her heart, but Charlie's mother stayed alive.- and by the time she grudgingly agreed that Esther could live with them Esther would not marry Charlie and live with that old witch -whom even Charlie thought to be a witch- and he supported her as his duty and not for love of her.Esther could not bring herself to live under the same roof as she knew the mother would make her true love's life miserable. That mother lived until she was close to one hundred (years).I don't know what finally happened to Charles as I was so rarely in Hartford- but Esther never dated dany other men! She went to live with Babe and with Geetter to help them with the five children when Geetter went to war.She lugged home the meat and eggs after work from Swift and Company and stayed with the five babies while Babe shopped in the evening- and helped with the washing and the housework in addition to her job. Geetter said to me, "I think so much of Esther I don't know which one I married - Babe or Esther." She was always "Nan" to the children and should have had a flock of her own! Now her birthday approaches- about seventy-nine and Geetter will send the the big yellow chrysanthemum he sends every year - the flowers that will still be fresh on Thanksgiviing Day. Esther and I were very close, but never once did she breathe to me the sadness of her broken romance. Esther Meranski born November 19, 1894 Front Street Hartford, CT p 38 Edit Esther attended business school and became bookkeeper at H.L. Handy Co and then at Swift and CompANY MEAT PACKERS HARTFORD.She assisted her younger sister Sophie and brother Israel Peter in meeting college expenses and lived with her brother Abe and his wife Ethyle at 75 Hawkins Street in l930s and with her youngest sister Babe Rebekah and her husband Dr. Isadore Geetter from l945 until l974 when she became a resident at Hebrew Home, Hartford very active until shortly before her death of metastasized breast cancer october l981. She helped served the noon meal at Meranski restaurant 25 Morgan Street about 1910-l915 and helped her mother with the younger children - bought a piano on which her sister Rebekah took lessons - also a victrola on whch family played Al Jolson and Eddie Cantor recordings around l920. She often brought home maple walnut candies and other treats for the younger children.Esther Meranski -l973 letter Sophie Barrett to Ivan McCormack Date: Thu, 02 Jul 1998 13:22:25 PDT Sophie Barrett letter to Ivan McCormack in Salem New York (Sophie sublet from Mrs. McCormack l927-l930 at 27Commerce St, Greenwich Village) (1973) November 2 Friday morning VITAMIN enclosed. Dear Ivan, As Esther's birthday approaches on the nineteenth of November it occurs to me that I have neglected her shamefully in my accounts of the four sisters in my family. That is unfaiur as she was as interesting as any of us-taller than the other three with jet black hair like my mother, jet black eyes and with a better figure than Bee, Babe or me.- and from an early age she mothered us as we were eight by birth and more than fourteen by additions of motherless children who actually lived with us.Esther had more close girl friends and boy friends than we did, and with the first money she earned she bought a piano for the family as well as a record player and many records - and paid for a telephone when so few people we knew had telephones that ours rarely rang.She did well professionally because she was smart and went to a fine business college for bookkeeping, typing, and shorthand- at which she was a whiz.But her first job was at Vogel and son,a Hartford wholesale grocer. To preserve their stock there was no heat in the place - not even in her office as the men wore overcoats and sweaters at worlk and warm gloves. It was a big, profitable business that Esther enjoyed,but because she had to do bookkeeping,typing and stenography, she couldn't wear gloves while working and got frostbitten hands as well as feet! He boss liked her, so she stayed despite the cold, but when she confided to her best girl friend that her married boss was trying to make love to her- that friend told my father, who would not let her rtrun to that job- not even to collect her pay and her sweater!Soon the business college got her a job at the H.L. Handy Company,-wholesale dealer in meats, poultry and eggs. In the (p.2) office was Charles Bardous the head bookkeeper, one other male bookkeeper, and Esther.She really liked that job, was a happy girl with a piano record player, telephone,and always treated us to "college ices" -sundaes of chocolate sauce and nuts and always had a pound box of chocolates in her bureau drawer.I used to steal a few candies, which she never complained about if she knew they were gone.One night Pete was reading in bed at age fifteen, and I said to him,"Don't drop those apple cores on the floor- throw them out."-And as he chewed Esther's candies, he replied with a gleam in his eye,"Sis, there are no cores in these apples!"Esther must have known we were eating her candies, but she never stopped us or let us know she realized we were at her drawer.And when I could not see how I could pay the colllege fees, Esther and Al told me to go ahead - they would meet the expenses! Esther gave me her suitcase, her winter coat, and a lot more , and Al took me right to my room at the college (September l9l9). =And Esther was at the station to see me off in HER best clothes I was wearing. In my freshman year she came to visit and won the hearts of my classmates, who gave supper parties in their rooms for her, and the house mother invited Esther to sit with her at the head table while I waited on that table for one hundred dollars that year.Esther was so proud of me as very few women from Hartford went to the five best women's colleges in those days- certainly none of our friends except one older one who went to Brown University in Providence (earlier) but was working in Washington when I was growing up. And when I came home, Esther had a grand job for me (l921) for the summer in HER office- so we walked to and from work together every day and across the street near the lad I eventually invited to my junior prom (p 3) for a fabulously delightful weekend- a prom date with a car and a tux of his own!I was blind to the charms of Esther because she never seemed to have men come to the house for a date but yet she went out every evening, and I thought she was walking with her girl friends - who by then had telephones.One night I went to an outdoor summer dance with a girl Esther's age and was startled when she told me she was sorry for Esther. Only then did I learn that Esther and her young boss in the office were deeply in love and had been for years, but Esther would not marry him.What I did not know is that my father REFUSED to allow it and would not let Charlie come to the house, so she met him every evening on Main Street - had no place to entertain himin any weather, and that bothered Esther's close friend, as Esther told her it would be Charlie Bardous or no one. My father objected to Charles only because he was not Jewish. This went on for years while Esther saw me through college after Al married, and then Esther began to see Pete through college and medical school and mother Babe when I was away and when my mother died.Even then my father would not see Charlie.H.L. Handy sold out to Swift and Company, soEsther and Charlie were transferred to a big office force where they were never alone. Charlie then lived w8ith his aged mother, who was as opposed to a Jewish daughter-in-law (beautiful and generous and wise and kind and musical and in love with Charlie to the exclusion )(p.4) of all other men) Julius Aronson loved her for years before he finally married Mollie at an advanced age.So it went on.My father died in l933, so Esther was free to follow her heart, but Charlie's mother stayed alive.- and by the time she grudgingly agreed that Esther could live with them Esther would not marry Charlie and live with that old witch -whom even Charlie thought to be a witch- and he supported her as his duty and not for love of her.Esther could not bring herself to live under the same roof as she knew the mother would make her true love's life miserable. That mother lived until she was close to one hundred (years).I don't know what finally happened to Charles as I was so rarely in Hartford- but Esther never dated dany other men! She went to live with Babe and with Geetter to help them with the five children when Geetter went to war.She lugged home the meat and eggs after work from Swift and Company and stayed with the five babies while Babe shopped in the evening- and helped with the washing and the housework in addition to her job. Geetter said to me, "I think so much of Esther I don't know which one I married - Babe or Esther." She was always "Nan" to the children and should have had a flock of her own! Now her birthday approaches- about seventy-nine and Geetter will send the the big yellow chrysanthemum he sends every year - the flowers that will still be fresh on Thanksgiviing Day. Esther and I were very close, but never once did she breathe to me the sadness of her broken romance. Maybe now you will know why I was so secretive about my marriage (p5) to Jack - an Irish Catholic and a devout one.I knew about Esther's broken romance with a Christian, and I feared for mine even though I learned about Esther's only from her best friend who later told me Esther wept bitterly often over my father's attitude before Charles ever told his mother about Esther.So I kept my marriage secret until I was about to sail, and then I did NOT go to Hartford to see my good Dad bfore I sailed.I did not want to see him hurt that his daughter who had been so sought after by fine Jewish men should marry a Christian- even one s fine as Jack Barrett. Esther's life had been ruined, and no one was going to ruin life forjack and me.I saw my father only once after that in l932 shortly before he died, but Jack was not with me.Pa ignored my marriage and made no effort to see me in Boston and died some months later (March 29, l933).All Hartford was there (at his funeral) to hear the rabbi say "David gave his life to the unfortunate in Hartford after the expense of his own chldren, who numbered eight by birth but countless by his big heart." Esther loved him always, so she disregarded Charlie's pleas that she elope with him as she had no desire to hurt Pa.What a person. Greater than I could ever hop[e to be. I was headstrong. Even when my father came to New York to urge me to accept Bill Nuremberg and to forget the charming but poor Irish naval officer of a different faith.He came to New York only to dissuade me from Jack long before Jack proposed.What I did not know was that Jack (p.6) went (December l928) to New Haven and to Hartford to inspect naval Reserves at the armories there, had found my brother Al's home had dinner there and left Al with the impression that he was seriously interested in me.Al told Pa, who came rushing to New York to put a stop to the nonsense.She had NOT met Jack but did meet him at your apartment (27 Commerce Street) the night he lost his money to thieves in the subway.There is no doubt Pa likedJack BUT vastly preferred Bill (Nuremberg) whom he had called on atGrand Central Building that afternoon without my knowledge or consent.The father watched his daughters closely - could run Esther, Bee, Babe but found me always headstrong attractive to the Italian and Irish boys.He moved away from 25 Morgan Street (l9l6) because of the attentions of Joe Paonessa- a rich builder's son from Holy Cross who lived across the street. And on Wooster Street he told Justin McCarthy a United States sailor, that his daughter could not go out with him and could NOT accept thebeaded bag Justin had brought to me all the way from the Mediterranean. Justin went off with that bag really scared, and I never saw him again.My father was very tall- powerful, and even an Irish sailor feared his wrath.He did likeSam Pollack Dr. Geetter, and his three good Jewish daughter-in-law! All (except Pete and Jen in Baltimore) were married in his living room except Babe, who was married in his summer home ("The Shack" or "Snug Harbor" near Windsor) with Jack present (June l6, l929).A really wonderful man of principle. He did not just blindly object to marriage outsidethe faith. He believed firmly that the chance o hapiness in mixed marriages was slight but p7 above all he believed such marriage a great injustice to the children.I had a very good father and a very good mother.I believe Esther would be the first to agree.Charles Bardous was not her only chance for happiness.Julius Aronson loved her, Jack Fine loved her,Charlie Rosenblatt loved her - all had sense enough to make happy marriages with other girls- all were successful, happy men - all would have made Esther happy,and my father knew it. But she was in love with Charlie when she knew his mother objected and knew that after their elopement she would have to live with her as Charlie would never desert that mother who tied him so closely for her own support.He did not earn enough as one employed bookkeeper to support two households.She was happy (later) to live with Babe and Geetter and her five nieces and nephews who adore her as she appraoches her birthday on November l9. But isn't it strange that p8- she never talked to Bee or to me or to Babe about her broken rmance and that I never heard it discussed by any of my sisters or brothers? I got it in bits and piece from her friends and from my father.One of her friends married Julis Aronson and another close friend married Charles Rosenblatt... the others my father and mother cared for in their home I have only sketchy information except for Julius Aronson and Catherine Cooper, who for years I believed were my blood sister and brother. And Catherine married Sam Aronson! He was Julius's brother -9- who almost lived with us when his mother died but went home only to sleep as we had run out of bedspace! All of us slept two in a bed- four in a room, but we ran out of space even when my two oldest brothers Harry and Ben offered to sleep on the living room floor if my parents would only keep a few of their motherless friends. One day Al stepped on Ben's hand while Ben was sleeping on thefloor, and his hand was broken.Ben needed that hand to play the saxophone when he had the vaudeville bug at an early age and left the good job in the drug store and then added gray hairs to my father's fine head of jet black hair!My father put Ben out of the house for giving up that job.Then he sent me out with fod for Ben and shut his eyes when Ben sneaked in to bed at night! - And poor Pete had the earache, and Ma got Dr. Kates to come in. He asked her what she had done for the boy, and Ma said she had heated sweet oil and put a spoonful or two in the ear.The doctor turned on Ma - a very Jewish doctor and said, "I don't want no 'hoil' in 'dat h'ear."Poor Pete was in pain, but he roared laughing, and after that we would mimic"I don't want no 'hoil' in that h'ear." I forget what he prescribed, but he did clear it up. I sippose my mother could have clogged the ear and hurt the hearing permanently. When I was small my father owned a good-sized restaurant He had a big coal stove and loved to stand near it. At times one of his customers would brew tea- strong tea there and -p 10- put it into small bottles. he claimed to be a drug salesman. I learned later that he sold that tea as eye drops from his pack of patent medicines he sold to druggists. That was about 1909.(After recent Halloween activity in West Roxbury) I am remind of l907 the one year we lived on 27th Street in the heart of the East Side of New York city in the Panicof l906 when I was five or six.In terror I stood at the window on the second floor of the tenement house and watched the boys with long stockings - women's black- filled with flour hit poor passing men and other boys across the back- hit them so hard white fluor showed on their overcoats. I was petrified and did not go out all day. It was traditional then just as trick or treat is here.-re lost.He lived on LpowerEast side part of l907 in Economic pani, when friend named Samuel Shlimbaum found him tailoring work.Shlimbaum was in Hartford directory one year abour l892. David Meranski knew Boris Thomaschevsky of Second Avenue Yiddish theater in New York, who performed at the Meranski restaurant with members of his family around l912. Aunt Babe Thalia's motherrecollects that he invited aunt Bertha to travel with his touring troup, but the family did not think it advisable.Bertha belpong to business club and singing group at Hartford Publioc high School class of l9l7 with her friends Eva Levin and one other. Their [photos are in the l9l7 Yearbook on file at Hartford Public library. I hope to get copies for website.There was no l9l9 yearbook because of paper shortage after World War I. There may be historical material on Hartford Puiblic high School and elementary Brown school at Stow-Day House in Hartford, an important repository, and other interesting material at Jewish historical Society of Greater Hartford - thanks to cousin DavidGeetter for sending me the address.. There is atape there that rose Rosenblatt Witkower made for them. She lived to age ninety-one and remembered the Meranskis. Her husband was born in Vienna but his older brother in Brody. The Witkowers came to US in April l890. Rose Witkower's brother Charley was a very close friend of the older Meranskis. His father had been a populist candidate for governor of California in l884 - came to Hartford l885. Rose son continues Witkower Press. There is a letterin this notebbok eight from Albert Geetter and one from Saul Seidman of Hartford, descenant of Mrs. Meiselmann, another Brody emigrant and friend of Thalia goldfeld Meranski our granmother. i am very glad this material has survived the l993 thefts and will be typing it out. - cousin John Barrett Bertha Meranski-Sophie's next older sister - married Sam Pollack l924 Edit Sophie roomed with her older sister Bertha and often received her hand-me-down clothes. They walked to school together. Bertha took the business course. Three photos of her appear in the l9l7 Year Book of Hartford Public High School - one a formal photo, and she also appears in the Glee Club group and Girls business club groups.I would like to obtain copies of these three photos if anyone who sees thiscan visit the Hartford PublicLibrary (masin) when I saw these photos in l988. I would also like to obtain the photos of Bertha's friends and classmates Eva Levin (later Mrs. Bacon) and Lynette Silverberg - they were also in the photo groups. Eva Levin and her older brother Meyer were neighbors of the Meranskis on Morgan St l9l2 - and they introduced Bertha to their relative Sam Pollaack of Minsk and Dorchester, whom she married in l924 - having sonJason daughter Thalia (Klein) and four grandsons.


 

1482.
p 102- #1482 May 31, 1934 party in Panama City for departing Captain and Mrs. Robert M. Hinckley of Survey ship HANNIBAL

 

In front row from left of picture are Jack and Sophie Barrett, Captain Robert Hinckley, his successor Captain Gresham, Mrs. Hinckley,Mrs. Helen Akin, Chester Peake, and unidentified lady, and Mrs. Gene Nelson, whose husband then-Lieutenant Paul Nelson is standing behind her. Lieutenants Red Akin, Richard Visser, and Mervin Halstead are standing in an aisle toward left of photo, Akin identifiable holding up a glass, Visser behind Akin, and Halstead next to Akin probably to photo-left, Akin's right.The following 1989 letter from Read Admiral Richard G. Visser identifies several other persons in the photo and lists Annapolis year of several.Year: 1934,May 31____ P_A-N-A-M-A ___ Sophie and Jack Barrett are sitting at left of front row. Jack was Executive officer of survey ship HANNIBAL October l933 to September l935. Next to Sophie is guest of honor Captain Robert M. Hinckley, who was being relieved by Captain Gresham, who is next to him, then Mrs. Hinckley. Lieutenants Richard Visser and Mervin Halstead and Benny Crosser were in the group.Photo was taken in Panama City. Additional portion at right of photo is in existence and will be added to website. According to following 1989 letter of Admiral Visser, photos of Jean and Paul Nelson appear in right segment: "postmark August 30 1989 Rear Admiral and Mrs. Richard Gerben Visser United States Navy Retired : Madrid Sunday 27 August '89 Dear John, Thank you for sending the pictures of Captain Hinckley's farewell party,- they bring back treasured memories. Except for commanding the SS DALY (DD519) during World War II, I think my tour on survey duty in the HANNIBAL was the most interesting and self satisfying of my naval career.As young officers we were given the responsibility we wanted, and we could see the results of our work. I reported to the ship just after New Years Day in 1934 and served nearly two years until October, 1935,before being transferred. To identify some of the people:- (1)standing in the aisle holding up his drink is Lieutenant jg "Red" Akin US Naval Academy 1929 a classmate; (2) beside him on his right is Mervin Halstead USNA 1930;(3) I am standing just behind Akin. I don't see Dr. Smith in the picture.4 Commander Gresham with the swollen left arm is Hinckley's relief and sitting between Commander and Mrs. Hinckley. (5) Sitting beside Mrs. Hinckley is Helen Akin, Red's wife; next (6) is Lieutenant C.B. Peake the Supply Officer. I forget the name of the attractive girl next. I dated her, and she was the sister of a flyer (Army Air Corps) at Albrook Field. Jean Nelson is the last girl seated, and her husband Paul is standing behind her. He is a classmate also. I hope you sent these pictures to Halstead, too, for he will appreciate them as do I. This year is the sixtieth anniversary of my USNA class of 1929, and we are celebrating our reunion on 25 and 26 October in Annapolis with homecoming following on the 27th and 28th.We're meeting with our daughter and grandson and cousins, so it should be a great reunion. Many thanks again for sending the pictures.I shall write to the Halsteads.I'm sorry they live out in California - too far to visit. Joanna joins in sending best regards.-- Dick Visser.P___A___N___A___M___A part i --- HANNIBAL main text P-A-N-A-M-A chapter In l933 in Boston Jack was at first disappointed when he received orders as Executive Officer of survey ship HANNIBAL operating on the west coast of Panama for eight months a year and spending four months in Norfolk, Virginia for repairs, smooth work on reports,and leave and liberty for the crew.For two years he had been a Lieutenant Commander on shore duty in Boston where he had command of the Reserve training ship EAGLE l9,before which he had been gunnery officer of the gunboat TULSA in TIENTSIN, China. a ship that had been at the dock much of the time,and now he wanted command of a combatant ship to help him qualify eventually for promotion to Commander. He told me that duty on the HANNIBAL would sidetrack him, hurt his chances of selection for promotion especially because of his age in grade overage because he was thirty-three when he received his first Regular Navy commission as Lieutenant. In the fall of l933 we went to Norfolk to report to the HANNIBAL, where his disappointment did not last long.He was challenged when the Executive officer he relieved told him, "You can spend a lot of time in your bunk. This ship runs itself." Jack was amazed to find that the civilian hydrographer and ship's officers usurped the Captain's cabin every evening for "conferences" on the next day's work.Immediately Jack reorganized the ship - he liked and admired Captain Robert Hinckley, the captain of the ship.Every afternoon Jack met with the Captain and the chief hydrographer- the Jack wrote out the orders for the next day, and there were no more evening meetings in the Captain's cabin.Thus the Captain and other ships' officers could have the evening to themselves for rest and relaxation.[NBK 2 p 249] Officially the home port of the HANNIBAL was Portsmouth, Virginia, but in fact the ship was there only in the fall and very early winter. for repair work and transcription of the year's survey results and for leave and liberty. Most of the year the ship was in waters on the Pacific coast of Panma and Costa Rica surveying largely uncharted waters.which were becoming of interest to the national governments and American commercial interests. The officers and crew were Reugular Navy, and the civilian hydrographic engineers from the Naval Hydrographic office supervised the surveying.Commander Robert Hinckley was the Commanding Officer of the HANNIBAL, Lieutenant Commander Jack Barrett was the Executive officer, Dr. Clarence Nickerson Smith was the medical officer, Lieutenant Commnader Chester Peake was the Supply Officer, Dan Candler was the navigator and a senior watch officer, and the small boats were run by Clarence Boyd, Ted Ascherfeld, Dutch Woefel, Paul Nelson, Dick Visser, Mervin Halstead, and "Red" Aiken. Benny Crosser was also aboard as First Lieutenant and a watch officer. Commander Gresham relieved Commander Hinckley was was then relieved by Jack and then by Commander John Garfield Stevens. Jack considered his Boatswain Pittman very capable. After we left, Pittman subsequently drowned in 1936. I planned to live in the Canal zone in Panama when the ship was down there, because the HANNIBAL came into Balboa every month or six weeks and stayed in Balboa about ten days. My husband inquired about military transportation for me, but as Portsmouth was the home port, we had to pay for the transportation 251 where I occupied a house reserved for a civilian family due to arrive in about a month. The only furnishings were the basic furniture and dishes supplied by the federal government to all civilian households in the Canal Zone. The house was overrun with cockroaches and giant spiders, and the iguanas lived on the roof. Clarence Boyd skipper of one of the small boats and his wife Mary who could find no place to live, stayed with us on Plant Street but soon found a place of their own in Ancon. They had a lively wire haired terrier named Mischief. On Plant St with nothing to do in that empty house I read Culbertson bridge book from cover to cover, really studying it and also read two large volumes on "The Life of John Marshall" The first Saturday night there Jack and I went to the Union Club with Captain and Mrs. Hinckley, with Navy friends the Foggs and with Army friends Major and Mrs. Robb. The Union Club in Panama City is a most romantic spot where you drink and dance under the moon and stars and where you and your money are soon separated. One Navy friend, after an evening there drove his car right onto the grass of a mid town Open monument square! When the family arrived to claim its home on Plant St I moved into the small bachelor quarters of a woman telephone operator who was going to the mainland for three months. Mary Boyd, Mary Ascherfeld, and I spent nearly every afternoon at Fort Amador an Army fort where we could swim because Army wire kept the sharks out of the area. One evening late in l933 [or early in l934] Jack and I were having dinner at the Heart of Ghent Hotel in Norfolk, Virginia, shortly before I sailed for Panama.Jack happened to look over to the far side of the dining room,jumped up suddenly, and rushed off with a happy smile on his face. For some time he talked animatedly with a couple who seemed as glad to see him as he was to see them.When he returned to the table he told me the man was a Revenue Cutter cadet at the same time he was- Commander William Keester of the Class of l9l0. Only five cadets were graduated in the class of l9l0, and Bill Keester was one of Jack's good friends.The next evening we went by invitation to see the Keesters at their home in Norfolk, and they spent several happy hours with Jack talking about the subsequent careers of their contemporaries. Jack saw Keester later in Washington when Jack went there to inquire about small Coast Guard boats for the USS HANNIBAL's survey work. Jack got two dories from the Coast Guard- boats that were invaluable in the treacherous surf in shallow survey areas on the western coast of Panama and Costa Rica.Jack found a fine group of officers on the HANNIBAL when he joined the ship in Norfolk October l933. Captain Hinckley was very well qualified. He was able, even-tempered, friendly, appreciative of the work of his officers and men and had a "happy" ship. In letters from many of the ships' officers including Dan Candler, Dick Visser,Mervin Halstead, Jack Agnew, Harry Ferguson, Paul Lehman, Lafayette Jones, Woelfel-they all agree that they worked hard on the HANNIBAL but considered those years among the happiest of their naval careers- they worked hard at sea and played hard when they came ashore in Panama.Dan Candler, the navigator had a jolly disposition, and no amount of painstaking works was too much for him.Dr. Clarence Nickerson Smith, had a real interest in tropical medicine and diseases and a most challenging job to keep the officers and men free of malaria and other tropical diseases. An efficient paymaster, Chester Peake, was liked by everyone and gave us an awful scare when he was desperately sick in a Panama hospital suffering from a severe case of malaria. Clarence Boyd, Ted Ascherfeld, Dick Visser,Mervin Halstead,Paul Nelson, "Red" Aiken were among the young officers who ran the small boats- motor launches, sub chasers, and dories. Harry Ferguson relieved Boileau as Engineer Officer. Mervin Halstead owned a small pit bear, cut down a poisonous tree which almost cost him his eyesight, and he discovered a previously uncharted pinnacle rock which they temporarily termed "Hinckley Rock", and later it was permanently named Heradura rock on the charts.It was a dangerous rock only six feet below the surface of the water.Captain Hinckley wrote from Washington DC in l970 that discovery of that "Pinnacle Rock" was the greatest thrill he had while aboard the HANNIBAL.Very soon after the first of the year in l934 I went to Panama on the SS CRISTOBAL where Ethel Smith shared a cabin with me.It was pleasant aboard, especially as Ethel knew a young Army officer.One night he was in the cabin when I wanted to go to bed, and I sensed that Ethel would be glad to have him leave.So I said, "Mr. ---will you kindly leave so we can go to bed?" He was incensed- not because I asked him to leave, but because I had addressed him as "Mr." He informed me that all Army officers, even Second Lieutenants were always given a title and told me to address him as "Lieutenant." He had no use for me the rest of that trip.(l57) Captain Hinckley was succeeded by Captain Gresham, who invited Jack and me to dinner aboard the HANNIBAL. Both Captain Hinckley and his succesor Captain Gresham wrote in fitness reports that Jack was a fine seaman, an excellent ship handler,an excellent organizer, and a highly satisfactory Executive officer.Jack knew that Captain Gresham was affected with cancer and did all he could for the Captain's comfort during the time Captain Gresham was in command (about June l934-April l935).When he left, Jack was in acting command early l935, and I remember standing on the dock watching Jack take the"White Swan" (as the HANNIBAL was known) out of Balboa bound for the survey area. It was done with skill and with consideration for his officers and men.I was pleased when the Chief Hydrographer in Washington wrote that the HANNIBAL had done its work well during the periods of Jack's command. While I was still in the telephone operator's apartment just before I went to live with Mary in Ancon (where we had the luncheon for the Freeman girls) the Pacific fleet came to Balboa. A constant stream of white- uniformed sailors passed my house to and from the YMCA which was right next door to me.In the evening I could hear he band music until the "Y" closed about eleven o;clock. I wrote to Jack, who was out in the Survey area when the Fleet came in - on April 24, l934, " When most of the taxis, buses, and trolleys bearing the one o'clock liberty parties departed Balboa for Panama City,I walked to the Post Office where I found a fat letter for me in Box 208.It was a happy girl who opened that letter, then sat down on the Post Office steps to spend some time with you.Although there are so many demands on your time and attention in that dangerous work,you make time to write to me.If appreciation counts, you are well rewarded.If I were busy, the time might not seem so long, but there is little for me to do when I have no husband to serve and such a good maid to serve me.Mary Boyd is all excited.. she got a message from Clarence saying they would leave on the ANCON in May for Annapolis, where Clarence will go to Post Graduate School.She is delighted to be going home. My good friend Helen Miller writes asking me to invite her to Panama in June as she wants to make a cruise from New York City. The powers-that-be have changed their minds about the length of the stay of the Fleet on this side of the Canal. Consequently the hostesses on this side of the Canal are wild with rage.It makes no difference to me because without you parties and receptions have no charm. They decided night before last to push the ships through the Canal as fast as possible in order to find out how long it would take in case of war.Ships started through early yesterday morning.The word is that all of them will have gone through before six o'clock tomorrow morning.Since the fleet officers have to be ready to leave or have already left,all receptions and parties remaining on the schedule have been cancelled.You and I were invited to dance at the governor's reception and to the dance at Fort Amador.The arrival of the Fleet last Saturday has made very little difference in my life.Mary Boyd refused all parties involving fleet officers- says Clarence would not approve.On Saturday morning Mrs. Corbin drove Mary and me to Fort Amador to watch the battleships PENNSYLVANIA and CALIFORNIA come in, followed by many other ships.That afternoon in the heat and blazing sun,hundreds of sailors in clean white uniforms passed our house.They came back before six o'clock, sober, quiet, cheerful, none the worse for wear.Saturday evening Mrs. Corbin drove me to the Union Club- as an extra lady.There were only a few Naval officers in her party- mostly senior officers.Sunday afternoon thousands of sailors passed our house.I suppose they were glad to be ashore, but I was sorry for them in the heat and glare.Since the arrival of the Fleet, I haven't taken the car out., as the traffic is wild.I am most interested in what you say about the performance of the self-bailer and of the dory - guess you are proud of them.-Sophie Barrett" In May I rented a large house until I was scheduled to go North in September l934.Helen Miller a New York City secretary who had worked with me at the Division of Publications of the Commonwealth Fund under Mary Augusta Clark a l903 Mount Holyoke alumna, visited me there.There was a big party at the hope of Captain Crapo the afternoon Helen arrived. Although Helen met many naval people, she was land-sick after travel. Soon the HANNIBAL came into port, and our paymaster helped us entertain her. ..l62 In September or October l934 I returned to Portsmouth, Virginia via the CRISTOBAL. We found an unattractive furnished apartment with a dark kitchen, but it had two bedrooms.Pa Barrett came down from Boston by train, stayed a week and went back by boat.We still have the enthusiastic account he wrote about his boat trip home.He and Jack drove around the Virginia countryside. They liked to talk with the peanut farmers, one of whom picked a handful of peanuts for Pa Barrett.He invited him to come back and pick all he wanted to take home with him to Boston, but Pa Barrett had trouble chewing peanuts with the few teeth he had left when he was almost eighty years old. The peanut-fed pigs were used to produce hams with a special flavor.Jack remembered about the indignation of the farmers when the New Deal and Henry Wallace "plowed little pigs under" to reduce production and support prices. On Friday of that week we bought a whole fish, which Pa Barrett cleaned, prepared and cooked. Pa Barrett enjoyed going aboard the HANNIBAL when she was in port and had lunch there with Jack a few times.In May l934 Mollie Barrett and her grade school classmate Gertrude Granville visited Jacksonville Florida and sent photographs from the Manson Hotel there to us in Panama.Now in the fall October l934 Mollie and her cousin Eileen Lane of Melrose were traveling on the Merchant and Miners Line boat from Boston to Norfolk.Jack met them at the boat in Norfolk and drove them to our apartment in Norfolk for lunch.Then the went by bus to Washington to see their second cousin John Lambert who worked as an editorial writer for a Washington newspaper. He had been many years a reporter in Portsmouth New Hampshire and was a friend of President Calvin Coolidge. One Naval officer in Portsmouth had a large family. "All I have to do is look at my wife, and she gets pregnant," he explained. 'l65About this time I drove to Baltimore to see my doctor brother Pete, his wife Jen, and their infant son Arthur, who died of appendicitis at age four. My brother Pete, whom I hadn't seen for five years, was building up his pediatric practice also doing a great deal of free work for the Salvation Army. MaNY YEARS LATER WHEN MY BROTHER'S DAUGHTER DEBBY (Deborah BORN 1935) was married in June l957 to Alfred Sonnenstrahl, the Salvation Army sent a representative to the wedding to honor my brother for the countless hours of free service he had given to the Salvation Army. -54''- #54' Now I am entering into Jack's memoirs some greatly prized letters sent to me from his HANNIBAL shipmates in response to our queries relating to Jack and the HANNIBAL. We had an amazing and rewarding response from every officer of that ship to whom we wrote.It was gratifying that they seemed to enjoy reviving the old memories. We kept in touch with several up to 1986. The consensus of opinion was that Jack was an outstanding Executive Officer for that survey work and a good shipmate under sometimes trying conditions.Commander Dan Candler of Dallas Texas wrote on 14 March l970: "Dear Sophie': Your letter arrived yesterday. Please ask your son John to forgive my delay in answering his letter.The reason was merely laziness, but my excuse was that I wanted time to get my thoughts together.I was sorry to hear of Jack's death as I had always considered him to be one of my best friends.When the chips were down, we were on the same side.That service on the HANNIBAL has always been considered one of the happiest times of my life.Our tours of duty covered the same period approximately, although I left a little after your husband did, in February l936.Then I went to the TEXAS until mid-l938 - then to mine sweeper - submarine tender in Hawaii, the SEAGULL from l939 to June l942.We were at Maui when Pearl Harbor occurred.I saw you all at least once in Pearl Harbor, and I remember that Jack helped with his influence to get me some transportation- I believe that was to help me in reporting to the CABOT - a small aircraft carrier-in l944.I ended up the war as skipper of the repair ship CEBU in the Philippines and Okinawa.Getting back to the HANNIBAL: I was Navigator- we surveyed the coast of Panama from the Cape Mala I believe about eighty-ninety miles south of the Pacific entrance to the Canal to the Costa Rica border as well as the Gulf of Necoya in Costa Rica.. After I left they covered a small part of the Atlantic coast.That is where Pitman was lost.We also covered the outlying islands- the names of many of them escape me. On one of them the old chart had a note "Caution - the island may be erroneously located - possibly as much as two miles." We found that it was out of position about one half mile. One of the other islands covered was Coiba, - and Quibo, which was the penal colony of Panama. We knew the boss man as well as some of the convicts, who were used as guides to help us in locating the best places to put up our signals.One day the President of Panama decided to meet us.We advised him against it, as the weather was bad- with lots of rain- but he was adamant and came anyway. The planes just barely made it, and at least one of them could not leave for two days until we had time to bake their generators dry.The President might have looked like a President in Panama City, but when he came aboard the HANNIBAL that day, he looked like a half-drowned rat. We also wrote the sailing directions for the area covered. "Central American Pilot" I believe the book is called. But not having seen the chart or the sailing directions for more than twenty years- anything said is from memory -and that is not as it once was.As to our old friends, I remember the name (Guillermo) Medina from his connection with the HANNIBAL or the Hydrographic Office. It was also good to have news of Paul Lehman.Recently I read that Captain Hinckley. who with his wife had traveled widely since retirement, had to call of a proposed jaunt due to his hospitalization.Dick Visser and Mervin Halstead could give you more information on the YP boats than I. The Vissers had been in Spain for ten years- or twenty- then came back here and spent about two years traveling and buying a house and getting located in Florida.They decided to move back to Spain. They said their address would be c/o General Delivery APO New York NY 09283.I have seen Dr. and Mrs. Clarence Smith over the years - in fact saw "Surge" the month before he died- last June I believe. They had been living around Philadelphia, and my wife Ann, comes from Philadelphia, so we get up there once a year.You did not mention the engineer. But Boileau died some years ago, and I believe that Harry Ferguson lives in Jacksonville, Florida. Agnew went into the Supply Corps. I saw him when he was Supply Officer on an Aircraft carrier.Harvey Akin, the fellow who liked to work calculus problems as a pastime, died a few years ago in North Carolina.I saw him last in Honolulu soon after Pearl Harbor.Benny Crosser was the First Lieutenant, the ship's housekeeper and an exceedingly good one. CANDLER #54 preceded by p. l75: It was Dick Visser's motor launch that was lost. He was trying to do too good a job & a wave broke too close to him & swamped his boat and pulled it on the rocks. Boats could not be landed on that side of the island-Cebaco Island-I'd forgotten its name until you mentioned it. So boats landed on the lee side and men had to go up over the hogback and down on the other side.As I remember it, the jungle was not so bad,but it was a job to haul heavy weights like boat engines over the hill.But there never was a crew that was in better condition than the crew on the HANNIBAL- at that time the oldest ship in commission in the Navy.-Think that the pinnacle you refer to was named by us 'Hinckley Reef.' I don't know whether it came out on the chart like that or not.(Halstead later wrote, "I was the guy who found 'Heradura Rock'- it was six feet below the surface and a hazard.") To answer one of John's questions, I don't know whether it is history or legend but Admiral Dewey is said to have found the HANNIBAL a collier built in England about l896- in the South China Sea loaded with coal previous to the attack on Manila.He bought it for the price of the coal. All of the survey ships were ships which would not have been of much use to the Navy on any other duty.The NIAGARA,which was working on the east coral America was a converted yacht." (p. l76) And on the 28th of March l970 Dan Candler wrote to John:"Dear John-I enjoyed both your & your mother's letters.I shall try to answer your questions as well as pass on any information which may be of interest.The notes of your Dad would be much more accurate than my memory.I remember that tropical storm as in that storm I saw the anemometer reading eighty-three knots,which is the highest reading I ever saw on an instrument.We tried letting salad oil drip in the windward scuppers but as to whether it did any good or not I can't say.We knew about the storm before passing Guantanamo,but everyone was eager to get back to Norfolk so we did not stay there.After that it seemed that when we were clear of land we ran with the wind on the quarter until it passed on,which took two or three days.I am sure that Mervin Halstead gave you a better picture of the YP boats than I could give.There were also three - I believe- twin screw motor launches with platforms for heaving the lead to take soundings.There is also a platform or "chains" from which one may take soundings on most ships.Your father knew more about small boats than anyone else on board & at his instigation we obtained two dories, -one was a Nahant dory & I can't remember the name of the other.l77 To get a starting point for the survey a party was sent ashore for about a month to locate a point by taking sights of lower magnitude stars.A base line & direction from this point was then actually measured-which gave two points.Signals were then erected - consisting essentially of a flag on a tripod- on conspicuous point in the vicinity.Then by bearings these signals were located on our temporary charts- then a boat or a YP or the HANNIBAL would take simultaneously two sextant angles -horizontal using three signals- & a sounding which would finally end up as a depth marking on a finished chart.Where it was difficult to locate signals on land, we sometimes we sometimes used floaters, which were made square - four steel drums & two by twelve timbers about fifteen feet long.These were moored in comparatively shallow water & had signal flags mounted on them.The hydrographic engineers would make up the rough charts with the signals on them the night before so they would be ready for the boats the next morning.In deeper waters the HANNIBAL ran lines of soundings.Once we were taking bearings on the top of a hill where we had a signal which was about eighty-five miles away.-It was not that the HANNIBAL required such a long time for overhaul,but the time was taken up for the hydrographic engineers to get their temporary charts & sounding records in shape to turn over to the Hydrographic Office. Of course the time in Norfolk was used also for rest & recreation, leave for the crew,many of whom lived in Philadelphia & could not afford to have their families in the Canal Zone.One of the last things to be done l78 before departure was after the rough charts were made up-the writing of the sailing directions was my job.I can remember working over a chart in the Norfolk Navy Yard on New Year's Day & trying to listen to a football game on the radio.On the way to & from the Canal Zone we were directed to take what were called "dynamic soundings". This consisted of getting samples of water at different depths & sending them either to Woods Hole or Scripps Institute of Oeanography at La Jolla California.We would probably take soundings at six locations on each trip.There was one rather protected anchorage behind one large island & only about one half mile from another with a good swimming beach.At first we liked to go in swimming until someone started fishing for sharks over the stern.After one was hooked we would shoot him.There were as many as six or seven ten-or-twelve-foot sharks on lines over the stern at one time.Most of us lost our interest in swimming after that.The crew was the hardest working ever - & not baD AT PLAYING EITHER. ALL IN ALL IT WAS ONE OF THE MOST ENJOYABLE TOURS OF DUTY I HAVE HAD.I always considered you father one of my best friends. I admire him for going back & getting that law degree. He was a good seagoing man and a good l79 shipmate.You may well be proud of him.Kindly remember me to your other."- Dan Candler." (According to Mervin Halstead, Candler's family at one time had a controlling interest in Coca-Cola company in early days when it was very small- in later years he was in Dallas Texas). #51 Paul Lehman hydrographic engineer Sophie introduction: "The mess steward Machete knew that I liked curry, so when the ship was in port (infrequently) he always told Jack when they were going to have curry, and Javk would tell me or drive home and get me for the treat. Aboard ship the steward goes from man to man with vegetable dishes of beef or chicken curry, and each man helps himself.Then he serves the rice. Then he goes to each man with a tray which contains a variety of flavorings, chopped nuts, picadilly, chutney, coconut. I always sat next to Dr. Clarence Smith, who piled his plate high, and we certainly enjoyed that lunch. I sat across from Paul Lehman, the junior hydrographic engineer on the HANNIBAL. One noon he smiled at me across the table and said, "My fiancee is just like you, Mrs. Barrett." That was in 1934. When we returned to Balboa in 1935, Helen was Mrs. Lehman, a new bride, and Paul was a happy man. I was very surprised to see a girl about my height and weight, a brunette,who had her arm in a sling. She, a new bride, had fallen and broken her wrist. I was sympathetic, but the officer who visited with me then teasingly accused Paul of twisting her arm." On March 24,l970 our friend the junior hydrographic engineer,a civilian on the HANNIBAL, Paul Lehman wrote to me from Bethesda,Maryland:"Dear Sophie-We were so glad as well as surprised to receive your nice long interesting letter.Helen & I have thought about you & John many times since we were all together in Panama in l934-l935.We were so sorry to learn of Jack's passing.Our love & heartfelt sympathy go out to you at this time.We know that it must be a great l82 comfort to you to have your son with you.Sophie I'll do my best in answering your questions.Aboard a survey ship there are generally three civilian engineers,one senior hydrographic engineer & two junior hydrographic engineers. The term hydrographer is used loosely to designate any one of the three.Actually the real Hydrographer of the Navy is an Admiral.He never goes to the survey area but stays in Washington as the head of the Hydrographic Office.The title of Hydrographer of the Navy,held by an Admiral,was changed to Oceanographer of the Navy in l962,& the name of the office was changed to U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office & is located in Suitland,Maryland.Now as well as in l935 one of the several nautical publications produced is the nautical (navigational) charts.The US Coast & Geodetic Survey has the responsibility of making nautical charts & maintaining them corrected to date for all over the world.Many of these charts by reciprocal agreement are almost reproductions of foreign government charts.The nations that have the means of doing hydrographic surveying work do so for the nations that need to have their coasts charted but do not have the means for doing so.The International Hydrographic Bureau at Monaco monitors all of the work.In this way chart nations do not overlap-that is-survey in the same area.Rather by agreement they exchange information.Anyway the above somehow tells why the USS HANNIBAL was working in Panama & in Costa Rica in l934-l935.The best chart-making nations in the past & today are in this order: United States,Great Britain,Germany, Japan, & France.On a ship doing hydrographic surveying the officers,hydrographic engineers, & crew obtain l83 the basic information needed for constructing nautical charts.These charts show the contour of the ocean floor.You probably know that the floor of the ocean is made up of mountains,hills, & valleys.In the ocean mountain peaks are called pinnacles if they are below the surface of the water or islands if they are above the surface.Before the survey ship with its sounding boats goes into an area a definite control system has to be established to determine the exact latitude & longitude of the area to be surveyed.This is done by the means of building eighty foot high steel towers at various places along the shore & up to within three or four miles behind the shoreline.Some of these towers are built on high hills or mountains.From the top of each tower the engineer reads angles between the other towers that are visible to him- mountain peaks,points of land, islands.This system of control towers is known as a "Triangulation Net." This triangulation net is drawn (or portrayed) over a three foot by four foot piece of paper at a scale to show about thirty,forty or fifty miles of coastline- the waters off of which are to be surveyed.This net drawn as geometric figures (as triangles,parallelograms) is the main control of the survey work.The towers forming the net are colored with different-colored canvas so that they can more readily be seen against various backgrounds- trees or sea or sky. One-foot-in-diameter holes are cut in the canvas covering to allow the wind to go through- or rather so that the wind would not knock the tower down.Large colored flags are flown from the tops.At the start of the net a metal plate l84 with a cross cut thereon is set into a concrete base.Then the exact latitude of the intersection of the cross is determined astronomically.Hundreds of readings are taken of the stars each night & the sun each day.Finally the exact latitude & longitude of this point is known.Next from this point a baseline of about four or five miles in length has to be very accurately measured.This is done along a railroad track when possible.The iron-steel measuring tape must be under 3.5 pounds pressure when read,& temperature readings must be taken & corrections made accordingly.The measurement must be made three times.The results must be within five inches of error.This measured line or distance becomes the vertex of the triangle- which in turn becomes the first figure of the triangulation net.By having all the angles between the towers read & knowing the sides & angles of the first triangle, by trigonometric computation the latitude & longitude of each tower is determined.ow the exact location of intermediate stations is determined.The ship, sub-chasers & motor launches then go into the area & measure the depth of the water by taking thousands of soundings.These soundings portray the contour of the ocean floor.The officers taking the soundings record the information on the boat sheets.Quartermasters simultaneously read angles with sextants between these stations,thus determining the position of the boats. Periodically small changes in the course steered have to be made to stay on the sounding lines drawn on the boat sheets.The location of the sounding lines & the distance between them are designated by the engineers after a study is made of the nature of the terrain of the ocean floor.Fathometers are used to l85 periodically measure the depth of the water.From the bottom of the sounding boat the signal of the fathometer sends a sound wave to the ocean floor.The time of the returning echo gives the depth of the water.The boat sheet material is worked up onto smooth sheets when the ship is in Norfolk or Philadelphia.The completed sheets are sent to the Oceanographic Office & are the basic material for the making of the new charts.The senior hydrographic engineer spends about ninety per cent of his time aboard the mother ship joining with the Captain & Executive officer in formulating plans & procedures for the work& they review the progress made & the accuracy of the results obtained.In some situations a more concentrated effort in operations must be made. Generally the Captain, Executive officer & senior hydrographic engineer visit Port Authority officers to make sure that agreements are understood regarding matters of right-of-way at tower & signal sites- the clearing or cutting down of timber sites (which are often on the top of high hills & mountain peaks) & the use of lighthouses as triangulation stations, obtaining materials & food.At the present time junior hydrographic engineers must be graduates in civil engineering, having been schooled in hydrography, topography & oceanography. They have to be able to make trigonometric computations mainly for the triangulation control net. l86 During my time on the HANNIBAL we lost a motor whaleboat-not a motor launch.he sailors & I were in a motor whaleboat that capsized in the surf while making a landing.We swam to shore.one of us was injured. The boat was demolished as it was dashed against the rocks near the shore.All that was salvaged of the wreckage was a little piece of the side of the boat that contained the boat's number - this I handed to Captain Hinckley when I finally got back aboard the HANNIBAL.My last trip that Iaent ilsvice was in the 1934-1935 season when Jack a was the Executive officer,& Helen & you were in Balboa.I hope Sophie,that some of my answers to your questions will be of help to you & your son.Helen joins me in sending much love. -Paul Lehman."-#52 Adm. Visser- #52 VISSER letter Hannibal l934-5 On the 25th of March l970 Rear Admiral Richard Gerben Visser residing in Madrid,Spain- a young boat officer on the HANNIBAL when Jack was its Executive Officer wrote:Dear Sophie & John junior,Forgive me for not having acknowledged your letters sooner but it has been virtually impossible.Joanne & I sold our house in Florida in January & moved back here to Madrid,where we formerly lived from l957 to l967.My years in the HANNIBAL are some of the treasured memories of my life.I enjoyed fine associations with everyone on board & found the work of hydrographic surveying to be highly interesting.As a young officer I was given a great deal of responsbility & in the beautiful finished charts could see the final completed products of all our united research & effort.The YP 42 was my first command,& I learned the basics of ship handling & seamanship from this experience.We had loads of fun in Panama- all of us together when the ship was in port,going to the several swank beer l87 gardens in the evenings & to the Union club on Saturday nights for dinner & dancing. On Sunday afternoon there were the horse races which were fun to attend. Captain Hinckley was a particularly fine captain& he & Mrs. Hinckley always joined in with us in our social activities. I have kept up with them over the years & stopped to see them in Washington about five years ago.I am distressed to know that he has been hospitalized.Commander Barrett was a fine Executive Officer & particularly well qualified for that duty.Under his direction I was given charge of an operation to drag several hundred square miles of coastal waters to a depth of twelve fathoms. We employed both YP's, & Mervin Halstead worked with me.It was unique from the normal survey work & presented a challenge to us.We did the job in three weeks & we had the feeling of having accomplished something worthwhile.During the course of the operation we located & charted a pinnacle which could have ripped the bottom out of a ship.We may have named it 'Hinckley Rock' or some such name.I'm sure you know the history of the HANNIBAL.It was a British collier & Admiral Dewey bought it it China during the Spanish-American war.It was loaded with coal- & to get the coal he had to buy ship & cargo. It remained on the rolls of the Navy right up to World War II.I think its last service was as a station ship in Norfolk.It had a wrought iron hull & one reciprocating engine of either 300 or 600 horsepower.It had natural draft with tall stack, fire tube boilers which l88 burned soft coal-these had to be cleaned regularly-that is the reason we got back to port about once a month.The main pumps,including the air pumps,were all connected to the main shaft,so whenever we got underway we started with zero vacuum (if John junior is an engineer he will appreciate this!)Steam was generated in the boilers & pushed through the cylinders.As the main shaft turned over,it activated the main air pump which began to suck a vacuum in the main condenser thus permitting an easier flow of steam.With an engine of such low power the efficiency was never very high & only under the best conditions of a fair breeze were we able to obtain a maximum speed of six to seven knots!I often remember rounding Cape Mala en route to & from the survey area on the west coast of Panama-the current there is rather strong - two-three knots. Invariably we would have the lighthouse bearing on the bow at sunset- & at sunrise the next day it would still be in plain sight on the quarter. With a ship of such low power you can readily understand that it was a dangerous situation when we were caught in that hurricane north of Cuba (September l935).We were fearful that, being caught in mountainous seas & 75-l00 mile per hour winds we would be unable to maintain steerage way & might founder. Ah- but she was a comfortable old ship & served us well-& we loved her!To answer a couple of John junior's questions:The HANNIBAL spent three months in Norfolk not only for overhaul but in working up the rough data of our season's work into smooth charts for reproduction by the Hydrographic Office.The charts were beautiful!The last survey of the area we completed in l934-l935 had been carried out by the British one hundred years before-considering what they had to work with,their charts were reasonably good. We found one rock "Pillar of Salt" only about two miles out of position. l89 The "Morrow Puercos" operation covered an area to a considerable distance offshore where the water was comparatively shallow-under one hundred fathoms.To run the lines getting depths, we extended the triangulation from known points on shore to floaters (rafts with flags & skirts on pyramids),which we anchored in depths up to thirty fathoms.Using these to determine the ship's position at any moment, we ran our lines covering a wide area out of sight of land.Poor Captain Gresham had a cancerous tumor in his arm & was not with us very long. Captain Stevens relieved him toward the end of my last survey season, so I didn't get to know either of them very well.The YP-42 operated independently away from the HANNIBAL much of the time.For example I was in charge (& had Mr. Devine & Mr. Livingston with me) of the survey of the Gulf of Nicoya on the west coast of Costa Rica.The entrance of this gulf is about as wide as the English Channel.It took us three months to do the job,& I didn't see the HANNIBAL during all this time.The YP 41 brought us supplies & mail and exchanged Livingston & Devine,who split the time between them.After all this I hesitate to bore you further with an outline of my career during & after the war.To sketch it briefly I graduated from the Naval War College on 2 December l94l & reported to COMINCH headquarters in Washington- Admiral King-when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor.It took a year to extricate myself from Washington & take command of a new 2l00-ton destroyer l90 USS DALY DD5l9 & get to sea. After a shakedown in the Atlantic operating with other destroyers out of Argentia (Newfoundland) we went to the Pacific to join our squadron.We participated in the Aleutian operation from August to December l943,then went to the Southwest Pacific theater where we participated in the forward movement of the Allied forces through New Guinea,then Halmahera Islands & the invasion of the Philippines culminating in the Battle of Surigao Strait (OCTOBER,L944). I had tremendous success with the DALY, saw a lot of combat & had a wonderful crew-& no one got hurt while I had command.From the DALY after Surigao I was ordered to the staff of Admiral Turner Commander Amphibious Forces of the Pacific Fleet as Assistant Operations Officer. In that capacity I helped prepare the plans for & participated in the assault & conquest of both Iwo Jima & Okinawa. At war's end we were in Manila working with the Sixth Army & had just competed the plans for the invasion of the Japanese home islands.Thank God we didn't have to carry them out!-although I sometimes wonder what chain reactions we have inherited by having used the bomb.After the war I had various commands in both the Destroyer & Amphibious Forces & served on major staffs.I was also selected for & attended the National War College in Washington. I love the Navy & have fine memories of it.From your description it appears that Commander Barrett had a long & varied career,& his memories should prove most interesting and worth publishing.I sincerely wish you success with it. I would be glad to hear from you again & hope the contents of this letter will be helpful. Sincerely, Dick Visser." #53 Halstead- #53 HALSTEAD HANNIBAL l934 On January 25,l970 Captain Mervin Halstead who was one of Jack's junior officers on the HANNIBAL wrote to John from Los Altos California:" Yes I was aboard with Hinckley,Gresham,& Stevens-Candler, Visser, Boyd,Ascherfeld & many others were there with me.Your mother was a small, dark-haired lady then. My father General Lawrence Halstead US Army was in command of the U.S. Army in Panama then.Being the son of a "bigshot" I was enjoying myself plenty.I was the guy who found Heradura Rock-it was six feet below the surface & was a hazard.I dragged for it & found it only ONCE. Even though I took an accurate fix,the current was so swift you could not stay over it long enough to find it again.The HANNIBAL came north during hurricane season & damn near foundered in l935. There was another ship a converted German yacht NOKOMIS-she was always on the east coast of Panama.Until late in l936 the HANNIBAL operated on the west coast. The east coast was extremely dangerous because of constant surf-waves.Boatswain Pittman drowned in late l936.I did see your father in Hawaii. He put me aboard a ship CAPE BLANCO to get me out before someone grabbed me & took me out to the action area in the Pacific before I could get my thirty days leave.I had been in action area three years plus.Very nice of him.All the names you mention are on the chart. Cape Mala was the turning point coming home to Balboa - it is ninety miles out. l80 I have the original of the enclosed post card.(YP 41 illustrated)The YP 41 was painted white,with yellow superstructure.It had two Winton air injection engines, carried l500 gallons of drinking water & sometimes as many as fifty men. It was very wide & made the trip from Norfolk to Panama easily.It had wooden deck & one half inch thick steel hull.There was a sister ship GALLATIN YP 42. Lieutenant jg Dick Visser commanded it. Neither Visser nor Halstead (me) took promotion exams until l938.The note 'Halstead & Visser better read up' referred to the two of us commanding such boats as these. These boats ran survey lines as many miles as possible from "can't see to can't see" eight am to dark -as many as thirty thousand miles per year.Glossy water, teeming with sharks, barracudas,crocodiles.(Pictureshows Halstead marked by arrows showing compensated magnetic compass,search light,port holes, fenders to keep from bumping, patent anchors - atmosphere very hot & wet- picture of where Halstead was stationed -also Boatswain Warrell,Seaman Peyton, CPO Engineer Hall, & AFFIRM flag meaning "We are coming alongside,PORT side." It is a picture of YP 4l the MAHONING,which was given to the Navy by the Coast Guard for survey work.It was 2l0 tons & made ten knots.It had one of the first depth finding appliances aboard.At the time of the picture it was coming aboard the USS HANNIBAL,which was the mother ship on which Barrett was the Executive Officer.The HANNIBAL made eight knots.This particular picture was made in l935 off Aufuera Island,Panama Pacific coast -Sophie Barrett note) "Yes there were three civilians you named l8l & another one arrived in l936.They plotted our stuff.Devine was in charge.I found the largest scorpion in the world one day on the east coast of Panama.He is in Smithsonian now.Big as a crab. I chopped down a manzanilla tree & got poisoned as Lord Nelson had done a century before.Almost lost my eyes. The doctor was 'Cyanide' Smith. Gresham died of cancer.He was going place in the Navy when he came down with it.They didn't know what it was- so sent him to the HANNIBAL to rest.Ship spent about thirty days out (then) ten days in Balboa.I went to US Naval Academy postgraduate school from HANNIBAL. I got twelve hours notice to be ready to get off to USS HERBERT DDl60 as we passed through canal.(When I arrived,Ascherfeld picked me up in a sub chaser that YP 4l replaced later & took me out to the HANNIBAL. Very interesting duty-but so long ago- 36 years.We spent October,November, &December in Norfolk Naval Shipyard each year. On YP 41 I had a Keysote bear (crotommi) named Oscar that bit you pa & he wanted me to get rid of him - not really (joke). Very truly yours-Mervin Halstead." #16 Agnew Letter Panama l933=l935 #16 And on May l, l97l Commander Jack Agnew who was one of the junior officers on the HANNIBAL when we joined her in l933 wrote from Dover, Delaware,"Dear Mrs. Barrett, It was good to hear from you after so many years. At almost sixty-two years of age I suppose my memory of the early 'Thirties is not as good as it should be.For example I could not have told you the name of the Boatswain who succeeded Mr. Fry - until you mentioned Pitman. But of course Agnes and I both remember you and your fine husband, such a gentleman, fine seaman, and good administrator! We were so sorry to hear of your great loss.Since my retirement in l960, I have had no time for nostalgia about the Navy, dearly as I love it.After all it took me as a kid of sixteen, through the Academy and thirty years of subsequent service.But even before the actual date of retirement, I was in a classroom getting my teaching credentials, and the next year I started teaching full time. I am now teaching Spanish at Wesley College here.But back to the HANNIBAL- the "White Swan of the Carribean". We have many fond memories. Of course it was personally nice duty for us because of Balboa being Agnes's home town and having her mother still down there at that time. We greatly enjoyed the times when the ship was in port, whether we went to the Union Club, or the beer garden, - golfing at Amador, driving up into the interior- and that wonderful time when our wives joined us in Puntarenas (Costa Rica) and we had a spectacular trip up to San Jose where we spent about four days.-That ambassador's champagne party when Captain Hinckley kept hovering over us to make sure we did not imbibe too much! I understand that Costa Rica has a fine new banana port which we surveyed before moving into the Gulf of Necoya.Puntarenas was not too interesting, and the only way we could get cold beer was to go aboard a German ship. Quepos Point on the other hand, was wild virgin territory when we moved in.How well I remember the Easter Sunday morning when I had a bunch of natives well inland on top of a high hill, clearing away the underbrush and cutting down trees so that the Tower party could put up one of their structures.That was where I learned that the male monkey comes chattering through the trees loudly so that one does not notice the female and the young going through a little further away.I never felt too good at cutting my way through those tropical jungles, nor did any of the others- I am sure- realizing that if a deadly fer-de-lance (snake) was around and bit a person, it would probably be the end of him.One bad thing about the Costa Rica work was that we were so far from Balboa and could not go in and out as we had when working in Panama.It was off Panama southeast of Bahia Honda I believe that the incident of finding the pinnacle rock of which you spoke occurred and if that was the same incident, it was my boat that found it.And when we did find it, -oh boy- the HANNIBAL was coming right for it.She might have had her bottom ripped off if we had not stopped her. My crew would not go back to work until they let us come alongside and collect the prize which the skipper had offered- a box of cigars, I believe! It was also off Panama nearby where I caught my most satisfactory fish, a forty-five pound red snapper, slowly trawling around a rock offshore.We had a lot of fun fishing.One would have thought we were nuts, running lines of soundings,putting up markers offshore and ashore,for six days a week and then taking a boat out fishing on Sunday!And all the sounding boat engineers kept a line astern when we were working and frequently gave us freshly caught and grilled mackerel to augment our lunch.Of course the work had its dangerous side out in the boats and in landing - both. I remember the time I ran my boat aground, but fortunately it was in Manzanillo Bay on the Atlantic side on my first time out, and there was no surf. But when Dick Visser did (the same thing), it was on a wild coast, and the boat was lost.I remember that he had all the little radios, which they were trying out for us to use in the sounding boats,out testing them, and of course they went, too.On one landing in a whale boat putting a beach party ashore, Mr. Fry lost his glasses and was nearly killed, as his successor Pitman was later (1936). Good old 'Shorty' Candler! I remember I could never make the chili hot enough for him and had to provide him with extra chili powder when he would have dinner with us in Balboa.. Poor 'Shorty' - the time when - early in his time aboard, he got too much sun, , and with his fair complexion he was quite badly off. Somebody told him crude oil would help, so he put some on in the shower.-what a mess! We had enough junior officers to man two World War I sub chasers and four sounding boats as I remember.As to the enlisted men, I have a most vague memory except for my boat captain, whose name was I believe, Edwards and who though only a seaman, was the better of any boatswain's mate I was to come across later.It was our great pleasure to host Captain and Mrs. Hinckley and several of the ex-"HANNIBALites" at a party at the Sub Base, Pearl Harbor late l937. I'll bet Marion and Bob (Hinckley) never forgot the ride back to their hotel, for I believe I had "too many martoonis." When I left the HANNIBAL, I had only been thinking about the Supply Corps, but after a year on the "black gang" as Boiler Division officer on the PORTLAND, I had made up my mind. After a short but wholly satisfactory interlude as Second Division officer and No. 2 turret officer (my turret won the "E" the week after I left) I went to Supply School in Philadelphia Navy Yard. There followed duties at Pearl Harbor, Norfolk Navy Yard, Patoka, Naval Aviation School Patuxent, and the carrier WASP- then ashore for good I went to Naval Aviation School San Diego, Naval Storehouse Gulfport-Assistant Fleet Supply Officer, Atlantic- Logistics Officer for Admiral Blandy- the Logistics course at the Naval War College,- Regional Accounting Office Philadelphia. Well there you have a thumbnail sketch of what I remember of the good old HANNIBAL and of our lives since. If you have any specific questions,I should be most glad to answer them.At any rate. it has been grand to be back in touch with someone from the"White Swan" and I hope we can keep in touch.Agnes joins me in affectionate greetings.Most sincerely, - Jack Agnew."In September l97l I received a letter from Captain J.C. Woefel of Long Beach California" Dear Mrs. Barrett, Your letter arrived just as we returned from a lot of traveling.I am sorry to learn of Dan Candler's passing. He was always such a jolly person.I joined the HANNIBAL in l933 in time to go South, and then left her as soon as we got to Panama. I never returned to her. While I knew Commander Barrett briefly, I do remember that he was well read and had many interests and was most co-operative.He was most helpful in getting my surveyparty off on my second trip to Alaska. I next saw him in l944 at Pearl Harbor when he arranged my transportation to the states after I relinquished command of my destroyer.He went out of his way to get me headed for home, which I greatly appreciated.After leaving the HANNIBAL, I worked in Panama and Costa Rica and then on to Alaska.From there I went to combatant ships. In l935 I was married just before going to Post Graduate School at Annapolis. We have three children. I retired from the Navy in l955 and went with Richmond Oil Company- retired now- Best - "Dutch" Woefel


 

1483.
Mark Salzer and family - wife Becky and son Emmet born July 1998 before departure for East Timor p 102 #1483

 

Mark Salzer was the courageuous and energetic chair 1994-2000 of Boston chapter East Timor Action Network - married 1997, he took his wife and son to East Timor in October 2000. for several years he taught science at Curley Middle School in Jamaica Plain section of Boston. Previously he resided in Medford and Arlington at various times. He was an inspiration to human rights activists. Please click to enlarge and read newspaper article.


 

 

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