Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

1056.

 

p 52-1056 wrestling 1949 back Connors Alpert Crook Arthur Cox, coach Kelsey front Ed Keating, Coffey, Davis, Dimock, Rollins Price ---Bill French - I remember several years ago you attended a couple of programs of New England Botanical Club, and I remember you were in conversation with our past President from around 1988 Dr. Garrett Crow of University of New Hampshire at Durham. He is an authority on botany and ecology and conservation of the state of New Hampshire. he was original in Michigan and has done botany in Siberia, Bolivia, Tierra del Fuego among other places - knowledgable on arctic, mountain, aquaitic habitats and generally. His colleague at Durham Professor Lynn Bogle is an authority on Hawaii, where is wife's father was a volcanologist at Kiluaea. among their students Vin Klink and Don Padgett come to mijd as active in New England Botanical Club. I suggest many at Kabeyun would be interested in University of New Hampshire botany and New England Botanical Club. Perhaps some of the botanists will have sons who would enjoy and benefit from Kabeyun.I could give you names of many botanists in the other New England states and New York if anyone is interested in those areas. I am going to try to send this to as it should interest Trips department, and I'll look up current E mails of Chuck and Laura Mills and others. Can you fill me in on Who's Who in Kabeyun Nature Department ----- the reminds me Bill--- I haVE looking for information on DYER GROSSMAN- onetime Kabeyun nature counselor - is he OK - no word in ages? Other old-time Kabeyun naturalists include Geroge West 1951,Wally Brent 1952, Ken Paulley 1952-3, Scott Brackett, Bill Ricker. Please pass this along. As you will see, Dr. Garrett Crow has a huge list of publications------Merry Christmas to the French family and everyone interesting in Kabeyun [and Kehonka and Tella-Wooket}. ---John Barrettt: DR. GARRETT E. CROW Professor of Botany Department of Plant Biology University of New Hampshire [PAST PRESIDENT NEW ENGLAND BOTANICAL CLUB]bibliography PUBLICATIONS Books/Theses Scientific Articles Reports,Miscellaneous Publications Theses of G. Crow's Grad Students Undergraduate Honors Theses Papers Presented at Scientific Meetings Invited Seminars/Lectures Link to Hodgdon Herbarium Web Page Books/Theses Crow, G. E. 1968. An Ecological, Floristic, and Phytogeographical Analysis of a Southern Michigan Bog. M.S. Thesis. Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Crow, G. E. 1974. A Revision of the North American Species of Sagina(Caryophyllaceae).Ph.D. Dissertation. Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Storks, I. M. and G. E. Crow. 1978. Rare and endangered vascular plant species in New Hampshire. The New England Botanical Club in cooperation with the U. S. Fish andWildlife Service[Newton Corner, MA].69pp. Crow, G. E. 1982. New England's rare, threatened, and endangered plants. U. S. Gov. Print. Off., Washington, D.C. 169 pp. Dudley, T. R. and G. E. Crow. 1983. A contribution to the flora and vegetation of Isla de los Estados (Staten Island), Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Antarctic Research Series--Terrestrial Biology. Vol. 37. 184 pp. Crow, G. E. and C. B. Hellquist. 2000. Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Northeastern North America. Vol. 1. Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms, and Angiosperms: Dicotyledons. Univ. of Wisconsin Press. Madison, Wisconsin. 536 pp. Crow, G. E. and C. B. Hellquist. 2000. Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Northeastern North America. Vol. 2. Angiosperms: Monocotyledons. Univ. of Wisconsin Press. Madison, Wisconsin. 456 pp. Scientific Articles Crow, G. E. 1969. An ecological analysisof a southern Michigan bog.Michigan Bot.8:1127. Crow, G. E. 1969. A phytogeographical analysis of a southern Michigan bog. Michigan Bot. 8: 51-60. Crow, G. E. 1969. Species of vascular plants of Pennfield Bog, Calhoun Co., Michigan. Michigan Bot. 8: 131-136. Crow, G. E. 1975. The vascular flora of Isla de los Estados, Argentina. Antarctic Jour. U. S. 10: 81-85. Voss, E. G. and G. E. Crow. 1976. Across Michigan by covered wagon: a botanical expedition in 1888. Michigan Bot. 15: 1-70. Crow, G. E. 1978. A taxonomic revision of Sagina (Caryophyllaceae) in North America. Rhodora 80: 1-91. Crow, G. E. 1979. The systematic significance of seed morphology in Sagina (Caryophyllaceae) utilizing SEM. Brittonia 31: 52-63. Hodgdon, A. R., G. E. Crow and F. L. Steele. 1979. Grasses of New Hampshire. I. Tribes Poeae (Festuceae) and Triticeae (Hordeae).N.H. Agric.Exp. Sta. Bull. 512. McDonnell, M. J. and G. E. Crow. 1979. The typification and taxonomic status of Spartina caespitosa A. A. Eaton. Rhodora 81: 123-129. Storks, I. M. and G. E. Crow. 1979. Endangered, threatened and rare plants of the White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire. Report prepared for the White Mountain National Forest, USFS in cooperation with the N.H. Agric. Exp. Sta.,Durham, N.H. Crow, G. E. and I. M. Storks. 1980. Rare and endangered plants of New Hampshire: a phytogeographic viewpoint. Rhodora 82: 173-189. Crow, G. E. W. D. Countryman, G. L. Church, L. M. Eastman, C. B. Hellquist, L. J. Mehrhoff and I. M. Storks. 1981. Rare and endangered vascular plants in New England. Rhodora 83: 259-299. Hellquist, C. B. and G. E. Crow. 1980. Aquatic vascular plants of New England: Part 1. Zosteraceae, Potamogetonaceae, Zannichelliaceae, Najadaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 515. McDonnell, M. J. and G. E. Crow. 1980. On the typification of Spartina caespitosa--a reply. Rhodora 82: 513-516. Philbrick, C. T. and G. E. Crow. 1980. Type specimens of the Hodgdon Herbarium, University of New Hampshire. Rhodora 82: 579-597. Chapman, S. R. Ross and G.E.Crow.1981. Raunkiaer's life form classification in relation to fire. Bartonia 48: 19-33. Chapman, S. R. Ross and G. E. Crow. 1981a. Application of Raunkiaer's life form system to plant species survival after fire. Bull.Torrey Bot.Club 108: 472-478. Crow, G. E. and R. E. Graber. 1981. Survey of hiker activity and mapping of critical habitat of Potentilla robbinsiana. Report prepared for the White Mountain National Forest and the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Endangered Species. Crow, G. E. and C. B. Hellquist. 1981. Aquatic vascular plants of New England: Part 2. Typhaceae and Sparganiaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 517. Hellquist, C. B. and G. E. Crow. 1981. Aquatic vascular plants of New England. Part 3. Alismataceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 518. Crow, G. E. and C. B. Hellquist. 1982. Aquatic vascular plants of New England. Part 4. Juncaginaceae, Scheuchzeriaceae, Butomaceae, and Hydrocharitaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 520. Graber, R. E. and G. E. Crow. 1982. Hiker traffic on and near the habitat of Robbins Cinquefoil, an endangered plant species. N. H. Agric.ExpSta.Bull. 522. Hellquist, C. B. and G. E. Crow. 1982. Aquatic vascular plants of New England. Part 5. Araceae, Lemnaceae, Xyridaceae, Eriocaulaceae, Pontederiaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 523. Crow, G. E. and C. B. Hellquist. 1983. Aquatic vascular plants of New England. Part 6. Trapaceae, Haloragaceae and Hippuridaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 524. Dunlop, D. A. and G. E. Crow. 1983. Coastal endangered plant inventory. A report on the rare and endangered plant species of the coastal zone of New Hampshire. Prepared forthe NH Office of State Planning,Concord,NH. Dunlop, D. A., G. E. Crow and T. J. Bertrand. 1983. Coastal endangered plant inventory. A report on the Seabrook Dunes, its vegetation and flora. Prepared for the N. H. Office of State Planning, Concord, NH. Philbrick, C. T. and G. E. Crow. 1983. Distribution of Podostemum ceratophyllum Michx. (Podostemaceae). Rhodora 85: 325-341. Hellquist, C. B. and G. E. Crow. 1984. Part. 7. Cabombaceae, Nymphaeaceae, Nelumbonaceae, and Ceratophyllaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull 527. Crow, G. E. and C. B. Hellquist. 1985. Aquatic vascular plants of New England. Part 8. Lentibulariaceae. N. H. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull. 528. Dunlop, D. A. and G. E. Crow. 1985. Rare plants of coastal New Hampshire. Rhodora 87: 471-486. Dunlop, D. A. and G. E. Crow. 1985a. The vegetation and flora of the Seabrook Dunes, N. H., with special reference to rare plants. Rhodora 87: 487-501. Crow, G. E. and D. I. Rivera. 1986. Aquatic vascular plants of Palo Verde National Park, Costa Rica. Uniciencia 3: 71-78. [appeared May 1988, Heredia, Costa Rica]. Hellquist, C. B. and G. E. Crow. 1986. Potamogeton ´ haynesii (Potamogetonaceae), a new species from northeastern North America. Brittonia 38: 415-419. Crow, G. E., D. I. Rivera, and C. Charpentier. 1987. Aquatic vascular plants of two Costa Rican ponds. Selbyana 10: 31-35. Shannon, R. K., G. E. Crow and A. C. Matheison. 1988. Seasonal abundance and recruitment patterns of Petalonia fascia (O. F. Muller) Kuntze and Scytosiphon lomentaria (Lyngbye) Link var. lomentaria in New Hampshire, U.S.A. Botanica Marina 31: 207-214. Shannon, R. K., G. E. Crow and A. C. Mathieson. 1988. Evidence for sexual reproduction in Petalonia fascia (O. F. Muller) Kuntze. Botanica Marina 31: 511-513. Brackley, F. E. and G. E. Crow. 1989. Notes on the rare flora of New Hampshire. Rhodora 91: 103-109. Crow, G. E. 1989. Plant conservation: a biogeographic perspective. Introduction. Rhodora 91: 6-9. [Proceedings of the New England Botanical Club Symposium, held May 8, 1988 at Harvard University]. Crow, G. E. 1990. Observations on the vegetation of the Crimea, USSR. In Proceedings of the USA-USSR Botanical Exchange Conference, Novosibirsk, Siberia, USSR. 7-18 July 1989. Weatherbee, P. B. and G. E. Crow. 1990. The phytogeography of Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Rhodora 92: 232-256. Caldwell, F. A. and G. E. Crow. 1992. A floristic and vegetation analysis of a freshwater tidal marsh on the Merrimack River, West Newbury, Massachusetts. Rhodora 94: 63-97. Weatherbee, P. A. and G. E. Crow. 1992. Natural plant communities of Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Rhodora 94: 171-209. Philbrick, C. T. and G. E. Crow. 1992. Isozyme variation and population structure of Podostemum ceratophyllum Michx. (Podostemaceae): implications for colonization of glaciated North America. Aquat. Bot. 43: 311-325. Crow, G. E. 1993. Species diversity in aquatic angiosperms: latitudinal patterns. Aquat. Bot. 44: 229-258. [Special Issue comprising papers from 1991 AIBS symposium: "Evolution of Aquatic Angiosperms"] Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1993. Some unwelcome additions to the flora of New Hampshire. Rhodora 95: 348-351. Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1994. A vegetation and floristic analysis of a created wetland in southeastern New Hamsphire. Rhodora 96:1-29. Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1994. A systematic investigation of Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae). Water Garden J. 10: 32-42. Crow, G. E., N. P. Ritter, K. M. McCauley, and D. J. Padgett. 1994. Botanical reconnaissance of Mountain Pond Research Natural Area. U.S.D.A. Forest Service Northeastern Forest Exp. Sta. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-187. Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1993 [1994]. A comparison of floristic composition and species richness within and between created and natural wetlands of southeastern New Hampshire. Pp. 171-186 in Webb., F. J., Jr. (ed.). Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference on Wetlands Restoration and Creation. Hillsborough Community College.Plant City,FL. Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1994. Foreign plant stock: concerns for wetland mitigation. Restoration & Management Notes 12: 168-171. Crow, G. E. 1992 [1995]. The genus Utricularia in Costa Rica. Brenesia 38: 1-18. Snow, N. and G. E. Crow. 1993[1995]. El Primer documentación de Leptochloa panicoides (Presl.) Hitchc.(Poaceae) en Costa Rica.Brenesia 39-40: 189-190. Fahey, L. L. and G. E. Crow. 1995. The Vegetation of Pequawket Bog, Ossipee,New Hampshire. Rhodora 97:39-92. Padgett, D. J., D. H. Les and G. E. Crow. 1996. Systematic studies of Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae), the yellow waterlilies. Amer. J. Bot. 83: 184-185. Hellquist, C. E. and G. E. Crow. 1997. The bryophyte and vascular flora of Little Dollar Lake Peatland, Mackinac County, Michigan. Rhodora 99: 195-222. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1998. Myriophyllum quitense H.B.K. (Haloragaceae) in Bolivia: a terrestrial growth-form with bisexual flowers. Aquat. Bot. 60: 389-395. Crow, G. E. and N. P. Ritter. 1999. Myriophyllum mattogrossense Hoehne (Haloragaceae), a rare lowland watermilfoil new to Bolivia. Rhodora 101: 28-39. Hellquist, C. E. and G. E. Crow. 1999. The distribution of bryophyte and vascular plant vegetation at Little Dollar Lake Peatland, Mackinac County, Michigan. Rhodora 101: 46-86. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1999. Primera documentatión de Myriophyllum aquaticum (Haloragaceae) en Bolivia. Ecología en Bolivia: 32: 37-39. Dunlop, D. A. and G. E. Crow. 1999. The taxonomy of Carexsection Scirpinae(Cyperaceae).Rhodora 101:163-199. Padgett, D. J., D. H. Les, and G. E. Crow. 1999. Phylogenetic relationships in Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae): evidence from morphology, chloroplast DNA, and nuclear ribosomal DNA. Amer. J. Bot. 86:1316-1324. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 2000. The Lentibulariaceae in Bolivia: a new genus record (Genlisea) for the Country, with two additional species records in the genus Utricularia. Rhodora 102: 217-224. IN PRESS Fahey, L. L. and G. E. Crow. In press. Floras of Pequawket and Heath Pond Bogs, Ossipee, New Hampshire. Rhodora. Crow, G. E. In press. Sagina. In: Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 4. Flora of North America Editorial Committee.Oxford Press. New York, NY. Crow, G. E. In press. Alismataceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Hydrocharitaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Limnocharitaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Mayacaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Pontederiaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Potamogetonaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Lentibulariaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Crow, G. E. In press. Ceratophyllaceae. In Hammel, B., N. Zamora, and M. Grayum. Las Plantas de Costa Rica. INBIO. San José, Costa Rica. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. In press. Primera documentatión de Myriophyllum aquaticum (Haloragaceae) en Bolivia. Ecología en Bolivia. Ritter, N. P., G. E. Crow, T. J. Killeen, and M. Garvizu. In press. A Study of the Aquatic Habitats of Parque Nacional Noel Kempff Mercado, Bolivia. [Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia]. Ecologia en Bolivia. McCauley, K. M. and G. E. Crow. In press. A vegetation analysis of Platt Park, Southbury, Connecticut. Rhodora 00: 00-00. Teeling, L. M., G. E. Crow and G. L. Wade. In press. The floristic diversity in the experimental watersheds of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. Rhodora. Ritter, N. P., G. E. Crow, T. J. Killeen, and M. Garvizu. In press. A Study of the Aquatic Habitats of Parque Nacional Noel Kempff Mercado, Bolivia. Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Ecología de Bolivia. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. In press. A floristic and biogeographical analysis of the wetlands of the Bolivian cloud forest. Rhodora. Ritter, N. P., G. E. Crow and J. H Wiersema. In press. Nymphaea (Nymphaeaceae) in Bolivia: Three country records, with notes on two additional species rarely collected in the country. Rhodora. Crow, G. E. In press. Lentibulariaceae. In: Families of Neotropical Flowering Plants. A. Henderson and S. Heald, eds. New York Botanical Garden. Bronx, NY. Crow, G. E. In press. Plantas acuáticas del Parque Nacional Palo Verde y Valle Tempisque, Costa Rica / Aquatic plants of Palo Verde National Park and the Tempisque Valley. (A bilingual field guide). Instituto Nacional Biodiversidad (INBio), Santo Domingo de Heredia, Costa Rica. Reports Crow, G. E. 1994. Lamprey River Vegetation Assessment. Report prepared for The Nature Conservancy/NH Natural Heritage Inventory Program/National Park Service. Hodgdon Herbarium, University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Crow, G. E. 1994. Forest Health Monitoring Project: Plant Identifications from FHM Plot Numbers. Minnesota and New England. Report prepared for the USDA Forest Serivce, Northeast Experiment Station, Radnor, PA. Hodgdon Herbarium, University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Sperduto, D. D. and G. E. Crow. 1994. A Vegetation Assessment of the Lamprey River Corridor in Epping, Lee, Durham, and Newmarket, NH. Report prepared for The National Park Service, North Atlantic Region, Boston, MA. N. H. Natural Heritage Program and The Nature Conservancy Heritage Task Force, Department of Resources and Economic Development (DRED). Concord, NH. Crow, G. E. 1995. USA-Russia Botanical Exchange Expeditions: Aquatic and Wetland Habitats of Northeastern United States and Siberia. National Geographic Society. Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1995. A systematic investigation of Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae). Water Garden J. 10: 32-42. (Grant Proposal) Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1995. A systematic investigation of Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae). Water Garden J. 11: 25-34. (Grant Proposal) Ritter, N. P., G. E. Crow, T. J. Killeen, and M. Garvizu. 1997. A Study of the Aquatic Habitats of Parque Nacional Noel Kempff Mercado, Bolivia. A report prepared for the Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1999. Reporte Sobre Nuestras Investigaciones de los Sistemas Acuáticos del Parque Nacional Noel Kempff Mercado: junio y julio de 1998. A report prepared for the Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1999. Investigations on the Aquatic Ecosystems: Parque Nacional Noel Kempff Mercado, Bolivia. A report prepared for the Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1999. Proyecto Pantanal: La Flora Aquática de los Lagunas Grandes del Pantanal Boliviano. A report prepared for the Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1999. Composition, Structure, and Diversity of the Aquatic Flora of the Large Lakes of the Bolivian Pantanal. A report prepared for the Museo de Historia Natural Noel Kempff Mercado, Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 2000. Plant Biodiversity in Tropical Aquatic Ecosystems: Amazon Basin of Bolivia. Research Report submitted to the National Geographic Society. Miscellaneous Publications Crow, G. E. 1980. Rare and endangered plants of New England. New England Wild Flower Notes. Spring Issue. Crow, G. E. and R. A. Fralick. 1981. Edible Wild Plants of New Hampshire. University of New Hampshire Printing Service. Durham, New Hampshire. Crow, G. E. and R. E. Graber. 1981a. Robbins' Cinquefoil--can it survive? Appalachia 47(5): 7-8. Crow, G. E. [1994]. Poison-Ivy. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. Leaflet. Williams, C. W. and G. E. Crow. 1994. Putting Poisonous Plants In Perspective. Department of Plant Biology. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. Leaflet. Williams, C. W. and G. E. Crow. 1994. Putting Poisonous Plants in Perspective. Yankee Nursery Quarterly 4(2): 18-22. Williams, C. W. and G. E. Crow. [1994]. Growing Ferns. University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. Leaflet. Crow, G. E. 1996. Plant Biodiversity in a New Hampshire Forest. Educational box. P. 727 in: Raven, P. and G. Johnson. BIOLOGY, 4th ed. Wm. C. Brown Publ., Dubuque, IA. Burdette, J. and G. E. Crow. 1998. A Field Guide to the University of New Hampshire Kingman Farm Nature Trail. University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH. Book Reviews Crow, G. E. 1975. Book review--Winter keys to woody plants of Maine. Rhodora 77: 438-439. Crow, G. E. 1978. Book review--Botanical beachcombers and explorers: Pioneers of the 19th century in the Upper Great Lakes, by Edward G. Voss. Systematic Botany 3: 256. Crow, G. E. 1998. BookReview. Michigan Flora Part III Dicots (Pyrolaceae—Compositae), by Edward G. Voss (1996). Systematic Botany 23: 595-596. Graduate Student Theses--Directed by G. Crow Ross, S. Rachel. 1978. The effects of prescribed burning on ground cover vegetation of white pine and mixed hardwood forests in southeastern New Hampshire. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Carter, Jonathan K. 1979. A floristic and phytogeographical analysis of selected serpentine sites in Maine. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. McDonnell, Mark J. 1979. The vascular flora of Plum Island, Essex County, Massachusetts, with an analysis of the impact of human trampling on the coastal dune vegetation. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Storks, Irene M. 1979. Rare and endangered vascular plant species in New Hampshire with special reference to the White Mountain National Forest. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Levesque, Christine M. 1980. Taxonomic implications of seed morphology of Arenaria and Minuartia (Caryophyllaceae) utilizing scanning electron microscopy. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Brackley, Frances E. 1981. The Orchidaceae of New Hampshire. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Philbrick, C. Thomas. 1982. Contributions to the reproductive biology of Podostemum ceratophyllum Michx. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Dunlop, Debra A. 1983. The flora and vegetation of a New Hampshire peat bog. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Shannon, Robynn K. 1985. Phenology and life history of Petalonia fascia and Scytosiphon lomentaria (Scytosiphonales: Phaeophyta) in New Hampshire. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. (joint advisor, A. C. Mathieson). Dunlop, Debra A. 1990 A biosystematic study of the Scirpinae group of Carex (Cyperaceae). Ph.D. Dissertation. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Caldwell, Fredricka A. 1990. The floristics and vegetation ecology of a fresh water tidal marsh on the Merrimack River, West Newbury, Massachusetts. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Weatherbee, Pamela B. 1990 The flora of Berkshire County, Massachusetts. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Weiss, Sandra J. 1992. The floristics and vegetation ecology of a coastal saltmarsh in New Hampshire. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Fahey, Linda L. 1993. The flora, vegetation, and phytogeography of two New Hampshire peatlands. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Padgett, Donald J. 1993 A comparison of created and natural wetlands of southeastern New Hampshire: flora and vegetation. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Williams, G. E. Mary. 1996. The flora and vegetation of Fortress Louisbourg Parks Canada [Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada]. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Hellquist, C. Eric. 1996. A flora and analysis of the Bryophyte and Vascular Plant Communities of Little Dollar Lake Peatland, northern Michigan. M.S. Thesis. Univeristy of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. McCauley, Kathleen M. 1996. An analysis of the flora, vegetation and phytogeography of Platt Park, Southbury, Connecticut. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Padgett, Donald J. 1997. A biosystematic monograph of the genus Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae). Ph.D. Dissertation. University of New Hampshire. Durham, NH. Teeling, Leslie M. 1998. The Floristic Diversity of the Experimental Watersheds of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. M.S. Thesis. University of New Hampshire. Ritter, Nur P. Plant biodiversity and species richness in Bolivian aquatic ecosystems from the Andes to the Amazon basin. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of New Hampshire. (Defense expected spring 2000). Undergraduate Senior Honors Theses/IROP Awards Hellquist, C. Eric. 1994. A comparison of the plant biodiversity of Mud Pond Bog, Moultonborough, New Hampshire to four other North American peatlands. Senior thesis. University Honors Program. Department of Plant Biology, University of New Hampshire. McCauley, Kathleen M. 1994. The vegetation of the Bermudas. Senior thesis. University Honors Program. Department of Plant Biology, University of New Hampshire. Osgood, Katherine. 1995. Predicting potential habitat for the federally endangered orchid Isotria medioloides by use of a Geographic Information System (GIS): field testing the model. Senior Thesis. Honors-in-Major. Department of Plant Biology, University of New Hampshire. Caughlin, Brook M. 1998. Medicinal plants used in San José de la Moñtana, Barva, Heredia, Costa Rica. UNH International Research Opportunity Program (IROP). Biology Program, University of New Hampshire. McAllister, Heath. 1998. Investigation of the plant diversity of the boreal forest (taiga) in the region of St. Petersburg, Russia, and the floristic similarities with New England. UNH International Research Opportunity Program (IROP). Russian Language Program/Plant Biology, University of New Hampshire. Caughlin, Brook M. 2000. Medicinal plant usage in San José de la Montaña, Barva, Heredia, Costa Rica. Senior Thesis. University Honors Program. Biology Program, University of New Hampshire. McAllister, Heath. 2000. Plant diversity in the boreal forest of the region of St. Petersburg, Russia. Senior Thesis. University Honors. University of New Hampshire. Papers Presented at Scientific Meetings Crow, G. E. 1968. A phytogeographical analysis of a southern Michigan bog. Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters. Grand Valley State College, Grand Valley Michigan. Crow, G. E. 1973. The systematic significance of seed morphology in Sagina (Caryophyllaceae) utilizing SEM. Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Voss, E. G. and G. E. Crow. 1975. Across Michigan by Covered Wagon: a botanical expedition in 1888. Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Crow, G. E. 1975. The systematic significance of seed morphology in Sagina (Caryophyllaceae) utilizing the scanning electron microscope. XII International Botanical Congress, Leningrad, USSR. Crow, G. E. 1977. Evolutionary trends in Sagina (Caryophyllaceae) with special reference to the North American Species. AIBS. Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Crow, G. E. and I. M. Storks. 1979. Rare and endangered plants of New Hampshire: a phytogeographic viewpoint. NEBC Symposium, "Rare and Endangered Plant Species in New England." Harvard Univeristy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Storks, I. M. and G. E. Crow. 1979. Rare plants in high places. American Association of Botanical Gardens and Arboreta. University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire. Crow, G. E. 1980. Alpine zone of Mt. Washington. Joint Field Meeting of Botanical Society of America and Philadelphia Botanical Club, Stowe, Vermont. Crow, G. E. 1983. New England's rare, threatened and endangered vascular plants. AIBS. University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota. Brackley, F. E. and G. E. Crow. 1988. Rare plants of New Hampshire. NEBC Symposium, "Plant Conservation: a biogeographic perspective." Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Crow, G. E. 1988. Aquatic plants of Palo Verde National Park, Costa Rica. AIBS. University of California, Davis, California. Crow, G. E. 1989. Observations on the vegetation of the Crimea, USSR. USA-USSR Botanical Exchange Conference, Novosibirsk, Siberia, USSR. 7-18 July 1989. Crow, G. E. 1990. Plant biodiversity in tropical aquatic habitats. Abstract. AIBS. University of Richmond, Richmond VA. Amer. J. Bot. Suppl. 77(6): 126. Crow, G. E. 1991. Species diversity in aquatic angiosperms: latitudinal patterns. Abstract. AIBS. San Antonio, TX. Symposium: "Evolution of Aquatic Angiosperms". Amer. J. Bot. Suppl. 78(6): 156-157. Padgett, D. J. and G. E. Crow. 1993. A vegetation comparison of created and natural wetlands of southeastern New Hampshire. Abstract. Conference on Wetland Restoration and Creation. May 13-14, 1993. Tampa, FL. Hellquist, C. E. and G. E. Crow. 1994. A comparison of the plant biodiversity of Mud Pond Bog, Moultonborough, New Hampshire to four other North American Peatlands. College of Life Sciences and Agriculture Undergraduate Research Conference, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH. Padgett, D. J., D. H. Les and G. E. Crow. 1995. Molecular evidence in the systematics of Nuphar Sm. (Nymphaeaceae). New England Molecular and Evolutionary Biologists. University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. November 11, 1995. Poster. Crow, G. E. 1996. Plant exploration in Siberia. Northeast Section Meetings, American Society for Horticultural Science. University of New Hamsphire, Durham, NH. Padgett, D. J., D. H. Les and G. E. Crow. 1996. Systematic studies of Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae), the yellow waterlilies. Abstract. AIBS. Seattle, WA. Padgett, D. J., D. H. Les and G. E. Crow. 1996. Taxonomic studies of the Yellow Waterlilies. Abstract. Aquatic Plant Manag. Soc. 36th Annual Meeting, Burlington, VT. Crow, G. E., G. L. Wade, W. Martin and L. Teeling. 1996. Vascular floras of Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest Watersheds. Poster. Hubbard Brook Cooperators Meeting.Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest,Woodstock,NH. Teeling, L., G. E. Crow, G. L. Wade, and W. Martin. 1997. Floristic Biodiversity of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Watersheds. Hubbard Brook Cooperators Meeting.Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest,Woodstock,NH. Crow, G. E., G. L. Wade, L. Teeling, and W. Martin. 1997. Vascular floras of Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest watersheds. Ecological Soc. Amer. Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, NM. Poster. ESA Abstracts: Bull. Ecol. Soc. Amer. Suppl. 78: 237. Teeling, L., G. E. Crow, G. L. Wade, and W. Martin. 1998. Floristic Biodiversity of the Hubbard Brook Experimental Watersheds. Hubbard Brook Cooperators Meeting. Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Woodstock, NH. Teeling, L., G. E. Crow, G. L. Wade, and W. Martin. 1998. Floristic diversity of Hubbard Brook Experimental Watersheds. AIBS. Baltimore, MD. Ritter, N. P. and G. E. Crow. 1998. Flora acuática de Bolivia. Simposio: Biologiá de las Plantas Acuáticas Vaculares y su Hábitat en Latinoamérica. VII Congreso Latinoamericano de Botánica. XIV Congreso Mexicano de Botánica. Diversidad y conservación de los recursos vegetales en Latinoamérica. Libro de resúmenes p. 335. Ciudad de México, D.F. Invited Seminars/Lectures 1975. "The Vegetation of Isla de los Estados, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina--An Expedition to the End of the World." University of New Hampshire, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology. 1976. "Across Michigan by Covered Wagon--a botanical expedition in 1888." New England Botanical Club, Harvard University. 1976. "An Expedition to the End of the World." University of New Hampshire, Outdoor Education. 1976. "The Vegetation of Tierra del Fuego. University of New Hampshire, Ecology. 1976. "Systematic Considerations in the North American Species of Sagina (Caryophyllaceae)." Harvard University, Biological Laboratories. 1976. "Across Michigan by Covered Wagon." University of New Hampshire, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology. 1977. "The Vegetation of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina." Gordon College, Department of Biology. 1977. " An Expedition to the End of the World, Isla de los Estados, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina." New England Botanical Club, hosted at University of New Hampshire. 1978. "Denizens of the Bog." Durham Garden Club, Durham, NH. 1979. "An Expedition to the End of the World, Isla de los Estados, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina." Plymouth State College, Science Club. 1979. "Poisonous and Edible Plants of New Hampshire." Londonderry Garden Club, Londonderry, NH. 1979. "A Botanical Expedition to Newfoundland." New England Botanical Club, Harvard University. 1979. "Botanizing in Newfoundland." University of New Hampshire, joint Department Plant Science/Botany. 1980. "The Alpine Flora of Mt. Washington, NH." Joint Field Meetings of Botanical Society of America (ne. section) and Philadelphia Botanical Club, Stowe, VT. 1981. "A Botanical Expedition to the Soviet Union." University of New Hampshire, Department of Botany and Plant Pathology. 1981. "Vegetation of Coastal Dunes." University of New Hampshire, Marine Program Docents. 1981. "Plant Exploration in the Soviet Union: an expedition to the Crimea and Western Caucasus." New England Botanical Club, Harvard University. 1982. "The Flora of Tierra del Fuego." New York Botanical Garden, Cary Arboretum. 1982. "A Botanical Expedition to the Soviet Union." Taylor University, Natural Science seminar. 1982. "The Systematics of Sagina (Caryophyllaceae)." Taylor University, Systematic Botany class. 1983. "Endangered Species and other Wildflowers." Sedgewick Gardens, Long Hill Reservation, Beverly, MA. 1983. "New England's Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Plants." AuSable Trails Biological Station, Mancelona, Michigan. 1984. "Introduccion de Plantas Acuaticas." (in spanish) Universidad Nacional, Heredia Costa Rica. 1985. "New England's Rare, Threatened, and Endangered Plants." Garden Club of America, Annual Northeast Regional Meeting, York, ME. 1985. "Aquatics of the Pacific Slope of Costa Rica." New England Botanical Club, Harvard University. 1986. "Plants of Costa Rica." Durham Garden Club, Durham, NH. 1987. "A Botanist in Costa Rica." Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity, University of New Hampshire. 1989. "A Botanical Expedition in 1888 with Liberty Hyde Bailey." University of New Hampshire, joint Department Plant Science/Botany. 1989. "Plants of the Altai Mountains, Siberia, USSR." University of New Hampshire, Department of Plant Biology. 1989. "Plantas Acuaticas del Parque Nacional Palo Verde, Costa Rica." (in spanish) Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica. 1990. "The Nature of Mountains: the alpine floras of North America, the USSR, Costa Rica, and Tierra del Fuego." President's Address. New England Botanical Club, Harvard University. 1991. "New England's Threatened Habitats: Alpine regions." New England Wildflower Society. Garden in the Woods, Framingham, MA. 1991. "Diversity in Aquatic Plants: Are the Tropics really that Rich?" Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, Claremont, California. 1992. "New England's Rare Plants." Rhode Island Wild Plant Society, Providence, RI. 1993. "Exploring for Aquatic and Wetland Plants in Siberia." Department of Plant Biology, University of New Hampshire. 1993. "The 1993 US/Russian Aquatic Plant Expedition to Siberia." Alice and Rolla Tryon Lecture series. Institute for Systematic Botany, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL. 1993. "Aquatic plant diversity in Costa Rica." Marie Selby Botanic Garden, Sarasota, FL. 1993. "Impressions from a Botanical Expedition to Siberia." Symposium: "Russia in 1993: Three Eyewitness Accounts," Professors Arna Bronstein, Russian; Tom Trout, Political Science; Garrett Crow, Plant Biology. Russian Studies Forum, University of New Hampshire. 1994. "The Russian Connection: exploring for aquatic and wetland plants in Siberia." Department of Biology, Gordon College. 1994. "Created Wetlands and Potential Problems Relating to Introduction of Plant Stock Not Native to the Area of Mitigation" (with Don Padgett). Lecture, discussion, and field trip to created site in Portsmouth New Hampshire. New Hampshire Natural Areas Council. 1994. "Exploring the Bogs of New Hampshire." Arnold Arboretum of Harvard, Adult Education Program. (2 sessions and 1 all-day field trip). 1995. "A Botanical Spy in Siberia." Department of Biology, Wheaton College. 1995. "Exploring the Bogs of New Hampshire." Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Adult Education Program. (2 sessions and 1 all-day field trip). 1996. "Botanizing in Newfoundland: In Anticipation of the Centennial Field Excursion". New England Botanical Club. Harvard University Herbaria. Harvard University. 1996. "The Flora of Newfoundland." Arnold Arboretum of Harvard, Adult Education Program. 1997. "Biodiversity of Aquatic Plants in the Tropics" Josselyn Botanical Society. Spring meeting at Bates College, Lewiston, Maine. 1997. "A Globetrotter’s View of the Alpine Environment." Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Adult Education Program. 1997. "Alpine Flora of Mount Washington." Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Adult Education Program. 1998. "Aquatic Plant Biodiversity in Costa Rica and Bolivia: Is New England Really the Amazonia of Aquatic Diversity?" New England Botanical Club. Away meeting at University of New Hampshire. Last updated: 8 January 1998


 

1057.
football 1949 p 52-1057 coach Foley,Rollins,-,-, Newcombe,-Bartlett 2-- Bradt,Cox,Curley,Alpert,cap J Cochran,Spofford,Haggett,Davis, Rooney 3-- Coffey,connors Albert

 

ALANINE A ala 89.1 may act as B6 pyridoxine precursor. ARGININE R Arg 174.2 ASPARAGINE N Agn may fight ammonia build-up needed in fast dividing cells such as intestine lining.precursor of nitric oxide - anticoagulant -blocks somatostatin of pituitary favoring production of human growth hormone stimulates thymus, convertible to ornithine 132.1 ASPARTIC ACID D Asp 133.2 CYSTEINE C Cys 121.2 GLUTAMATE E Glu 147.1 GLUAMINE Q Gln 146.2 GLYCINE G Gly 75.1 LYSINE K Lys 146.2 potatoes good source. believed to relieve herpes, aid calcium absorption but may elevate cholesterol.REQ HISTIDINE H His 155.2 Under ordinary circumstances adults may be able to synthesize as much histidine as they need. Greater quantities are probably needed in infants and small children and during pregnancy. There are suggestions that histidine levels may be low in rheumatoid arthritis, and that histidine may be needed to remove toxic heavy metals from the body. On the other hand, histidine can be a source for synthesis of histamines, and high levels of histamine contribute to allergies. Histidine contributes for formation of glycosylated amines and proteins. ISOLEUCINE I Ile 131.2 REQ hydrophobic LEUCINE L Leu 131.2 REQ hydrophobic METHIONINE M Met 149.2 sulfur, initiates DNA transcription REQ PHENYLALANINE F Phe phenyl ring REQ 165.2 cancer risk PROLINE P Pro 115.1 bone, collagen HYDROXYPROLINE SERINE S Ser 105.1 THREONINE T Thr 119.1 alcohol group REQ VALINE V Val 117.1 REQ hydrophobic TRYPTOPHAN W Trp 204.2 serotonin REQ TYROSINE Y Tyr 181.2 kinase phosphorylation in normal and cancer growth notebk 5 p 34 Telephone call from Robert J. Hoarde Oct. 7, 1970 Baby in the family was in Army Air force World War II. lives at 101 School St. waltham Works at Charles River Country club. Lives at elks Club waltham 893-9517 893-7742. Kept a home at 161 Ash St. Waltham for father and mother. Gave up home after father's death ayear ago, over ninety. His mother elizabeth will be ninety tomorrow born Oct. 8, 1880 She lives with his married sister Julia in Brighton Mrs. Charles Maloney. 9 Bostonia Ave 782-7857 five children His mother's sisters are twins eight 1/2years younger than mother 1889 Sarah deceased Bussier Libby St. goffstown NH. His siter Mary Brooks living in Burlington MA 11 Holden Avenue. Elizabeth Mehegan Pieper Hoarde lives with her daughter Mrs. Charles Maloney 5 ch many gand. eliz has three liv child.


 

1058.
52-1058

 

Loretto letter notebooi 5-122 States. She married into the home Jeremiah Sheehy - their son Maurice Sheehy is married into a farm near me in Moskeigh brother Jeremiah is over USA in East Hartford CT John Joseph is with me. The daughter Maryt ellen and a son Daneil were cecdeased about twenty years of age. -=My aunt Ellen the nun sister Mary peter [Buckley) Presentation Convent Aberdeen South Dakota. She was home in the year 1932 as did say she got letters from Minnie Fracnes Buckley. This sister Peter was a nurse in that order- and if the cutting we got from paper were right -she dida lot for thwt convent- as she was the founder of St. Luke's hospital on the convent. There was another consin of ours [there] at the same time. She ws sister Margaret Grainger, and I tink she was writing a book in 1932.She ws home also that year.There is a nun still living that was a great friend of my aunt ellen - {Ellie she was called in Ireland) Sister Mary Clair is the nun that loved my aunt and she writes efery year here to me. You won't have any trouble with the record there.= Jerome Buckley family settled perhaps in Ohio. I may learn more from their nephew Maurice Sheehy soon.=This picture of your father and mother are nice to have, and he was a right Buckley also. And Mrs. O sullivan could be another cousin as the Moskeigh Buckleys had near cousins in Raheen. It's not so far from me, Perhaps


 

1059.
Glee Club 1949 (R)

 

p 52 Giuseppe deLellis organized Glee Glub in 1946 Subject: Giuseppe deLellis,ROXLat glee club Date: Sat, 10 Oct 199 friend Giuseppe deLellis of West Newton. I may share this when completed with Mrs. DeLellis and her family, who are at 27 Harding Road. My father and i both took piano lessons l947-l951 and l967-l969. Giuseppe delellis perfomed Rachmaninoff and Mozart piano concertos with Boston Pops and Arthur Fiedler. In music classes at Roxbury Latin, the recordings of the Carnegie Collection were an amportant resoure.I reember Toscanini conducting Schbubert Great C Major, the Frank symphony d minor -bach Mass in b minor - Giuseppe stressed the power ofm"sanctus,sanctus, sanctus arlesienne suite of Bizet, Lt. Kije suite of prokoffiev, La Mer of Debussy. I have put Year Book 1953 photos of my family memoir website at http://www.ccilink.com/photobook -- these include good photos of giuseppe with the Roxbury latin and Beaver glee clubs. He later taught at Dean Junior College near his original home in Franklin l957-l969. He studied with Nadia Boulanger Paris and at Longy School Cambridge. I heard him perform with violiniist Faith Quesada Costa Rican at Waltham library the Franck violin-piano sonata.Puerto Rico pianist Jesus Maria SanRoma and his brother in Newton were particular friends of the deLellis family. My initial emphais where I request help is in recollecting songs performed by the Roxbury Latin and other Glee Clubs - here are a few (Based on Ecclesisticus or Wiusdom of Sirach in Bible Apochrypha is the first: Let us now praise famous men And our father that begot us Such as did bear rule in teir kingdoms Men renowned for their power Leaders of the people by their councils and their knowledge Such as found out musical tunes and recited verses in writing. ASll these were honored in their generations and were the glory of the times. And some there be that have no memoirial Who are buried as though they had never been Their bodies are buried in peace But their Name liveth fore-evermore." Old Abram Brown is Dead and gone To every man ther openeth a way and ways and a way Hallehluia chorus Handel The monks marck - Wales -them of Haydn Piano students included James Rumrill Randy Hare, David Spectre, Robert Murray, John Barrett - Clark Heath and Ross Holloweay played stringed instruments 0- violin or cello.-I remember Bob Murray working on Percy Grainer;s "Cpountry Gardens" Some of the piano music I worked on with Giusepppe included Schubert Moment Musical in f minor Op. 94 #3, Standchen or Serenade original and Lisztg arrangment- Military MaRCH IN D, piano sonatas especially op. 147 B major and B flat posthumous, and Schubert-Liszt arrangements of Ave Maria, Erlkonig, Die Forelle, Das Wandern ist das Muller's Lust"- Beethoven Minuet in G and PATHETQUE PIAN SONATA MOZART TURKISH RONDO AND MANY SONATAS. HAYDEN MANY SONATATA AND PIANO CONCERTO PIANO P[ART AND GYPSY RONDO TRIO- BRAHMS WALTZ IN A FLAT AND QUARTER OP. 33, AND D MInOR TWO PAINO ARRANGEMENTS OF first PIANO CONCERTO, Verdi - GrAND MARCH AND THIRD ACT OF AIDA, EXCERPTS FROM RIGOLETTO AND LA TRAVIATA,CHOPIN POLONIAISES, PRELUDES, WALTZES, ETUDES, FIRXT CONC3RTO.to be continued - recollections requested- John Barrett 22==113 w. Third St. Port Angeles WA 98362-2824 (still being edited


 

1060.
TRIPOD staff 1949 front Sloane,Cochran,Haggett,George Stebbins 1948-9 editor, Lee Lockwood 1949-50 editor - Ulin, John Rooney -2- Malcolm Rivkin,Hamilton Pierce,Bill Kaye, Frank Geisheker,John Connors,Mark Granofsky,Jonathan Fine, - Jason Albert

 

p 52-1060 Black Notebook 5 p 35-6 The Revolutionary Rising Thomas Buchanan Read p 172 The National Fifth Reader 1866 Edition by A.S. Barnes and Company [used by Jack Barrett in school declamation]"Out of the north the wild news came, Far flashing on its wings of flame, swift as the boreal light, which flies at midnight through the startled skies.And there was tumult in the air, the fife's shrill note, the drums' loud beat, And through the wide land everywhere, The answering tread of hurrying feet, While the first oath of freedom's gun, Came on the blast from Lexington; And Concord roused, no longer tame, -Forgot her old baptised name, Made bare her patriot arm of power, And Swell the discord of the hour. Within its shade of elm and oak, the churchof Berkley Manor stood; there Sunday found the rural folk And some esteemed of gentle blood. In vain their feet with loitering tread passed mid the graves where rank is naught; All could not read the lesson tonight, In that republic of the dead. How sweet the hour of Sabbath talk, The vale with peace and sunshine full Where all the happy people walk, decked in their homespun flax and wool! The pastor came; his snowy locks Hallowed his brow of thought and care; and calmly, as shepherds lead their flocks, He led into the house of prayer.Then soon he rose; the prayer was strong; the pslm was warrior David's song; the text, a few short words of might,"The Lord of Hosts shall arm the right!" He spoke of wrongs too long endured, of sacred rights to be secured; then from his patriot tongue of flame, The sartling words for freedom came. The stirring sentences he spoke Compelled the heart to glow or quake, And rising in his theme's broad wing, And grasping in his nervous hand, The imaginary battle's brand, In face of death he dared to fling Defiance to a tyrant king. Even as he spoke, his frame renewed In eloquence of attitude Rose as it seemed a shoulder higher; Then swept his kindling glance of fire From startled pew to breathless choir. When suddenly his mantle wide, his hands impatient flung aside, And lo he met their wondering eyes Complete in all a warrior's guise. A moment there was awful pause, - When Berkley cried, "Cease, traitor! cease! God's temple is the house of peace!" The other shouted, "Nay, not so, When God is with our righteous cause His holiest places then are ours! His temples are our forts and towers, That frown upon the tyrant foe; In this the dawn of freedom's day, There is a time to fight and pray!" And now before the open door- the warrior priest had ordered so-The enlisting trumpet's sudden roar Rang through the chapel, O'er and o'er Its long reverberating blow, So loud and clear It seemed the ear of dusty death Must wake and hear. And there the startling drum and fife Fired the living with fiercer life. While overhead, with wild increase forgetting its ancient toll of peace The great bell swung as ne'er before, It seemed as it would never cease; And every word its ardor flung From off its jubilant iron tongue Was, "WAR, WAR,WAR!" [At this point Jack Barrett's speaking time was up, and he had to sit down]. This was the patriot's cry As striding from the desk he came "Come out with me In freedom's name For her to live, For her to die!" A hundred hands flung up reply, A hundred voices answered,


 

1061.
1949 track

 

p 52-1061 BIRDS OF BROOK FARM 1941 by Francis Henry ALLEN 119 species: Typed from original in West Roxbury Historical Society Archive. written 1941 for Brook Farm Centennial organized by Rev. Harold Arnold of West Roxbury. --: THE BIRDS OF BROOK FARM by Francis Henry Allen born 1867 attended Roxbury Latin member West Roxbury Historical Society founder of Thoreau Society worked at Houghton Mifflin TEXT: My acquaintance with Brook Farm began in the year 1874, when as a boy of seven living on Mount Vernon Street, West Roxbury, I joined other boys of the neighborhood in rambling through the woods and fields of the region.Our rambles extended from the blueberry pastures of what was then known as the May estate, now bounded by LaGrange, Vermont & Temple Streets and the railroad,to Home Farm, now Mount Benedict Cemetery.Home Farm, formerly owned by Colonel Harry Russell and the home of the famous trotter "Smuggler", was then the property of Joseph Arnold, who later lived on Corey Street. Within its borders were what we called the Checkerberry Woods and "the chasm" - a gap in a large puddingstone ledge, a very exciting playground for boys.The May estate was famous not only for its blueberries, but also for a large white oak, long since fallen,that we children knew as Prince Edward's Oak - I never knew why- but which was called by our elders the Parker Oak from a tradition that Theodore Parker was wont to rest under it, probably on his way to and fro between his house on Centre St. and Brook Farm. Brook Farm itself occupied the middle part of our customary wanderings.It was the brook, of course, that attracted us boys most, and I have a distinct recollection of drawing from its mysterious depths a few brook pickerel, which I think were caught with a real hook and not with the traditiopnal bent pin. We knew this brook higher up on its course too and fished it there, in what is now St. Joseph's Cemetery and the woods above it.It was not until years afterward that I discovered an old mill-dam in those woods and farther up the reamins of a reservoir dam. I then learned for the first time that the brook was known as Palmer's Brook, at least in the town of Brookline,and that there was another milldam higher up on its course.The old settlers used every possible source of watrpower for their sawmills and gristmills.Palmer's Brook lost much of its water when the metropolitan sewer was put through and is now much less of a stream than in the days of the Brook Farm community. My more intimate acquaintance with Brook Farm began when I began to hunt for birds within its precincts. I soon found that the variety of cover there - fields, tillage, pasture, meadows, woods and shade trees - attracted an unusual variety of birds, and it became a favorite haunt of mine. The first mention of Brook Farm that I find in my youthful bird diaries is under the date of February 22, 1884, when I "went to walk beyond Brook Farm" and heard there my first robin for the year." My records are not complete,for I never have kept complete lists of all the birds I have seen or heard on the farm, but they show one hundred nineteen species on Brook Farm, and I can think of eight or ten more that must certainly visit the Farm or fly over it every year, besides a good many more that must be occasional visitors. This does not include the birds that could only be found on the [Charles] river and the meadows immediately bordering it. Of course, I am not the only one who has enjoyed the birds of Brook Farm. Without making any real search of the literature I must at least quote Nathaniel Hawthorne's observations on birds in that part of his Note-Books which was devoted to his life at the Farm. Under date of October 9, 1841, he wrote :"A walk this afternoon to Cow Island.... Coming within view of the river, I saw several wild ducks under the shadow of the opposite shore, which was high and covered with a grove of pines. I should not have discovered the ducks had they not risen and skimmed the surface of the glassy river, breaking its dark water with a bright streak and, sweeping round, gradually risen high enough to fly away. I likewise started a partridge just within the verge of the woods; and in another place a large squirrel ran across the wood-path from one shelter of trees to the other. Small birds, in flocks, were flitting about the fields, seeking and finding I know not what sort of food." And under October 12th of that year "The cawing of the crow resounds among the woods. A sentinel is aware of your approach a great way off and gives the alarm to his comrades loud and eagerly-Caw, caw,caw! Immediately the whole conclave replies, and you behold them rising above the trees, flapping darkly and winging their way to deeper solitudes. Sometimes, however, they remain till you come near enough to discern their sable gravity of aspect, each occupying a separate bough,or perhaps the blasted tip-top of a pine.As you approach, one after another with loud cawing flaps his wings and throws himself upon the air." These are the notes, not of a ornithologist, but of a man who kept his eyes open and knew how to report what he saw.The descendants of these same crows still haunt Brook Farm; the small birds still flit about the fields; I see wild ducks almost every time I walk there, and if the partridge no longer lives in the woods, he was there only a very few years ago to my knowledge. My Brook Farm bird-list, incomplete as it is, is too long to givve here in its entirelty. I will name only the more uncommon birds and those most characteristic of the locality. First, there is the PIED-BILL GREBE, a small water-bird that visits our river in spring and fall but is commonest in the fall. I have seen it near the Needham Branch railroad bridge, and I haven't the slightest doubt that it can often be seen swimming and diving along the marshy shores of the Farm. It is a dull-colored bird, sometimes mistaken for a small duck, but a more expert diver than any duck and having a facility of sinking in the water till only the head shows above the surface. Three herons haunt the meadows, the GREEN HERON and the NIGHT HERON all summer and the magnificent GREAT BLUE HERON in spring, late summer, and autumn. It would be entirely possible too to find in late summer an occasional WHITE AMERICAN EGRET or a lttle blue heron in its immature snow-white plumage. I have found both these birds in the nearby Broad Meadows across the river. The AMERICAN BITTERN is often to be seen in the brook meadow or in the river meadow, standing like a stake with upward pointed bill or flying heavily just above the tops of the grasses or cat-tails, and its curious song, which sounds near-at-hand like the working of an old-fashioned pump, - at the distance like the driving of a stake, may be heard in the spring. The commonest duck is the BLACK DUCK, which nests in the maple swamp or thereabout and flies up and off with loud quacks. More interesting because somewhat less common and much more beautiful is the WOOD DUCK, probably the most beautiful of the ducks of the world. A pair nested in 1935 in the hollow trunk of a large red maple in front of the main building of the Farm and only about forty feet from the front door. They seem to have brought off their brood successfully, and the next year they - or another pair- nested in another tree nearer the meadow. SPARROW HAWKS always nest in one of the large trees and are regular features of the landscape as they conduct their graceful flights over field, pasture, and meadow, hunting their prey of insects and mice.Two other birds might possibly be mistaken for sparrow hawks in the air. One is the MOURNING DOVE, a graceful and beautiful bird,- smaller and with a longer tail than the common pigeon, that probably nests not far away. The other is the KILLDEER, a large plover with two black bands on its white breast and a strident voice.A pair can sometimes be seen with their young in the upper meadow or in pasture or tillage. The brook meadow often harbors a few VIRGINIA RAILS, which can be detected only by their notes of "kid-ik, kid-ik", or "wak'wak'wak",because they usually keep themselves hidden among the flags or cat-tails; and SORAs, those smaller and no less secretive rails, reveal their presence by their "kur-wee" or a musical whinny. In spring and fall you may put up a SNIPE or a YELLOW-LEGS or a few LEAST SANDPIPERS as you walk along the brookside, and in summer the unmusical chattering of the SHORT-BILLED MARSH WREN rises from all points of the meadow,and if you keep sharp watch you may see the little songster on the top of a low bush or a tall weed or making a short ascent into the air as he sings. I don't mention the characteristic but common KINGBIRDS and REDWINGS, nor the CATBIRDS and VEERIES of the nearby maple swamp. The larger river meadows,where cat-tails are now superseding the meadow grasses to a great extent, have LONG-BILLED MARSH WRENS,whose bubbling though woodeny songs are more pleasant than the efforts of their SHORT-BILLED cousins, and in several years I have found the ALDER FLYCATCHER along their borders, a bird that is rather rare in eastern Massachusetts, though fairly common in northern New England. Perhaps Brook Farm is the last stand of the BOBOLINK and the MEADOWLARK in the City of Boston. Both of these species were abundant in West Roxbury in my boyhood, but they have retreated before the real-estate operator. They are birds of the open field and not-too-wet medowland, and there is not much of that kind of country left now hereabouts. I was delighted to hear two singing boblinks on Brook Farm this June and the sweet piercing strains of a meadowlark too. I have said nothing of the woods of Brook Farm because their bird life is not so very different from that of other parts of West Roxbury.And the woods too are less extensive and fine than they used to be before the sand-and-gravel companies and cemeteries invaded them, and the hurricanes ruined much of what was left.They will still reward the bird enthusiast, however, and I never visit the farm without going into the pine grove there and listening at the edge of the small maple swamp. in these woods I have seen such rare birds as the ARCTIC THREE-TOED WOODPECKER, the YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER, the WINTER WREN, and the GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH. And now I am speaking of uncommon birds,I must record a few more seen elsewhere on the Farm- a mockingbird in January 1919, a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW in 1939, a PINE GROSBEAK in 1884, and two SNOW BUNTINGS in March,1939.Snow buntings, though common in winter along the seashore,are rare in West Roxbury, and I was much surprised to see those two on the hillside near the old barn. I have one lament for the old days at Brook Farm- I have missed the BARN SWALLOWS that used to be such a feature of my visits in spring and summer. Oh, I see a few now and then in their migrations, and TREE SWALLOWS and BANK SWALLOWS too,but the barn swallows, the most graceful flyers of all our birds,no longer course all day over the meadow. West Roxbury is getting too civilized,and barn doors and windows are no longer open to the swallows." Francis Allen, a member of the West Roxbury Historical Society, founded the Thoreau Society, which has preserved much information about the Concord writer and his interest in preserving the natural environment.On October 7, 1895, the West Roxbury Historical Society presented a program "Through the Seasons with Henry Thoreau" by naturalist-&-photographer Albert Bussewitz,an officer of the Thoreau Society, long active with the Audubon Society and on staff of the Arnold Arboretum. In 1985 Mr. Bussewitz was in charge of training Arnold Arboretum tour guides.At the October 7 program, Miriam Dickey of the Children's Museum made introductory remarks about the Audubon Society. Arnold Arboretum director Peter Ashton also spoke on Borneo to the West Roxbury Historical Society October 28, 1985.


 

1062.
Class of 1950 as seniors

 

p 52-1062 ALANINE A Ala 89.1 may act as B6 pyridoxine precursor. ARGININE R Arg 174.2 ASPARAGINE N Agn 132.1 ASPARTIC ACID D Asp 133.2 CYSTEINE C Cys 121.2 GLUTAMATE E Glu 147.1 GLUTAMINE Q Gln 146.2 may fight ammonia build-up needed in fast dividing cells such as intestine lining. GLYCINE G Gly 75.1 HISTIDINE H His 155.2 Under ordinary circumstances adults may be able to synthesize as much histidine as they need. Greater quantities are probably needed in infants and small children and during pregnancy. There are suggestions that histidine levels may be low in rheumatoid arthritis, and that histidine may be needed to remove toxic heavy metals from the body. On the other hand, histidine can be a source for synthesis of histamines, and high levels of histamine contribute to allergies. Histidine contributes for formation of glycosylated amines and proteins. ISOLEUCINE I Ile 131.2 REQ hydrophobic LYSINE K Lys 146.2 potatoes good source. believed to relieve herpes, aid calcium absorption but may elevate cholesterol.REQ LEUCINE L Leu 131.2 REQ hydrophobic METHIONINE M Met 149.2 sulfur, initiates DNA transcription REQ PHENYLALANINE F Phe phenyl ring REQ 165.2 cancer risk PROLINE P Pro 115.1 bone, collagen HYDROXYPROLINE SERINE S Ser 105.1 THREONINE T Thr 119.1 alcohol group REQ wheat germ nuts beans enamel collagen thymus prevent liver-fat VALINE V Val 117.1 REQ hydrophobic TRYPTOPHAN W Trp 204.2 serotonin REQ TYROSINE Y Tyr 181.2 kinase phosphorylation in normal and cancer growth


 

1063.
Class of l951 as third class l949

 

p 52 back John Molloy,Frank Molloy ,Chester Reynolds, Walter Newcombe, Bill Farrell,Bill Coughlin, George Blair Clark, John Wilbourn James -2-Duane, Gifford, Leo Raphaelian, John Bennett,Garrity, Bill Crook, Leo Keene, David Hershenson, Jason Albert,James Keene,-3- George McLaughlin,Ted Cooney, Paul Powell, Mark Granofsky,John Connors, Frank Long, Barry, Robert Vey. -front-Richard Holt, Golden,Jerry Lenthall, Kevin O'Connell


 

 

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