Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

137.
July l931 Sophie Barrett at Chefoo in rickshaw WEB page EIGHTEEN #137 Sophie in ricksha Chefoo #138 Peking November 1931 #139 SOPHIE at Tientsin Country Club 1931

 

CHINA During spring 1931 Asiatic Fleet maneuvers Sophie stayed at Wineglass Boarding House, found by Chaplain William A. Maguire, World War I veteran later hero at Pearl Harbor advisor to Jack Barrett on hardship cases of evaucation of families at Overseas Transportation Office. See 1943 book "The Captain Wears a Cross" Chapter Nine "Bread on the Waters". #138 Sophie Peking November 1931 # 140 + 141 Mollie with Pistorino family Rome 1963 # 142 Barrett family 1940 Owls Head Park Brooklyn #143 Barretts + Mimi Bronson 1946 #144 Sophie addresses Roslindale Historical Society 1978 - CHINA captions- July l931 Sophie Barrett at Chefoo in rickshaw Year: 1931rickshaw #137 p 18 CHINAchapter During spring 1931 Asiatic Fleet maneuvers Sophie stayed at Wineglass Boarding House, found by Chaplain William A. Maguire, World War I veteran later hero at Pearl Harbor advisor to Jack Barrett on hardship cases of evaucation of families at Overseas Transportation Office. See 1943 book "The Captain Wears a Cross" Chapter Nine "Bread on the Waters". p 64 #1160 Sophie Barrett in rickshaw 1931 from negative Year: 1931rickshaw This is one of four extant photos of Sophie Barrett in human-drawn rickshaws from CHINAchapter 1931. I believe the background resembles another one marked "Chefoo" from when TULSA participated in Asiaitic Fleet maneuvers late spring or early summer and Sophie stayed at Wineglass Boarding House, which Chaplain Maguire located for her when accomododations were scarce during fleet visit.These negatives and other photos were salvaged by John Barrett junior in packing July 1996 on moving from West Roxbury after huge 1993 thests in which ten thousand photos and many notebooks and letters disappeared.++1931,July Sophie traveled on commercial freighter along with Gertrude and Nathalie Rice and Rachel Doughtie when gunboat TULSA joined Asiatic Fleet annual maneuvers and gunnery competition late spring -early summer .1931 Sophie used to sing the Navy song "The Wear Clothespins on their noses in North China They wear clothespins on their noses in north China- They wear clothespins on their noses For Chefoo doesn't smell like roses - They wear clothespoins on their noses in North China." There were goats immediately outside her window at the Wineglass boarding house in Chefoo, as accomodations were scarce while the Asiatic Fleet was gathered for spring l931 gunnery and maneuvers, in which Jack's gunboat TULSA won the fleet competition - he was gunnery officer aided by Marine Lt. William Paca. Paul rice was commander of the TULSA.Sophie was grateful to Chaplain William Maguire, who later played a heroic role at Pearl Harbor December 7, l941, though he remained a non-combatant, and the legend he fired a gun at Japanese airplanes is fictitious. He visited the Barretts in Waikiki and described the work of Jack's Overseas Transportation Office in his l943 book, "The Captain Wears a Cross." As a new Navy wife Sophie studied Emily Post's "Etiquette" text carefully. She gave a party to celebrate the TULSA's victory in gunnery. The wife of theExecutive officer complained about being seated too near the candles -she said "Candlelight does not become me." Rachel Claude Doughtie used to tell a tale of a visitor who came to see her mother's Maryland family for the weekend and stayed for forty years.Sophie Barrett and Gertrude Rice took a small Chinese rowboat to shore in Weihaiwei to buy fine teasets ornamented with pewter.They nearly were stranded, with difficulty returning to their southbound British freighter. Year: 1931_ ++++ from web p 79-1287 + 8 Liangs visit T-U-L-S-A 1287w p 79 CHINAchapter +photo captions We invited the Liangs to dinner -just Mr. and Mrs. Liang and Grace. The mess steward had given the word when Mr. Liang would be aboard for dinner, and when we approached the ship that evening we had difficulty getting aboard because of the crush of Chinese people on the dock hoping to get a glimpse of Mr. Liang. Since Grace left soon after to be married in Shanghai we never saw her again. We understand that she has been teaching in Connecticut at the Central Connecticut State College, New Britain, Connecticut.--Altho the Court Hotel was reputed to have the best food in North China. food was definitely a problem because we dared not touch milk, butter, fresh vegetables or Chinese grown fruits.My husband grew tired of the steady diet of rice and snipe but managed to wash it down with liquids. I lived on toast with marmelade,rice, snipe, pot roast, cooked dessets and tea. Captain and Mrs. Rice occupied a furnished house and most graciously invited us to dinner fortnightly. When we wanted to return their hospitality and to entertain the new Executive Officer and his wife, Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. Leonard Doughty, we invited them to the Court Hotel for dinner.One evening Rachel Claude Doughty, who came from Washington D.C. regaled us with tales of her mother's friend who came to the Claude home in Washington and stayed for forty years. The Court Hotel was the home of several Hai Ho River pilots mostly of English extraction. Mrs. Johnson, English and the wife of a pilot, invited me to go to Schlessinger's Tea House with her about eleven o'clock one morning late in December. She invited us to attend a costumed New Year's Eve Ball at the Tientsin Country Club, of which we were members, saying she hoped we would understand that we would have to pay our share of the cost. My husband and I had matching costumes made of inexpensive blue and white Chinese silk- ad we enjoyed the pilots who remained friendly throughout our stay. --Not long after new Year's I was sitting in the small reception room in the Court Holtel after tiffen when two men sat down, talking. When I realized that they were Americans, I asked them what they wre doing in Tientsin, and they said they were taking a train later that afternoon for Manchuria, where they would buy furs.When I said I had never been as cold as I was on the streets of Tientsin, they offered to buy some skins for me, as they expected to be back in Tienstin in a few weeks. When they returned they had for me enough sea otter skins for a gorgeous coat.The cost was small - the coat warm and bewautiful. It was made up by a Chinese tailor. Sea otter is a lustrous light grey skin.--As time passed that winter and spring I became well known to the Chinese and Japanese shopkeeppers on Taku and Victoria Roads. I bougt some rare dragon and turtle candlesticks of brass,some 48- red and green Chinese lacquer drums, which served as small tables and through Mrs. Mendelsohn U located a lovely black and gold lacquer Chinese chest with inlaid colored semi-precious stones arranged in patterns. I also shopped for linens at Takahashi Japanese linen store.--The TULSA was scheduled to go to Chefoo fir gunnery exercises in June and my husband as gunnery officer was anxious to make a good showing.So in the spring of l931 on the TULSA in Tientsin he spent a lot of time training gunners.His Marine officer Lieutenant William W. Paca was training his Marines to shoot and was working hard with my husband.Captain Rice was very pleased with the gunnery score they made din Chefoo in the summer of l931 text continues in Notebook Two with account of Sophie's trip to Chefoo and Shanghai -= end of page 48 notebook PIOCTURE CAPTIONS p 17 Tientsin China winter l931 Sophie is wearing Manchurian fur coat. The fur buyers later brought news of the Japanese capture of Mudken, which Sophie telephoned to Captain Rice and the navy with first report.Paul Rice, who cmmanded gunboat TULSA l930-l932 at Tientsin lived to age 95 to l98l, and Gertrude born Dec. 3, l893 Juneau Alaska,. lived to age l02 1/2 to late July l996. Her daughter Nathalie is Mrs. Vernon Hawley, Saint Helena, California Sophie Meranski Barrett at Court Hotel preparing for New Year's party at Tientsin Country Club Dec. l931 Court Hotel was operated by an Australian lady Ms Moore in British Concession Tientsin on Elgin Avenue. Sophie watched rug making at Nichols factory in Russian concession to the north - then bought Chinese rugs at outlet in Peking.Nov. l931.Sophie got in touch with Mount Holyoke Club of North China - Mrs. Faison Jordon helpd make the contact with Mrs. Evans of the club, and Sophie's l925 student Grace Liang was daughter of diplomat and customs- railroad official M.T. Liang, who was Jack Barrett's guest with his wife for dinner aboard gunboat TULSA - a rare honor for a Chinese in l931.Sophie met American writer Nora Waln and her British husband who ran the Tientsin post office. The British chief of Police Mr. Isemonger and his daughter Tina were frequent visitors at the Court Hotel. Sophie had a pretty white rabbit-fur coat she bought in Shanghai, but it shed too much fur on Jack's uniform so she discarded it. During her trip she carefully studied Emily Post's "Etiquette" book to prepare for the formal entertainment and correspondence expected of navy Wives.One TULSA wife Rachel Claude Doughtie told how her mother's Maryland family the Claudes had a visitor who " came for the weekend and stayed for forty years.#136 p 17 CAPTION p 46 w1002 Jack at Court Hotel At lower right is a shiny, round table-like object, which Sophie referred to as a "drum." She believed they were made of some sort of durable heavy paper. The Barretts purchased a pair of these while in Tientsin 1930-1931 and had them in their living rooms with the Chinese rugs first at 422 Columbia Road, Dorchester, Boston 1932-3; then at Stradone Road, Bala Cynwyd near Philadelphia l937-8, 9615 Shore Road Brooklyn 1939-l941 and at 52 Emmonsdale Road, West Roxbury from Thanksgiving Day l947 when they moved in, until Chinese materials were stolen in l976.Information on the style or history of these and other Chinese furniture will be welcome. p 18 w137 rickshaw Chefoo w 138 sea otter coast Peking w139 Tientsin Country Club After l993 thefts of desks, bureaus, furniture, books and papers in West Roxbury l993, this is the only remaining photo of an outstanding group taken by Mr. Isemonger spring l931 at Tientsin Country Club. He arrived at Tientsin after the Barretts early l931 probably from India and became chief of police in British concession of Tientsin, where Court Hotel was located.He was a frequent luncheon visitor to the Court Hotel, sometimes accompanied by his daughter Tina.He was frequently helpful to both Jack and Sophie, obtaining bottled drinking water for Sophie to take aboard a commercial freighter on which Sophie followed the TULSA south on its l931 Asiatic Fleet annual cruise, but this was one of a number of situations where Sophie found it necessary as a newly married young Navy wife to avoid too much close contact with unmarried men, where European and American women were few in number. Nonetheless the loss of the Tientsin Country Club photos was a great disappointment, and also a group of photos of Sophie taken at Yamamoto studios Tientsin. p 18 #139 p 64 w1160 rickshaw Chefoo from negative 1931--p 37 w924 Dec 31,1930 -December 31, l930 detail of costume party Tientsin country club - Jack at left - Sophie at right - lady between unidentified. Sophie wore a rabbit's-fur jacket she had bought at Shanghai- she liked it until she found it was shedding fur on Jack's blue Navy uniform, so this New Year's party at Tientsin Country Club was the last time she wore it.Friends in Tientsin included Paul, Gertrude and Nathalie Rice, Army Dr. and Mrs. Mendelssohn, Mr. and Mrs. "Bunny" Warren, Mrs. Evans of Mount Holyoke Club of North China, Grace Liang Mount Holyoke 1925 ( later Mrs. Dan Yapp), and Grace;s father and mother of Elgin Avenue- Mr. Eismonger - chief of police in British concession -a Danish gentlman who collected Chinese coins- American fur buyers who brought first word of Japanese aggression at Mukden Manchuria September 19, l931, Narine |William W. Paca of TULSA, Cdr. and Mrs. Leonard & Rachel Doughty and Dr. Supan of TULSA. Elsewhere in China Barretts saw William Rupertus |US Marine corps in Peking, Chaplain William Maguie at Chefoo, sisters Maimie and Mickey Ashley and their adopted Chinese daughter at Shanghai. --p 36 w918-"Center of Universe" Peking #918 -Sophie visited Peking twice, February 1931 as tourist and November 1931 when Jack proceeded there for physical examination for promotion to Lieutenant Commander. That autumn he studied for the promotion exam, and was helped by exceptionally favorable fitness report from gunboat TULSA's Commander Paul Rice, based in part on outstanding performance of the ship in Asiatic Fleet annual gunnery competition near Chefoo in summer 1931- Jack Barrett was TULSA gunnery officer and worked with Marines under William W. Paca, later Commander of Camp Caitlin Oahu l944-l946. At Peking Sophie met Marine William Rupertus, who had recently lost his wife and daughter with scarlet fever. Rupertus was working on gunnery problems, and Jack had several visits with his former Revenue Cutter School ITASCA shipmate during 1930 and 1931.-p 29 w863 The Gunboat TULSA was "the northernmost ship of the Asiatic Fleet, kept in North China for intelligence purposes, Jack Barrett used to say. Its normal station was on the Hai Ho river at Tientsin. In November l930 and spring l931 it put to sea to participate in Asiatic Fleet maneuvers, and in the spring of l931 when Jack Barrett was Gunnery officer and William Paca in charge of Marines, the TULSA won fleet gunnery competition. Colmmander Rice delayed the November l930 sailing of the TULSA one day so Jack Barrett could meet Sophie on her November 13 arrival after a three month Pacific voyage on big Navy transport HENDERSON. This photo was taken near Chefoo during a picnic about June 1931.Paul Rice l886-l981 was an Annapolis classmate of Hawaii governor Samuel Wilder King, the first native Hawaiian to attend the Naval Academy, and of Floyd Sexton, who became a Coast Guard Admiral, World War II. His wife Gertrude was born Dec. 3, l893 in Juneau Alaska and lived to age 102 and a half to July l996. Their daughter Nathalie is Mrs. Vernon Hawley, St. Helena, Napa Valley California. CAPTIONS CHINA chapter 1931 cave Chefoo w 1288 p 80 Sophie traveled on commercial freighter along with Gertrude and Nathalie Rice and Rachel Doughtie when gunboat T-U-L-S-A joined Asiatic Fleet annual maneuvers and gunnery competition late spring -early summer 1931 Sophie used to sing the Navy song "They Wear Clothespins on their noses in North China They wear clothespins on their noses in north China- They wear clothespins on their noses For Chefoo doesn't smell like roses - They wear clothespins on their noses in North China." There were goats immediately outside her window at the Wineglass boarding house in Chefoo, as accomodations were scarce while the Asiatic Fleet was gathered for spring l931 gunnery and maneuvers, in which Jack's gunboat TULSA won the fleet competition - he was gunnery officer aided by Marine Lt. William Paca. Paul Rice was commander of the TULSA.Sophie was grateful to Chaplain William Maguire for finding her a place to stay - Chefoo was crowded because of the big Fleet visit-, -Father Maguire later played a heroic role at Pearl Harbor December 7, l941, though he remained a non-combatant, and the legend he fired a gun at Japanese airplanes is fictitious. He visited the Barretts in Waikiki and described the work of Jack's Overseas Transportation Office in his l943 book, "The Captain Wears a Cross." As a new Navy wife Sophie studied Emily Post's "Etiquette" text carefully. She gave a party to celebrate the TULSA's victory in gunnery. The wife of the Executive officer complained about being seated too near the candles -she said "Candlelight does not become me." Rachel Claude Doughtie used to tell a tale of a visitor who came to see her mother's Maryland family for the weekend and stayed for forty years.Sophie Barrett and Gertrude Rice took a small Chinese rowboat to shore in Weihaiwei to buy fine teasets ornamented with pewter.They nearly were stranded, with difficulty returning to their southbound British freighter. -p 8 w62 popular tourist cave Shantung peninsula near Chefoo China summer 1931 Sophie-Along with her friends Gertrude and Nathalie Rice and Rachel Doughtie - of the very few women family members with gunboat TULSA officers, Sophie traveled south spring l931 on a British freighter when the TULSA went to Asiaitic fleet gunnery and annual fleet exercises.Sophie nearly was stranded in Wei-hai-Wei after a shopping expedition. She had a pleasant picnic with Gertrude and Paul Rice near Chefoo and visited a popular cave near this photo.She stayed at Wineglass Boarding house, arranged by Chaplain Wiilliam Maguire, later famous for heroism at Pearl Harbor December 7, l941.When Jack helped Fleet Chaplain Maguire with transportation needs of Navy families,he said it was "bread on the water", as Chaplain Maguire had helped Sophie at Chefoo l93l. At Shanghai Sophie met Maimie and Mickey Ashley, Cockeye the Naval Tailor, Ah Sing Ships' Chandler and other friends of Jacks.She bought Wei-hai-wei pottery-pewter tea set on trip.


 

138.
Sophie at Peking wearing Manchurian sea otter fur coat p 18-138

 

From Colonel William W. Paca 680 American Drive, Apartment 42 Annapolis Maryland 21403 June 23, 1970 Dear Mrs. Barrett, I was distressed to learn via your letter of Jack's decease this past August. Please know that you have my sincere sympathy in your bereavement. As for myself, I was graduated from West Point in August, 1917. I was promoted to Captain while in France.After the war and the letdown of demobilization I resigned from the Army. Three years later, and because I badly missed service life I joined the Marine Corps. This was basically because I loved the water and ships, and I had wanted to be in the Navy in the first place but had been unable to obtain a principal appointment to the Naval Academy. = I commanded Camp Catlin, Oahu, from 1944 to 1946. I was then on duty at Headquarters, Marine Corps, and later was Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, Naval Base, Philadelphia. = My great, great, great grandfather was William Paca, a Maryland signer of the Declaration of Independence. The main part of the hotel, Carvel Hall, was built on the rear of William Paca's town house. The hotel part has now been torn down, and the mansion and gardens are being restored by the local historical society. = There have been, and are, a rather surprising number of TULSA officers living here. These in addition to myself include Captain Doughty (deceased) , Admiral William T. Fitzgerald, jr., Rear Admiral Wayne R. Loud, Rear Admiral Charles E. Coney, and Colonel Gordon Hall (my predecessor on the TULSA) In addition General Pedro A. Del Valle lives here, and I see him fairly frequently. = Again please forgive my remissions.I do hope this finds things well with you. Sincerely, William W. Paca Colonel United State Marine Corps Retired."#138p 18 CHINAchapter Sophie made two visits to Peking February & November 1931. During the second visit she purchased rugs she had seen being made by hand at Nicholson Rug Factory in Russian Concession Tientsin.Jack took physical exam for promotion to Lieutenant Commander at Peking November 1931.SECOND NOTEBOOK 215 text continued from BLACK Notebook One In June 1931 the TULSA Chef for gunnery practice. missionary deep southern China, that she had been 216 home to Engalnd on leave and was returning via the northern route monger "The lady will have stew" so I went in to see Rach 217 ... 218 who scouted around until he found a rooom for me Wineglass ..could not diagnose or 219 treat the ailment not leprosy. Supan candlelight freighter reached the waters a few miles out 220 of Wei Hai Wai daughter. where Mickey Ashley worked for the 221 Standard oil Co Isem English doctor pomphylyx fur buyers cost to me was very little. 222 [NOTE TULSA at Taku Bar Dec 25 Tangku was a nerby port where we boarded the CHOWAN MARU for Kobe Japan. Only a ten, minute rickshaw ride from Taku Bar to CHOWAN MARU] On Sep 18, 1931 the TULSA was at TAKU BAR in HSHINHO ab 35 miles from Tientsin Early in December 1931 my .. made in Teintsin only a few blocks from the 223 Court Hotel. On Christmas morning left Court Hotel for the last time Rice dinner aboard TULSA with only the duty officer Ben Crosser present. Right after dinner we took rickshas to the dock in Tangku about one half a mile away were we were due to board a Japanese ship the CHOWAN MARU sailing that afternoon PRESIDENT PIERCE at Kobe on Jan 1, 1932,Japanese officer who could speak English 224 appeared, asked us what we were doing there with visits to Osaka and Nara was interesting but uneventful. Ah Sing pongee robe. 225 [The next stop was only a few hours in Hong Kong, where we walked around looking at the native markets.] When I boarded the PIerce AT Kobe JanANUARY 1, 1932, black velvet dress suitable only 226 for cold weather Johore Pardee coffee madame?" baths I had had. 227 {In Naples I saw Vesuvius ruins at Pompeii wrong season to go to Capri] I argued with the clerk performers looked like pygmies [see p. 230] 228 [from 102 --Jane is married. Bertha was the fifth born - a dentist 6. Sophie 229 "7. Israel Peter- about sixty years old [to p. 268] 230 [from 227] We had no opera glasses -woolen underwear Marsala wine. 231 From Venice we went to Vienna Austria where my mother was born.I remember Jack using a few Italian words Austrian Alps grey February day Danube was unattractive But that night we went to the 232 opera in Vienna balcony sandwiches Zenz Munich Science Museum 233 From Munich we took a night train for Paris [boullabaise the onion fish soup Ho^tel de Provence's Restaurant Garderenne at 12 Cours Belsunce a' proximite/ de la Cannelie're, Marseilles] contents wee undamaged.It was a very rough trip -even Jack 234 who aboard ship wanted to be out on deck most of the time, purser for the number of your room, 235, he gave it to me but - Victoria Hotel much too expensive for us. we took many --- 241


 

139.
Sophie Meranski Barrett at Tientsin County Club photo by Tientsin Police Chief Isemonger CHINAchapter p 18-139

 

Jack used mainly a German Voightlander purchased San Francisco June l929 en route to Philippines and a Kodak Speed Graphic purchased for $250 in Honolulu 1944 with tripod, flash and yellow and infrared filters.speed thousandth-second"Willie Steele" Story told to Sophie by Jack Barrett When Jack was Gunnery Officer on the USS TULSA in Tientsin in 1930, he enjoyed going to the Tientsin Club after work about five in the afternoon, before my arrival November 1930. The Club was for men only - a chance to relax and get acquainted with men of many nationalities with good conversation. At the Tientsin Club he met businessman Faison Jordon, Mr. Reymolds of Ford Motors, and "Willie" Steele, head of The Tientsin Pukow Railway line. According to Jack ,Willie was a tremendous Scotsman with a tremendous appetite for good food, good liquor, and good conversation. When Jack said to him, "Willie, are you a Highlander or a Lowlander?" Willie struck Jack hard on the back in friendly fashion and replied, "Ach, mon, that's all past and done!" CHINAchapter TULSA CHAPTER INTRODUCTION BY JOHN BARRETT-- Sophie Barrett's chapter "Living in the Orient" begins with her arrival November 13, 1930. Jack Barrett had been in North China since May, 1930. He arrived on destroyer TRUXTUN, was detached about May 15, and spent six days leave at Marine Barracks, American Legation, Peking, where he discussed gunnery with his 1910 ITASCA Revenue Cutter School shipmate William Rupertus. Then Jack was Gunnery Officer,First Lieutenant, Senior Watch Officer and temporarily Executive Officer of the gunboat TULSA based at Tientsin. At first Walter Decker was Captain, succeeded by Commander Paul Rice. The Rice family became very close friends of the Barrett family over many years in China, Panama, Hawaii, and after the war, and they may be introduced by several letters. Paul Rice lived to age 95 1886-1981 and his wife Gertrude to age 102 + 1/2 born Juneau, Alaska, December 3, 1893 to July 25, 1996. Her father was a silver miner named Hammond, and her mother's father named Coleman was one of the first 1847 settlers of St. Paul, Oregon in the Willamette Valley. He had eleven children. Gertrude had three older sisters, one of whom married Navy Admiral Cross. The Hammond family came to the San Francisco Bay area 1906 or 1907 shortly after the great earthquake and fire. In 1917 Gertrude married Naval Academy 1909 graduate Paul Rice, and their daughter Nathalie, born June 1919 was eleven years old when Sophie arrived in Tientsin. Nathalie was trained in social work and said Sophie played a part in interesting her in the field. The friendship of the Rice family was extremely beneficial for Sophie as a young Navy wife in a strange land, and Paul Rice's encouragement helped Jack Barrett achieve promotion to Lieutenant Commander and another fifteen highly productive years in his Navy career. These letters will introduce Gertrude and Paul Rice: Mrs. Paul H. Rice (Gertrude) 523 South Hudson Avenue, Pasadena, California 91106 22 July l970 Dear Sophie, We would be glad to write to Bill Paca if you would send his address. You've never written if he is married. I thought he did marry many years ago. The things he wrote about Jack must have pleased you. It seems that somehow they should be woven into your book. I'm sure that Paul always looks to his command of the TULSA as one of his most happy commands. Strangely enough he had a command in every grade, beginning with Ensign. He had a great regard for the officers that served with him on "the TULSA," and there always seemed to be such a good relationship. I always thought the China duty the best thing the Navy had to offer, but of course we've never been in Europe. Nath has three children, two boys and a girl. Chris is 24, John is 20, and Erica 18. Nathalie is Mrs. J. V Hawley (Mrs. Vernon Hawley 333 Marion Avenue, Mill Valley California 94941." PAUL RICE letter On February l0,l970 a letter came from Paul Rice Captain USN who was with us on the TULSA in Tientsin l930-3l, visited Panama in l935 & lived in Waikiki l94l when the war struck until February l942."Dear John, As you surmise,Sexton was a classmate of mine, class of l909 at the Naval Academy. Captain Samuel Wilder King was a classmate- knew him very well.He relieved me of command of the USS SAMAR at Hankow,China in June,l9l5. We had no Chaplain on the TULSA. As I remember the anchorage at the entrance of the Hai Ho River was called Tangku. The TULSA used oil-not coal.I spent about three years on the Yangtze- had command of the SAMAR & navigated it to Ichang one thousand miles up the river.Navigation on the river was similar to that on the Mississippi,I suppose.During the summer floods good sized ships could navigate to Hankow.Of course Gertrude & I would be glad to try to identify pictures.Mrs. Rice says she & Nathalie met your uncle Bill in New York City in l942 (but did not meet your aunt Virginia)).Please give our regards to your mother.Sincerely, Paul H. Rice." Sophie added a note: "Jack & I sailed from Tangku to Japan on the Chowan Maru.Tangku is where the Japanese soldiers crossed their swords on my chest when I started to the wrong dock where a Japanese Army troop ship was next to the passenger ship dock." [[PHOTO LIST 1-6, 4-27, 5-38, 7-49,53, 8-62, 17-135,136 18-137,138,139, 29-863, 36-918, 37-924, 39-945, 46-1002,49-1024, 53-1067,1068, 64-1160, -1371, 90-1381,1382 After l993 thefts of desks, bureaus, furniture, books and papers in West Roxbury l993, photo web p. 18 #139 is the only remaining photo of an outstanding group taken by Mr. Isemonger spring l931 at Tientsin Country Club. He and his daughter Tina arrived at Tientsin just after the Barretts December 1930 from India, and he became chief of police in British concession of Tientsin, where Court Hotel was located.He was a frequent luncheon visitor to the Court Hotel, sometimes accompanied by his daughter Tina.He was frequently helpful to both Jack and Sophie. The loss of the Tientsin country Club photos was a great disappointment, and also a group of photos of Sophie taken at Yamamoto studios Tientsin. p 18 #] p 26-796 China- arrive Nov 1930- Liang, Rice,New Years,Fleet Maneuvers 1931-Paca letter-Mukden incident- GUNBOAT TULSA - CHINA "LIVING IN THE ORIENT" MAIN SOPHIE BARRETT TEXT NOVEMBER 1930 - ARRIVAL CHINGWANTAO + TIENTSIN + COURT HOTEL + GUNBOAT TULSA + RICE FAMILY Between Manila & Hong Kong on the transport HENDERSON we encountered a typhoon when the ship rocked & pitched dangerously & even I spent much time in my bunk-not because I was seasick but because it was not safe to be on deck.An Army wife,Florence Hilldring,came aboard in Manila for the trip to Chingwantao en route to Peking for a change of climate as she found Manila too hot & humid. Finally on the thirteenth of November l930 the ship arrived early in the morning at Chingwantao far in in northern China near the Manchurian border.Jack met the ship and had breakfast aboard. I was at the head of the gangway and watched him come aboard in Navy blue winter uniform.We smiled and waved to each other for about half an hour while the ship tied up.He brought a new dark gray heavy woolen steamer rug (English) to use on the train trip from Chingwantao to Tientsin one hundred twenty-five miles. Although Jack was very thin,he looked well & very happy to see me & was most complimentary about my small velvet hat & my coat trimmed with Persian lamb fur. We took first a train, then a motor car to the Court Hotel on Victoria Road in the British concession where we had lunch-called "tiffen" by the Australian woman Miss Moore who owned the small hotel.Then Jack dropped the bomb.He told me that Captain Paul Rice had held the TULSA over one day so Jack could meet me & get me settled.The next morning-early-the TULSA would sail for Shanghai for a priod of overhaul & liberty- & I would be left alone again-this time in the Orient where I knew no one.I left the hotel with him right after tiffen to go the mile to the ship.Two ricksha coolies came up,& Jack signalled me to get into one. Jack gave the Chinese command "Dong-y-dong" for them to proceed. At first I was reluctant to have human beings wait on me in this way, but it was a necessity for European women, and they were glad to have the money, at a time when most Chinese lived in extreme poverty.We arrived at the Court Hotel by taxi from the railroad station in time to have lunch "tiffen" there.Then we went by rickshaw down Victoria Road to the TULSA - about a five to ten minute walk- on the dock on the Hai Ho River.I met some of Jack's shipmates and looked over the many linen items Jack had bought in China.About four p.m. we went by rickshaw to call on Mrs. Faison Jordan, wife of an American business executive for a British company, who was friendly at the Tientsin Country Club. When she found out that I was a Mount Holyoke graduate,she told us about Mrs. Evans, leader of the Mount Holyoke Alumnae Club of North China, whose husband was a Tientsin lawyer. We made a short call on Mrs. Evans, who told me that my former student Grace Liang was living in Tientsin.Grace soon called on me at the Court Hotel and later entered my name in the Mount Holyoke Club of North China. The Liangs lived at 314 Elgin Avenue in the British Concession of Tientsin, where the Court Hotel was located also. About five o'clock we went to call at the home of our TULSA commander - Commander and Mrs. Paul Rice at 127 Meadows Road, also in the British Concession. The TULSA was leaving for Shanghai the next day and Captain Rice had held the ship at Tientsin an extra day or two so that Jack could await my arrival. "Captain" Rice was really a Navy Commander, class of 1909 at the Naval Academy. When Jack first reported to the TULSA in May 1930,Commander Walter Decker was the Captain, but by the time I arrived, November 13, 1930,Paul Rice was in command.This was his second tour of duty in China.In 1912 he had commanded the USS SAMAR, a Yangtze River Patrol Boat.which navigated one thousand miles up the river to the city of Ichang.Navigating on the Yangtze, according to Captain Rice,is like navigating on the Mississippi River.When he was detached from the SAMAR,it was then commanded by Samuel Wilder King in 1915.Captain Rice had been on the Yangtze about three years, and his good friend Samuel Wilder King, later in 1950s appointed governor of the Territory of Hawaii by President Dwight Eisenhower, was his 1909 classmate - the first native Hawaiian appointed to the United States Naval Academy. When Paul Rice first met his wife Gertrude (Hammond), he decided that she was the girl he would marry. I knew her well in China, Panama, and Hawaii. She was not only pretty,but a charming hostess, an excellent conversationalist, a devoted wife,mother, and friend.Many of my most vivid memories in Tientsin, Chefoo, Shanghai, and Waikiki revolve around her. We had many exciting experiences together in Wai-hai-Wei, China, and Hawaii. She occurs again and again in the pages of this narrative.She and Paul and their daughter Nathalie did much to help me meet what Jack called the "vicissitudes" of the Navy and to enjoy Navy life despite its many challenges. About six o'clock we went back to our hotel for dinner, and I unpacked.At nine the next morning Jack left for the TULSA, which sailed to Shanghai for repairs and leave and liberty for the crew. When the ricksha coolies finally dropped us at our hotel room early in the evening for our dinners, they were well paid by Jack. Jack spent a lot of time warning me to drink only boiled water & to eat no fresh fruit or vegetables-I would get Chinese stomach ache or even cholera.Also he told me never to touch shellfish as the water was so polluted.Before I knew it,early morning arrived,& Jack was off to the TULSA & to Shanghai.MRS. FAISON JORDAN'S DINNER PARTY + TIENTSIN CLUB Things picked up a bit when Mrs. Jordon called on me early the following week & invited me to a formal dinner party at her home on Saturday night followed by dancing at Tientsin Country Club. Mrs. Faison Jordan's dinner party was my initiation into the social whirl of Tientsin. For the first time I wore my new black velvet evening dress, a white rabbit's -fur jacket purchased in Shanghai on the way up and wore the crystal beads Miss Farmer, one of my workers at Macy's, had given me as a "bon voyage" present.At dinner I sat on Mr. Jordan's left. At my left was Nora Waln, well-known author whose writing frequently appeared in the Atlantic Monthly magazine.Her husband, an Englishman, was head of the Chinese Post Office in Tientsin.Although everyone else sympathized with me about going half way round the world to be with my husband and then being left alone for eight days when the TULSA went to sea the next day,Nora Waln said nothning to me either at dinner or later, though the others were friendly.Mr. Jordan drove me to the Tientsin Country Club where I enjoyed dancing, music, and sandwiches.Suddenly before midnight Nora Waln went home.The rest of the party left the club when it closed about two o'clock,and although I asked to be taken to my hotel, they took me to a different party in a commercial hotel, and I was not delivered to my own hotel until daybreak.Ms. Waln's husband was the one who took me to the Court Hotel and invited me to dinner at their home on Wednesday evening. I told him I could not accept an invitation that did not come from his wife. He answered, "Child, you are in North China now, where the men are the masters, and my wife being an American, owes you some hospitality. I will call for you here at the Hotel at seven on Wednesday." Early Sunday afternoon my room boy brought me a chit from him reading:"Dear Mrs. Barrett, My wife is indisposed, so the invitation for Wednesday is cancelled." I never heard from them again. MR. and MRS "BUNNY" WARREN + MR. HENINGSON at COURT HOTEL I soon met Mr. and Mrs. "Bunny" Warren, guests at the Court Hotel whose small table for two was close to my table in the dining room. Mr. Warren was employed by the British Imperial Chemical Company.They remained at the hotel for several months until they found a furnished house that suited them.After they left the Court Hotel I frequently at tea with "Mollie" Warren at their home. At the hotel too I met Mr and Mrs. Heningson of Denmark, who were still living at the hotel when we left China.Mr. Heningson, although "not a stamp collector", he said cut every stamp off the envelopes he received and put them in a small green cardboard box.He gave me a boxful of stamps, mostly Chinese and Danish.We later allowed aunt Mollie Barrett to look through those and give some to my nephew Billy, and Willie Kennedy at Macy's also looked through the box and took a few when she visited Boston in 1932.Willy was still working at Macy's in 1932 and gave me a copy of a report I had been working on when I resigned in 1930,-definitions of terms used to describe successful and unsuccessful sales clerks.She told me that she was in Boston at the request of Percy Strauss of Macy's [whom I knew] to go over the report with Mr. Kirstein of Filene's to get his impression of it.I was very pleased to find that the report was credited to me because so much of the work had been completed before I left for China.-43- GRACE LIANG MOUNT HOLYOKE 1925 + FAMILY Mrs. Evans had told my former Mount Holyoke (class of l925) student Grace Liang, that I was in Tientsin.Her father had graduated from Hartford Public High School Connecticut about l880, & then a change of government policy required him to return to China, where he had a distinguished career first in north China railroads & customs offices & then in the Foreign Service.I believe he was the first Chinese to be invited to address the United States Congress- around the time of the Nine Power Conference in l922 when Japanese commercial ambitions conflicted with America's Open Door policy on China enunciated Secretary of State John Hay in the McKinley administration & with the principle of self-determination pronounced by Woodrow Wilson. Grace came to call on me very soon after I arrived & invited Jack & me for tea at their home when the TULSA returned.Soon we called on Mrs. Liang ,who served us tea-we left when the servants brought our coats & hats & bowed us out-but she had given us the honor of inviting us to dinner- at which her distinguished husband,her daughter Grace,& her two doctor sons would be present.These young men had been educated in England,& their services were greatly in demand.The family occupied a spacious compound.Years later when the Communists occupied Tientsin,the family lost all its possessions and Tou.....Liang though a valued physician,was liquidated.At that dinner party Grace & her mother appeared in exquisite Chinese dresses,but the men wore European clothes.Since Mr. Liang expressed an interest in ships, Jack invited the family to dinner aboard the TULSA.That evening the dock was crowded with Chinese people,who had gotten the word that Mr. Liang was expected. They respectfully kept their distance & silence as he left his car & boarded the ship.They remained on the dock throughout the dinner to get another glimpse of the respected diplomatic official.He told us about the low standard of living of most Chinese laborers & how little it took to support a family in those days deep in the worldwide economic depression.Later in l93l Grace left Tientsin to marry Dan Yapp of Shanghai, and then we saw no more of her. In l970 we located them in Waikiki on Kalakaua Avenue.We understand that she has been teaching in Connecticut at the Central Connecticut State College, New Britain, Connecticut. CHIEF OF POLICE ISEMONGER and his DAUGHTER TINA, HAI HO RIVER PILOTS and WIVES, NEW YEAR'S EVE COSTUME PARTY 1930-31 Since I arrived in Tientsin on the thirteenth of November, 1930, the holiday season was fast approaching. A new guest registered at the Hotel just before Christmas. He was Mr. Isemonger, who was an Englishman just employed in India in charge of the Sikhs, in the police of India. He had come to Tientsin with his twenty-year-old daughter Tina to take charge of the Chinese and Sikhs police in the British concession of Tientsin where we lived. Jack informed me that it was part of his job to foster international relations, so we were friendly. The Isemongers lived at the Court Hotel for a while and later had lunch there frequently.When Mr. Isemonger found a nice house in Tientsin, Jack and I were frequent guests for Saturday noon dinner and for dancing later at the Country Club. The Court Hotel was the home of several Hai Ho River pilots mostly of English extraction. Mrs. Johnson, English and the wife of a pilot, invited me to go to Schlessinger's Tea House with her about eleven o'clock oone morning late in December. She invited us to attend a costumed New Year's Eve Ball at the Tientsin Country Club, of which we were members, saying she hoped we would understand that we would have to pay our share of the cost. My husband and I had matching costumes made of inexpensive blue and white Chinese silk- and we enjoyed the pilots who remained friendly throughout our stay. Mr. Isemonger and several of the pilots and their wives are with us in the New Year's Eve 1930-1931 photo on web page 39 photo #945. --Mr. Isemonger had an excellent camera and found me photogenic. He would come by the Court Hotel in the morning to invite me to ride to the Country Club with me where he was tireless and gifted in photography. He always gave me copies of the pictures without charge. He spent many hours in the Chinese city hunting for an embroidered evening coat for me- he found a white one with large white flowers.The bottom was embroidered with exquisite silk tiny blue and black flowers - also the front of the evening coat had the same border, modeled on styles of the Empress Dowager's family. In the fall of 1952 I wore it to my son's Junior prom in West Roxbury when I was the hostess, because he was Class president that year. We emjoyed Mr. Isemonger's hospitality for many months. Jack used his new Voightlander camera frequently to take pictures of me in our hotel room, and I took one of him, in which a red table-like paper drum is visible. Evenings he spend a lot of time studying to get ready for a promotion exam at the end of 1931.ACCOMPANYING PHOTO web p. 18-#139 After l993 thefts of desks, bureaus, furniture, books and papers in West Roxbury l993, photo web p. 18 #139 is the only remaining photo of an outstanding group taken by Mr. Isemonger spring l931 at Tientsin Country Club. He and his daughter Tina arrived at Tientsin just after the Barretts December 1930 from India, and he became chief of police in British concession of Tientsin, where Court Hotel was located.He was a frequent luncheon visitor to the Court Hotel, sometimes accompanied by his daughter Tina.He was frequently helpful to both Jack and Sophie. The loss of the Tientsin country Club photos was a great disappointment, and also a group of photos of Sophie taken at Yamamoto studios Tientsin. p 18 #139] JANUARY 1931 - SOPHIE'S MANCHURIAN SEA OTTER FUR COAT --Not long after New Year's 1931 I was sitting in the small reception room in the Court Hotel after tiffen when two men sat down, talking.I was wearing my cloth coat with only Persian lamb trim- not warm enough for the north China climate with its peircing cold winds. When I realized that they were Americans, I asked them what they were doing in Tientsin, and they said they were taking a train later that afternoon for Manchuria, where they would buy furs. When I said I had never been as cold as I was on the streets of Tientsin, they offered to buy some skins for me, as they expected to be back in Tientsin in a few weeks. When they returned they had for me enough sea otter skins for a gorgeous coat.The cost was small - the coat warm and beautiful and very inexpensive. It was made up by a Chinese tailor in Tientsin. Sea otter is lustrous and light gray -a short,durable fur with a lovely silver sheen-very warm & comfortable.This coat appears in many photos of Sophie in China 1931 and in Bala Cynwyd 1937, and lasted extremely well. Sophie continued to use it during her years in West Roxbury after world War II. Sophie often commented that North China winters are very cold, and most of the north Chinese are taller than the Cantonese workers who have come to Hawaii, San Francisco, and other parts of the United states. The following September I saw these same fur buyers, when they brought word of the Japanese capture of Mukden, which news I telephoned to Captain Paul Rice - the first report to United States Navy and government.Although the Court Hotel was reputed to have the best food in North China. food was definitely a problem because we dared not touch milk, butter, fresh vegetables or Chinese grown fruits. My husband grew tired of the steady diet of rice and snipe but managed to wash it down with liquids. I lived on toast with marmelade,rice, snipe, pot roast, cooked dessets and tea. Captain and Mrs. Rice occupied a furnished house and most graciously invited us to dinner fortnightly. When we wanted to return their hospitality and to entertain the new Executive Officer and his wife, Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. Leonard Doughty, we invited them to the Court Hotel for dinner.One evening Rachel Claude Doughty, who came from Washington D.C. regaled us with tales of her mother's friend who came to the Claude home in Washington and stayed for forty years. Jack took photographs of a traditional Chinese funeral, in which great honor is paid to ancestors. White is the color of mourning. FEBRUARY 1931 Jack took leave, and we visited Peking and the Great Wall of China and the Ming Tombs and Forbidden City where the Emperors had lived and "Center of the Universe." .-- PURCHASES As time passed that winter and spring I became well known to the Chinese and Japanese shopkeepers on Taku and Victoria Roads. I bought some rare dragon and turtle candlesticks of brass,some 48- red and green Chinese lacquer drums, which served as small tables and through Mrs. Mendelsohn I located a lovely black and gold lacquer Chinese chest with inlaid colored semi-precious stones arranged in patterns. I also shopped for linens at Takahashi Japanese linen store. SPRING-SUMMER 1931 ASIATIC FLEET GUNNERY + MANEUVERS CHEFOO - SHANGHAI In the spring of l93l the gunboat TULSA went to Chefoo and Shanghai for Asiatic Fleet maneuvers & shooting excercises. The rest of the year she was kept near Tientsin primarily for intelligence purposes. Gertrude Rice, wife of our captain, (with her daughter Nathalie), & Rachel Doughty,wife of our executive officer & I decided to go to Chefoo & Weihaiwei on the Shantung peninsula while the TULSA was cruising south.Jack agreed I could go on a British freighter provided I take twenty-four bottles of boiled water-sold by the case in a drug store.Since the TULSA left before we did,Mr. Isemonger bought the case of water for me & drove me to the freighter,where the coolie stored the box near my bunk. Before we left Tientsin, we had lunch on the ship, and Mr. Isemonger joined me. There was a choice of hot beef stew or prawns. I was tempted to have the prawns for a change of diet, but Mr. Isemonger emphatically told the waiter, "The lady will have stew." I was disappointed at the time,but that night on the ship several of the ladies had severe intestinal trouble after eating the prawns. There was considerable cholera in the Orient, and Americans did not have their immune systems adapted to many strains of bacteria that Asians have adapted to. I shared a cabin with a British missionary lady returning from leave in England=she was on her way to a very hot dry region in Southwestern China.She was in the cabin when the case of water was stowed & subsequently had nothing to do with me-avoided me like the plague.When we arrived in Chefoo,I offered my case of water to the missionary woman,as I hadn't used any of it,&it was too heavy to take ashore.She was startled but very glad to have the water, which she thought all along was gin,as she understood that all American Navy women were heavy drinkers of strong liquor.The reason she avoided me was she thought I was planning to drink a case of liquor in her cabin. CHAPLAIN MAGUIRE FINDS A BOARDING HOUSE FOR SOPHIE Since the whole Asiatic fleet was in Chefoo for exercises,Jack had trouble finding a place for me to live.Finally the chaplain, Father William Maguire found room & board for me in a small boarding house owned by Mr.Wineglass. The goats lived right outside my room- there was no running water=a makeshift toilet & no bath. Before I left Tientsin, Jack had tried to warn me before and mentioned a famous Navy song, which we remembered and sang in later years-,"They wear clothespins on their noses in North China- They wear clothespins on their noses -(Be)cause Chefoo don't smell like roses - a verse of "O the monkeys have no tails in Zamboanga." GUNNERY OFFICER JACK BARRETT AND MARINE COMMANDER PACA ACHIEVE TOP GUNNERY SCORES The gunnery was successful beyond anything the ship had previously scored. Jack & Captain Rice were delighted. Jack's experience in gunnery went back to 1909 at Revenue Cutter School and included work with big guns on battleship WYOMING 1932. At Peking he discussed techniques and innovations with his former classmate Bill Rupertus, who was studying the latest Marine techniques. COLONEL WILLIAM WINCHESTER PACA LETTER 1970 Our friend Colonel William W. Paca,US Marine Corps (native of Annapolis Maryland,where he was named for great-great-great-grandfather who signed Declaration of Independence) wrote June 23,l970-he was the senior Marine officer on the TULSA & worked closely with Jack in winning the Asiatic Fleet l93l gunnery competition--"Colonel William W. Paca 680 American Drive, Apartment 42 Annapolis Maryland 21403 June 23, 1970 Dear Mrs. Barrett, I was distressed to learn via your letter of Jack's decease this past August. Please know that you have my sincere sympathy in your bereavement.= "I remember Jack fondly as a fine officer and one of the best of shipmates.I remember him too with gratitude-which I hope I expressed directly to him at the time-for his guidance & advice-which as gunnery officer of the TULSA,he gave me relative to the training of our Marine gun crew & which resulted in our gunners winning an "E" at that year's gunnery practice. = The cause of this inexcusable delay in replying to your so interestinhg letter has been twofold = First, I hoped to find among my effects, upon my return from several months stay in the South. several memorabilia relating to the TULSA. I did have a really excellent photograph of the ship, and I thought I also had a photograph of the officers and crew. I intended to send both to you for possible incorporation in Jack's memoirs, but I have been unable to locate either. The second cause is the embarassment I feel due to my deplorable memory, which worsens year by year, and which I am reluctant to confess. I have forgotten so very many names, dates, and other incidents of my military service. =-I do have one especially clear memory of Jack- and that is that he was one of a rare group of people who have the faculty of being 'where the action is.' Frequently during wardroom conversations on the TULSA when past events were mentioned,it would develop that Jack had either been there or nearby or otherwise had been in a position to have special knowledge of the event.In past years I have several times remarked that I once served with a naval officer who had that rare facility or gift.As for myself, I was graduated from West Point in August, 1917. I was promoted to Captain while in France.After the war and the letdown of demobilization I resigned from the Army. Three years later, and because I badly missed service life I joined the Marine Corps. This was basically because I loved the water and ships, and I had wanted to be in the Navy in the first place but had been unable to obtain a principal appointment to the Naval Academy. = I commanded Camp Catlin, Oahu, from 1944 to 1946. I was then on duty at Headquarters, Marine Corps, and later was Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, Naval Base, Philadelphia. = My great, great, great grandfather was William Paca, a Maryland signer of the Declaration of Independence. The main part of the hotel, Carvel Hall, was built on the rear of William Paca's town house. The hotel part has now been torn down, and the mansion and gardens are being restored by the local historical society. = There have been, and are, a rather surprising number of TULSA officers living here. These in addition to myself include Captain Doughty (deceased), Admiral William T. Fitzgerald, jr., Rear Admiral Wayne R. Loud, Rear Admiral Charles E. Coney, and Colonel Gordon Hall (my predecessor on the TULSA) In addition General Pedro A. Del Valle lives here, and I see him fairly frequently. = Again please forgive my remissions.I do hope this finds things well with you. Sincerely, William W. Paca Colonel United State Marine Corps Retired." PARTY AT CHEFOO CLUB To celebrate the TULSA's good score Jack wanted to give a party at the Chefoo Club for all the ship's officers.I bought hand painted place cards, candles,Japaese lanterns as the party as to be outdoors on a lovely summer night.Every officer was invited even though there were only three wives attached to the ship at that time. There was much good conversation for twenty-six guests.After every other guest had gone, the wife of the executive officer, Rachel Doughty came up to me & said, "Sophie, you ought to know better than to seat me in candle light. It is not becoming to me." NEARLY STRANDED AT WEI-HAI-WEI As we approached Wei-Hai-Wei, I became excited because I had often enjoyed breakfast at Gertrude Rice's home in Tientsin,where we were served in bed.The coffee pot was red pottery with pewter,& the cream pitcher & sugar bowl were also red pottery with pewter-lovely pieces of china as well as being useful & unique & Gertrude told me that they had come from Wei-Hai-Wei.It was a beautiful town developed by Germans but given back to China after World War I. I wanted to buy a Wei-Hai-Wei coffee & tea service of this red pottery with silver trim.But to my disappointment the ship anchored out quite a distance. We could not even see Wei-Hai-Wei from the ship.But a smll boat was leaving our freighter & without even going to my cabin to get my purse I persuaded Gertrude Rice to get into the boat with me with me for the trip to Wei-Hai-Wei. I took it for granted that the Chinese man running the small motor boat was on an errand for my freighter & would certainly return to it.I don't know why,but we left twelve-year-old Nathalie Rice on the freighter when we made our hurried departure,& we waved to her as we left.Our boatman spoke no English,but I believed he understood us when he nodded assent to my questioning him as to whether we could have two hours in Wei-Hai-Wei before returning to our ship. It was getting to be late afternoon & I did not want to be in the Chinese city after dark.We started off happily & even found the shop which sold the Wei-Hai-Wei coffeee & tea sets. There I charged a set to be sent to the TULSA as I had no money with me in my haste to get into the departing small boat.When night threatened,we returned to our dock,but found no small motor boat.At first we were not alarmed,but when we heard the freighter's whistle sounding repeatedly & impatiently & when no small boat appeared as darkness approached, we bargained with a sampan to row us out to the freighter. Gertrude paid him from her purse & he tried hard to row us but made litle headway with the heavy seas.He managed to reach a Chinese junk sailing along in the wind, & we again bargained for a ride & paid the owner of the junk to take us aboard.The wind held, & the junk mnade good progress with the large square sails & we again met a difficult transfer from the junk to the freighter.The captain of the freighter was greatly annoyed by the delay & stated he would have stranded us if Nathalie had not tearfully appealed for him to wait for her mother & Mrs. Barrett. SHANGHAI SUMMER 1931 ASHLEY SISTERS AND TOPSY From Chefoo we went to Shanghai where we lived at the Palace Hotel but aside from having clothes made in Shanghai and a very enjoyable luncheon at the home of ships' chandler Ah Sing I could do very little socially as my hands were very sore. However, I did spend one happy evening at the home of Mickie and Maimie Ashley and their brother. Mickey was Jack's old friend from MARBLEHEAD days in 1927. She was born in China and worked as secretary to the local head of Standard Oil Company of New York. She and her sister had adopted a Chinese girl, Topsy, who lived with them until Maimie became a prisoner of the Japanese in 1941 after Pearl Harbor. Mickey had gone to the states, but Maimie was waiting in hopes that Topsy could obtain permission to come with her to the United States. Maimie did hear Topsy calling her by name in the Japanese prison camp, but she feared the Japanese would take reprisals against Topsy if she was seen with an American. Topsy disappeared and must not have survived.Mickie Ashley letters 1937 and 1970 appear atend of this chapter and tell of Japanese brutality. = Knowing I would return to the United States with Jack via Europe in early 1932, I ordered many new clothes made up for me in Shanghai. We attended a long play at a Chinese theater where we were given steaming hot towels to refresh ourselves during the long performance. RETURN TO COURT HOTEL TIENTSIN When we returned to the Court Hotel Mr. Isemonger was concerned about my physical condition. He recommended the same Dr. Grice, whom I had seen for indigestion when I first arrived in Tientsin. Dr. Grice called my hand condition "pomphylyx" caused by too much medication. he scraped much sore tissue away surgically and applied silver nitrate and asked me to wear white cotton gloves. My hands did improve toward autumn. SEPTEMBER 19, 1931 SOPHIE SENDS FIRST REPORT OF JAPANESE AGGRESSION AT MUKDEN, MANCHURIA In the winter of l930-31 I had met two American fur buyers in the lobby of the Court Hotel.They bought sea otter fur skins from which the Tientsin tailors made me my very warm & comfortable, long-lasting coat.In September l93l they returned to the hotel & I visited with them before they left for Mukden & other parts of Manchuria to buy furs for their New York concern.Only a few days later they reurned to the hotel,visibly shaken as they had barely escaped with their lives when the Japanese captured Mukden September l8-l9,& they got away on the last train allowed to leave the city- a bribe to Japanese officers was necessary for them to leave.The Japanese claimed that the railroad track to be used by their troops had been bombed by the Chinese,-& they used that as an excuse to occupy Mukden. I immediately telephoned Captain Rice, who was at Taku Bar with the TULSA forty miles east of Tientsin at the mouth of the Hai Ho River,because of unusually low water levels that year, which made navigation to Tientsin inadvisable.He immediately telegraphed the Admiral of the Asiatic Fleet at Shanghai-probably the first report the United States government received.The U.S. ambassador in Tokyo was on vacation. The Navy was told to keep "hands off" the situation.When we did nothing to stop them,the emboldened Japanese militarists established the state of Manchukuo with a puppet emperor Pu Yi.They proceeded to conquer much of North China & attacked Shanghai in l932..Their heady successes in China ultimately encouraged the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, l94l.Had we pushed them out of Manchuria in l93l, we might have avoided large scale conflict later.Secretary of State Stimson & many European leaders favored action, but President Herbert Hoover, a pacifist who built no ships and had lost political support in view of the deep economic Depression, missed the opportunity to nip World War II in the bud.NICHOLSON RUG FACTORY RUSSIAN CONCESSION TIENTSIN North of the Court Hotel and Hai Ho River in Russian concession in Tientsin was located the Nicholson rug factory, where Sophie watched high quality traditional Chinese rugs being hand woven. The pricipal sales outlet was at Peking, and Jack and Sophie purchased a nine by twelve gold living room rug, an eight-by-ten black-bordered dining room rug, and six smaller gold and blue rugs. They used these rugs at 422 Columbia Road Dorchester 1932-3, 712 Stradone road, Bala Cynwyd Pennsylvania 1936-8, 9615 Shore Road, Brooklyn 1939-1941 and 52 Emmonsdale road, West Roxbury 1947 to 1980s, although Bill Barrett's girl friend Anita Douredoure burned a hole in the gold rug with ciagarette ashes in 1933. PEKING NOVEMBER 1931 Sophie accompanied Jack to Peking in November when he went for physical exam for promotion to Lieutenant Commander. The good score of the TULSA in Asiatic Fleet gunnery and maneuvers and strong fitness report from Commander Paul Rice and intensive study for exam helped Jack achieve this promotion. VISITS WITH RICE FAMILY The Barretts had a cordial visit with the Rice family around the December 1931 holidays, and young Nathalie Rice became interested in Sophie's social work experience and became a social worker herself years later. Sophie narrates: "Just before [our] departure Captain and Mrs. Rice asked us if we would spend one night at their home to look after Nathalie while they spent the evening and night in Peking. So we spent the night with Nathalie, and the next morning at breakfast the number one 'boy' [they were adults - this was the term used] inquired of Jack, "Master wantchee eyogg?" Jack had no idea what he was asking about, so the 'boy' repeated this question several times. Finally young Nathalie explained that her father always had two EGGS for breakfast, and the 'boy' was merely inquiring whether Jack wanted eggs for breakfast. He pronounced 'egg' like 'IGG' the "i" being long as it is in "Ike". Jack wanted no part of Chinese eggs, which were always too old for anything but scrambled eggs. Jack liked to tell a [related] story about a man who ordered FRIED eggs in China. The servant said, 'Fly - no can do -- scramble - maybe can.'" John Barrett note The Departure of Sophie and Jack from Tientsin is treated in the next chapter "RETURN FROM THE ORIENT VIA EUROPE December 1931 - March 1932." The Rice family came to the Tientsin railroad station to say goodbye Christmas Day 1931 - then Jack and Sophie had Christmas dinner aboard the TULSA at Taku Bar at the outlet of the Hai Ho River more than thirty miles east. Then they traveled a short distance to Tangku, where they planned to board the Japanese passenger liner CHOWAN MARU to travel to Kobe, Japan. However, there was a terrifying incident when two Japanese sentries crossed their swords in front of Sophie, because there was a secret Japanese miliitary shipyard next door to the commercial ship. The next chapter tells of enjoyable visits to Pagsanjan Canyon, Philippines, botanical gardens in Malaya and Ceylon, the Sphinx and pyramids, and great cities in Europe. A major theme of RED HEADED STEPCHILD is the Japanese brutality and aggression of the 1930s, and letters from Mickey Ashley of Shanghai form the conclusion of this chapter. They also appear with MARBLEHEAD and Harold Fultz materials. DEPARTURE GOODBYE TO RICE FAMILY TIENTSIN- CHRISTMAS DINNER ON BOARD TULSA - ENCOUNTER WITH JAPANESE SENTRIES BOARDING SHIP the anchorage at the entrance of the Hai Ho River was called Tangku (note by Sophie M. Barrett"Jack & I sailed from Tangku to Japan on the Chowan Maru.Tangku is where the Japanese soldiers crossed their swords on my chest when I started to the wrong dock where a Japanese Army troop ship was next to the passenger ship dock."). MADGE 'MICKEY' ASHLEY letters 1937, 1970 - Ashley letter l937 war crimes Shanghai: On November l2, l937 our good friend in China Mickey Ashley wrote from 94 Canton Road in Shanghai China "During July I went to a party & an Indian juggler entertained us.The year so far had been a quiet one & I was wondering what I could put in my usual Christmas letter,so I asked the man to put his performing python around my neck- at least that would be something to write about.Now I've seen so much I don't know where to commence.The war has lasted over three months & we are still in a tight spot.We hate to see the Japanese win, but selfishly hope they will drive the Chinese a few miles out of Shanghai so that our lives & property will be safe.It is a strain to hear guns going day & night,planes droning,explosions, not to be able to sleep.The company (Standard Oil) never mentioned evacuation or took any steps in that direction regarding stenographers in spite of all the U. S. authorities were urging, so I did not evacuate & my sister would not leave without me. However,all the wives & children were sent away at the Company's expense. After the first terrible air raid when everything in Shanghai was at a standstill,with no transportation facilities, they told me to stay home for a couple of days,but we've been working regular hours ever since.Being short staffed-five girls away,three on leave,& two evacuated because they couldn't stand it any longer- we were often very rushed,especially when four fell ill.However,my sister & I took the precaution of having our pasasports ready & the necessary papers made out to enable us to have our little Chinese girl accompany us to the United States if conditions became decidedly worse.I told the office I wasn't staying if the Japs used poison gas in Shanghai. What a lot of red tape- there were so many signatures & guarantees when the Consulate knew an emergency existed & we couldn't possibly leave the (adopted) child here (their adopted daughter, the Chinese child named Topsy- Sophie Barrett note).The greatest danger was the air raids while going to or returning from the office.The horror of the first one will always live in my memory, especially as I saw the planes & heard the antiaircraft guns just as I was approaching the devastated area of "Bloody Saturday" bombing.The huge crater was roped off,but skeletons of charred cars still remained.To watch the white smaoke in the air, to hear the pounding of guns & to know that any moment your own self & car may be a similar tangled mess wasn't pleasant.My stomach felt as if a giant had squeeezed it tight in his huge hand, & only a vacuum remained.Then to know that we were driving into the danger - the Jap men-of-war were firing from the river- & upon arrival at the office to feel the building shake & hear the bang, bang, bang as if a thousand bricks were being flung against the windows- was really terrifying.That same day & during that raid shrapnel fell at Maimie's feet when she left our car.Every day one sees hordes of refugeees with their small bundles without any idea where to go in this crowded place, little lost children- poor bewildered dogs following - cats & other animals are left to wait for death- horribly wounded people, nasty-smalling coffins conveying away soldiers or victims of shrapnel- sick & weary lying on roadsides & families parked for weeks on sidewalks with only straw mats.No wonder disease is rampant.We have all had inoculations against typhoid & cholera & been vaccinated against smallpox.Already two dear friends have paid the price of staying here-they died of dysentery.One was head of the Blind school where my little "Pine Tree" was taken in. The school has been badly damaged & how frightened the blind *& deaf boys must have been.Another friend is dangerously ill with typhoid.The doctors ran short of medical supplies.The pity & tragedy of it all just because a group of men must have more power.If it were possible, I would condemn such to intense suffering the rest of their lives.So many homes had to be abandoned- palaces & cottages alike.The very best of everything was looted- but that wasn't enough.Furniture was hacked to pieces - the Japs say eventually they must buy Japanese goods. food not eaten was strewn about, & malicioius damage done whever possible.In a garden section of the eastern division where we once lived, the Japs have put furniture on the sidewalks while their horses are placed in dining & drawing rooms.Mills have been dismantled & their machinery shipped to Japan for scrap iron.An old friend now seventy-three "Auntie" we call her-has lost practically everything, her beautiful collection of linen, furs, silver, stamps, books- the treasures of fity-two years.She was so overcome over the condition of her home - her own property-that when we visited her that same evening, her face was grey with misery,& she wept- something I've never seen the little person do.Her husband was an artist & art collector- all his ivories & scrolls, stamps - his son's paintings his own embroideries were all gone.Oil paintings not taken were pierced by bayonets - doors & trunks hacked open.The Chinese had been driven out of the district long ago & the Japanese were in complete control as nobody is allowed to carry a bundle without numerous examinations by Japanese sentries-all of her things must have been carried off with the cognizance of the Japanese military.While the fighting continued in the north, & east, we were more or less safe once at home. What beautiful weather & delightful moonlit nights there were -it was difficult to believe that only a few miles away, men were being slaughtered.We preferred rain, because in fine weather planes would drone, then guns roar,-tracer bullets in gay colors would light up the sky,& anti-aircraft guns would spoil the beauty of the night.As the Japs drove the Chinese from the east & north,we in the west then came in danger,but not before those two districts were swept by fire as far as the eye could see.From a tenth story apartment we watched the destruction- our eyes glued to the holocaust-& our hearts sank with pity for those who had escaped the shells but now must run from the fire.. We thanked god fervently those two nights that there was no wind & that a creek separated us from that part of Shanghai.Every day we heard the guns & explosions a little nearer.Fortunately, from the beginning we had dismantled our pretty little home.Cases stood in the hall & only bare necessities were being used. On October 28 the nearness of guns made it imperative to move. 539 On the thirtieth while at dinner shells whizzed past the house- then I decided the hour had come.No trucks could be had at that late hour, so they were ordered for 8:30 AM. We packed until twelve & tried to sleep.I was the last to leave on my bicycle leading the dog.(Now) our one room apartment the size of Maimie's bedroom is jammed, crammed with things, but my sister is clever & has made it liveable.Some of our furnture is with friends, the balance in a garage.Where the sixty-eight thousand poorer Chinese refugees stay I don't know, though numerous refugee camps have been erected.We don't know what emergency awaits us.One morning a huge shell fell in the warehouse adjoining our office- at the same time big department stores were bombed.U.S. Naval experts say that had it exploded, it would have damaged all buildings within a radius of one acre. Our office & we would have gone up in smoke as the yard was full of drums of gasoline.We miss our home, those airy rooms, & the garden.. To be cramped into a small apartment & not even know which trunk contains one's clothes isn't important- but annoying.It's funny how one can tolerate the roar of cannons & explosions & get fussed over petty things. At the office where men's nerves are raw, it is not easy to work. I've seen as many as eleven planes over our place.We are making quilts for refugees., also helping Topsy make strips for gas masks. I hope you will receive this. So many of our cards & letters have gone astray.-Mickey Ashley."In l939 or l940 Mickey Ashley left Shanghai to work for Standard Oil's New York office because the value of "Mex" (Chinese currency ) had fallen so low she could not afford to accept her Shanghai "Mex" salary.We saw her in New York. Now she is retired & lives in Ridgewood New Jersey after years of lecturing about China. Ashley letter SHANGHAI "June 30,l970 from Miss Madge Ashley ("Mickey") 7l5 Hilldrest Road, Ridgewood New Jersey 07450 Dear Sophie (P.S. For twenty years I lectured before women's clubs & garden clubs on China).It is a long time since I heard from you.The last was a card from Honolulu. I hope Jack did not suffer long. I lost my dear Maimie the same year & feel very lost without her.She had a long illness- it was heart. In September l969, I suppose it was too much for me.I had an acute coronary thrombosis & was in hospital a month, two weeks in a nursing home,& had home care for three weeks.I had to learn to walk again & now am going very slowly.I have been at Cape May for a vacation.It is lovely here- so very clean-& the food is excellent. We face the ocean. About twenty years ago my sister & I bought this little house in Ridgewood,& we have been very happy in it.The number is 7l5 Hillcrest Road (not 3l5) Ridgewood, New Jersey 07450. Ridgewood is a purely residential district,& it is kept very nicely.The people were marvelous to me when Maimie died & during my illness.All the years that I worked in New York & when I retired we have kept in touch with Harold Fultz.He suffers badly from emphysema.You asked about my brother. He married a Shanghai American school teacher from Kentucky.They came to the United States over thirty years ago.They have two daughters,who are both married.One has three boys -eight.six & four (years)-& Bob her husband was a Captain in the Marines.He went to Vietnam after three years in Okinawa.He left the Marines & is now with Kodak. The other daughter lives in Dallas & is now a government accountant. They have two girls (six & four years).Brother & Dorothy l;ive in Louisville, Kentucky.I am sorry to say Maimie- who remained in Shanghai while I came to New York to get a job- never saw (her adopted Chinese daughter) "Topsy" again after she was put in the Japanese (concentration) camp where they nearly starved to death until rescued by American fliers.I am "Mickie" & Madge is my real name.You want to know how we met Harold & Jack.The MARBLEHEAD was anchored at the Standard Oil wharf Pootung.The foreigners at the installation were under my boss- therefore I met them all when they came to the office.The families would invite me for weekends, etc.,& include some Navy officers,& then they would escort me home the next day & stay for "tiffen" - lunch & dinner..Several came that way.How my father went to China is that he wanted to see the world- so went on a sailing ship as many pioneers did- & liked the Far East so much he stayed first in Hong Kong- where he met my mother & then in Shanghai.He & a fellow American started the first volunteer fire brigade in China. All the equipment- even the huge fire bells- came from New York.There were so many civil wars that we got used to storing rice & canned goods, filling both tubs with water, & hiding the family silver.Some of our friends were killed, but Maimie only suffered when the Japanese were so rotten to all foreigners.I don't know GraceLiang. The two Russian sisters (Gala & Vera Tsirentchikoff) I hardly knew. I met Gala once at a party,& that's all.I sent your letter to my brother.He represented Lloyd's of London & two steamship companies, so he knew Ah Sing well.We knew Cockeye & "Jelly Belly" (because he had a fat tummy) the tailors.Most American gunboats went to Tsingtao - a summer resort first made beautiful by the Germans- a bit of Europe in China & after World War I taken by the Japanese. One night in Shanghai (spring l927) the MARBLEHEAD GAVE A CONCERT & later a dance.During the show we were asked not to applaud as "There had been a death in one of the Standard Oil families." Then Harold (Fultz) told me confidentially that little Billy Robertson (his father was manager of the installation) had died of cholera.He took ill at noon & was dead in a few hours.Had any of us known I doubt that we would have gone to the dinner & dance, as cholera is a terrible thing, especially as there were so many salads & cold food on the table. ....On November 4, l970 our friend Mickey Ashley of China days whose l937 letter appears in this chapter wrote: My sister Maimie was in the Japanese concentration camp- starved & sick with malaria, but she was never beaten. Some Americans were.Topsy came to the camp & called,'Miss Ashley, Miss Ashley' outside, but Maimie's friends advised her not to answer because the Japs would ill-treat all Chinese who favored Americans. Maimie never saw her again. We presumed she was dead. We lost ever so many valuables, & our Chinese money went to nothing overnight. Our lovely home went for seven thousand dollars U.S currency, & we were lucky to get it. -Mickey (Ashley)" SEE TULSA CHAPTER SUPPLEMENT letters of CAPTAIN JENKINS, who lost his TULSA diaries Autumn 1942 at Ironbottom Sound. Solomon Islands, CAPTAIN MARVIN STONE interned at Tokyo December 1941 and exchanged via the neutral ship GRIPSHOLM, and CAPTAIN GORDON HALL, who had a problem cashing checks because his name was the same as a well-known Tientsin building, so people assummed his name was an alias. Also a listing of Sophie's extensive purchases in China, which she treasured to 1980s.


 

140.
Mollie Barrett Rome trip l963 with Josephine Frances and anna Pistorino of I Street South Boston p 18-140

 

[ to be INSERTED in place]Joan Rooney from downstairs apartment appears in a group of photos December 1940 in Barrett apartment. Brooklyn & Hawaii black notebook One version #1261 p 76 from"BlackNotebook One"1969 .+The wild apple blossoms were one of the attractive features of the spring flowers on the undeveloped slope between Shore Road and the ocean waters near The Narrows leading to New York Harbor in front of our apartment at #9615 Shore Road+ We toured the Perisphere and Trilon at the New York World's Fair, and Jack was proud of a lighted night view of the Perisphere, which he took with his Voightlander camera. We enjoyed the Borden cows and milking exhibit. + +++++++++p 18-142 p 73-1232 Sophie notebook Two 1939 pp.188-9 w1232 B- R-O-O-K-L-Y-N H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines. NEW YORK chapter HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE August 1939 to June 1941 and departure for Hawaii about July 10, 1941. [follows TRINITY chapter] TEXT: AUGUST 1939 We had a three week visit in South Boston with Jack's eighty-four year old father and his sister Mollie in very hot August weather. The three weeks John and I spent in South Boston in August 1939 [while Jack was househunting in New York and Brooklyn] were the longest opportunity for John and his grandfather to become acquainted. Grandpa Barrett had visited Norfolk {Virginia] in [May] 1936 and [Bala Cynwyd] Philadelphia in 1937 and 1938 when John was a baby, and saw him again briefly in June 1941 juat before we left for Hawaii. John sent carefully lettered cards to him from Hawaii when he was six years old, and Jack took countless picutres of us to send to Grandpa and Mollie to keep their spirits high. A very large batch of pictures were sent to him from Hawaii in June, l942. Grandpa saw and enjoyed them before he died two months later [August 21, l942 less than] four months before his eighty-eighth birthday. The old house at 640 East Seventh Street was not an ideal place for an active three year old boy in the August heat. Grandpa wanted to keep all the doors shut, but John and I felt the need of fresh air. He also thought that John should get more sleep, but John was not accustomed to going to bed right after supper in broad daylight, and I thought it would be cruel to put him to bed so early, especially when he always had an afternoon nap. Mollie even brought down from the attic some of the kindergarten supplies -wooden pegs and puzzles,- which her brother Bill's first wife Catherine Miley used in teaching her kindergarten classes in New York in the 1920s. [Catherine married Bill Barrett in 1923, died of cancer February 1931 while we were in Tientsin, China.]= Grandpa thought they should occupy John for days on end.[end p. 189, notebook Two] [p. 259 Notebook Four]--Plagued by the heat and fatigue, Jack reported to Captain Baggaley at the Naval Hydrographic Office, then in New York Customs House, and found a temporary furnished apartment for himself in Brooklyn. We remained at 640 East Seventh Street [South Boston] as the guests of Grandpa and Aunt Mollie, who did all they could for our comfort that stifling hot summer. ett in her teaching days. SEPTEMBER 1939 The war in Europe was about to begin September 3, 1939 with Hitler's invasion of Poland. The New York Branch Hydrographic Office would be an important and sensitve center for the Navy to receive reports of mine, blockade, and submarine hazards as well as the usual weather, ice, and water depth reports. Finally with the help of his Fordham Law School friend John Papp, Jack found an unfurnished apartment at 9615 Shore Road in Brooklyn,-Apartment 2A on the second floor - arranged the furniture which had arrived from storage in San Diego,-found a garage where he left his car,came to Boston for us, - and Jack, John and I traveled by train to the Grand Central Station, then took a taxi to the apartment in Brooklyn. There was a central long corridor, an excellent view,two large bedrooms,a large living room, a good sized kitchen, and plenty of room for all our Chinese rugs and other furnishings. John was three and a half years old then and still remembers that apartment, thirty years later. The rent was very reasonable.The very large apartment house [six floors] belonged to the State of New York, which kept in excellent repair with a capable superintendant, two hall boys in the large entrance hall, and an exterminator who came frequently to inquire about roaches or other bugs. The area across Shore Road was a mixture of tall grass, trees, sand, shrubs, and flowers, - unfortunately sacrificed only a few years later to build vast expanses of paved highways. But when we lived there, Jack and John enjoyed many happy hours picking wild grasses, buttercups, daisies, and dandelions for my bouquets, and they took many excellent snapshots of John's toy animals there. John loved that apartment and vicinity. His crib was in our bedroom, but John had his own play room, and had his father with him every evening and weekend.The play room faced on New York Harbor- we could see the ships coming and going in and out of New York. Jack raised and photographed flowers in pots in the room- flowers that John liked very much, - amaryllis, ranunculus, tuberous begonias, anemones and other potted plants. Jack had no luck with freesias. He used three toothpicks in a triangle to suspend the stones from avocadoes over water in glass milk bottles, and the avocadoes would sprout several feet with big leaves. There was a large Chinese ancient kassu rug on the play room floor, - building blocks, Tinkertoys,a small and a large rocking chair, and a blackboard on the wall. There was also a solidly built writing table, on which Jack had cut off the legs to make the writing surface about two feet from the floor, and a small straight chair to fit the table. The room had many child's books including a Koala book from Australia- all the Beatrix Potter Peter Rabbit series books - Uncle Bill's gift of French Becassine books he purchased in Europe on his 1938 honeymoon- - "The Little Engine That Could" and many paper books about animals. One little children's cloth book about a dog and a cat "Sniffy and Mitzi" provided a name for a favorite toy cat, Mitzi, which was the gift of our 1937 Cynwyd maid, Nellie Kelly from Ireland. I used to read to John by the hour, pointing to the words as I -p. 260- read, and by the time John was three and a half years old, I was amazed to find that he could read although I had made no effort to teach him. As a matter of fact I thought he was correcting me from memory, until he actually read something to me. He would puzle over the Culbertson bridge columns, understanding card play before bidding. The Barrett family used to play "High-Low-Jack" in South Boston. My father played pinochle, and I learned "Russian bank" aboard the transport HENDERSON in 1930. John also studied the comic strips, "Napoleon and Uncle Elby", "Bringing up Father" with Maggie and Jiggs, and "Mutt and Jeff." =Not long after Billy Barrett was born August 26, 1939, Bill & Virginia had trouble getting help & were glad to get Miss Caffey's name from Jack as a nurse for Billy. OCTOBER She was working for them in Darien Connecticut when we visited them at suppertime one day in October l939.Since Virginia expected us early in the afternoon & didn't expect us to have dinner there, I am afraid we ate Miss Caffey's hamburger- but she was most gracious & happy to see John again.If she happens to read this, I hope she'll send her address.In l940 Bill called up to give me my first news of Jack's promotion to Commander.He also had been the first one to read the news when Jack made Lieutenant Commander early in l932. NOVEMBER At Thanksgiving we drove to Overbrook Pennsylvania near Philadelphia to see my sister Bee. Sam Pollack worked for LaRoux liquers making cordials, & their two children Jason & Thalia were somewhat older than John.Jen & Pete Meranski drove up from Baltimore for a fine Thanksgiving dinner. we met the Pollacks at Atlantic City New Jersey in 1940, where Jack said John dog-paddled without instruction and was ready to "head for Europe." Members of my family visited us many times in Brooklyn, especially my brother Harry's wife's sister Marion Taylor, who was then a nurse in Brooklyn at Greenpoint hospital. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son Ted and daughter Carol Jane were among the visitors, and my sister Esther, and several times we saw my sister Bertha Pollack and her children Jason and Thalia. Other frequent vistors were my 1927-1930 landlady social worker Ann Taylor McCormack, and Helen Miller of the Commonwealth Fund, Sometimes we took guests to Jones Beach on Long Island, where once Jack Barrett had to take a deep breath before being rolled around the beach under a eight-or-ten-foot high breaking ocean wave. Fortunately he saw it a moment before it hit, grabbed a deep breath, and rolled around with it until is passed by without serious effects.After that we used the children's area to swim in at Jones Beach.Jones Beach was much cleaner and less crowded than Coney Island where we went once or twice.It did have high waves, however, and rather cold water. My 1923 Mount Holyoke clasmate Catherine Kay Trufant made one trip to Jones Beach iwth us, as did Anne McCormack's sister Eleanor Taylor. Kay Trufant's family raised cranberries in Cape Cod area. Anne gave John a Hershey bar-it would have been the first candy bar he ever had. He was not used to chocolate at that time, and when he did not open it after several days, I finally ate it. Anne and Ivan came for Sunday dinner one time at 9615 Shore Road, and we returned their visit - at Patchin Place, Greenwich Village, where they resided at this time and for many years. Anne continued acquaintance with Harry Hopkins, whom I had known in 1928 - she worked for Travelers Aid many years. She had known Jane Addams, the early Chicago social worker.Sometimes we would take guests to New York World's Fair at Flushing,where Jack photographed the Perisphere and Trilon. Visitors to West Roxbury in 1950s admired the light and dark contrasts in Jack's nighttime photo of the illuminated Perisphere, where Worlds Fair visitors watched movies inside. DECEMBER 1939 John was quite interested in the snow in the back courtyard at 96l5 Shore Road after the mild winter the year before in the San Diego area.The paved courtyard used to have curious little whirlwinds produced by the shape of the building- his father would point them out& talk about low pressure systems.Jack explained the terms "transparent, translucent, opaque" as we has a translucent frosted bathroom window. There was a small patch of poison ivy on our back fence downstairs, & Jack would tell how his father once in autumn met some tourists who ignored his advice & collected bright-red bunches of three-leaved poison ivy, with a little stem on the middle leaf. Both Christmases at Brooklyn l939-40 we devoted considerable energy to decorating small Christmas trees.One year there was a considerable problem with a leak in a tub of water that was used to prevent the tree from drying out. We have photos from both Christmases, & Joan Rooney age five from downstairs appears in the l940 Christmas photos.We still have l970 much of the Chinese furniture which appears in pictures in the Brooklyn apartment.Jack fashioned clothesline swings on the roof for John. The stores in Brooklyn on Third, Fourth & Fifth Streets were about five blocks walk up 97th Street from Shore Road.This was also the route to the subway Jack rode to work at the Custom House tower.There was a good meat market on Third Avenue where we bought rib roasts & chopped sirloin.We soon made the acquaintance of the George Rooney family on the first floor & became very good friends.For recreation we would walk to Fort Hamilton, drive to Prospect Park or Owls Head park to see the squirrels.Later on we made more ambitious trips to Jones Beach, Coney Island,& the l939-40 World's Fair at Flushing. FEBRUARY 1940 After dinner every evening John enjoyed a very leisurely bath, playing with a transparent plastic ball which contained a few toy fish, - and with a large red, celluloid fish.Then his father put on his own pajamas, and John wore his,and the two of them would study the stars at the bedroom window, which faced Shore Road and the Ocean near the Narrows..-In February l940 there was a spectacular display of the five planets Mercury,Venus,Mars,Jupiter & Saturn all visible shortly after sunset in the western sky over the Narrows, where on the New Jersey side west of us there was a big red illuminated Wrigley's chewing gum advertising neon sign.We used to say we hoped Venus wouldn't get stuck in the chewing gum. This close alignment of the five visible planets is infrequent, occuring evering twenty years or so. John's bedroom was on the front of the house where they could get an excellent view of the stars over the water, and John developed a lasting interest in astronomy, -p. 189- which his navigator father always encouraged. Before he was four years old, John could point out the North Star, the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia's Chair, Venus, Mercury, Deneb, and many others. When he was five or six years old, in Hawaii, he could point out the Southern Cross to me over Diamond Head in Waikiki. Sometimes when Jack was tired he would say he "wouldn't go across the street to see the Statue of Liberty do a dance."We began to accumulate the Beatrix Potter series of illustrated books Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny,the Flopsy Bunnies, Mrs. Tittlemouse, the Tailor of Gloucester,Timmy Tiptoes, Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, Tom Kitten, the Roly-Poly Pudding, Jeremy Fisher, the Two Bad Mice, Johnny Townmouse, and the rest.Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. MAY 1940 The blitzkrieg overwhelmed France, which surrendered. Northern France was directly ruled by Nazi forces, while a Vichy regime collaborated with the invaders in the south. [Sophie Barrett later read with interest the memoir of Admiral Leahy, who became United States ambassador to the Vichy governent and in 1942 Chief of Staff to President Roosevelt.] The mine and sub situation in the Atlantic was hazardous for convoys and all ships, inclreasing the responsiblity of the Hydrographic office for complete up-to-date information. JUNE 1940 Jack was not particularly anxious to retire in 1940, though he had thought of continuing law study. However, officers were being encouraged to retire under a policy that gave an extra grade of rank to those that applied for voluntary retirement - a so-called Irish promotion. Very reluctantly about February 1940 he submitted his request for voluntary retirement. Unexpectedly, instead of being retired, he was promoted to Commander.He would have gone on the Retired List June 30, 1940 while in fact remaining on duty in charge of the New York [Branch] Hydrographic Office. On June 12, eighteen days before his scheduled retirement, all voluntary retirements were cancelled, and he stayed on the active list for six and one half more years, thus giving him an opportunity to qualify for thirty years active service, which he attained in mid-1943. He would remain on active duty for the DURATION of the National Emergency. The word "DURATION" was heard frequently throughout the war in Hawaii in relation to shortages, miitary law, and in many contexts.Around this date Jack succeeded retiring Captain Baggaley as officer in charge of the busy New York Branch Hydrographic Office. He retained a great enthusiasm for maps and charts, dating back to his Revenue Cutter School travels 1909-11, his work revising Bowditch tables 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office in District of Columbia, and his days as Executive Officer of Survey ship HANNIBAL 1933-5. SUMMER 1940 Photo web. p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines.The Barretts frequently watched gray squirrels at Owls Head park a few blocks from home at 96l5 Shore Road overlooking Narrows in Southwest Brooklyn..One time Jack had to hold his breath when a ten-foot-high wave suddenly crested near him - he rolled around on Jones Beach, and the wave passed over and he got up. He said John tried to swim to Europe with a dog-paddle.He stressed ability to float and tread water. We also visited the Bronx zoo, and Jack collected several books about the Zoo. We tried Coney Island once but regularly went to Jones Beach. During the summer of 1940 we visited Mrs. Dora Conover in Ossining, New York. She was a friend from the PRESIDENT PIERCE voyage of 1932 and looked well at age seventy-four on this visit. She prepared good meals despite unfortunately hot weather. Her son Frank sold antiques at home. We saw the film Pinocchio in Brooklyn. The "Technicolor" was considered advanced at the time.Jack collected books of his friend Felix Riesenberg, "Under Sail", "Cape Horn", "The Pacific Ocean." Mollie came to 9615 Shore Road only once, and that was a quick trip during a visit at Bill's in Darien. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son and daughter Carol Jane stayed one night in the apartment when they were our guests at the World's Fair. We bought a pencil -p.68- sharpener which we still have [1970] and another one as a gift for Ted. I was struck by the length of time Ethyle cooked the hamburgers; theyt wanted them crisp and well-done for their lunch the day after they went to the Fair, before leaving for their home in Hartford. On one occasion Sam Pollack had business in New York and brought his family. I think he was arranging to transfer to the Schenley company, which wanted him in its management.Not long after this he joined their staff in Cincinnati and later came as a senior executive to the home office in the Empire State Building. Young Thalia stayed with us. Friday she went with us to the World's Fair, where we enjoyed seeing the Borden cows milked mechanically. . I especially enjoyed a restaurant where we got tender rare roast beef and a wonderful dessert of cake and ice cream with fudge sauce. My brother Harry's sister-in-law, Marion Taylor, was a nurse at the Green Point hospital, Brooklyn, at this time. I invited her to dinner, and I spent a lot of time making roast chicken, which I had never served to my family before. Jack, John, and I were enjoying the meal when Marion said, "I don't like chicken." She ate it like a good sport. Helen Miller lived in Brooklyn and came to the apartment once to help hang curtains and draperies. She was still working for Mary Augusta Clark in the Commonwealth Fund. I talked with Mrs. Edward Beach on the phone early in our stay in Brooklyn, when she called up to invite me to dinner. I had to decline, however, as we had no baby sitter, and she felt it would not be an appropriate dinner for John. As a result I have not yet met those very good friends of Jack's from the battleship WYOMING [is it destroyer TOUCEY 1921?] About July 1940 we went to see Bee and Sam in Atlantic City. Jack said John needed no swimming instruction but instinctively dog-paddled, treaded water, floated, and tried to head for Europe. By the time we returned to their house, Sam and Bee had gone out for the evening, and John was so tired, we went right to bed. Jack was tired too, and although he meant to stretch out to rest for a short time, he fell asleep for the night. The next morning he found a police ticket in his car for having parked illegally overnight. One time Jack was caught in an eight or ten foot wave at Jones Beach,where we went frequently on south coast of Long Island. AUGUST 1940 Wednesday, August 28, 1940 was Jack's fifty-second birthday, and it happened that his 1912 shipmate Chester Swanner from the Lighthouse Tender ZIZANIA came to visit that day and accompanied Jack to Macy's Stores at 34th Street, where Jack bought a Baldwin spinet piano, of which we were very fond. It cost about seven hundred dollars on special sale in the summer doldrums, when many people are away and do not like to shop downtown. John learned to play "Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?" and other melodies. The piano remained in storage during our six years in Hawaii but was unpacked after we moved into our West Roxbury home on Thanksgiving Day 1947, where both Jack and John and our music teacher Giuseppe deLellis used it extensively. Chester Swanner was a native of Mississippi who was many years at sea. He went with us to the New York World's Fair that day and had dinner with us at #9615, but wanted to study the cattle in detail while we toured many exhibits. He had a special interest in Ayrshire cattle.Once in 1923 he had sent Jack a postcard from at freighter at Tamipaulis, Mexico. He had a daughter born about 1920.Mollie Barrett could not locate him when she visited Bay St. Louis, Mississippi in 1961 [Mollie went to see Mrs. DeSta, mother of her brother Bill's wife Margaret, whom Bill married in 1958]. Between Shore Road and the water of the harbor, we used to enjoy spring apple blossoms and other flowers, but that area was scheduled for highway developments after we left. One place we used to drive to see the "muck light" - the base of an old streetlight no longer in use . SEPTEMBER 1940 Joan Rooney from downstairs apartment appears in a group of photos December 1940 in Barrett apartment. [The wild apple blossoms were one of the attractive features of the spring flowers on the undeveloped slope between Shore Road and the ocean waters near The Narrows leading to New York Harbor in front of our apartment at #9615 Shore RoadWe toured the Perisphere and Trilon at the New York World's Fair, and Jack was proud of a lighted night view of the Perisphere, which he took with his Voightlander camera. We enjoyed the Borden cows and milking exhibit] There are some good family photos in Owl's Head Park with the Rooneys in September 1940. The latter part of our stay in Brooklyn they became close friends. We saw a lot of them around Christmas, l940 and in June 1941. OCTOBER 1940 Admiral James O.Richardson, highest ranking Navy officer afloat makes personal appeal to President Roosevelt to move Pacific Fleet back to Los Angeles from Pearl Harbor, where it was sent earlier in 1940 supposedly on temporary maneuvers, which becmae permanent base. Richardson may have had isolationist sentiments but presented strong evidence that ships and personnel were in grave danger of air or torpedo attack. If the President intended to keep the Fleet at Pearl Harbor, repeated War Games indicated the urgent need to increase safety. Richardson came to Washington D.C. three weeks before Presidential Election Day and confronted President Roosevelt, who was angry, believing Richardson crossed the line from military advice to political decision-making. Richardson thought he had persuaded the president, but was fired January 1941 shortly after Roosevelt's re-election to a third term despite secret major health problems. NOVEMBER 1940 Relocation of New York Branch Hydrographic office 4 p 226-8 Year: 1940_ New York Journal of Commerce,Thursday November 28, 1940 -from Sophie Barrett notebook Four pages 226-8: "DISPUTE REMOVAL OF NAVY BUREAU:-- SENTIMENT FAVORS CUSTOM HOUSE LOCATION OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C OFFICE. Reports that the New York Branch of the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, to which deep sea pilots always resort for navigation aids before sailing, will be moved from its present location in the Custon House to another site has stirred considerable comment in steamship circles. While no formal protest of the impending removal of the Bureau to a less convenient location has been launched as yet,numerous ship line officers and several maritime and trade organizations were understood to be considering such a step. DECENTRALIZATION OPPOSED. Moving of the Hydrographic Office to another building would mark the removal of a third Bureau closely allied with ship operations and navigation from the confines of the Custom House -- a decentralization of the shipping facilities that has found little favor with steamship operators. The Steamboat Inspectors' Office is now located at 45 Broadway,while the Coast and Geodetic Survey Office has been moved to 90 Church Street.Since ship masters, particularly those of vessels operating in foreign trade, always consult the Hydrographic Office on navigation conditions in their routes as soon as they have secured clearance papers,- moving of the Office from the Custom House is seen as especially inconveniencing regular services of the Office such as giving of information on ice conditions in the North Atlantic and sailing obstacles in foreign waters. These have been increased by the considerable special information on mine fields and other war-created hazards since the outbreak of the conflict.SPECIAL WARNINGS VALUABLE: As a consequence its service to pilots has become even [p.227] more valuable than in ordinary times.Masters of vessels plying into the war zone never fail to secure special warnings released by the Hydrographic Office regarduing such war hazards.Steamship companies apprised of the possible moving of the Office out of the Customs Building- in which they now obtain clearance papers and Coast Guard harbor regulations for leaving the harbor indicated their disapproval of the change. Although none of them was willing to comment officially,more than a dozen intimated they would direct a communication to W. E. Reynolds, the Administrator of Public Buildings of the Federal Works agency in Washington.Several maritime organization expressed the same view,with two of the leading ones suggesting they would not permit the removal of the Hydrographic Office to go through without directing their opinion to the proper governmental source.Commander John B. Barrett USN is the officer in charge of the New York Branch of the United States Navy Hydrographic Office.[end of news story]. DEMPWOLF letters: [Captain DEMPWOLF was an officer of Revenue Cutter School and appears along with cadet Jack Barrett in 1910 photo aboard training ship ITASCA, which appears on this website] "Dear Commander Barrett, The enclosed copy of a letter received from Captain G.S. Bryan, U.S. Navy., Washington D.C., dated 12 November 1940, is forwarded for your information. Sincerely, R. W. Dempwolf, Captain, United States Coast Guard,- Commander, New York district." [p.228] "New York, N.Y. 7 November 1940 [To] Captain C.C. Todd, U.S. Navy--Acting Hydrographer, Hydrographic Office, Washington D.C. -- Dear Captain Todd: It has come to my attention that efforts are being made by other government agencies to obtain the space now occupied by the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Custom House, New York. If such agencies succeed in obtaining this space, it would cause considerable inconvenience and hardship upon the masters of merchant vessels in obtaining necessary information prior to clearing the Port of New York.The clearances of vessels from the Port of New York are handled through the Marine Division at the Custom House and through the Commander, New York District of the Coast Guard.All of such clearances are approved by the Ship Control Board, Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. Whenever the clearance of a vessel is approved, the master is given a special number by the Coast Guard through the Marine Division at the Custom House.As you know, the average master desires the very latest information, and it is only fitting and proper that he should get this information just prior to his sailing from the Port of New York. Therefore, in my capacity as Commander New York District, United States Coast Guard and Captain of the Port of New York, I urgently recommend that the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Port of New York remain in its present location in the United States Custom Office. Very truly yours, R.W. Dempwolf, Captain United States Coast Guard, Commander New York District." The office was moved, but Jack considered the new location satisfactory, much better than the one originally proposed. I voted for Wendell Willkie for president in November 1940. It was the first time I voted. During World War II we purchased his book "One World", a report after his visits to Russia and China to encourage the war effort. The State of New York used to discriminate against voting by military personnel, so my husband could not vote. They also tried to collect 1939 income taxes, though he resided principally in California that year. A mistake by the Navy in sending data to New York required much correspondence to straighten out. Jack had also to explain the situation to Massachusetts Tax Commissioner Henry Long, who was later [1951] to become his good friend as his teacher in Taxation at Northeastern University Law School. DECEMBER 1940 Christmas photo p 68-1196 shows neighbor Joan Rooney age 5 of Apartment 1-A downstairs and John and Algeria photos and Tientsin rug. JANUARY 1941 President Roosevelt removed Admiral James O. Richardson from command of the Pacific based at Pearl Harbor after only one year of service instead of the usual two years. Roosevelt was angry because of Richardson's strenuous demand the Fleet be moved back to Los Angeles for safety. Roosevelt mistakenly believe the presence of the Fleet would deter Japenese aggressive intentions and show American resolve and support of Britain and Australia. Both were angry and did not communicate well. A dialogue on making the Fleet safer at Pearl Harbor could have been highly productive, but Roosevelt surrounded himself with 'yes-men.' APRIL 1941 -43-977 [Black Notebook 2 -p 157] "April 10, 1941 - 4701 Reservoir Road, Washington DC To. Commander John B. Barrett, Branch Hydrographic Office, New York, N.Y. Dear Doc: It was very kind of you to call attention to the discrepancies between the New York and Boston broadcasts. This matter does not come under my section, but I was glad to bring it to the attention of Watt, who is in charge of Pilot Charts. = He explains to me that the first broadcast, either New York or Boston, is used as a basis for the Washington broadcast. It is considered here that the mailgram would be too late for a radio broadcast from here. It seems that errors in transmission occasionally creep in, for recently the latitude of one of these submarine areas was given as twenty-one degrees -- the requested repeat still came twenty-one degrees - which was, of course, an obvious error. = In the case of forty degrees thirty minutes instead of forty degrees fifty minutes the larger area was chosen for the reason you advanced - for being on the safe side. Watt emphasizes the fact that he takes either your broadcast or that of Boston, - whichever comes first into the office, - and the mailgram is too late. The Coast Survey has placed these areas on their charts at our particular request,and what we are looking to do is to be able, after a time,to simplify the broadcasts by using the letters. This, I think, will be done as soon as the new charts beome thoroughly disseminated in the Navy and merchant marine. = The office is very busy here, as you may well imagine, but the work is increasingly interesting. I keep going pretty well and hope to see you if you make a trip this way. Be sure I appreciate your letter. Sincerely, s/Brad --P.S. Watt has just shown me a radiogram from Branch Hydrographic Office New York ... "between Latitudes forty - fifty northward and eight North and twenty-one twenty North. " We sent for a report, and it came back o.k except 'Latitude twenty-one". [Gershom Bradford, editor Notices to Mariners 1935-1942 Naval Hydrographic office,Washington D.C.] MAY 1941 In the spring of 1941 Jack was consulted by Charles Edey Fay of Connecticut, who had access to Atlantic Insurance Company records of the disappearance of the five man crew of the New Bedford fishing schooner MARY CELESTE November, 1872. Atlantic was one of five companies that insured the MARY CELESTE. Fay wanted Jack's interpretation of certain navigational notes of the MARY CELESTE near the Azores. He suggested the crew suddenly abandoned ship and got into small boats because they FEARED AN EXPLOSION OF ALCOHOL VAPORS FROM CARGO. Gershom Bradford published in American Neptune magazine his theory that waterspouts are frequent near the Azores in November - local severe tornados that draw water and sometimes fish high in the air and threaten small ships. The mystery remains unsolved, though some skeptics have suggested the motive was insurance fraud, and the crew may have survived. A waterspout would provide a rational explanation for the captain's decision to leave the vessel in good condition, and get into small boats, which were overwhelmed. Bradford showed evidence that water came down from above the ship in a peculiar manner suggestive of a waterspout, a reversal of the usual pressure conditions. Jack kept four of Fay's letters from around the time the Barretts left for Pearl Harbor mid-l941. Not long before we left New York, we spent an afternoon visiting Virginia, Bill, and Billy in Darien, where our former nursemaid Miss Blanche Caffey from Norfolk was helping look after young Billy.John, Jack, and Billy went swimming at the Darien Country Club. Jack took a photo of five year old John kneeling on the grass next to his twenty-month-old cousin Billy. We had it in our West Roxbury bedroom in 1950s and 1960s.We used Bill Barrett's dentist Dr. Ellis on Fifth Avenue in New York. We had a lady come in twice a week to vacuum the floors and furniture. She also took my aprons home to wash, and I gave her a great many of John's baby things when she said that her daughter was going to have a baby. On June 30,our last day in our apartment, Mrs. Rooney gave us a very good lunch - chicken, potatoes, and peas just before we caught our train for the West Coast. Mrs. Rooney died during the war, but we saw George Rooney and his second wife in 1958 in their same apartment after the wedding of David Geetter and his wife Joan Trouboff. Mr. Rooney said his daughter Joan was studying nursing. In 1941 Admiral Chester Nimitz then in charge of the Bureau of Navigation, sent orders for Jack to leave for Pearl Harbor in July. It was rather painful to tell Grandfather Barrett and Mollie. Grandpa guessed the news, but Mollie did not. In our 1937 Lincoln Zephyr we took a tour to Springfield and Greenfield, in western Massachusetts, drove near Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire, and stopped in for a night in South Boston without explaining the reason. It was a slightly awkward visit, as Mollie did not expect us and did not guess we were to be away for six years. Later on a visit to Darien we told Bill and Virginia we were leaving, and Bill and Jack took pictures of John (age five) and Billy (twenty-one months). In conversation with his brother Bill and with Brooklyn neighbors, especially in the aparment across the street at #9701, Jack emphatically predicted the Japanese would soon start a war, and urged action to cut off petroleum and scrap iron. In 1932 he had called the election between Hoover and Roosevelt a terible choice, as both were very weak on defense. Alongside isolationists like Herbert Hoover, Charles Lindberg, and Joseph Kennedy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt could maintain an image as an internationalist, but he often placed politics and budgetary consideratins ahead of re-building almost non-existent modern defenses. One example was the curtailment of Naval Reserve programs in 1933, when Roosevelt attempted to fulfill a 1932 campaign promise to balance the budget. The June 18m 1832 issue of Springfield Republican newspaper in a front page story commented on the issues when Springfield area Navy reservists made the last of the EAGLE 19 training cruises, and Jack Barrett was transferred to the survey ship HANNIBAL. Roosevelt appointed personal cronies to high military posts for which they were unqualfied - Navy chief Admiral Harold Stark, intelligence chief Richmond Kelley Turner, congressional liaison Admiral Claude Bloch, courageous but blundering Admiral Callaghan, and Army chief George Marshall. By ingenious deceptions the public was kept in ignorance of the severity of President Roosevelt's paralysis, which interfered with military decisions and prevented exercise, which severely aggravated his hardening of the arteries and led to incapacity at Yalta conference with Stalin February 1945 and his tragic stroke at age sixty-three April 12, 1945. These factors, along with Roosevelt's egotism, led to needless loss of more than two thousand three hundred lives at Pearl Harbor December 1941. The fall of Wake Islands and the Philippines were further falling dominoes, and the holocaust in Europe and subsequent Russian control of east Europe. On the other hand the majority of Congress, the public and the news media were equally culpable, without Roosevelt's medical excuse. The New York Times for years in the 1930s suppressed reports of the mass murder of Ukrainian farmers by Stalin and Lysenko.Hitler invaded Russia June 1941 and advanced rapidly with fast tank movements. Russia appeared in collapse as Leningrad was surrounded and beseiged, Moscow threatened, most of Ukraine breadbasket captured, southern oil fields threatened, and decisive battle near Volga at Stalingrad deep in Russia about a year and a half away. On the last day of our lease June 30 after a goodbye lunch with the Rooneys we took a train for the West Coast.JULY 1941 We took a northerly route because of our previous experience with summer weather. We crossed Nebraska. Around daybreak at five AM Jack called us as we passed into Colorado at Julesburg on the northern border of the state. We were only in the state a few minutes. Then we went across Wyoming and were a mile high in Cheyenne, as Jack told us then and used to recollect in later years. We got out of the train there briefly. At Salt Lake City we changed trains and headed South through Utah to Las Vegas and southern California.Probably there was a little less hot weather than on the Arizona route.. We were to catch the Matson Line LURLINE at Wilmington, California near Los Angeles about July 10 and arrive Honolulu July 15. The Pardees saw us off and were very impressed with the suite we occupied on the LURLINE. I think C.J. Todd [former Revenue Cutter School classmate] may have been there also. HAWAII CHAPTER FOLLOWS. #142 p 18


 

141.
Mollie and Pistorino family Rome l963

 

Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines. Year: 1940BrooklynOwlsHead p 18-142 p 73-1232 Sophie notebook Two 1939 pp.188-9 w1232 B- R-O-O-K-L-Y-N H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines. NEW YORK chapter HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE August 1939 to June 1941 and departure for Hawaii about July 10, 1941. [follows TRINITY chapter] TEXT: AUGUST 1939 We had a three week visit in South Boston with Jack's eighty-four year old father and his sister Mollie in very hot August weather. The three weeks John and I spent in South Boston in August 1939 [while Jack was househunting in New York and Brooklyn] were the longest opportunity for John and his grandfather to become acquainted. Grandpa Barrett had visited Norfolk {Virginia] in [May] 1936 and [Bala Cynwyd] Philadelphia in 1937 and 1938 when John was a baby, and saw him again briefly in June 1941 juat before we left for Hawaii. John sent carefully lettered cards to him from Hawaii when he was six years old, and Jack took countless picutres of us to send to Grandpa and Mollie to keep their spirits high. A very large batch of pictures were sent to him from Hawaii in June, l942. Grandpa saw and enjoyed them before he died two months later [August 21, l942 less than] four months before his eighty-eighth birthday. The old house at 640 East Seventh Street was not an ideal place for an active three year old boy in the August heat. Grandpa wanted to keep all the doors shut, but John and I felt the need of fresh air. He also thought that John should get more sleep, but John was not accustomed to going to bed right after supper in broad daylight, and I thought it would be cruel to put him to bed so early, especially when he always had an afternoon nap. Mollie even brought down from the attic some of the kindergarten supplies -wooden pegs and puzzles,- which her brother Bill's first wife Catherine Miley used in teaching her kindergarten classes in New York in the 1920s. [Catherine married Bill Barrett in 1923, died of cancer February 1931 while we were in Tientsin, China.]= Grandpa thought they should occupy John for days on end.[end p. 189, notebook Two] [p. 259 Notebook Four]--Plagued by the heat and fatigue, Jack reported to Captain Baggaley at the Naval Hydrographic Office, then in New York Customs House, and found a temporary furnished apartment for himself in Brooklyn. We remained at 640 East Seventh Street [South Boston] as the guests of Grandpa and Aunt Mollie, who did all they could for our comfort that stifling hot summer. ett in her teaching days. SEPTEMBER 1939 The war in Europe was about to begin September 3, 1939 with Hitler's invasion of Poland. The New York Branch Hydrographic Office would be an important and sensitve center for the Navy to receive reports of mine, blockade, and submarine hazards as well as the usual weather, ice, and water depth reports. Finally with the help of his Fordham Law School friend John Papp, Jack found an unfurnished apartment at 9615 Shore Road in Brooklyn,-Apartment 2A on the second floor - arranged the furniture which had arrived from storage in San Diego,-found a garage where he left his car,came to Boston for us, - and Jack, John and I traveled by train to the Grand Central Station, then took a taxi to the apartment in Brooklyn. There was a central long corridor, an excellent view,two large bedrooms,a large living room, a good sized kitchen, and plenty of room for all our Chinese rugs and other furnishings. John was three and a half years old then and still remembers that apartment, thirty years later. The rent was very reasonable.The very large apartment house [six floors] belonged to the State of New York, which kept in excellent repair with a capable superintendant, two hall boys in the large entrance hall, and an exterminator who came frequently to inquire about roaches or other bugs. The area across Shore Road was a mixture of tall grass, trees, sand, shrubs, and flowers, - unfortunately sacrificed only a few years later to build vast expanses of paved highways. But when we lived there, Jack and John enjoyed many happy hours picking wild grasses, buttercups, daisies, and dandelions for my bouquets, and they took many excellent snapshots of John's toy animals there. John loved that apartment and vicinity. His crib was in our bedroom, but John had his own play room, and had his father with him every evening and weekend.The play room faced on New York Harbor- we could see the ships coming and going in and out of New York. Jack raised and photographed flowers in pots in the room- flowers that John liked very much, - amaryllis, ranunculus, tuberous begonias, anemones and other potted plants. Jack had no luck with freesias. He used three toothpicks in a triangle to suspend the stones from avocadoes over water in glass milk bottles, and the avocadoes would sprout several feet with big leaves. There was a large Chinese ancient kassu rug on the play room floor, - building blocks, Tinkertoys,a small and a large rocking chair, and a blackboard on the wall. There was also a solidly built writing table, on which Jack had cut off the legs to make the writing surface about two feet from the floor, and a small straight chair to fit the table. The room had many child's books including a Koala book from Australia- all the Beatrix Potter Peter Rabbit series books + Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. A little child's story of the dog Sniffy and the cat Mitzi provided us with a name for the toy cat our 1937 Cynwyd maid from Ireland Nellie Kelley gave John in Philadelphia. On May 19, 1940 Mitzi appears in several of John's better photographs in the fields across Shore Road. The koala bear sent by the Craig family from Melbourne was one of the first of John's big collection of toy animals.Jack also had a porcelain kookaburra bird less than two inches high from Australia. Mitzie was an early addition. Grandpa gave a white toy horse, and Bill gave a rocking horse in Coronado. A candy company gave away toy Peter Rabitt bunnies with boxes of Easter candy, and we added a "Saucy Squirrel", several more rabbits, a toy dog, a bear, a panda, and a cow. We also had TinkerToys to use to make windmills with blue cardboard blades, a derrick, and a spring motor. We spent long hours with the TinkerToys. My sister Esther sent several books, among them "The Little Engine that Could.". - Uncle Bill's gift of French Becassine books he purchased in Europe on his 1938 honeymoon. " I used to read to John by the hour, pointing to the words as I -p. 260- read, and by the time John was three and a half years old, I was amazed to find that he could read although I had made no effort to teach him. As a matter of fact I thought he was correcting me from memory, until he actually read something to me. He would puzle over the Culbertson bridge columns, understanding card play before bidding. The Barrett family used to play "High-Low-Jack" in South Boston. My father played pinochle, and I learned "Russian bank" aboard the transport HENDERSON in 1930. John also studied the comic strips, "Napoleon and Uncle Elby", "Bringing up Father" with Maggie and Jiggs, and "Mutt and Jeff." =Not long after Billy Barrett was born August 26, 1939, Bill & Virginia had trouble getting help & were glad to get Miss Caffey's name from Jack as a nurse for Billy. OCTOBER She was working for them in Darien Connecticut when we visited them at suppertime one day in October l939.Since Virginia expected us early in the afternoon & didn't expect us to have dinner there, I am afraid we ate Miss Caffey's hamburger- but she was most gracious & happy to see John again.If she happens to read this, I hope she'll send her address.In l940 Bill called up to give me my first news of Jack's promotion to Commander.He also had been the first one to read the news when Jack made Lieutenant Commander early in l932. NOVEMBER At Thanksgiving we drove to Overbrook Pennsylvania near Philadelphia to see my sister Bee. Sam Pollack worked for LaRoux liquers making cordials, & their two children Jason & Thalia were somewhat older than John.Jen & Pete Meranski drove up from Baltimore for a fine Thanksgiving dinner. we met the Pollacks at Atlantic City New Jersey in 1940, where Jack said John dog-paddled without instruction and was ready to "head for Europe." Members of my family visited us many times in Brooklyn, especially my brother Harry's wife's sister Marion Taylor, who was then a nurse in Brooklyn at Greenpoint hospital. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son Ted and daughter Carol Jane were among the visitors, and my sister Esther, and several times we saw my sister Bertha Pollack and her children Jason and Thalia. My brother Benjamin Meranski came down one time from Hartford. He was interested in music and theater. Other frequent vistors were my 1927-1930 landlady social worker Ann Taylor McCormack, and Helen Miller of the Commonwealth Fund, Sometimes we took guests to Jones Beach on Long Island, where once Jack Barrett had to take a deep breath before being rolled around the beach under a eight-or-ten-foot high breaking ocean wave. Fortunately he saw it a moment before it hit, grabbed a deep breath, and rolled around with it until is passed by without serious effects.After that we used the children's area to swim in at Jones Beach.Jones Beach was much cleaner and less crowded than Coney Island where we went once or twice.It did have high waves, however, and rather cold water. My 1923 Mount Holyoke clasmate Catherine Kay Trufant made one trip to Jones Beach iwth us, as did Anne McCormack's sister Eleanor Taylor. Kay Trufant's family raised cranberries in Cape Cod area. Anne gave John a Hershey bar-it would have been the first candy bar he ever had. He was not used to chocolate at that time, and when he did not open it after several days, I finally ate it. Anne and Ivan came for Sunday dinner one time at 9615 Shore Road, and we returned their visit - at Patchin Place, Greenwich Village, where they resided at this time and for many years. Anne continued acquaintance with Harry Hopkins, whom I had known in 1928 - she worked for Travelers Aid many years. She had known Jane Addams, the early Chicago social worker.Sometimes we would take guests to New York World's Fair at Flushing,where Jack photographed the Perisphere and Trilon with his Voightlander camera. We enjoyed the Borden cows and milking exhibit. Visitors to West Roxbury in 1950s admired the light and dark contrasts in Jack's nighttime photo of the illuminated Perisphere, where Worlds Fair visitors watched movies inside. DECEMBER 1939 John was quite interested in the snow in the back courtyard at 96l5 Shore Road after the mild winter the year before in the San Diego area.The paved courtyard used to have curious little whirlwinds produced by the shape of the building- his father would point them out& talk about low pressure systems.Jack explained the terms "transparent, translucent, opaque" as we has a translucent frosted bathroom window. There was a small patch of poison ivy on our back fence downstairs, & Jack would tell how his father once in autumn met some tourists who ignored his advice & collected bright-red bunches of three-leaved poison ivy, with a little stem on the middle leaf. Both Christmases at Brooklyn l939-40 we devoted considerable energy to decorating small Christmas trees.One year there was a considerable problem with a leak in a tub of water that was used to prevent the tree from drying out. We have photos from both Christmases, & Joan Rooney age five from downstairs appears in the l940 Christmas photos.We still have l970 much of the Chinese furniture which appears in pictures in the Brooklyn apartment.Jack fashioned clothesline swings on the roof for John. The stores in Brooklyn on Third, Fourth & Fifth Streets were about five blocks walk up 97th Street from Shore Road.This was also the route to the subway Jack rode to work at the Custom House tower.There was a good meat market on Third Avenue where we bought rib roasts & chopped sirloin.We soon made the acquaintance of the George Rooney family on the first floor & became very good friends.For recreation we would walk to Fort Hamilton, drive to Prospect Park or Owls Head park to see the squirrels.Later on we made more ambitious trips to Jones Beach, Coney Island,& the l939-40 World's Fair at Flushing. FEBRUARY 1940 After dinner every evening John enjoyed a very leisurely bath, playing with a transparent plastic ball which contained a few toy fish, - and with a large red, celluloid fish.Then his father put on his own pajamas, and John wore his,and the two of them would study the stars at the bedroom window, which faced Shore Road and the Ocean near the Narrows..-In February l940 there was a spectacular display of the five planets Mercury,Venus,Mars,Jupiter & Saturn all visible shortly after sunset in the western sky over the Narrows, where on the New Jersey side west of us there was a big red illuminated Wrigley's chewing gum advertising neon sign.We used to say we hoped Venus wouldn't get stuck in the chewing gum. This close alignment of the five visible planets is infrequent, occuring evering twenty years or so. John's bedroom was on the front of the house where they could get an excellent view of the stars over the water, and John developed a lasting interest in astronomy, -p. 189- which his navigator father always encouraged. Before he was four years old, John could point out the North Star, the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia's Chair, Venus, Mercury, Deneb, and many others. When he was five or six years old, in Hawaii, he could point out the Southern Cross to me over Diamond Head in Waikiki. Sometimes when Jack was tired he would say he "wouldn't go across the street to see the Statue of Liberty do a dance."We began to accumulate the Beatrix Potter series of illustrated books Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny,the Flopsy Bunnies, Mrs. Tittlemouse, the Tailor of Gloucester,Timmy Tiptoes, Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, Tom Kitten, the Roly-Poly Pudding, Jeremy Fisher, the Two Bad Mice, Johnny Townmouse, and the rest.Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. MAY 1940 The blitzkrieg overwhelmed France, which surrendered. Northern France was directly ruled by Nazi forces, while a Vichy regime collaborated with the invaders in the south. [Sophie Barrett later read with interest the memoir of Admiral Leahy, who became United States ambassador to the Vichy governent and in 1942 Chief of Staff to President Roosevelt.] The mine and sub situation in the Atlantic was hazardous for convoys and all ships, inclreasing the responsiblity of the Hydrographic office for complete up-to-date information. JUNE 1940 Jack was not particularly anxious to retire in 1940, though he had thought of continuing law study. However, officers were being encouraged to retire under a policy that gave an extra grade of rank to those that applied for voluntary retirement - a so-called Irish promotion. Very reluctantly about February 1940 he submitted his request for voluntary retirement. Unexpectedly, instead of being retired, he was promoted to Commander.He would have gone on the Retired List June 30, 1940 while in fact remaining on duty in charge of the New York [Branch] Hydrographic Office. On June 12, eighteen days before his scheduled retirement, all voluntary retirements were cancelled, and he stayed on the active list for six and one half more years, thus giving him an opportunity to qualify for thirty years active service, which he attained in mid-1943. He would remain on active duty for the DURATION of the National Emergency. The word "DURATION" was heard frequently throughout the war in Hawaii in relation to shortages, miitary law, and in many contexts.Around this date Jack succeeded retiring Captain Baggaley as officer in charge of the busy New York Branch Hydrographic Office. He retained a great enthusiasm for maps and charts, dating back to his Revenue Cutter School travels 1909-11, his work revising Bowditch tables 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office in District of Columbia, and his days as Executive Officer of Survey ship HANNIBAL 1933-5. SUMMER 1940 Photo web. p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines.The Barretts frequently watched gray squirrels at Owls Head park a few blocks from home at 96l5 Shore Road overlooking Narrows in Southwest Brooklyn..One time Jack had to hold his breath when a ten-foot-high wave suddenly crested near him - he rolled around on Jones Beach, and the wave passed over and he got up. He said John tried to swim to Europe with a dog-paddle.He stressed ability to float and tread water. We also visited the Bronx zoo, and Jack collected several books about the Zoo. We tried Coney Island once but regularly went to Jones Beach. During the summer of 1940 we visited Mrs. Dora Conover in Ossining, New York. She was a friend from the PRESIDENT PIERCE voyage of 1932 and looked well at age seventy-four on this visit. She prepared good meals despite unfortunately hot weather. Her son Frank sold antiques at home. We saw the film Pinocchio in Brooklyn. The "Technicolor" was considered advanced at the time.Jack collected books of his friend Felix Riesenberg, "Under Sail", "Cape Horn", "The Pacific Ocean." Mollie came to 9615 Shore Road only once, and that was a quick trip during a visit at Bill's in Darien. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son and daughter Carol Jane stayed one night in the apartment when they were our guests at the World's Fair. We bought a pencil -p.68- sharpener which we still have [1970] and another one as a gift for Ted. I was struck by the length of time Ethyle cooked the hamburgers; theyt wanted them crisp and well-done for their lunch the day after they went to the Fair, before leaving for their home in Hartford. On one occasion Sam Pollack had business in New York and brought his family. I think he was arranging to transfer to the Schenley company, which wanted him in its management.Not long after this he joined their staff in Cincinnati and later came as a senior executive to the home office in the Empire State Building. Young Thalia stayed with us. Friday she went with us to the World's Fair, where we enjoyed seeing the Borden cows milked mechanically. . I especially enjoyed a restaurant where we got tender rare roast beef and a wonderful dessert of cake and ice cream with fudge sauce. My brother Harry's sister-in-law, Marion Taylor, was a nurse at the Green Point hospital, Brooklyn, at this time. I invited her to dinner, and I spent a lot of time making roast chicken, which I had never served to my family before. Jack, John, and I were enjoying the meal when Marion said, "I don't like chicken." She ate it like a good sport. Helen Miller lived in Brooklyn and came to the apartment once to help hang curtains and draperies. She was still working for Mary Augusta Clark in the Commonwealth Fund. I talked with Mrs. Edward Beach on the phone early in our stay in Brooklyn, when she called up to invite me to dinner. I had to decline, however, as we had no baby sitter, and she felt it would not be an appropriate dinner for John. As a result I have not yet met those very good friends of Jack's from the battleship WYOMING [is it destroyer TOUCEY 1921?] About July 1940 we went to see Bee and Sam in Atlantic City. Jack said John needed no swimming instruction but instinctively dog-paddled, treaded water, floated, and tried to head for Europe. By the time we returned to their house, Sam and Bee had gone out for the evening, and John was so tired, we went right to bed. Jack was tired too, and although he meant to stretch out to rest for a short time, he fell asleep for the night. The next morning he found a police ticket in his car for having parked illegally overnight. One time Jack was caught in an eight or ten foot wave at Jones Beach,where we went frequently on south coast of Long Island. AUGUST 1940 Wednesday, August 28, 1940 was Jack's fifty-second birthday, and it happened that his 1912 shipmate Chester Swanner from the Lighthouse Tender ZIZANIA came to visit that day and accompanied Jack to Macy's Stores at 34th Street, where Jack bought a Baldwin spinet piano, of which we were very fond. It cost about seven hundred dollars on special sale in the summer doldrums, when many people are away and do not like to shop downtown. John learned to play "Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?" and other melodies. The piano remained in storage during our six years in Hawaii but was unpacked after we moved into our West Roxbury home on Thanksgiving Day 1947, where both Jack and John and our music teacher Giuseppe deLellis used it extensively. Chester Swanner was a native of Mississippi who was many years at sea. He went with us to the New York World's Fair that day and had dinner with us at #9615, but wanted to study the cattle in detail while we toured many exhibits. He had a special interest in Ayrshire cattle.Once in 1923 he had sent Jack a postcard from at freighter at Tamipaulis, Mexico. He had a daughter born about 1920.Mollie Barrett could not locate him when she visited Bay St. Louis, Mississippi in 1961 [Mollie went to see Mrs. DeSta, mother of her brother Bill's wife Margaret, whom Bill married in 1958]. The wild apple blossoms were one of the attractive features among the spring flowers on the undeveloped slope between Shore Road and the ocean waters near The Narrows leading to New York Harbor in front of our apartment at #9615 Shore Road but that area was scheduled for highway developments after we left. One place we used to drive to see we called the "muck light" - the base of an old streetlight no longer in use SEPTEMBER 1940 Joan Rooney from downstairs apartment appears in a group of photos December 1940 in Barrett apartment. There are some good family photos in Owl's Head Park with the Rooneys in September 1940. The latter part of our stay in Brooklyn they became close friends. We saw a lot of them around Christmas, l940 and in June 1941. OCTOBER 1940 Admiral James O.Richardson, highest ranking Navy officer afloat makes personal appeal to President Roosevelt to move Pacific Fleet back to Los Angeles from Pearl Harbor, where it was sent earlier in 1940 supposedly on temporary maneuvers, which becmae permanent base. Richardson may have had isolationist sentiments but presented strong evidence that ships and personnel were in grave danger of air or torpedo attack. If the President intended to keep the Fleet at Pearl Harbor, repeated War Games indicated the urgent need to increase safety. Richardson came to Washington D.C. three weeks before Presidential Election Day and confronted President Roosevelt, who was angry, believing Richardson crossed the line from military advice to political decision-making. Richardson thought he had persuaded the president, but was fired January 1941 shortly after Roosevelt's re-election to a third term despite secret major health problems. NOVEMBER 1940 Relocation of New York Branch Hydrographic office 4 p 226-8 Year: 1940_ New York Journal of Commerce,Thursday November 28, 1940 -from Sophie Barrett notebook Four pages 226-8: "DISPUTE REMOVAL OF NAVY BUREAU:-- SENTIMENT FAVORS CUSTOM HOUSE LOCATION OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C OFFICE. Reports that the New York Branch of the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, to which deep sea pilots always resort for navigation aids before sailing, will be moved from its present location in the Custon House to another site has stirred considerable comment in steamship circles. While no formal protest of the impending removal of the Bureau to a less convenient location has been launched as yet,numerous ship line officers and several maritime and trade organizations were understood to be considering such a step. DECENTRALIZATION OPPOSED. Moving of the Hydrographic Office to another building would mark the removal of a third Bureau closely allied with ship operations and navigation from the confines of the Custom House -- a decentralization of the shipping facilities that has found little favor with steamship operators. The Steamboat Inspectors' Office is now located at 45 Broadway,while the Coast and Geodetic Survey Office has been moved to 90 Church Street.Since ship masters, particularly those of vessels operating in foreign trade, always consult the Hydrographic Office on navigation conditions in their routes as soon as they have secured clearance papers,- moving of the Office from the Custom House is seen as especially inconveniencing regular services of the Office such as giving of information on ice conditions in the North Atlantic and sailing obstacles in foreign waters. These have been increased by the considerable special information on mine fields and other war-created hazards since the outbreak of the conflict.SPECIAL WARNINGS VALUABLE: As a consequence its service to pilots has become even [p.227] more valuable than in ordinary times.Masters of vessels plying into the war zone never fail to secure special warnings released by the Hydrographic Office regarduing such war hazards.Steamship companies apprised of the possible moving of the Office out of the Customs Building- in which they now obtain clearance papers and Coast Guard harbor regulations for leaving the harbor indicated their disapproval of the change. Although none of them was willing to comment officially,more than a dozen intimated they would direct a communication to W. E. Reynolds, the Administrator of Public Buildings of the Federal Works agency in Washington.Several maritime organization expressed the same view,with two of the leading ones suggesting they would not permit the removal of the Hydrographic Office to go through without directing their opinion to the proper governmental source.Commander John B. Barrett USN is the officer in charge of the New York Branch of the United States Navy Hydrographic Office.[end of news story]. DEMPWOLF letters: [Captain DEMPWOLF was an officer of Revenue Cutter School and appears along with cadet Jack Barrett in 1910 photo aboard training ship ITASCA, which appears on this website] "Dear Commander Barrett, The enclosed copy of a letter received from Captain G.S. Bryan, U.S. Navy., Washington D.C., dated 12 November 1940, is forwarded for your information. Sincerely, R. W. Dempwolf, Captain, United States Coast Guard,- Commander, New York district." [p.228] "New York, N.Y. 7 November 1940 [To] Captain C.C. Todd, U.S. Navy--Acting Hydrographer, Hydrographic Office, Washington D.C. -- Dear Captain Todd: It has come to my attention that efforts are being made by other government agencies to obtain the space now occupied by the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Custom House, New York. If such agencies succeed in obtaining this space, it would cause considerable inconvenience and hardship upon the masters of merchant vessels in obtaining necessary information prior to clearing the Port of New York.The clearances of vessels from the Port of New York are handled through the Marine Division at the Custom House and through the Commander, New York District of the Coast Guard.All of such clearances are approved by the Ship Control Board, Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. Whenever the clearance of a vessel is approved, the master is given a special number by the Coast Guard through the Marine Division at the Custom House.As you know, the average master desires the very latest information, and it is only fitting and proper that he should get this information just prior to his sailing from the Port of New York. Therefore, in my capacity as Commander New York District, United States Coast Guard and Captain of the Port of New York, I urgently recommend that the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Port of New York remain in its present location in the United States Custom Office. Very truly yours, R.W. Dempwolf, Captain United States Coast Guard, Commander New York District." The office was moved, but Jack considered the new location satisfactory, much better than the one originally proposed. I voted for Wendell Willkie for president in November 1940. It was the first time I voted. During World War II we purchased his book "One World", a report after his visits to Russia and China to encourage the war effort. The State of New York used to discriminate against voting by military personnel, so my husband could not vote. They also tried to collect 1939 income taxes, though he resided principally in California that year. A mistake by the Navy in sending data to New York required much correspondence to straighten out. Jack had also to explain the situation to Massachusetts Tax Commissioner Henry Long, who was later [1951] to become his good friend as his teacher in Taxation at Northeastern University Law School. DECEMBER 1940 Christmas photo p 68-1196 shows neighbor Joan Rooney age 5 of Apartment 1-A downstairs and John and Algeria photos and Tientsin rug. JANUARY 1941 President Roosevelt removed Admiral James O. Richardson from command of the Pacific based at Pearl Harbor after only one year of service instead of the usual two years. Roosevelt was angry because of Richardson's strenuous demand the Fleet be moved back to Los Angeles for safety. Roosevelt mistakenly believe the presence of the Fleet would deter Japenese aggressive intentions and show American resolve and support of Britain and Australia. Both were angry and did not communicate well. A dialogue on making the Fleet safer at Pearl Harbor could have been highly productive, but Roosevelt surrounded himself with 'yes-men.' APRIL 1941 -43-977 [Black Notebook 2 -p 157] "April 10, 1941 - 4701 Reservoir Road, Washington DC To. Commander John B. Barrett, Branch Hydrographic Office, New York, N.Y. Dear Doc: It was very kind of you to call attention to the discrepancies between the New York and Boston broadcasts. This matter does not come under my section, but I was glad to bring it to the attention of Watt, who is in charge of Pilot Charts. = He explains to me that the first broadcast, either New York or Boston, is used as a basis for the Washington broadcast. It is considered here that the mailgram would be too late for a radio broadcast from here. It seems that errors in transmission occasionally creep in, for recently the latitude of one of these submarine areas was given as twenty-one degrees -- the requested repeat still came twenty-one degrees - which was, of course, an obvious error. = In the case of forty degrees thirty minutes instead of forty degrees fifty minutes the larger area was chosen for the reason you advanced - for being on the safe side. Watt emphasizes the fact that he takes either your broadcast or that of Boston, - whichever comes first into the office, - and the mailgram is too late. The Coast Survey has placed these areas on their charts at our particular request,and what we are looking to do is to be able, after a time,to simplify the broadcasts by using the letters. This, I think, will be done as soon as the new charts beome thoroughly disseminated in the Navy and merchant marine. = The office is very busy here, as you may well imagine, but the work is increasingly interesting. I keep going pretty well and hope to see you if you make a trip this way. Be sure I appreciate your letter. Sincerely, s/Brad --P.S. Watt has just shown me a radiogram from Branch Hydrographic Office New York ... "between Latitudes forty - fifty northward and eight North and twenty-one twenty North. " We sent for a report, and it came back o.k except 'Latitude twenty-one". [Gershom Bradford, editor Notices to Mariners 1935-1942 Naval Hydrographic office,Washington D.C.] MAY 1941 In the spring of 1941 Jack was consulted by Charles Edey Fay of Connecticut, who had access to Atlantic Insurance Company records of the disappearance of the five man crew of the New Bedford fishing schooner MARY CELESTE November, 1872. Atlantic was one of five companies that insured the MARY CELESTE. Fay wanted Jack's interpretation of certain navigational notes of the MARY CELESTE near the Azores. He suggested the crew suddenly abandoned ship and got into small boats because they FEARED AN EXPLOSION OF ALCOHOL VAPORS FROM CARGO. Gershom Bradford published in American Neptune magazine his theory that waterspouts are frequent near the Azores in November - local severe tornados that draw water and sometimes fish high in the air and threaten small ships. The mystery remains unsolved, though some skeptics have suggested the motive was insurance fraud, and the crew may have survived. A waterspout would provide a rational explanation for the captain's decision to leave the vessel in good condition, and get into small boats, which were overwhelmed. Bradford showed evidence that water came down from above the ship in a peculiar manner suggestive of a waterspout, a reversal of the usual pressure conditions. Jack kept four of Fay's letters from around the time the Barretts left for Pearl Harbor mid-l941. Not long before we left New York, we spent an afternoon visiting Virginia, Bill, and Billy in Darien, where our former nursemaid Miss Blanche Caffey from Norfolk was helping look after young Billy.John, Jack, and Billy went swimming at the Darien Country Club. Jack took a photo of five year old John kneeling on the grass next to his twenty-month-old cousin Billy. We had it in our West Roxbury bedroom in 1950s and 1960s.We used Bill Barrett's dentist Dr. Ellis on Fifth Avenue in New York. We had a lady come in twice a week to vacuum the floors and furniture. She also took my aprons home to wash, and I gave her a great many of John's baby things when she said that her daughter was going to have a baby. On June 30,our last day in our apartment, Mrs. Rooney gave us a very good lunch - chicken, potatoes, and peas just before we caught our train for the West Coast. Mrs. Rooney died during the war, but we saw George Rooney and his second wife in 1958 in their same apartment after the wedding of David Geetter and his wife Joan Trouboff. Mr. Rooney said his daughter Joan was studying nursing. In 1941 Admiral Chester Nimitz then in charge of the Bureau of Navigation, sent orders for Jack to leave for Pearl Harbor in July. It was rather painful to tell Grandfather Barrett and Mollie. Grandpa guessed the news, but Mollie did not. In our 1937 Lincoln Zephyr we took a tour to Springfield and Greenfield, in western Massachusetts, drove near Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire, and stopped in for a night in South Boston without explaining the reason. It was a slightly awkward visit, as Mollie did not expect us and did not guess we were to be away for six years. Later on a visit to Darien we told Bill and Virginia we were leaving, and Bill and Jack took pictures of John (age five) and Billy (twenty-one months). In conversation with his brother Bill and with Brooklyn neighbors, especially in the aparment across the street at #9701, Jack emphatically predicted the Japanese would soon start a war, and urged action to cut off petroleum and scrap iron. In 1932 he had called the election between Hoover and Roosevelt a terible choice, as both were very weak on defense. Alongside isolationists like Herbert Hoover, Charles Lindberg, and Joseph Kennedy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt could maintain an image as an internationalist, but he often placed politics and budgetary consideratins ahead of re-building almost non-existent modern defenses. One example was the curtailment of Naval Reserve programs in 1933, when Roosevelt attempted to fulfill a 1932 campaign promise to balance the budget. The June 18m 1832 issue of Springfield Republican newspaper in a front page story commented on the issues when Springfield area Navy reservists made the last of the EAGLE 19 training cruises, and Jack Barrett was transferred to the survey ship HANNIBAL. Roosevelt appointed personal cronies to high military posts for which they were unqualfied - Navy chief Admiral Harold Stark, intelligence chief Richmond Kelley Turner, congressional liaison Admiral Claude Bloch, courageous but blundering Admiral Callaghan, and Army chief George Marshall. By ingenious deceptions the public was kept in ignorance of the severity of President Roosevelt's paralysis, which interfered with military decisions and prevented exercise, which severely aggravated his hardening of the arteries and led to incapacity at Yalta conference with Stalin February 1945 and his tragic stroke at age sixty-three April 12, 1945. These factors, along with Roosevelt's egotism, led to needless loss of more than two thousand three hundred lives at Pearl Harbor December 1941. The fall of Wake Islands and the Philippines were further falling dominoes, and the holocaust in Europe and subsequent Russian control of east Europe. On the other hand the majority of Congress, the public and the news media were equally culpable, without Roosevelt's medical excuse. The New York Times for years in the 1930s suppressed reports of the mass murder of Ukrainian farmers by Stalin and Lysenko.Hitler invaded Russia June 1941 and advanced rapidly with fast tank movements. Russia appeared in collapse as Leningrad was surrounded and beseiged, Moscow threatened, most of Ukraine breadbasket captured, southern oil fields threatened, and decisive battle near Volga at Stalingrad deep in Russia about a year and a half away. On the last day of our lease June 30 after a goodbye lunch with the Rooneys we took a train for the West Coast.JULY 1941 We took a northerly route because of our previous experience with summer weather. We crossed Nebraska. Around daybreak at five AM Jack called us as we passed into Colorado at Julesburg on the northern border of the state. We were only in the state a few minutes. Then we went across Wyoming and were a mile high in Cheyenne, as Jack told us then and used to recollect in later years. We got out of the train there briefly. At Salt Lake City we changed trains and headed South through Utah to Las Vegas and southern California.Probably there was a little less hot weather than on the Arizona route.. We were to catch the Matson Line LURLINE at Wilmington, California near Los Angeles about July 10 and arrive Honolulu July 15. The Pardees saw us off and were very impressed with the suite we occupied on the LURLINE. I think C.J. Todd [former Revenue Cutter School classmate] may have been there also. HAWAII CHAPTER FOLLOWS. #142 p 18


 

142.
Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines.

 

p 18-142 p 73-1232 Sophie notebook Two 1939 pp.188-9 w1232 B- R-O-O-K-L-Y-N H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines. NEW YORK chapter HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE August 1939 to June 1941 and departure for Hawaii about July 10, 1941. [follows TRINITY chapter] TEXT: AUGUST 1939 We had a three week visit in South Boston with Jack's eighty-four year old father and his sister Mollie in very hot August weather. The three weeks John and I spent in South Boston in August 1939 [while Jack was househunting in New York and Brooklyn] were the longest opportunity for John and his grandfather to become acquainted. Grandpa Barrett had visited Norfolk {Virginia] in [May] 1936 and [Bala Cynwyd] Philadelphia in 1937 and 1938 when John was a baby, and saw him again briefly in June 1941 juat before we left for Hawaii. John sent carefully lettered cards to him from Hawaii when he was six years old, and Jack took countless pictures of us to send to Grandpa and Mollie to keep their spirits high. A very large batch of pictures were sent to him from Hawaii in June, l942. Grandpa saw and enjoyed them before he died two months later [August 21, l942 less than] four months before his eighty-eighth birthday. The old house at 640 East Seventh Street was not an ideal place for an active three year old boy in the August heat. Grandpa wanted to keep all the doors shut, but John and I felt the need of fresh air. He also thought that John should get more sleep, but John was not accustomed to going to bed right after supper in broad daylight, and I thought it would be cruel to put him to bed so early, especially when he always had an afternoon nap. Mollie even brought down from the attic some of the kindergarten supplies -wooden pegs and puzzles,- which her brother Bill's first wife Catherine Miley used in teaching her kindergarten classes in New York in the 1920s. [Catherine married Bill Barrett in 1923, died of cancer February 1931 while we were in Tientsin, China.]= Grandpa thought they should occupy John for days on end.[end p. 189, notebook Two] [p. 259 Notebook Four]--Plagued by the heat and fatigue, Jack reported to Captain Baggaley at the Naval Hydrographic Office, then in New York Customs House, and found a temporary furnished apartment for himself in Brooklyn. We remained at 640 East Seventh Street [South Boston] as the guests of Grandpa and Aunt Mollie, who did all they could for our comfort that stifling hot summer. SEPTEMBER 1939 The war in Europe was about to begin September 3, 1939 with Hitler's invasion of Poland. The New York Branch Hydrographic Office would be an important and sensitve center for the Navy to receive reports of mine, blockade, and submarine hazards as well as the usual weather, ice, and water depth reports. Finally with the help of his Fordham Law School friend John Papp, Jack found an unfurnished apartment at 9615 Shore Road in Brooklyn,-Apartment 2A on the second floor - arranged the furniture which had arrived from storage in San Diego,-found a garage where he left his car,came to Boston for us, - and Jack, John and I traveled by train to the Grand Central Station, then took a taxi to the apartment in Brooklyn. There was a central long corridor, an excellent view,two large bedrooms,a large living room, a good sized kitchen, and plenty of room for all our Chinese rugs and other furnishings. John was three and a half years old then and still remembers that apartment, thirty years later. The rent was very reasonable.The very large apartment house [six floors] belonged to the State of New York, which kept in excellent repair with a capable superintendant, two hall boys in the large entrance hall, and an exterminator who came frequently to inquire about roaches or other bugs. The area across Shore Road was a mixture of tall grass, trees, sand, shrubs, and flowers, - unfortunately sacrificed only a few years later to build vast expanses of paved highways. But when we lived there, Jack and John enjoyed many happy hours picking wild grasses, buttercups, daisies, and dandelions for my bouquets, and they took many excellent snapshots of John's toy animals there. John loved that apartment and vicinity. His crib was in our bedroom, but John had his own play room, and had his father with him every evening and weekend.The play room faced on New York Harbor- we could see the ships coming and going in and out of New York. Jack raised and photographed flowers in pots in the room- flowers that John liked very much, - amaryllis, ranunculus, tuberous begonias, anemones and other potted plants. Jack had no luck with freesias. He used three toothpicks in a triangle to suspend the stones from avocadoes over water in glass milk bottles, and the avocadoes would sprout several feet with big leaves. There was a large Chinese ancient kassu rug on the play room floor, - building blocks, Tinkertoys,a small and a large rocking chair, and a blackboard on the wall. There was also a solidly built writing table, on which Jack had cut off the legs to make the writing surface about two feet from the floor, and a small straight chair to fit the table. The room had many child's books including a Koala book from Australia- all the Beatrix Potter Peter Rabbit series books, and Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. A little child's story of the dog Sniffy and the cat Mitzi provided us with a name for the toy cat our 1937 Cynwyd maid from Ireland Nellie Kelley gave John in Philadelphia. On May 19, 1940 Mitzi appears in several of John's better photographs in the fields across Shore Road. The koala bear sent by the Craig family from Melbourne was one of the first of John's big collection of toy animals.Jack also had a porcelain kookaburra bird less than two inches high from Australia. Mitzie was an early addition. Grandpa gave a white toy horse, and Bill gave a rocking horse in Coronado. A candy company gave away toy Peter Rabitt bunnies with boxes of Easter candy, and we added a "Saucy Squirrel", several more rabbits, a toy dog, a bear, a panda, and a cow. We also had TinkerToys to use to make windmills with blue cardboard blades, a derrick, and a spring motor. We spent long hours with the TinkerToys. My sister Esther sent several books, among them "The Little Engine that Could.". - Uncle Bill's gift of French Becassine books he purchased in Europe on his 1938 honeymoon. " I used to read to John by the hour, pointing to the words as I -p. 260- read, and by the time John was three and a half years old, I was amazed to find that he could read although I had made no effort to teach him. As a matter of fact I thought he was correcting me from memory, until he actually read something to me. He would puzle over the Culbertson bridge columns, understanding card play before bidding. The Barrett family used to play "High-Low-Jack" in South Boston. My father played pinochle, and I learned "Russian bank" aboard the transport HENDERSON in 1930. John also studied the comic strips, "Napoleon and Uncle Elby", "Bringing up Father" with Maggie and Jiggs, and "Mutt and Jeff." =Not long after Billy Barrett was born August 26, 1939, Bill & Virginia had trouble getting help & were glad to get Miss Caffey's name from Jack as a nurse for Billy. OCTOBER She was working for them in Darien Connecticut when we visited them at suppertime one day in October l939.Since Virginia expected us early in the afternoon & didn't expect us to have dinner there, I am afraid we ate Miss Caffey's hamburger- but she was most gracious & happy to see John again.If she happens to read this, I hope she'll send her address.In l940 Bill called up to give me my first news of Jack's promotion to Commander.He also had been the first one to read the news when Jack made Lieutenant Commander early in l932. NOVEMBER At Thanksgiving we drove to Overbrook Pennsylvania near Philadelphia to see my sister Bee. Sam Pollack worked for LaRoux liquers making cordials, & their two children Jason & Thalia were somewhat older than John.Jen & Pete Meranski drove up from Baltimore for a fine Thanksgiving dinner. we met the Pollacks at Atlantic City New Jersey in 1940, where Jack said John dog-paddled without instruction and was ready to "head for Europe." Members of my family visited us many times in Brooklyn, especially my brother Harry's wife's sister Marion Taylor, who was then a nurse in Brooklyn at Greenpoint hospital. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son Ted and daughter Carol Jane were among the visitors, and my sister Esther, and several times we saw my sister Bertha Pollack and her children Jason and Thalia. My brother Benjamin Meranski came down one time from Hartford. He was interested in music and theater. Other frequent vistors were my 1927-1930 landlady social worker Ann Taylor McCormack, and Helen Miller of the Commonwealth Fund, Sometimes we took guests to Jones Beach on Long Island, where once Jack Barrett had to take a deep breath before being rolled around the beach under a eight-or-ten-foot high breaking ocean wave. Fortunately he saw it a moment before it hit, grabbed a deep breath, and rolled around with it until is passed by without serious effects.After that we used the children's area to swim in at Jones Beach.Jones Beach was much cleaner and less crowded than Coney Island where we went once or twice.It did have high waves, however, and rather cold water. My 1923 Mount Holyoke clasmate Catherine Kay Trufant made one trip to Jones Beach iwth us, as did Anne McCormack's sister Eleanor Taylor. Kay Trufant's family raised cranberries in Cape Cod area. Anne gave John a Hershey bar-it would have been the first candy bar he ever had. He was not used to chocolate at that time, and when he did not open it after several days, I finally ate it. Anne and Ivan came for Sunday dinner one time at 9615 Shore Road, and we returned their visit - at Patchen Place, Greenwich Village, where they resided at this time and for many years. Anne continued acquaintance with Harry Hopkins, whom I had known in 1928 - she worked for Travelers Aid many years. She had known Jane Addams, the early Chicago social worker.Sometimes we would take guests to New York World's Fair at Flushing,where Jack photographed the Perisphere and Trilon with his Voightlander camera. We enjoyed the Borden cows and milking exhibit. Visitors to West Roxbury in 1950s admired the light and dark contrasts in Jack's nighttime photo of the illuminated Perisphere, where Worlds Fair visitors watched movies inside. DECEMBER 1939 John was quite interested in the snow in the back courtyard at 96l5 Shore Road after the mild winter the year before in the San Diego area.The paved courtyard used to have curious little whirlwinds produced by the shape of the building- his father would point them out& talk about low pressure systems.Jack explained the terms "transparent, translucent, opaque" as we has a translucent frosted bathroom window. There was a small patch of poison ivy on our back fence downstairs, & Jack would tell how his father once in autumn met some tourists who ignored his advice & collected bright-red bunches of three-leaved poison ivy, with a little stem on the middle leaf. Both Christmases at Brooklyn l939-40 we devoted considerable energy to decorating small Christmas trees.One year there was a considerable problem with a leak in a tub of water that was used to prevent the tree from drying out. We have photos from both Christmases, & Joan Rooney age five from downstairs appears in the l940 Christmas photos.We still have l970 much of the Chinese furniture which appears in pictures in the Brooklyn apartment.Jack fashioned clothesline swings on the roof for John. The stores in Brooklyn on Third, Fourth & Fifth Streets were about five blocks walk up 97th Street from Shore Road.This was also the route to the subway Jack rode to work at the Custom House tower.There was a good meat market on Third Avenue where we bought rib roasts & chopped sirloin.We soon made the acquaintance of the George Rooney family on the first floor & became very good friends.For recreation we would walk to Fort Hamilton, drive to Prospect Park or Owls Head park to see the squirrels.Later on we made more ambitious trips to Jones Beach, Coney Island,& the l939-40 World's Fair at Flushing. FEBRUARY 1940 After dinner every evening John enjoyed a leisurely bath, playing with a transparent plastic ball which contained a few toy fish, - and with a large red, celluloid fish.Then his father put on his own pajamas, and John wore his,and the two of them would study the stars at the bedroom window, which faced Shore Road and the Ocean near the Narrows..-In February l940 there was a spectacular display of the five planets Mercury,Venus,Mars,Jupiter & Saturn all visible shortly after sunset in the western sky over the Narrows, where on the New Jersey side west of us there was a big red illuminated Wrigley's chewing gum advertising neon sign.We used to say we hoped Venus wouldn't get stuck in the chewing gum. This close alignment of the five visible planets is infrequent, occuring evering twenty years or so. John's bedroom was on the front of the house where they could get an excellent view of the stars over the water, and John developed a lasting interest in astronomy, -p. 189- which his navigator father always encouraged. Before he was four years old, John could point out the North Star, the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia's Chair, Venus, Mercury, Deneb, and many others. When he was five or six years old, in Hawaii, he could point out the Southern Cross to me over Diamond Head in Waikiki. Sometimes when Jack was tired he would say he "wouldn't go across the street to see the Statue of Liberty do a dance." Our house in southwest Brooklyn was fairly near the Statue of Liberty across the bay. We began to accumulate the Beatrix Potter series of illustrated books Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny,the Flopsy Bunnies, Mrs. Tittlemouse, the Tailor of Gloucester,Timmy Tiptoes, Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, Tom Kitten, the Roly-Poly Pudding, Jeremy Fisher, the Two Bad Mice, Johnny Townmouse, and the rest.Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. MAY 1940 The blitzkrieg overwhelmed France, which surrendered. Northern France was directly ruled by Nazi forces, while a Vichy regime collaborated with the invaders in the south. [Sophie Barrett later read with interest the memoir of Admiral Leahy, who became United States ambassador to the Vichy governent and in 1942 Chief of Staff to President Roosevelt.] The mine and sub situation in the Atlantic was hazardous for convoys and all ships, inclreasing the responsiblity of the Hydrographic office for complete up-to-date information. JUNE 1940 Jack was not particularly anxious to retire in 1940, though he had thought of continuing law study. However, officers were being encouraged to retire under a policy that gave an extra grade of rank to those that applied for voluntary retirement - a so-called Irish promotion. Very reluctantly about February 1940 he submitted his request for voluntary retirement. Unexpectedly, instead of being retired, he was promoted to Commander.He would have gone on the Retired List June 30, 1940 while in fact remaining on duty in charge of the New York [Branch] Hydrographic Office. On June 12, eighteen days before his scheduled retirement, all voluntary retirements were cancelled, and he stayed on the active list for six and one half more years, thus giving him an opportunity to qualify for thirty years active service, which he attained in mid-1943. He would remain on active duty for the DURATION of the National Emergency. The word "DURATION" was heard frequently throughout the war in Hawaii in relation to shortages, miitary law, and in many contexts.Around this date Jack succeeded retiring Captain Baggaley as officer in charge of the busy New York Branch Hydrographic Office. He retained a great enthusiasm for maps and charts, dating back to his Revenue Cutter School travels 1909-11, his work revising Bowditch tables 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office in District of Columbia, and his days as Executive Officer of Survey ship HANNIBAL 1933-5. SUMMER 1940 Photo web. p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines.The Barretts frequently watched gray squirrels at Owls Head park a few blocks from home at 96l5 Shore Road overlooking Narrows in Southwest Brooklyn..One time Jack had to hold his breath when a ten-foot-high wave suddenly crested near him - he rolled around on Jones Beach, and the wave passed over and he got up. He said John tried to swim to Europe with a dog-paddle.He stressed ability to float and tread water. We also visited the Bronx zoo, and Jack collected several books about the Zoo. We tried Coney Island once but regularly went to Jones Beach. During the summer of 1940 we visited Mrs. Dora Conover in Ossining, New York. She was a friend from the PRESIDENT PIERCE voyage of 1932 and looked well at age seventy-four on this visit. She prepared good meals despite unfortunately hot weather. Her son Frank sold antiques at home. We saw the film Pinocchio in Brooklyn. The "Technicolor" was considered advanced at the time.Jack collected books of his friend Felix Riesenberg, "Under Sail", "Cape Horn", "The Pacific Ocean." Mollie came to 9615 Shore Road only once, and that was a quick trip during a visit at Bill's in Darien. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son and daughter Carol Jane stayed one night in the apartment when they were our guests at the World's Fair. We bought a pencil -p.68- sharpener which we still have [1970] and another one as a gift for Ted. I was struck by the length of time Ethyle cooked the hamburgers; theyt wanted them crisp and well-done for their lunch the day after they went to the Fair, before leaving for their home in Hartford. On one occasion Sam Pollack had business in New York and brought his family. I think he was arranging to transfer to the Schenley company, which wanted him in its management.Not long after this he joined their staff in Cincinnati and later came as a senior executive to the home office in the Empire State Building. Young Thalia stayed with us. Friday she went with us to the World's Fair, where we enjoyed seeing the Borden cows milked mechanically. . I especially enjoyed a restaurant where we got tender rare roast beef and a wonderful dessert of cake and ice cream with fudge sauce. My brother Harry's sister-in-law, Marion Taylor, was a nurse at the Green Point hospital, Brooklyn, at this time. I invited her to dinner, and I spent a lot of time making roast chicken, which I had never served to my family before. Jack, John, and I were enjoying the meal when Marion said, "I don't like chicken." She ate it like a good sport. Helen Miller lived in Brooklyn and came to the apartment once to help hang curtains and draperies. She was still working for Mary Augusta Clark in the Commonwealth Fund. I talked with Mrs. Edward Beach on the phone early in our stay in Brooklyn, when she called up to invite me to dinner. I had to decline, however, as we had no baby sitter, and she felt it would not be an appropriate dinner for John. As a result I have not yet met those very good friends of Jack's from the battleship WYOMING [is it destroyer TOUCEY 1921?] About July 1940 we went to see Bee and Sam in Atlantic City. Jack said John needed no swimming instruction but instinctively dog-paddled, treaded water, floated, and tried to head for Europe. By the time we returned to their house, Sam and Bee had gone out for the evening, and John was so tired, we went right to bed. Jack was tired too, and although he meant to stretch out to rest for a short time, he fell asleep for the night. The next morning he found a police ticket in his car for having parked illegally overnight. One time Jack was caught in an eight or ten foot wave at Jones Beach,where we went frequently on south coast of Long Island. AUGUST 1940 Wednesday, August 28, 1940 was Jack's fifty-second birthday, and it happened that his 1912 shipmate Chester Swanner from the Lighthouse Tender ZIZANIA came to visit that day and accompanied Jack to Macy's Stores at 34th Street, where Jack bought a Baldwin spinet piano, of which we were very fond. It cost about seven hundred dollars on special sale in the summer doldrums, when many people are away and do not like to shop downtown. John learned to play "Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?" and other melodies. The piano remained in storage during our six years in Hawaii but was unpacked after we moved into our West Roxbury home on Thanksgiving Day 1947, where both Jack and John and our music teacher Giuseppe deLellis used it extensively. Chester Swanner was a native of Mississippi who was many years at sea. He went with us to the New York World's Fair that day and had dinner with us at #9615, but wanted to study the cattle in detail while we toured many exhibits. He had a special interest in Ayrshire cattle.Once in 1923 he had sent Jack a postcard from at freighter at Tamipaulis, Mexico. He had a daughter born about 1920.Mollie Barrett could not locate him when she visited Bay St. Louis, Mississippi in 1961 [Mollie went to see Mrs. DeSta, mother of her brother Bill's wife Margaret, whom Bill married in 1958]. The wild apple blossoms were one of the attractive features among the spring flowers on the undeveloped slope between Shore Road and the ocean waters near The Narrows leading to New York Harbor in front of our apartment at #9615 Shore Road but that area was scheduled for highway developments after we left. One place we used to drive to see we called the "muck light" - the base of an old streetlight no longer in use SEPTEMBER 1940 Joan Rooney from downstairs apartment appears in a group of photos December 1940 in Barrett apartment. There are some good family photos in Owl's Head Park with the Rooneys in September 1940. The latter part of our stay in Brooklyn they became close friends. We saw a lot of them around Christmas, l940 and in June 1941. OCTOBER 1940 Admiral James O.Richardson, highest ranking Navy officer afloat makes personal appeal to President Roosevelt to move Pacific Fleet back to Los Angeles from Pearl Harbor, where it was sent earlier in 1940 supposedly on temporary maneuvers, which becmae permanent base. Richardson may have had isolationist sentiments but presented strong evidence that ships and personnel were in grave danger of air or torpedo attack. If the President intended to keep the Fleet at Pearl Harbor, repeated War Games indicated the urgent need to increase safety. Richardson came to Washington D.C. three weeks before Presidential Election Day and confronted President Roosevelt, who was angry, believing Richardson crossed the line from military advice to political decision-making. Richardson thought he had persuaded the president, but was fired January 1941 shortly after Roosevelt's re-election to a third term despite secret major health problems. NOVEMBER 1940 Relocation of New York Branch Hydrographic office 4 p 226-8 Year: 1940_ New York Journal of Commerce,Thursday November 28, 1940 -from Sophie Barrett notebook Four pages 226-8: "DISPUTE REMOVAL OF NAVY BUREAU:-- SENTIMENT FAVORS CUSTOM HOUSE LOCATION OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C OFFICE. Reports that the New York Branch of the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, to which deep sea pilots always resort for navigation aids before sailing, will be moved from its present location in the Custon House to another site has stirred considerable comment in steamship circles. While no formal protest of the impending removal of the Bureau to a less convenient location has been launched as yet,numerous ship line officers and several maritime and trade organizations were understood to be considering such a step. DECENTRALIZATION OPPOSED. Moving of the Hydrographic Office to another building would mark the removal of a third Bureau closely allied with ship operations and navigation from the confines of the Custom House -- a decentralization of the shipping facilities that has found little favor with steamship operators. The Steamboat Inspectors' Office is now located at 45 Broadway,while the Coast and Geodetic Survey Office has been moved to 90 Church Street.Since ship masters, particularly those of vessels operating in foreign trade, always consult the Hydrographic Office on navigation conditions in their routes as soon as they have secured clearance papers,- moving of the Office from the Custom House is seen as especially inconveniencing regular services of the Office such as giving of information on ice conditions in the North Atlantic and sailing obstacles in foreign waters. These have been increased by the considerable special information on mine fields and other war-created hazards since the outbreak of the conflict.SPECIAL WARNINGS VALUABLE: As a consequence its service to pilots has become even [p.227] more valuable than in ordinary times.Masters of vessels plying into the war zone never fail to secure special warnings released by the Hydrographic Office regarduing such war hazards.Steamship companies apprised of the possible moving of the Office out of the Customs Building- in which they now obtain clearance papers and Coast Guard harbor regulations for leaving the harbor indicated their disapproval of the change. Although none of them was willing to comment officially,more than a dozen intimated they would direct a communication to W. E. Reynolds, the Administrator of Public Buildings of the Federal Works agency in Washington.Several maritime organization expressed the same view,with two of the leading ones suggesting they would not permit the removal of the Hydrographic Office to go through without directing their opinion to the proper governmental source.Commander John B. Barrett USN is the officer in charge of the New York Branch of the United States Navy Hydrographic Office.[end of news story]. DEMPWOLF letters: [Captain DEMPWOLF was an officer of Revenue Cutter School and appears along with cadet Jack Barrett in 1910 photo aboard training ship ITASCA, which appears on this website] "Dear Commander Barrett, The enclosed copy of a letter received from Captain G.S. Bryan, U.S. Navy., Washington D.C., dated 12 November 1940, is forwarded for your information. Sincerely, R. W. Dempwolf, Captain, United States Coast Guard,- Commander, New York district." [p.228] "New York, N.Y. 7 November 1940 [To] Captain C.C. Todd, U.S. Navy--Acting Hydrographer, Hydrographic Office, Washington D.C. -- Dear Captain Todd: It has come to my attention that efforts are being made by other government agencies to obtain the space now occupied by the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Custom House, New York. If such agencies succeed in obtaining this space, it would cause considerable inconvenience and hardship upon the masters of merchant vessels in obtaining necessary information prior to clearing the Port of New York.The clearances of vessels from the Port of New York are handled through the Marine Division at the Custom House and through the Commander, New York District of the Coast Guard.All of such clearances are approved by the Ship Control Board, Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. Whenever the clearance of a vessel is approved, the master is given a special number by the Coast Guard through the Marine Division at the Custom House.As you know, the average master desires the very latest information, and it is only fitting and proper that he should get this information just prior to his sailing from the Port of New York. Therefore, in my capacity as Commander New York District, United States Coast Guard and Captain of the Port of New York, I urgently recommend that the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Port of New York remain in its present location in the United States Custom Office. Very truly yours, R.W. Dempwolf, Captain United States Coast Guard, Commander New York District." The office was moved, but Jack considered the new location satisfactory, much better than the one originally proposed. I voted for Wendell Willkie for president in November 1940. It was the first time I voted. During World War II we purchased his book "One World", a report after his visits to Russia and China to encourage the war effort. The State of New York used to discriminate against voting by military personnel, so my husband could not vote. They also tried to collect 1939 income taxes, though he resided principally in California that year. A mistake by the Navy in sending data to New York required much correspondence to straighten out. Jack had also to explain the situation to Massachusetts Tax Commissioner Henry Long, who was later [1951] to become his good friend as his teacher in Taxation at Northeastern University Law School. DECEMBER 1940 Christmas photo p 68-1196 shows neighbor Joan Rooney age 5 of Apartment 1-A downstairs and John and Algeria photos and Tientsin rug. JANUARY 1941 President Roosevelt removed Admiral James O. Richardson from command of the Pacific based at Pearl Harbor after only one year of service instead of the usual two years. Roosevelt was angry because of Richardson's strenuous demand the Fleet be moved back to Los Angeles for safety. Roosevelt mistakenly believe the presence of the Fleet would deter Japenese aggressive intentions and show American resolve and support of Britain and Australia. Both were angry and did not communicate well. A dialogue on making the Fleet safer at Pearl Harbor could have been highly productive, but Roosevelt surrounded himself with 'yes-men.' APRIL 1941 -43-977 [Black Notebook 2 -p 157] "April 10, 1941 - 4701 Reservoir Road, Washington DC To. Commander John B. Barrett, Branch Hydrographic Office, New York, N.Y. Dear Doc: It was very kind of you to call attention to the discrepancies between the New York and Boston broadcasts. This matter does not come under my section, but I was glad to bring it to the attention of Watt, who is in charge of Pilot Charts. = He explains to me that the first broadcast, either New York or Boston, is used as a basis for the Washington broadcast. It is considered here that the mailgram would be too late for a radio broadcast from here. It seems that errors in transmission occasionally creep in, for recently the latitude of one of these submarine areas was given as twenty-one degrees -- the requested repeat still came twenty-one degrees - which was, of course, an obvious error. = In the case of forty degrees thirty minutes instead of forty degrees fifty minutes the larger area was chosen for the reason you advanced - for being on the safe side. Watt emphasizes the fact that he takes either your broadcast or that of Boston, - whichever comes first into the office, - and the mailgram is too late. The Coast Survey has placed these areas on their charts at our particular request,and what we are looking to do is to be able, after a time,to simplify the broadcasts by using the letters. This, I think, will be done as soon as the new charts beome thoroughly disseminated in the Navy and merchant marine. = The office is very busy here, as you may well imagine, but the work is increasingly interesting. I keep going pretty well and hope to see you if you make a trip this way. Be sure I appreciate your letter. Sincerely, s/Brad --P.S. Watt has just shown me a radiogram from Branch Hydrographic Office New York ... "between Latitudes forty - fifty northward and eight North and twenty-one twenty North. " We sent for a report, and it came back o.k except 'Latitude twenty-one". [Gershom Bradford, editor Notices to Mariners 1935-1942 Naval Hydrographic office,Washington D.C.] MAY 1941 In the spring of 1941 Jack was consulted by Charles Edey Fay of Connecticut, who had access to Atlantic Insurance Company records of the disappearance of the five man crew of the New Bedford fishing schooner MARY CELESTE November, 1872. Atlantic was one of five companies that insured the MARY CELESTE. Fay wanted Jack's interpretation of certain navigational notes of the MARY CELESTE near the Azores. He suggested the crew suddenly abandoned ship and got into small boats because they FEARED AN EXPLOSION OF ALCOHOL VAPORS FROM CARGO. Gershom Bradford published in American Neptune magazine his theory that waterspouts are frequent near the Azores in November - local severe tornados that draw water and sometimes fish high in the air and threaten small ships. The mystery remains unsolved, though some skeptics have suggested the motive was insurance fraud, and the crew may have survived. A waterspout would provide a rational explanation for the captain's decision to leave the vessel in good condition, and get into small boats, which were overwhelmed. Bradford showed evidence that water came down from above the ship in a peculiar manner suggestive of a waterspout, a reversal of the usual pressure conditions. Jack kept four of Fay's letters from around the time the Barretts left for Pearl Harbor mid-l941. Not long before we left New York, we spent an afternoon visiting Virginia, Bill, and Billy in Darien, where our former nursemaid Miss Blanche Caffey from Norfolk was helping look after young Billy.John, Jack, and Billy went swimming at the Darien Country Club. Jack took a photo of five year old John kneeling on the grass next to his twenty-month-old cousin Billy. We had it in our West Roxbury bedroom in 1950s and 1960s.We used Bill Barrett's dentist Dr. Ellis on Fifth Avenue in New York. We had a lady come in twice a week to vacuum the floors and furniture. She also took my aprons home to wash, and I gave her a great many of John's baby things when she said that her daughter was going to have a baby. On June 30,our last day in our apartment, Mrs. Rooney gave us a very good lunch - chicken, potatoes, and peas just before we caught our train for the West Coast. Mrs. Rooney died during the war, but we saw George Rooney and his second wife in 1958 in their same apartment after the wedding of David Geetter and his wife Joan Trouboff. Mr. Rooney said his daughter Joan was studying nursing. In 1941 Admiral Chester Nimitz then in charge of the Bureau of Navigation, sent orders for Jack to leave for Pearl Harbor in July. It was rather painful to tell Grandfather Barrett and Mollie. Grandpa guessed the news, but Mollie did not. In our 1937 Lincoln Zephyr we took a tour to Springfield and Greenfield, in western Massachusetts, drove near Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire, and stopped in for a night in South Boston without explaining the reason. It was a slightly awkward visit, as Mollie did not expect us and did not guess we were to be away for six years. Later on a visit to Darien we told Bill and Virginia we were leaving, and Bill and Jack took pictures of John (age five) and Billy (twenty-one months). In conversation with his brother Bill and with Brooklyn neighbors, especially in the aparment across the street at #9701, Jack emphatically predicted the Japanese would soon start a war, and urged action to cut off petroleum and scrap iron. In 1932 he had called the election between Hoover and Roosevelt a terible choice, as both were very weak on defense. Alongside isolationists like Herbert Hoover, Charles Lindberg, and Joseph Kennedy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt could maintain an image as an internationalist, but he often placed politics and budgetary consideratins ahead of re-building almost non-existent modern defenses. One example was the curtailment of Naval Reserve programs in 1933, when Roosevelt attempted to fulfill a 1932 campaign promise to balance the budget. The June 18m 1832 issue of Springfield Republican newspaper in a front page story commented on the issues when Springfield area Navy reservists made the last of the EAGLE 19 training cruises, and Jack Barrett was transferred to the survey ship HANNIBAL. Roosevelt appointed personal cronies to high military posts for which they were unqualfied - Navy chief Admiral Harold Stark, intelligence chief Richmond Kelley Turner, congressional liaison Admiral Claude Bloch, courageous but blundering Admiral Callaghan, and Army chief George Marshall. By ingenious deceptions the public was kept in ignorance of the severity of President Roosevelt's paralysis, which interfered with military decisions and prevented exercise, which severely aggravated his hardening of the arteries and led to incapacity at Yalta conference with Stalin February 1945 and his tragic stroke at age sixty-three April 12, 1945. These factors, along with Roosevelt's egotism, led to needless loss of more than two thousand three hundred lives at Pearl Harbor December 1941. The fall of Wake Islands and the Philippines were further falling dominoes, and the holocaust in Europe and subsequent Russian control of east Europe. On the other hand the majority of Congress, the public and the news media were equally culpable, without Roosevelt's medical excuse. The New York Times for years in the 1930s suppressed reports of the mass murder of Ukrainian farmers by Stalin and Lysenko.Hitler invaded Russia June 1941 and advanced rapidly with fast tank movements. Russia appeared in collapse as Leningrad was surrounded and beseiged, Moscow threatened, most of Ukraine breadbasket captured, southern oil fields threatened, and decisive battle near Volga at Stalingrad deep in Russia about a year and a half away. On the last day of our lease June 30 after a goodbye lunch with the Rooneys we took a train for the West Coast.JULY 1941 We took a northerly route because of our previous experience with summer weather. We crossed Nebraska. Around daybreak at five AM Jack called us as we passed into Colorado at Julesburg on the northern border of the state. We were only in the state a few minutes. Then we went across Wyoming and were a mile high in Cheyenne, as Jack told us then and used to recollect in later years. We got out of the train there briefly. At Salt Lake City we changed trains and headed South through Utah to Las Vegas and southern California.Probably there was a little less hot weather than on the Arizona route.. We were to catch the Matson Line LURLINE at Wilmington, California near Los Angeles about July 10 and arrive Honolulu July 15.Jack was amazed when he learned that dependents were still allowed to go to Hawaii, and he made arrangements for John and me to sail from Los Angeles on the Matson liner LURLINE in July 1941. [about July 9 or 10, arriving Honolulu July 15, 1941].So again John crossed the country in the heat of the summer, but now he had his father with him. There is no doubt that the constant uprooting from familiar surroundings was hard on the five-year-old.At the end of the long cross country train ride there was only a hotel far from the center of Los Angeles, - a hotel that served no food.We had to find food out for three meals a day.That is very hard on a young child and his parents, too, as restaurant food is rarely suitable in the heat of summer for a small boy. We spent a whole week in Los Angeles waiting for the LURLINE and didn't even have our car, which was shipped from Brooklyn to Hawaii. I suppose the taxi driver who took us on the long ride from the station to the hotel [where no food was served] got a rebate from the hotel for every guest he delivered. Except for the lack of food, the hotel was suitable, because it was far from the crowded center of the city and was reasonably priced in a section of Los Angeles where we had so much free time to wander about with a five-year-old for a whole week.We had to vacate our apartment in Brooklyn June 30 or pay another -p.262- full month's rent. So we gave it up and went off to Los Angeles. When we finally boarded the LURLINE, we found ourselves in a spacious suite, - a living room, a bedroom with an extra cot, and a private bath. We were admiring our quarters when Mr. and Mrs, Pardee, our Saticoy friends from the l932 PRESIDENT PIERCE world tour Japan to Naples,- appeared to see us off,- and when they remarked about the elegance of the quarters, Jack explained that they cost the Navy only the cost of an ordinary first class passage- that the Matson line had no cabin for us -but had an unclaimed suite and gave it to us. The Matson Line supplied musicians on the dock and gave the passengers long colored paper streamers to throw down to their friends - very large numbers, which gave a very festive effect on a bright sunny day.I was well supplied with coats for myself and John, as I had often needed a coat, even in the tropics aboard ships under way in the evenings.John, like his mother and father, proved to be a good sailor- we missed no meals and had an uneventful trip to Honolulu The Pardees saw us off and were very impressed with the suite we occupied on the LURLINE. I think C.J. Todd [former Revenue Cutter School classmate] may have been there also. HAWAII CHAPTER FOLLOWS. #142 p 18


 

143.
Mimi Bronson, Barrett family, Lucy Sanborn l946 at 2415 ala wai Bouevard Waikiki

 

Margaret Gage Bronson was a l935 Mount Holyoke College graduate from Marlboro, Massachusetts. Her husband Harry was an entomologist. In l946 and l947 they rented Mr. and Mrs. James Needles upstairs apartment at 2421 Ala wai boulevard east of us next door.Harry Bronson may have taken this photo group on our front lawn with Lucy Sanborn, one of the 24ll Ala Wai tenants standing at right #143 p 18 BACKUP COPY Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines. Edit p 18-142 p 73-1232 Sophie notebook Two 1939 pp.188-9 w1232 B- R-O-O-K-L-Y-N H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C Sophie, John and Jack Barrett Owls Head Park Brooklyn summer l940 p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines. NEW YORK chapter HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE August 1939 to June 1941 and departure for Hawaii about July 10, 1941. [follows TRINITY chapter] TEXT: AUGUST 1939 We had a three week visit in South Boston with Jack's eighty-four year old father and his sister Mollie in very hot August weather. The three weeks John and I spent in South Boston in August 1939 [while Jack was househunting in New York and Brooklyn] were the longest opportunity for John and his grandfather to become acquainted. Grandpa Barrett had visited Norfolk {Virginia] in [May] 1936 and [Bala Cynwyd] Philadelphia in 1937 and 1938 when John was a baby, and saw him again briefly in June 1941 juat before we left for Hawaii. John sent carefully lettered cards to him from Hawaii when he was six years old, and Jack took countless pictures of us to send to Grandpa and Mollie to keep their spirits high. A very large batch of pictures were sent to him from Hawaii in June, l942. Grandpa saw and enjoyed them before he died two months later [August 21, l942 less than] four months before his eighty-eighth birthday. The old house at 640 East Seventh Street was not an ideal place for an active three year old boy in the August heat. Grandpa wanted to keep all the doors shut, but John and I felt the need of fresh air. He also thought that John should get more sleep, but John was not accustomed to going to bed right after supper in broad daylight, and I thought it would be cruel to put him to bed so early, especially when he always had an afternoon nap. Mollie even brought down from the attic some of the kindergarten supplies -wooden pegs and puzzles,- which her brother Bill's first wife Catherine Miley used in teaching her kindergarten classes in New York in the 1920s. [Catherine married Bill Barrett in 1923, died of cancer February 1931 while we were in Tientsin, China.]= Grandpa thought they should occupy John for days on end.[end p. 189, notebook Two] [p. 259 Notebook Four]--Plagued by the heat and fatigue, Jack reported to Captain Baggaley at the Naval Hydrographic Office, then in New York Customs House, and found a temporary furnished apartment for himself in Brooklyn. We remained at 640 East Seventh Street [South Boston] as the guests of Grandpa and Aunt Mollie, who did all they could for our comfort that stifling hot summer. SEPTEMBER 1939 The war in Europe was about to begin September 3, 1939 with Hitler's invasion of Poland. The New York Branch Hydrographic Office would be an important and sensitve center for the Navy to receive reports of mine, blockade, and submarine hazards as well as the usual weather, ice, and water depth reports. Finally with the help of his Fordham Law School friend John Papp, Jack found an unfurnished apartment at 9615 Shore Road in Brooklyn,-Apartment 2A on the second floor - arranged the furniture which had arrived from storage in San Diego,-found a garage where he left his car,came to Boston for us, - and Jack, John and I traveled by train to the Grand Central Station, then took a taxi to the apartment in Brooklyn. There was a central long corridor, an excellent view,two large bedrooms,a large living room, a good sized kitchen, and plenty of room for all our Chinese rugs and other furnishings. John was three and a half years old then and still remembers that apartment, thirty years later. The rent was very reasonable.The very large apartment house [six floors] belonged to the State of New York, which kept in excellent repair with a capable superintendant, two hall boys in the large entrance hall, and an exterminator who came frequently to inquire about roaches or other bugs. The area across Shore Road was a mixture of tall grass, trees, sand, shrubs, and flowers, - unfortunately sacrificed only a few years later to build vast expanses of paved highways. But when we lived there, Jack and John enjoyed many happy hours picking wild grasses, buttercups, daisies, and dandelions for my bouquets, and they took many excellent snapshots of John's toy animals there. John loved that apartment and vicinity. His crib was in our bedroom, but John had his own play room, and had his father with him every evening and weekend.The play room faced on New York Harbor- we could see the ships coming and going in and out of New York. Jack raised and photographed flowers in pots in the room- flowers that John liked very much, - amaryllis, ranunculus, tuberous begonias, anemones and other potted plants. Jack had no luck with freesias. He used three toothpicks in a triangle to suspend the stones from avocadoes over water in glass milk bottles, and the avocadoes would sprout several feet with big leaves. There was a large Chinese ancient kassu rug on the play room floor, - building blocks, Tinkertoys,a small and a large rocking chair, and a blackboard on the wall. There was also a solidly built writing table, on which Jack had cut off the legs to make the writing surface about two feet from the floor, and a small straight chair to fit the table. The room had many child's books including a Koala book from Australia- all the Beatrix Potter Peter Rabbit series books, and Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. A little child's story of the dog Sniffy and the cat Mitzi provided us with a name for the toy cat our 1937 Cynwyd maid from Ireland Nellie Kelley gave John in Philadelphia. On May 19, 1940 Mitzi appears in several of John's better photographs in the fields across Shore Road. The koala bear sent by the Craig family from Melbourne was one of the first of John's big collection of toy animals.Jack also had a porcelain kookaburra bird less than two inches high from Australia. Mitzie was an early addition. Grandpa gave a white toy horse, and Bill gave a rocking horse in Coronado. A candy company gave away toy Peter Rabitt bunnies with boxes of Easter candy, and we added a "Saucy Squirrel", several more rabbits, a toy dog, a bear, a panda, and a cow. We also had TinkerToys to use to make windmills with blue cardboard blades, a derrick, and a spring motor. We spent long hours with the TinkerToys. My sister Esther sent several books, among them "The Little Engine that Could.". - Uncle Bill's gift of French Becassine books he purchased in Europe on his 1938 honeymoon. " I used to read to John by the hour, pointing to the words as I -p. 260- read, and by the time John was three and a half years old, I was amazed to find that he could read although I had made no effort to teach him. As a matter of fact I thought he was correcting me from memory, until he actually read something to me. He would puzle over the Culbertson bridge columns, understanding card play before bidding. The Barrett family used to play "High-Low-Jack" in South Boston. My father played pinochle, and I learned "Russian bank" aboard the transport HENDERSON in 1930. John also studied the comic strips, "Napoleon and Uncle Elby", "Bringing up Father" with Maggie and Jiggs, and "Mutt and Jeff." =Not long after Billy Barrett was born August 26, 1939, Bill & Virginia had trouble getting help & were glad to get Miss Caffey's name from Jack as a nurse for Billy. OCTOBER She was working for them in Darien Connecticut when we visited them at suppertime one day in October l939.Since Virginia expected us early in the afternoon & didn't expect us to have dinner there, I am afraid we ate Miss Caffey's hamburger- but she was most gracious & happy to see John again.If she happens to read this, I hope she'll send her address.In l940 Bill called up to give me my first news of Jack's promotion to Commander.He also had been the first one to read the news when Jack made Lieutenant Commander early in l932. NOVEMBER At Thanksgiving we drove to Overbrook Pennsylvania near Philadelphia to see my sister Bee. Sam Pollack worked for LaRoux liquers making cordials, & their two children Jason & Thalia were somewhat older than John.Jen & Pete Meranski drove up from Baltimore for a fine Thanksgiving dinner. we met the Pollacks at Atlantic City New Jersey in 1940, where Jack said John dog-paddled without instruction and was ready to "head for Europe." Members of my family visited us many times in Brooklyn, especially my brother Harry's wife's sister Marion Taylor, who was then a nurse in Brooklyn at Greenpoint hospital. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son Ted and daughter Carol Jane were among the visitors, and my sister Esther, and several times we saw my sister Bertha Pollack and her children Jason and Thalia. My brother Benjamin Meranski came down one time from Hartford. He was interested in music and theater. Other frequent vistors were my 1927-1930 landlady social worker Ann Taylor McCormack, and Helen Miller of the Commonwealth Fund, Sometimes we took guests to Jones Beach on Long Island, where once Jack Barrett had to take a deep breath before being rolled around the beach under a eight-or-ten-foot high breaking ocean wave. Fortunately he saw it a moment before it hit, grabbed a deep breath, and rolled around with it until is passed by without serious effects.After that we used the children's area to swim in at Jones Beach.Jones Beach was much cleaner and less crowded than Coney Island where we went once or twice.It did have high waves, however, and rather cold water. My 1923 Mount Holyoke clasmate Catherine Kay Trufant made one trip to Jones Beach iwth us, as did Anne McCormack's sister Eleanor Taylor. Kay Trufant's family raised cranberries in Cape Cod area. Anne gave John a Hershey bar-it would have been the first candy bar he ever had. He was not used to chocolate at that time, and when he did not open it after several days, I finally ate it. Anne and Ivan came for Sunday dinner one time at 9615 Shore Road, and we returned their visit - at Patchen Place, Greenwich Village, where they resided at this time and for many years. Anne continued acquaintance with Harry Hopkins, whom I had known in 1928 - she worked for Travelers Aid many years. She had known Jane Addams, the early Chicago social worker.Sometimes we would take guests to New York World's Fair at Flushing,where Jack photographed the Perisphere and Trilon with his Voightlander camera. We enjoyed the Borden cows and milking exhibit. Visitors to West Roxbury in 1950s admired the light and dark contrasts in Jack's nighttime photo of the illuminated Perisphere, where Worlds Fair visitors watched movies inside. DECEMBER 1939 John was quite interested in the snow in the back courtyard at 96l5 Shore Road after the mild winter the year before in the San Diego area.The paved courtyard used to have curious little whirlwinds produced by the shape of the building- his father would point them out& talk about low pressure systems.Jack explained the terms "transparent, translucent, opaque" as we has a translucent frosted bathroom window. There was a small patch of poison ivy on our back fence downstairs, & Jack would tell how his father once in autumn met some tourists who ignored his advice & collected bright-red bunches of three-leaved poison ivy, with a little stem on the middle leaf. Both Christmases at Brooklyn l939-40 we devoted considerable energy to decorating small Christmas trees.One year there was a considerable problem with a leak in a tub of water that was used to prevent the tree from drying out. We have photos from both Christmases, & Joan Rooney age five from downstairs appears in the l940 Christmas photos.We still have l970 much of the Chinese furniture which appears in pictures in the Brooklyn apartment.Jack fashioned clothesline swings on the roof for John. The stores in Brooklyn on Third, Fourth & Fifth Streets were about five blocks walk up 97th Street from Shore Road.This was also the route to the subway Jack rode to work at the Custom House tower.There was a good meat market on Third Avenue where we bought rib roasts & chopped sirloin.We soon made the acquaintance of the George Rooney family on the first floor & became very good friends.For recreation we would walk to Fort Hamilton, drive to Prospect Park or Owls Head park to see the squirrels.Later on we made more ambitious trips to Jones Beach, Coney Island,& the l939-40 World's Fair at Flushing. FEBRUARY 1940 After dinner every evening John enjoyed a leisurely bath, playing with a transparent plastic ball which contained a few toy fish, - and with a large red, celluloid fish.Then his father put on his own pajamas, and John wore his,and the two of them would study the stars at the bedroom window, which faced Shore Road and the Ocean near the Narrows..-In February l940 there was a spectacular display of the five planets Mercury,Venus,Mars,Jupiter & Saturn all visible shortly after sunset in the western sky over the Narrows, where on the New Jersey side west of us there was a big red illuminated Wrigley's chewing gum advertising neon sign.We used to say we hoped Venus wouldn't get stuck in the chewing gum. This close alignment of the five visible planets is infrequent, occuring evering twenty years or so. John's bedroom was on the front of the house where they could get an excellent view of the stars over the water, and John developed a lasting interest in astronomy, -p. 189- which his navigator father always encouraged. Before he was four years old, John could point out the North Star, the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia's Chair, Venus, Mercury, Deneb, and many others. When he was five or six years old, in Hawaii, he could point out the Southern Cross to me over Diamond Head in Waikiki. Sometimes when Jack was tired he would say he "wouldn't go across the street to see the Statue of Liberty do a dance." Our house in southwest Brooklyn was fairly near the Statue of Liberty across the bay. We began to accumulate the Beatrix Potter series of illustrated books Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny,the Flopsy Bunnies, Mrs. Tittlemouse, the Tailor of Gloucester,Timmy Tiptoes, Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, Tom Kitten, the Roly-Poly Pudding, Jeremy Fisher, the Two Bad Mice, Johnny Townmouse, and the rest.Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories. MAY 1940 The blitzkrieg overwhelmed France, which surrendered. Northern France was directly ruled by Nazi forces, while a Vichy regime collaborated with the invaders in the south. [Sophie Barrett later read with interest the memoir of Admiral Leahy, who became United States ambassador to the Vichy governent and in 1942 Chief of Staff to President Roosevelt.] The mine and sub situation in the Atlantic was hazardous for convoys and all ships, inclreasing the responsiblity of the Hydrographic office for complete up-to-date information. JUNE 1940 Jack was not particularly anxious to retire in 1940, though he had thought of continuing law study. However, officers were being encouraged to retire under a policy that gave an extra grade of rank to those that applied for voluntary retirement - a so-called Irish promotion. Very reluctantly about February 1940 he submitted his request for voluntary retirement. Unexpectedly, instead of being retired, he was promoted to Commander.He would have gone on the Retired List June 30, 1940 while in fact remaining on duty in charge of the New York [Branch] Hydrographic Office. On June 12, eighteen days before his scheduled retirement, all voluntary retirements were cancelled, and he stayed on the active list for six and one half more years, thus giving him an opportunity to qualify for thirty years active service, which he attained in mid-1943. He would remain on active duty for the DURATION of the National Emergency. The word "DURATION" was heard frequently throughout the war in Hawaii in relation to shortages, miitary law, and in many contexts.Around this date Jack succeeded retiring Captain Baggaley as officer in charge of the busy New York Branch Hydrographic Office. He retained a great enthusiasm for maps and charts, dating back to his Revenue Cutter School travels 1909-11, his work revising Bowditch tables 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office in District of Columbia, and his days as Executive Officer of Survey ship HANNIBAL 1933-5. SUMMER 1940 Photo web. p 18 # 142 In Jack Barrett's left hand he holds device to snap his own picture with German Voightlander camera bought San Francisco June l929 en route to Asiatic Fleet duty Philippines.The Barretts frequently watched gray squirrels at Owls Head park a few blocks from home at 96l5 Shore Road overlooking Narrows in Southwest Brooklyn..One time Jack had to hold his breath when a ten-foot-high wave suddenly crested near him - he rolled around on Jones Beach, and the wave passed over and he got up. He said John tried to swim to Europe with a dog-paddle.He stressed ability to float and tread water. We also visited the Bronx zoo, and Jack collected several books about the Zoo. We tried Coney Island once but regularly went to Jones Beach. During the summer of 1940 we visited Mrs. Dora Conover in Ossining, New York. She was a friend from the PRESIDENT PIERCE voyage of 1932 and looked well at age seventy-four on this visit. She prepared good meals despite unfortunately hot weather. Her son Frank sold antiques at home. We saw the film Pinocchio in Brooklyn. The "Technicolor" was considered advanced at the time.Jack collected books of his friend Felix Riesenberg, "Under Sail", "Cape Horn", "The Pacific Ocean." Mollie came to 9615 Shore Road only once, and that was a quick trip during a visit at Bill's in Darien. My sister-in-law Ethyle Meranski and her son and daughter Carol Jane stayed one night in the apartment when they were our guests at the World's Fair. We bought a pencil -p.68- sharpener which we still have [1970] and another one as a gift for Ted. I was struck by the length of time Ethyle cooked the hamburgers; theyt wanted them crisp and well-done for their lunch the day after they went to the Fair, before leaving for their home in Hartford. On one occasion Sam Pollack had business in New York and brought his family. I think he was arranging to transfer to the Schenley company, which wanted him in its management.Not long after this he joined their staff in Cincinnati and later came as a senior executive to the home office in the Empire State Building. Young Thalia stayed with us. Friday she went with us to the World's Fair, where we enjoyed seeing the Borden cows milked mechanically. . I especially enjoyed a restaurant where we got tender rare roast beef and a wonderful dessert of cake and ice cream with fudge sauce. My brother Harry's sister-in-law, Marion Taylor, was a nurse at the Green Point hospital, Brooklyn, at this time. I invited her to dinner, and I spent a lot of time making roast chicken, which I had never served to my family before. Jack, John, and I were enjoying the meal when Marion said, "I don't like chicken." She ate it like a good sport. Helen Miller lived in Brooklyn and came to the apartment once to help hang curtains and draperies. She was still working for Mary Augusta Clark in the Commonwealth Fund. I talked with Mrs. Edward Beach on the phone early in our stay in Brooklyn, when she called up to invite me to dinner. I had to decline, however, as we had no baby sitter, and she felt it would not be an appropriate dinner for John. As a result I have not yet met those very good friends of Jack's from the battleship WYOMING [is it destroyer TOUCEY 1921?] About July 1940 we went to see Bee and Sam in Atlantic City. Jack said John needed no swimming instruction but instinctively dog-paddled, treaded water, floated, and tried to head for Europe. By the time we returned to their house, Sam and Bee had gone out for the evening, and John was so tired, we went right to bed. Jack was tired too, and although he meant to stretch out to rest for a short time, he fell asleep for the night. The next morning he found a police ticket in his car for having parked illegally overnight. One time Jack was caught in an eight or ten foot wave at Jones Beach,where we went frequently on south coast of Long Island. AUGUST 1940 Wednesday, August 28, 1940 was Jack's fifty-second birthday, and it happened that his 1912 shipmate Chester Swanner from the Lighthouse Tender ZIZANIA came to visit that day and accompanied Jack to Macy's Stores at 34th Street, where Jack bought a Baldwin spinet piano, of which we were very fond. It cost about seven hundred dollars on special sale in the summer doldrums, when many people are away and do not like to shop downtown. John learned to play "Pussycat, pussycat, where have you been?" and other melodies. The piano remained in storage during our six years in Hawaii but was unpacked after we moved into our West Roxbury home on Thanksgiving Day 1947, where both Jack and John and our music teacher Giuseppe deLellis used it extensively. Chester Swanner was a native of Mississippi who was many years at sea. He went with us to the New York World's Fair that day and had dinner with us at #9615, but wanted to study the cattle in detail while we toured many exhibits. He had a special interest in Ayrshire cattle.Once in 1923 he had sent Jack a postcard from at freighter at Tamipaulis, Mexico. He had a daughter born about 1920.Mollie Barrett could not locate him when she visited Bay St. Louis, Mississippi in 1961 [Mollie went to see Mrs. DeSta, mother of her brother Bill's wife Margaret, whom Bill married in 1958]. The wild apple blossoms were one of the attractive features among the spring flowers on the undeveloped slope between Shore Road and the ocean waters near The Narrows leading to New York Harbor in front of our apartment at #9615 Shore Road but that area was scheduled for highway developments after we left. One place we used to drive to see we called the "muck light" - the base of an old streetlight no longer in use SEPTEMBER 1940 Joan Rooney from downstairs apartment appears in a group of photos December 1940 in Barrett apartment. There are some good family photos in Owl's Head Park with the Rooneys in September 1940. The latter part of our stay in Brooklyn they became close friends. We saw a lot of them around Christmas, l940 and in June 1941. OCTOBER 1940 Admiral James O.Richardson, highest ranking Navy officer afloat makes personal appeal to President Roosevelt to move Pacific Fleet back to Los Angeles from Pearl Harbor, where it was sent earlier in 1940 supposedly on temporary maneuvers, which becmae permanent base. Richardson may have had isolationist sentiments but presented strong evidence that ships and personnel were in grave danger of air or torpedo attack. If the President intended to keep the Fleet at Pearl Harbor, repeated War Games indicated the urgent need to increase safety. Richardson came to Washington D.C. three weeks before Presidential Election Day and confronted President Roosevelt, who was angry, believing Richardson crossed the line from military advice to political decision-making. Richardson thought he had persuaded the president, but was fired January 1941 shortly after Roosevelt's re-election to a third term despite secret major health problems. NOVEMBER 1940 Relocation of New York Branch Hydrographic office 4 p 226-8 Year: 1940_ New York Journal of Commerce,Thursday November 28, 1940 -from Sophie Barrett notebook Four pages 226-8: "DISPUTE REMOVAL OF NAVY BUREAU:-- SENTIMENT FAVORS CUSTOM HOUSE LOCATION OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C OFFICE. Reports that the New York Branch of the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, to which deep sea pilots always resort for navigation aids before sailing, will be moved from its present location in the Custon House to another site has stirred considerable comment in steamship circles. While no formal protest of the impending removal of the Bureau to a less convenient location has been launched as yet,numerous ship line officers and several maritime and trade organizations were understood to be considering such a step. DECENTRALIZATION OPPOSED. Moving of the Hydrographic Office to another building would mark the removal of a third Bureau closely allied with ship operations and navigation from the confines of the Custom House -- a decentralization of the shipping facilities that has found little favor with steamship operators. The Steamboat Inspectors' Office is now located at 45 Broadway,while the Coast and Geodetic Survey Office has been moved to 90 Church Street.Since ship masters, particularly those of vessels operating in foreign trade, always consult the Hydrographic Office on navigation conditions in their routes as soon as they have secured clearance papers,- moving of the Office from the Custom House is seen as especially inconveniencing regular services of the Office such as giving of information on ice conditions in the North Atlantic and sailing obstacles in foreign waters. These have been increased by the considerable special information on mine fields and other war-created hazards since the outbreak of the conflict.SPECIAL WARNINGS VALUABLE: As a consequence its service to pilots has become even [p.227] more valuable than in ordinary times.Masters of vessels plying into the war zone never fail to secure special warnings released by the Hydrographic Office regarduing such war hazards.Steamship companies apprised of the possible moving of the Office out of the Customs Building- in which they now obtain clearance papers and Coast Guard harbor regulations for leaving the harbor indicated their disapproval of the change. Although none of them was willing to comment officially,more than a dozen intimated they would direct a communication to W. E. Reynolds, the Administrator of Public Buildings of the Federal Works agency in Washington.Several maritime organization expressed the same view,with two of the leading ones suggesting they would not permit the removal of the Hydrographic Office to go through without directing their opinion to the proper governmental source.Commander John B. Barrett USN is the officer in charge of the New York Branch of the United States Navy Hydrographic Office.[end of news story]. DEMPWOLF letters: [Captain DEMPWOLF was an officer of Revenue Cutter School and appears along with cadet Jack Barrett in 1910 photo aboard training ship ITASCA, which appears on this website] "Dear Commander Barrett, The enclosed copy of a letter received from Captain G.S. Bryan, U.S. Navy., Washington D.C., dated 12 November 1940, is forwarded for your information. Sincerely, R. W. Dempwolf, Captain, United States Coast Guard,- Commander, New York district." [p.228] "New York, N.Y. 7 November 1940 [To] Captain C.C. Todd, U.S. Navy--Acting Hydrographer, Hydrographic Office, Washington D.C. -- Dear Captain Todd: It has come to my attention that efforts are being made by other government agencies to obtain the space now occupied by the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Custom House, New York. If such agencies succeed in obtaining this space, it would cause considerable inconvenience and hardship upon the masters of merchant vessels in obtaining necessary information prior to clearing the Port of New York.The clearances of vessels from the Port of New York are handled through the Marine Division at the Custom House and through the Commander, New York District of the Coast Guard.All of such clearances are approved by the Ship Control Board, Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. Whenever the clearance of a vessel is approved, the master is given a special number by the Coast Guard through the Marine Division at the Custom House.As you know, the average master desires the very latest information, and it is only fitting and proper that he should get this information just prior to his sailing from the Port of New York. Therefore, in my capacity as Commander New York District, United States Coast Guard and Captain of the Port of New York, I urgently recommend that the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Port of New York remain in its present location in the United States Custom Office. Very truly yours, R.W. Dempwolf, Captain United States Coast Guard, Commander New York District." The office was moved, but Jack considered the new location satisfactory, much better than the one originally proposed. I voted for Wendell Willkie for president in November 1940. It was the first time I voted. During World War II we purchased his book "One World", a report after his visits to Russia and China to encourage the war effort. The State of New York used to discriminate against voting by military personnel, so my husband could not vote. They also tried to collect 1939 income taxes, though he resided principally in California that year. A mistake by the Navy in sending data to New York required much correspondence to straighten out. Jack had also to explain the situation to Massachusetts Tax Commissioner Henry Long, who was later [1951] to become his good friend as his teacher in Taxation at Northeastern University Law School. DECEMBER 1940 Christmas photo p 68-1196 shows neighbor Joan Rooney age 5 of Apartment 1-A downstairs and John and Algeria photos and Tientsin rug. JANUARY 1941 President Roosevelt removed Admiral James O. Richardson from command of the Pacific based at Pearl Harbor after only one year of service instead of the usual two years. Roosevelt was angry because of Richardson's strenuous demand the Fleet be moved back to Los Angeles for safety. Roosevelt mistakenly believe the presence of the Fleet would deter Japenese aggressive intentions and show American resolve and support of Britain and Australia. Both were angry and did not communicate well. A dialogue on making the Fleet safer at Pearl Harbor could have been highly productive, but Roosevelt surrounded himself with 'yes-men.' APRIL 1941 -43-977 [Black Notebook 2 -p 157] "April 10, 1941 - 4701 Reservoir Road, Washington DC To. Commander John B. Barrett, Branch Hydrographic Office, New York, N.Y. Dear Doc: It was very kind of you to call attention to the discrepancies between the New York and Boston broadcasts. This matter does not come under my section, but I was glad to bring it to the attention of Watt, who is in charge of Pilot Charts. = He explains to me that the first broadcast, either New York or Boston, is used as a basis for the Washington broadcast. It is considered here that the mailgram would be too late for a radio broadcast from here. It seems that errors in transmission occasionally creep in, for recently the latitude of one of these submarine areas was given as twenty-one degrees -- the requested repeat still came twenty-one degrees - which was, of course, an obvious error. = In the case of forty degrees thirty minutes instead of forty degrees fifty minutes the larger area was chosen for the reason you advanced - for being on the safe side. Watt emphasizes the fact that he takes either your broadcast or that of Boston, - whichever comes first into the office, - and the mailgram is too late. The Coast Survey has placed these areas on their charts at our particular request,and what we are looking to do is to be able, after a time,to simplify the broadcasts by using the letters. This, I think, will be done as soon as the new charts beome thoroughly disseminated in the Navy and merchant marine. = The office is very busy here, as you may well imagine, but the work is increasingly interesting. I keep going pretty well and hope to see you if you make a trip this way. Be sure I appreciate your letter. Sincerely, s/Brad --P.S. Watt has just shown me a radiogram from Branch Hydrographic Office New York ... "between Latitudes forty - fifty northward and eight North and twenty-one twenty North. " We sent for a report, and it came back o.k except 'Latitude twenty-one". [Gershom Bradford, editor Notices to Mariners 1935-1942 Naval Hydrographic office,Washington D.C.] MAY 1941 In the spring of 1941 Jack was consulted by Charles Edey Fay of Connecticut, who had access to Atlantic Insurance Company records of the disappearance of the five man crew of the New Bedford fishing schooner MARY CELESTE November, 1872. Atlantic was one of five companies that insured the MARY CELESTE. Fay wanted Jack's interpretation of certain navigational notes of the MARY CELESTE near the Azores. He suggested the crew suddenly abandoned ship and got into small boats because they FEARED AN EXPLOSION OF ALCOHOL VAPORS FROM CARGO. Gershom Bradford published in American Neptune magazine his theory that waterspouts are frequent near the Azores in November - local severe tornados that draw water and sometimes fish high in the air and threaten small ships. The mystery remains unsolved, though some skeptics have suggested the motive was insurance fraud, and the crew may have survived. A waterspout would provide a rational explanation for the captain's decision to leave the vessel in good condition, and get into small boats, which were overwhelmed. Bradford showed evidence that water came down from above the ship in a peculiar manner suggestive of a waterspout, a reversal of the usual pressure conditions. Jack kept four of Fay's letters from around the time the Barretts left for Pearl Harbor mid-l941. Not long before we left New York, we spent an afternoon visiting Virginia, Bill, and Billy in Darien, where our former nursemaid Miss Blanche Caffey from Norfolk was helping look after young Billy.John, Jack, and Billy went swimming at the Darien Country Club. Jack took a photo of five year old John kneeling on the grass next to his twenty-month-old cousin Billy. We had it in our West Roxbury bedroom in 1950s and 1960s.We used Bill Barrett's dentist Dr. Ellis on Fifth Avenue in New York. We had a lady come in twice a week to vacuum the floors and furniture. She also took my aprons home to wash, and I gave her a great many of John's baby things when she said that her daughter was going to have a baby. On June 30,our last day in our apartment, Mrs. Rooney gave us a very good lunch - chicken, potatoes, and peas just before we caught our train for the West Coast. Mrs. Rooney died during the war, but we saw George Rooney and his second wife in 1958 in their same apartment after the wedding of David Geetter and his wife Joan Trouboff. Mr. Rooney said his daughter Joan was studying nursing. In 1941 Admiral Chester Nimitz then in charge of the Bureau of Navigation, sent orders for Jack to leave for Pearl Harbor in July. It was rather painful to tell Grandfather Barrett and Mollie. Grandpa guessed the news, but Mollie did not. In our 1937 Lincoln Zephyr we took a tour to Springfield and Greenfield, in western Massachusetts, drove near Mount Monadnock in New Hampshire, and stopped in for a night in South Boston without explaining the reason. It was a slightly awkward visit, as Mollie did not expect us and did not guess we were to be away for six years. Later on a visit to Darien we told Bill and Virginia we were leaving, and Bill and Jack took pictures of John (age five) and Billy (twenty-one months). In conversation with his brother Bill and with Brooklyn neighbors, especially in the aparment across the street at #9701, Jack emphatically predicted the Japanese would soon start a war, and urged action to cut off petroleum and scrap iron. In 1932 he had called the election between Hoover and Roosevelt a terible choice, as both were very weak on defense. Alongside isolationists like Herbert Hoover, Charles Lindberg, and Joseph Kennedy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt could maintain an image as an internationalist, but he often placed politics and budgetary consideratins ahead of re-building almost non-existent modern defenses. One example was the curtailment of Naval Reserve programs in 1933, when Roosevelt attempted to fulfill a 1932 campaign promise to balance the budget. The June 18m 1832 issue of Springfield Republican newspaper in a front page story commented on the issues when Springfield area Navy reservists made the last of the EAGLE 19 training cruises, and Jack Barrett was transferred to the survey ship HANNIBAL. Roosevelt appointed personal cronies to high military posts for which they were unqualfied - Navy chief Admiral Harold Stark, intelligence chief Richmond Kelley Turner, congressional liaison Admiral Claude Bloch, courageous but blundering Admiral Callaghan, and Army chief George Marshall. By ingenious deceptions the public was kept in ignorance of the severity of President Roosevelt's paralysis, which interfered with military decisions and prevented exercise, which severely aggravated his hardening of the arteries and led to incapacity at Yalta conference with Stalin February 1945 and his tragic stroke at age sixty-three April 12, 1945. These factors, along with Roosevelt's egotism, led to needless loss of more than two thousand three hundred lives at Pearl Harbor December 1941. The fall of Wake Islands and the Philippines were further falling dominoes, and the holocaust in Europe and subsequent Russian control of east Europe. On the other hand the majority of Congress, the public and the news media were equally culpable, without Roosevelt's medical excuse. The New York Times for years in the 1930s suppressed reports of the mass murder of Ukrainian farmers by Stalin and Lysenko.Hitler invaded Russia June 1941 and advanced rapidly with fast tank movements. Russia appeared in collapse as Leningrad was surrounded and beseiged, Moscow threatened, most of Ukraine breadbasket captured, southern oil fields threatened, and decisive battle near Volga at Stalingrad deep in Russia about a year and a half away. On the last day of our lease June 30 after a goodbye lunch with the Rooneys we took a train for the West Coast.JULY 1941 We took a northerly route because of our previous experience with summer weather. We crossed Nebraska. Around daybreak at five AM Jack called us as we passed into Colorado at Julesburg on the northern border of the state. We were only in the state a few minutes. Then we went across Wyoming and were a mile high in Cheyenne, as Jack told us then and used to recollect in later years. We got out of the train there briefly. At Salt Lake City we changed trains and headed South through Utah to Las Vegas and southern California.Probably there was a little less hot weather than on the Arizona route.. We were to catch the Matson Line LURLINE at Wilmington, California near Los Angeles about July 10 and arrive Honolulu July 15.Jack was amazed when he learned that dependents were still allowed to go to Hawaii, and he made arrangements for John and me to sail from Los Angeles on the Matson liner LURLINE in July 1941. [about July 9 or 10, arriving Honolulu July 15, 1941].So again John crossed the country in the heat of the summer, but now he had his father with him. There is no doubt that the constant uprooting from familiar surroundings was hard on the five-year-old.At the end of the long cross country train ride there was only a hotel far from the center of Los Angeles, - a hotel that served no food.We had to find food out for three meals a day.That is very hard on a young child and his parents, too, as restaurant food is rarely suitable in the heat of summer for a small boy. We spent a whole week in Los Angeles waiting for the LURLINE and didn't even have our car, which was shipped from Brooklyn to Hawaii. I suppose the taxi driver who took us on the long ride from the station to the hotel [where no food was served] got a rebate from the hotel for every guest he delivered. Except for the lack of food, the hotel was suitable, because it was far from the crowded center of the city and was reasonably priced in a section of Los Angeles where we had so much free time to wander about with a five-year-old for a whole week.We had to vacate our apartment in Brooklyn June 30 or pay another -p.262- full month's rent. So we gave it up and went off to Los Angeles. When we finally boarded the LURLINE, we found ourselves in a spacious suite, - a living room, a bedroom with an extra cot, and a private bath. We were admiring our quarters when Mr. and Mrs, Pardee, our Saticoy friends from the l932 PRESIDENT PIERCE world tour Japan to Naples,- appeared to see us off,- and when they remarked about the elegance of the quarters, Jack explained that they cost the Navy only the cost of an ordinary first class passage- that the Matson line had no cabin for us -but had an unclaimed suite and gave it to us. The Matson Line supplied musicians on the dock and gave the passengers long colored paper streamers to throw down to their friends - very large numbers, which gave a very festive effect on a bright sunny day.I was well supplied with coats for myself and John, as I had often needed a coat, even in the tropics aboard ships under way in the evenings.John, like his mother and father, proved to be a good sailor- we missed no meals and had an uneventful trip to Honolulu The Pardees saw us off and were very impressed with the suite we occupied on the LURLINE. I think C.J. Todd [former Revenue Cutter School classmate] may have been there also. HAWAII CHAPTER FOLLOWS. #142 p 18


 

144.
Sophie Barrett addresses Roslindale Historical Society on Pearl Harbor history

 

Sophie Barrett [front] was active many years in Roslindale and West Roxbury Historical societies. In November l978 she spoke on the Pearl Harbor attack at Roslindale Knights of Columbus Hall. Probably Jim Dolliver orTony Solimeme photo for West Roxbury Transcript, where editor Jason Korell took a great interest in Barrett memoirs and programs on Brook Farm, Faulkner hospital, and Boston Latin 350 anniversary. In photo are Roslindale Historical society Treasurer Bill Welsh, John Barrett junior, President Helen Goetz, and Secretary Mrs. Mellyn p 18 $144 "Willie Steele" Story told to Sophie by Jack Barrett When Jack was Gunnery Officer on the USS TULSA in Tientsin in 1930, he enjoyed going to the Tientsin Club after work about five in the afternoon, before my arrival November 1930. The Club was for men only - a chance to relax and get acquainted with men of many natinalities with good conversation. At the Tientsin Club he met businessman Faison Jordon, Mr. Reynolds of Ford Motors, and "Willie" Steele, head of The Tientsin Pukow Railway line. According to Jack, Willie was a tremendous Scotsman with a tremendous appetite for good food, good liquor, and good conversation. When Jack said to him, "Willie, are you a Highlander or a Lowlander?" Willie struck Jack hard on the back in friendly fashion and replied, "Ach, mon, that's all past and done!" CHINAchapter TULSA CHAPTER INTRODUCTION BY JOHN BARRETT-- Sophie Barrett's chapter "Living in the Orient" begins with her arrival November 13, 1930. Jack Barrett had been in North China since May, 1930. He arrived on destroyer TRUXTUN, was detached about May 15, and spent six days leave at Marine Barracks, American Legation, Peking, where he discussed gunnery with his 1910 ITASCA Revenue Cutter School ship William Rupertus. Then Jack was Gunnery Officer,First Lieutenant, Senior Watch Officer and temporarily Executive Officer of the gunboat TULSA based at Tientsin. At first Walter Decker was Captain, succeeded by Commander Paul Rice. The Rice family became very close friends of the Barrett family over many years in China, Panama, Hawaii, and after the war, and they may be introduced by several letters. Paul Rice lived to age 95 1886-1981 and his wife Gertrude to age 102 + 1/2 born Juneau, Alaska, December 3, 1893 to July 25, 1996. Her father was a silver miner named Hammond, and her mother's father named Coleman was one of the first 1847 settlers of St. Paul, Oregon in the Willamette Valley. He had eleven children. Gertrude had three older sisters, one of whom married Navy Admiral Cross. The Hammond family came to the San Francisco Bay area 1906 or 1907 shortly after the great earthquake and fire. Gertrude married 1909 Naval Academy graduate Paul Rice in 1917, and their daughter Nathalie, born June 1919 was eleven years old when Sophie arrived in Tientsin. Nathalie was trained in social work and said Sophie played a part in interesting her in the field. The friendship of the Rice family was extremely beneficial for Sophie as a young Navy wife in a strange land, and Paul Rice's encouragement helped Jack Barrett achieve promotion to Lieutenant Commander and another fifteen highly productive years in his Navy career. These letters will introduce Gertrude and Paul Rice: Mrs. Paul H. Rice (Gertrude) 523 South Hudson Avenue, Pasadena, California 91106 22 July l970 Dear Sophie, We would be glad to write to Bill Paca if you would send his address. You've never written if he is married. I thought he did marry many years ago. The things he wrote about Jack must have pleased you. It seems that somehow they should be woven into your book. I'm sure that Paul always looks to his command of the TULSA as one of his most happy commands. Strangely enough he had a command in every grade, beginning with Ensign. He had a great regard for the officers that served with him on "the TULSA," and there always seemed to be such a good relationship. I always thought the China duty the best thing the Navy had to offer, but of course we've never been in Europe. Nath has three children, two boys and a girl. Chris is 24, John is 20, and Erica 18. Nathalie is Mrs. J. V Hawley (Mrs. Vernon Hawley 333 Marion Avenue, Mill Valley California 94941." PAUL RICE letters PAUL RICE January 1970 from Pasadena "The TULSA was a gunboat about 2300 tons with a crew of three hundred including thirty Marines and officers.It drew about ten feet so it could navigate the Hai Ho River well except one fall. The water was so low that we spent the winter when Jack was aboard in 1931 at the mouth of the river at Taku Bar. Liberty parties journeyed to Tientsin daily by rail. The TULSA (I believe) was one of three sister ships. It served in the Second World War as part of Admiral Hart's Asiatic Fleet and was sunk near New Guinea during the war. Our duty at Tientsin was for the primary purpose of keeping our Admiral informed of events in North China. We spent two winters there. Each summer we proceeded to Chefoo for target practice and Shanghai for repairs." On February l0,l970 a letter came from Paul Rice Captain USN who was with us on the TULSA in Tientsin l930-3l, visited Panama in l935 & lived in Waikiki l94l when the war struck until February l942."Dear John, As you surmise,Sexton was a classmate of mine, class of l909 at the Naval Academy. Captain Samuel Wilder King was a classmate- knew him very well.He relieved me of command of the USS SAMAR at Hankow,China in June,l9l5. We had no Chaplain on the TULSA. As I remember the anchorage at the entrance of the Hai Ho River was called Tangku. The TULSA used oil-not coal.I spent about three years on the Yangtze- had command of the SAMAR & navigated it to Ichang one thousand miles up the river.Navigation on the river was similar to that on the Mississippi,I suppose.During the summer floods good sized ships could navigate to Hankow.Of course Gertrude & I would be glad to try to identify pictures.Mrs. Rice says she & Nathalie met your uncle Bill in New York City in l942 (but did not meet your aunt Virginia)).Please give our regards to your mother.Sincerely, Paul H. Rice." Sophie added a note: "Jack & I sailed from Tangku to Japan on the Chowan Maru.Tangku is where the Japanese soldiers crossed their swords on my chest when I started to the wrong dock where a Japanese Army troop ship was next to the passengership dock." [Sophie Meranski Barrett at Tientsin Country Club photo by Tientsin Police Chief Isemonger After l993 thefts of desks, bureaus, furniture, books and papers in West Roxbury l993, this is the only remaining photo of an outstanding group taken by Mr. Isemonger spring l931 at Tientsin Country Club. He arrived at Tientsin after the Barretts early l931 probably from India and became chief of police in British concession of Tientsin, where Court Hotel was located.He was a frequent luncheon visitor to the Court Hotel, sometimes accompanied by his daughter Tina.He was frequently helpful to both Jack and Sophie, obtaining bottled drinking water for Sophie to take aboard a commercial freighter on which Sophie followed the TULSA south on its l931 Asiatic Fleet annual cruise, but this was one of a number of situations where Sophie found it necessary as a newly married young Navy wife to avoid too much close contact with unmarried men, where European and American women were few in number.Nonetheless the loss of the Tientsin country Club photos was a great disappointment, and also a group of photos of Sophie taken at Yamamoto studios Tientsin. p 18 #] p 26-796 China- arrive Nov 1930- Liang, Rice,New Years,Fleet Maneuvers 1931-Paca letter-Mukden incident- see photos p 37 924w p 5 38w p 8 62w p 17 136w #22 GUNBOAT TULSA - CHINA "LIVING IN THE ORIENT" MAIN TEXT NOVEMBER 1930 Between Manila & Hong Kong we encountered a typhoon when the ship rocked & pitched dangerously & even I spent much time in my bunk-not because I was seasick but because it was not safe to be on deck.An Army wife,Florence Hilldring,came aboard in Manila for the trip to Chingwantao en route to Peking for a change of climate as she found Manila too hot & humid. Finally on the thirteenth of November l930 the ship arrived early in the morning at Chingwantao far in in northern China near the Manchurian border.Although Jack was very thin,he looked well & very happy to see me & was most complimentary about my small velvet hat & my coat trimmed with Persian lamb fur. We took first a train, then a motor car to the Court Hotel on Victoria Road in the British concession where we had lunch-called "tiffen" by the Australian woman Miss Moore who owned the small hotel.Then Jack dropped the bomb.He told me that Captain Rice had held the TULSA over one day so Jack could meet me & get me settled.The next morning-early-the TULSA would sail for Shanghai for a month of overhaul & liberty- & I would be left alone again-this time in the Orient where I knew no one.I left the hotel with him right after tiffen to go the mile to the ship.Two ricksha coolies came up,& Jack signalled me to get into one.Aboard the TULSA I met some of his shipmates & saw many linens which Jack had bought-then we went to call on a civilian family-Mrs. Faison Jordon,whose husband was friendly at the Tientsin Country Club.When she learned I had been graduated from Mount Holyoke college, she said that Mrs. Evans, wife of a Tientsin lawyer, was president of the Mount Holyoke Club of North China, so we made a short call on her too.Then we called on the Captain of the TULSA & his wife, Commander Paul Rice & Gertrude. They were most gracious.When the ricksha coolies finally dropped us at our hotel room early in the evening for our dinners, they were well paid by Jack. Jack spent a lot of time warning me to drink only boiled water & to eat no fresh fruit or vegetables-I would get Chinese stomach ache or even cholera.Also he told me never to touch shellfish as the water was so polluted.Before I knew it,early morning arrived,& Jack was off to the TULSA & to Shanghai.Things picked up a bit when Mrs. Jordon called on me during the following week & (p.l5) invited me to a formal dinner at her home on Saturday night followed by dancing at Tientsin Country Club.Next to me at table sat Nora Waln, contributor to the Atlantic Monthly of many articles on China.Her husband ran the Post Office in the British concession section of Tientsin,where my hotel was located. GRACE LIANG MOUNT HOLYOKE 1925 + FAMILY Mrs. Evans had told my former Mount Holyoke (class of l925) student Grace Liang, that I was in Tientsin.Her father had graduated from Hartford Public High School Connecticut about l880, & then a change of government policy required him to return to China, where he had a distinguished career first in north China railroads & customs offices & then in the Foreign Service.I believe he was the first Chinese to be invited to address the United States Congress- around the time of the Nine Power Conference in l922 when Japanese commercial ambitions conflicted with America's Open Door policy on China enunciated Secretary of State John Hay in the McKinley administration & with the principle of self-determination pronounced by Woodrow Wilson. Grace came to call on me very soon after I arrived & invited Jack & me for tea at their home when the TULSA returned.Soon we called on Mrs. Liang ,who served us tea-we left when the servants brought our coats & hats & bowed us out-but she had given us the honor of inviting us to dinner- at which her distinguished husband,her daughter Grace,& her two doctor sons would be present.These young men had been educated in England,& their services were greatly in demand.The family occupied a spacious compound.Years later when the Communists occupied Tientsin,the family lost all its possessions and Tou.....Liang though a valued physician,was liquidated. At that dinner party Grace & her mother appeared in exquisite Chinese dresses,but the men wore European clothes.Since Mr. Liang expressed an interest in ships, Jack invited the family to dinner aboard the TULSA, Mr. and Mrs. Laing and Grace.The mess steward had given the word when Mr. Liang would be aboard for dinner, and when we approached the ship that evening we had difficulty getting aboard because of the crush of Chinese people on the dock hoping to get a glimpse of Mr. Liang when they heard he had been invited. They respectfully kept their distance in silence as he left his car and boarded the ship.They remained on the dock throughout the dinner to get another glimpse of the respected diplomatic official.He told us about the low standard of living of most Chinese laborers & how little it took to support a family in those days deep in the worldwide economic depression.Since Grace left soon after to be married to Dan Yapp and live in Shanghai, we never saw her again.In l970 we located them in Waikiki on Kalakaua Avenue and corresponded. We understand that for some years she has been teaching at the Central Connecticut State College, New Britain, Connecticut.-- NEW YEAR'S EVE COSTUME PARTY 1930-31 The Court Hotel was the home of several Hai Ho River pilots mostly of English extraction. Mrs. Johnson, English and the wife of a pilot, invited me to go to Schlessinger's Tea House with her about eleven o'clock oone morning late in December. She invited us to attend a costumed New Year's Eve Ball at the Tientsin Country Club , of which we were members, saying she hoped we would understand that we would have to pay our share of the cost. My husband and I had matching costumes made of inexpensive blue and white Chinese silk- ad we enjoyed the pilots who remained friendly throughout our stay. SOPHIE'S SEA OTTER FUR COAT--Not long after New Year's I was sitting in the small reception room in the Court Hotel after tiffen when two men sat down, talking. When I realized that they were Americans, I asked them what they were doing in Tientsin, and they said they were taking a train later that afternoon for Manchuria, where they would buy furs.When I said I had never been as cold as I was on the streets of Tientsin, they offered to buy some skins for me, as they expected to be back in Tientsin in a few weeks. When they returned they had for me enough sea otter skins for a gorgeous coat.The cost was small - the coat warm and beautiful. It was made up by a Chinese tailor. Sea otter is a lustrous light grey skin.This coat appears in many photos of Sophie in China 1931 and in Bala Cynwyd 1937, and lasted extremely well. Sophie continued to use it during her years in West Roxbury after World War II. +46 Altho the Court Hotel was reputed to have the best food in North China. food was definitely a problem because we dared not touch milk, butter, fresh vegetables or Chinese grown fruitsMy husband grew tired of the steady diet of rice and snipe but managed to wash it down with liquids. I lived on toast with marmelade,rice, snipe, pot roast, cooked dessets and tea. Captain and Mrs. Rice occupied a furnished house and most graciously invited us to dinner fortnightly. When we wanted to return their hospitality and to entertain the new Executive Officer and his wife, Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. Leonard Doughty, we invited them to the Court Hotel for dinner.One evening Rachel Claude Doughty, who came from Washington D.C. regaled us with tales of her mother's friend who came to the Claude home in Washington and stayed for forty years. --As time passed that winter and spring I became well known to the Chinese and Japanese shopkeepers on Taku and Victoria Roads. I bought some rare dragon and turtle candlesticks of brass,some 48- red and green Chinese lacquer drums, which served as small tables and through Mrs. Mendelsohn I located a lovely black and gold lacquer Chinese chest with inlaid colored semi-precious stones arranged in patterns. I also shopped for linens at Takahashi Japanese linen store.-JANUARY 1931 Jack took photographs of a traditional Chinese funeral, in which great honor is paid to ancestors. White is the color of mourning.FEBRUARY 1931 Jack took leave, and we visited Peking and the Ming Tombs and Forbidden City where the Emperors had lived and "Center of the Universe." SPRING-SUMMER 1931 ASIATIC FLEET GUNNERY + MANEUVERS CHEFOO - SHANGHAI In the spring of l93l the gunboat TULSA went to Chefoo and Shanghai for Asiatic Fleet maneuvers & shooting excercises. The rest of the year she was kept near Tientsin primarily for intelligence purposes. Gertrude Rice, wife of our captain, (with her daughter), & Rachel Doughty,wife of our executive officer & I decided to go to Chefoo & Weihaiwei on the Shantung peninsula while the TULSA was cruising south.Jack agreed I could go on a British freighter provided I take twenty-four bottles of boiled water-sold be the case in a drug store.Since the TULSA left before we did,Mr. Isemonger bought the case of water for me & drove me to the freighter,where the coolie stored the box near my bunk.I shared a cabin with a British missionary lady returning from leave in England=she was on her way to a very hot dry region in Southwestern China.She was in the cabin when the case was stowed & subsequently had nothing to do with me-avoided me like the plague.When we arrived in Chefoo,I offered my case of water to the missionary woman,as I hadn't used any of it,&it was too heavy to take ashore.She was startled but very glad to have the water, which she thought all along was gin,as she understood that all American Navy women were heavy drinkers of strong liquor.The reason she avoided me was she thought I was planning to drink a case of liquor in her cabin. CHAPLAIN MAGUIRE FINDS A BOARDING HOUSE FOR SOPHIE Since the whole Asiatic fleet was in Chefoo for exercises,Jack had trouble finding a place for me to live.Finally the chaplain, Father William Maguire found room & board for me in a small boarding house owned by Mr.Wineglass. The goats lived right outside my room- there was no running water=a makeshift toilet & no bath. Before I left Tientsin, Jack had tried to warn me before and mentioned a famous Navy song, which we remembered and sang in later years-,"They wear clothespins on their noses in North China- They wear clothespins on their noses -(Be)cause Chefoo don't smell like roses - a verse of "O the monkeys have no tails in Zamboanga." GUNNERY OFFICER JACK BARRETT AND MARINE COMMANDER PACA ACHIEVE TOP GUNNERY SCORES The gunnery was successful beyond anything the ship had previously scored. Jack & Captain Rice were delighted. Jack's experience in gunnery went back to 1909 at Revenue Cutter School and included work with big guns on battleship WYOMING 1932. At Peking he discussed techniques and innovations with his former classmate Bill Rupertus, who was studying the latest Marine techniques.Our friend Colonel William W. Paca,US Marine Corps (native of Annapolis Maryland,where he was named for great-great-great-grandfather who signed Declaration of Independence) wrote June 23,l970-he was the senior Marine officer on the TULSA & worked closely with Jack in winning the Asiatic Fleet l93l gunnery competition--"Colonel William W. Paca 680 American Drive, Apartment 42 Annapolis Maryland 21403 June 23, 1970 Dear Mrs. Barrett, I was distressed to learn via your letter of Jack's decease this past August. Please know that you have my sincere sympathy in your bereavement.= "I remember Jack fondly as a fine officer and one of the best of shipmates.I remember him too with gratitude-which I hope I expressed directly to him at the time-for his guidance & advice-which as gunnery officer of the TULSA,he gave me relative to the training of our Marine gun crew & which resulted in our gunners winning an "E" at that year's gunnery practice. = The cause of this inexcusable delay in replying to your so interestinhg letter has been twofold = First, I hoped to find among my effects, upon my return from several months stay in the South. several memorabilia relating to the TULSA. I did have a really excellent photograph of the ship, and I thought I also had a photograph of the officers and crew. I intended to send both to you for possible incorporation in Jack's memoirs, but I have been unable to locate either. The second cause is the embarassment I feel due to my deplorable memory, which worsens year by year, and which I am reluctant to confess. I have forgotten so very many names, dates, and other incidents of my military service. =-I do have one especially clear memory of Jack- and that is that he was one of a rare group of people who have the faculty of being 'where the action is.' Frequently during wardroom conversations on the TULSA when past events were mentioned,it would develop that Jack had either been there or nearby or otherwise had been in a position to have special knowledge of the event.In past years I have several times remarked that I once served with a naval officer who had that rare facility or gift.As for myself, I was graduated from West Point in August, 1917. I was promoted to Captain while in France.After the war and the letdown of demobilization I resigned from the Army. Three years later, and because I badly missed service life I joined the Marine Corps. This was basically because I loved the water and ships, and I had wanted to be in the Navy in the first place but had been unable to obtain a principal appointment to the Naval Academy. = I commanded Camp Catlin, Oahu, from 1944 to 1946. I was then on duty at Headquarters, Marine Corps, and later was Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, Naval Base, Philadelphia. = My great, great, great grandfather was William Paca, a Maryland signer of the Declaration of Independence. The main part of the hotel, Carvel Hall, was built on the rear of William Paca's town house. The hotel part has now been torn down, and the mansion and gardens are being restored by the local historical society. = There have been, and are, a rather surprising number of TULSA officers living here. These in addition to myself include Captain Doughty (deceased) , Admiral William T. Fitzgerald, jr., Rear Admiral Wayne R. Loud, Rear Admiral Charles E. Coney, and Colonel Gordon Hall (my predecessor on the TULSA) In addition General Pedro A. Del Valle lives here, and I see him fairly frequently. = Again please forgive my remissions.I do hope this finds things well with you. Sincerely, William W. Paca Colonel United State Marine Corps Retired." To celebrate the TULSA's good score Jack wanted to give a party at the Chefoo club for all the ship's officers.I bought hand painted place cards, candles,Japaese lanterns as the party as to be outdoors on a lovely summer night.Every officer was invited even though there were only three wives attached to the ship at that time. There was much good conversation for twenty-six guests.After every other guest had gone, the wife of the executive officer, Rachel Doughty came up to me & said, "Sophie, you ought to know better than to seat me in candle light. It is not becoming to me." NEARLY STRANDED AT WEI-HAI-WEI As we approached Wei-Hai-Wei I became excited because I had often enjoyed breakfast at Gertrude Rice's home in Tientsin,where we were served in bed.The coffee pot was red pottery with pewter,& the cream pitcher & sugar bowl were also red pottery with pewter-lovely pieces of china as well as being useful & unique & Gertrude told me that they had come from Wei-Hai-Wei.It was a beautiful town developed by Germans but given back to China after World War I. I wanted to buy a Wei-Hai-Wei coffee & tea service of this red pottery with silver trim.But to my disappointment the ship anchored out quite a distance. We could not even see Wei-Hai-Wei from the ship.But a smll boat was leaving our freighter & without even going to my cabin to get my purse I persuaded Gertrude Rice to get into the boat with me with me for the trip to Wei-Hai-Wei. I took it for granted that the Chinese man running the small motor boat was on an errand for my freighter & would certainly return to it.I don't know why,but we left ten-year-old Nathalie Rice on the freighter when we made our hurried departure,& we waved to her as we left.Our boatman spoke no English,but I believed he understood us when he nodded assent to my questioning him as to whether we could have two hours in Wei-Hai-Wei before returning to our ship. It was getting to be late afternoon & I did not want to be in the Chinese city after dark.We started off happily & even found the shop which sold the Wei-Hai-Wei coffeee & tea sets. There I charged a set to be sent to the TULSA as I had no money with me in my haste to get into the departing small boat.When night threatened,we returned to our dock,but found no small motor boat.At first we were not alarmed,but when we heard the freighter's whistle sounding repeatedly & impatiently & when no small boat appeared as darkness approached, we bargained with a sampan to row us out to the freighter. Gertrude paid him from her purse & he tried hard to row us but made litle headway with the heavy seas.He managed to reach a Chinese junk sailing along in the wind, & we again bargained for a ride & paid the owner of the junk to take us aboard.The wind held, & the junk mnade good progress with the large square sails & we again met a difficult transfer from the junk to the freighter.The captain of the freighter was greatly annoyed by the delay & stated he would have stranded us if Nathalie had not tearfully appealed for him to wait for her mother & Mrs. Barrett. SHANGHAI SUMMER 1931 From Chefoo we went to Shanghai where we lived at the Palace Hotel but aside from having clothes made in Shanghai and a very enjoyable luncheon at the home of ships' chandler Ah Sing I could do very little socially as my hands were very sore. However, I did spend one happy evening at the home of Mickie and Maimie Ashley and their brother. Mickey was Jack's old friend from MARBLEHEAD days in 1927. She was born in China and worked as secretary to the local head of Standard Oil Company of New York. She and her sister had adopted a Chinese girl, Topsy, who lived with them until Maimie became a prisoner of the Japanese in 1941 after Pearl Harbor. Mickey had gone to the states, but Maimie was waiting in hopes that Topsy could obtain permission to come with her to the United States. Maimie did hear Topsy calling her by name in the Japanese prison camp, but she feared the Japanese would take reprisals against Topsy if she was seen with an American. Topsy disappeared and must not have survived. = Knowing I would return to the United States with Jack via Europe in early 1932, I ordered many new clothes made up for me in Shanghai. We attended a long play at a Chinese theater where we were given steaming hot towels to refresh ourselves during the long performance. When we returned to the Court Hotel Mr. Isemonger was concerned about my physical condition. He recommended the same Dr. Grice, whom I had seen for indigestion when I first arrived in Tientsin. Dr. Grice called my hand condition "pomphylyx" caused by too much medication. he scraped much sore tissue away surgically and applied silver nitrate and asked me to wear white cotton gloves. My hands did improve toward autumn. SEPTEMBER 19, 1931 SOPHIE SENDS FIRST REPORT OF JAPANESE AGGRESSION AT MUKDEN, MANCHURIA In the winter of l930-31 I had met two American fur buyers in the lobby of the Court Hotel.When they remarked that my cloth coat trimmed with Persian lamb was not warm enough for the piercing cold of North China,I remarked I could not afford a fur coat. They offered to buy fur skins for me in Manchuria-said they would be beautiful & very inexpensive.When they returned,they had some sea otter skins,which were made up into a lovely coat. Sea otter is a short,durable fur with a lovely silver sheen-very warm & comfortable.In September l93l they returned to the hotel & I visited with them before they left for Mukden & other parts of Manchuria to buy furs for their New York concern.Only a few days later they reurned to the hotel,visibly shaken as they had barely escaped with their lives when the Japanese captured Mukden September l8-l9,& they got away on the last train allowed to leave the city- a bribe to Japanese officers was necessary for them to leave.The Japanese claimed that the railroad track to be used by their troops had been bombed by the Chinese,-&they used that as an excuse to occupy Mukden. I immediately telephoned Captain Rice, who was at Taku Bar with the TULSA forty miles east of Tientsin at the mouth of the Hai Ho River,because of unusually low water levels that year, which made navigation to Tientsin inadvisable.He immediately telegraphed the Admiral of the Asiatic Fleet at Shanghai-probably the first report the United States government received.The U.S. ambassador in Tokyo was on vacation. The Navy was told to keep "hands off" the situiation.When we did nothing to stop them,the emboldened Japanese militarists established the state of Manchukuo with a puppet emperor Pu Yi.They proceeded to conquer much of North China & attacked Shanghai in l932..Their heady successes in China ultimately encouraged the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, l94l.Has we pushed them out of Manchuria in l93l, we might have avoided large scale conflict later.Secretary of State Stimson & many European leaders favored action, but President Herbert Hoover, a pacifist who built no ships and had lost political support in view of the deep economic Depression, missed the opportunity to nip World War II in the bud. Sophie accompanied Jack to Peking in November when he went for physical exam for promotion to Lieutenant Commander. The good score of the TULSA in Asiatic Fleet gunnery and maneuvers and strong fitness report from Commander Paul Rice and intensive study for exam helped Jack achieve this promotion. The Barretts had a cordial visit with the Rice family around the December 1931 holidays, and young Nathalie Rice became interested in Sophie's social work experience and became a social worker herself years later.the anchorage at the entrance of the Hai Ho River was called Tangku (note by Sophie M. Barrett"Jack & I sailed from Tangku to Japan on the Chowan Maru.Tangku is where the Japanese soldiers crossed their swords on my chest when I started to the wrong dock where a Japanese Army troop ship was next to the passengership dock.") p.46 Altho the Court Hotel was reputed to have the best food in North China. food was definitely a problem because we dared not touch milk, butter, fresh vegetables or Chinese grown fruitsMy husband grew tired of the steady diet of rice and snipe but managed to wash it down with liquids. I lived on toast with marmelade,rice, snipe, pot roast, cooked dessets and tea. Captain and Mrs. Rice occupied a furnished house and most graciously invited us to dinner fortnightly. When we wanted to return their hospitality and to entertain the new Executive Officer and his wife, Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. Leonard Doughty, we invited them to the Court Hotel for dinner.One evening Rachel Claude Doughty, who came from Washington D.C. regaled us with tales of her mother's friend who came to the Claude home in Washington and stayed for forty years. The Court Hotel was the home of several Hai Ho River pilots mostly of English extraction. Mrs. Johnson, English and the wife of a pilot, invited me to go to Schlessinger's Tea House with her about eleven o'clock oone morning late in December. She invited us to attend a costumed New Year's Eve Ball at the Tientsin Country Club , of which we were members, saying she hoped we would understand that we would have to pay our share of the cost. My husband and I had matching costumes made of inexpensive blue and white Chinese silk- ad we enjoyed the pilots who remained friendly throughout our stay. --Not long after New Year's I was sitting in the small reception room in the Court Hotel after tiffen when two men sat down, talking. When I realized that they were Americans, I asked them what they wre doing in Tientsin, and they said they were taking a train later that afternoon for Manchuria, where they would buy furs.When I said I had never been as cold as I was on the streets of Tientsin, they offered to buy some skins for me, as they expected to be back in Tienstin in a few weeks. When they returned they had for me enough sea otter skins for a gorgeous coat.The cost was small - the coat warm and beautiful. It was made up by a Chinese tailor. Sea otter is a lustrous light grey skin.--As tinme passed that winter and spring I became well known to the Chinese and Japanese shopkeepers on Taku and Victoria Roads. I bought some rare dragon and turtle candlesticks of brass,some 48- red and green Chinese lacquer drums, which served as small tables and through Mrs. Mendelsohn I located a lovely black and gold lacquer Chinese chest with inlaid colored semi-precious stones arranged in patterns. I also shopped for linens at Takahashi Japanese linen store.--The TULSA was scheduled to go to Chefoo for gunnery exercises in June and my husband as gunnery officer was anxious to make a good showing.So in the spring of l931 on the TULSA in Tientsin he spent a lot of time training gunners.His Marine officer lieutenant William W. Paca was training his Marines to shoot and was working hard with my husband.Captain Rice was very pleased with the gunnery score they made in Chefoo in the summer of l931 text continues in Notebook Two with account of Sophie's trip to Chefoo and Shanghai -= end of page 48 notebook #1 T-U-L-S-A narrative "22" 1931 w1286 CHINAchapter Year: 1931___ Visit with classmate Rupertus is probable endTRUXTUN chapter:- 22a China- arrive Nov 1930- Liang, Rice,New Years,Fleet Maneuvers 1931-Paca letter-Mukden incident- see photos p 37 924w p 5 38w p 8 62w p 17 136w #22 China Mon, 13 Apr 1998 Between Manila & Hong Kong we encountered a typhoon when the ship rocked & pitched dangerously & even I spent much time in my bunk-not because I was seasick but because it was not safe to be on deck.An Army wife,Florence Hilldring,came aboard in Manila for the trip to Chingwantao en route to Peking for a change of climate as she found Manila too hot & humid. Finally on the fourteenth of November l930 the ship arrived early in the morning at Chingwantao far in in northern China near the Manchurian border.Although Jack was very thin,he looked well & very happy to see me & was most complimentary about my small velvet hat & my coat trimmed with Persian lamb fur. We took a motor car to the Court Hotel on Victoria Road where we had lunch-callled "tiffen" by the Australian woman Miss Moore who owned the small hotel.Then Jack dropped the bomb.He told me that Captain Rice had held the TULSA over one day so Jack could meet me & get me settled.The next morning-early-the TULSA would sail for Shanghai for a month of overhaul & liberty- & I would be left alone again-this time in the Orient where I knew no one.I left the hotel with him right after tiffen to go the mile to the ship.Two ricksha coolies came up,& Jack signalled me to get into one.Aboard the TULSA I met some of his shipmates & saw many linens which Jack had bought-then we went to call on a civilian family-Mrs. Faison Jordon,whose husband was friendly at the Tientsin Country Club.When she learned I had been graduated from Mount Holyoke college, she said trhat Mrs. Evans, wife of a Tientsin lawyer, was president of the Mount Holyoke Club of North China, so we made a short call on her too.Then we called on the Captain of the TULSA & his wife, Commander Paul Rice & Gertrude.They were most gracious.When the ricksha coolies finally dropped us at our hotel room early in the evening for our dinners, they were well paid by Jack. Jack spent a lot of time warning me to drink only boiled water & to eat no fresh fruit or vegetables-I would get Chinese stomach ache or even cholera.Also he told me never to touch shellfish as the water was so polluted.Before I knew it,early morning arrived,& Jack was off to the TULSA & to Shanghai.Things picked up a bit when Mrs. Jordon called on me during the following week & (p.l5) invited me to a formal dinner at her home on Saturday night followed by dancing at Tientsin Country Club.Next to me at table sat Nora Waln, contributor to the Atlantic Monthly of many articles on China.Her husband ran the Post Office in the British concession section of Shanghai,where my hotel was located.Mrs. Evans had told my former Mount Holyoke (class of l925) student Grace Liang, that I was in Tientsin.Her father had graduated from Hartford Public High School Connecticut about l880, & then a change of government policy required him to return to China, where he had a distinguished career first in north China railroads & customs offices & then in the Foreign service.I believe he was the first Chinese to be invited to address the United States Congress- around the time of the Nine Power Conference in l922 when Japanese commercial ambitions conflicted with America's Open Door policy on China enunciated Secretary of State John Hay in the McKinley administration & with the principle of self-determination pronounced by Woodrow Wilson. Grace came to call on me very soon after I arrived & invited Jack & me for tea at their home when the TULSA returned.Soon we called on Mrs. Liang ,who served us tea-we left when the servants brought our coats & hats & bowed us out-but she had given us the honor of inviting us to dinner- at which her distinguished husband,her daughter Grace,& her two doctor sons would be present.These young men had been educated in England,& their services were greatly in demand.The family occupied a spacious compound.Years later when the Communists occupied Tientsin,the family lost all its possessions and Tou.....Liang though a valued physician,was liquidated.Later in l93l Grace married Dan Yapp of Shanghai.In l970 we located them in Waikiki on Kalakaua Avenue.For some years Grace taught in Connecticut.At that dinner party Grace & her mother appeared in exquisite Chinese dresses,but the men wore European clothes.Since Mr. Liang expressed an interest in ships, Jack invited the family to dinner aboard the TULSA.That evening the dock was crowded with Chinese people,who had gotten the word that Mr. Liang was expected. They respectfully kept their distance & silence as he left his car & boarded the ship.They remained on the dock throughout the dinner to get another glimpse of the respected diplomatic official.He told us about the low standard of living of most Chinese laborers & how little it took to support a family in those days deep in the worldwide economic depression.In the spring of l93l the gunboat TULSA went to Shanghai for Asiatic Fleet maneuvers & shooting excercises. She was kept near Tientsin primarily for intelligence purposes.Gertrude Rice, wife of our captain, (with her daughter), & Rachel Doughty,wife of our executive officer & I decided to go to Chefoo & Weihaiwei on the Shantung peninsula while the TULSA was cruising south.Jack agreed I could go on a British freighter provided I take twenty-four bottles of boiled water-sold be the case in a drug store.Since the TULSA left before we did,Mr. Eismonger bought the case of water for me & drove me to the frieghter,where the coolie stored the box near my bunk.I shared a cabin with a British missionary lady returning from leave in England=she was on her way to a very hot dry region in Southwestern China.She was in the cabin when the case was stowed & subsequently had nothing to do with me-avoided me like the plague.When we arrived in Chefoo,I offered my case of water to the missionary woman,as I hadn't used any of it,&it was too heavy to take ashore.She was startled but very glad to have the water, which she thought all along was gin,as she understood that all American Navy women were heavy drinkers of strong liquor.The reason she avoided me was she thought I was planning to drink a case of liquor in her cabin.Since the whole Asiatic fleet was in Chefoo for exercises,Jack had trouble fng a place for me to live.Finally the chaplain, Father William Maguire found room & board for me in a small boarding house owned by Mr.Wineglass. The goats lived right outside my room- there was no running water=a makeshift toilet & no bath.In later years we would sing the Navy song,"They wear clothespins on their noses in North China- Thet wear clothespins on their noses -(Be)cause Chefoo don't smell like roses - a verse of "O the monkeys have no tails in Zamboanga." The gunnery was successful beyond anything the ship had previously scored. Jack & Captain Rice were delighted. to celebrate Jack wanted to give a party at the Chefoo club for all the ship's officers.I bought hand painted place cards, candles,Japaese lanterns as the party as to be outdoors on a lovely summer night.Every officerwas invited even though there were only three wives attached to the ship at that time. There was much good conversation for twenty-six guests.After every other guest had gone, the wife of the executive officer, Rachel Doughty came up to me & said, "Sophie, you ought to know better than o seat me in candle light. It is not becoming to me."As we approached Wei-Hai-Wei became excited because I had often enjoyed breakfast at Gertrude Rice's home in Tientsin,where we were served in bed.The coffee pot was red pottery with pewter,& the cream pitcher & sugar bowl were also red pottery with pewter-lovely pieces of china as well as being useful & unique & Gertrude told me that they had come from Wei-Hai-Wei.It was a beautiful town developed by Germans but given back to China after World War I. I wanted to buy a Wei-Hai-Wei coffee & tea service of this red pottery with silver trim.But to my disappointment the ship anchored out quite a distance. We coul not even see Wei=Hai-Wei from the ship.Butr a smll boat was leaving our freighter & withouteven going to my cabin to get my purse I persuaded Gertrude Rice to get into the boat with me with me for the trip to Wei-Hai-Wei.. I took it for granted that the Chinese man running the small motor boat was on an errand for my freighter & would certainly return to it.I don't know why,but we left ten-year-old Nathalie Rice on the freighter when we made our hurried departure,& we waved to her as we left.Our boatman spoke no English,but I believed he understood us when he nodded assent to my questioning him as to whether we could have two hours in Wei-Hai-Wei before returning to our ship. It was getting to be late afternoon & I did not want to be in the Chinese city after dark.We started off happily & even found the shop which sold the Wei-Hai-Wei coffeee & tea sets. There I charged a set to be sent to the TULSA as I had no money with me in my haste to get into the departing small boat.When night threatened,we returned to our dock,but found no small motor boat.At first we were not alarmed,but when we heard the freighter's whistle soundig repeatedly & impatiently & when no small boat appeared as darkness approached, we bargained with a sampan to row us out to the freighter. Gertrude paid him from her purse & he tried hard to row us but made litle headway with the heavy seas.He managed to reach a Chinese junk sailing along in the wind, & we again bargained for a ride & paid the owner of the junk to take us aboard.The wind held, & the junk mnade good progress with the large square sails & we again met a difficult transfer from the junk to the freighter.The captain of the freighter was greatly annoyed by the delay & stated he would have stranded us if Nathalie had not tearfully apealed for him to wait for her mother & Mrs. Barrett. Our friend Colonel William W. Paca,US Marine Corps (native ofAnnapolis Maryland,where he was named for great-great-great-grandfather who signed Declaration of Independence) wrote June 23,l970-he was the Marine officer on the TULSA & worked closely with Jack in winning the Asiatic Fleet l93l gunnery competition:"I remember Jack fondly as a fine officer & one of my best shiipmates.I remember him too with gratitude-which I hope I expressed directly to him at the time-for his guidance & advice-which as gunnery officer of the TULSA,he gave me relative to the training of our Marine gun crew & which resulted in our winning an "E" at that year's gunnery practice.I do have an especially clear memory of Jack- & that is that he was one of a rare group of people who have the faculty of being 'where the action is.' Frequently during wardroom conversations on the TULSA when past events were mentioned,it would develop that Jack had either been there or nearby or otherwise had been in a position to have special knowledge pf the event.In past years I have several times remarked that I .In September l93l they returned to the hotel & I visited with them before they left for Mukden & other parts of Manchuria to buy furs for their New York concern.Only a few days later they reurned to the hotel,visibly shaken as they had barely escaped with their lives when the Japanese captured Mukden September l8-l9,& they got away on the last train allowed to leave the city- a bribe to Japanese officers was necessary for them to leave.The Japanese claimed that the railroad track to be used by their troops had been bombed by the Chinese,-&they used that as an excuse to occupy Mukden. I immediately telephoned Captain Rice, who was at Taku Bar with the TULSA forty miles east of Tientsin at the mouth of the Hai Ho River,because of unusually low water levels that year, which made navigation to Tientsin inadvisable.He immediately telegraphed the Admiral of the Asiatic Fleet at Shanghai-probably the first report the United States government received.The U.S. ambassador in Tokyo was on vacation. The Navy was told to keep "hands off" the situiation.When we did nothing to stop them,the emboldened Japanese militarists established the state of Manchukuo with a puppet emperor Pu Yi.They proceeded to conquer much of North China & attacked Shanghai in l932..Their heady successes in China ultimately encouraged the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, l94l.Has we pushed them out of Manchuria in l93l, we might have avoided large scale conflict later.Secretary of State Stimson & many European leaders favored action, but President Herbert Hoover, a pacifist who built no ships and had lost political support in view of the deep economic Depression, missed the opportunity to nip World War II in the bud. She accompanied Jack to Peking in November when he went for physical exam for promotion to Lieutenant Commander. The good score of the TULSA in Asiatic Fleet gunnery and maneuvers and strong fitness report from Commander Paul Rice and intensive study for exam helped Jack achieve this promotion. The Barretts had a cordial visit with the Rice family around the December 1931 holidays, and young Nathalie Rice became interested in Sophie's social work experience and became a social worker herself years later.the anchorage at the entrance of the Hai Ho River was called Tangku (note by Sophie M. Barrett"Jack & I sailed from Tangku to Japan on the Chowan Maru.Tangku is where the Japanese soldiers crossed their swords on my chest when I started to the wrong dock where a Japanese Army troop ship was next to the passengership dock.")The TULSA used oil-not coal


 

 

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