Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

1064.
Fourth Class 1952 taken 1949 BACK-Toland, Keating, Heath, Craven,Higgins,Abramowicz, Story -2- McGowan,Rubin,Stetson,Horgan, Sheldon, Sewall, Cooney,Hey -3- Ross Holloway, Robert Sullivan, Flanagan, Reis, Paul Beatty, Jim Gustavson,Ted Williams, FitzPat

 

53-1064 At lower left Ross Holloway was editor of TRIPOD and played demanding long role of Captain Vere in 1952 performance of Herman Melville's "Billy Budd." His family were related to Betsy Ross and three ancestors fought in War of 1812 in Maryland.He was Predient of Chess club and active in Debating. Edward P. Williams and Jack Hey were at Camp Kabeyun many years. Jack's parents lived on Richwood Street West Roxbury and were close friends of Jack and Sophie Barrett in later years.Jack's sister Sally Hey became interested in Mount Holyoke college through Sophie and graduated there 1960. "Ted" Williams's father Frederick B. Williams was a Roslindale merchant active in Boston Latin alumni and helped Barrett family get in touch with Boston Latin alumni secretary Thomas Craven to locate Jack Barrett's l906 classmates l970- Gardner Murphy junior, Sam Finkel, Dr. Irving W. Jacobs, Emilio Goggio, George Carl Adams. The Barrett family had many other close friends in this group. Jim Gustafson's mother's sister Ellen Feeney was President of West Roxbury historcical Society 1971-1974 and played key role in preservation of Brook Farm site.


 

1065.
Class of 1953 as eighth grade 1949 p 53-1065

 

p 53-1065 Haddow Hare GMartin RobertAsh Ronan Banks GilHoag-2- Markell Bonarrigo Havelock Kavanaugh Meeker Cummings Cronin Barrett McLaughlin -3 Banton Kipp Galvin Sweeny Macdonald FredMartin Sullivan McNeese James Kipp is in photo, front row, second from left.+ Black notebook One Sophie Barrett text: draft of letter to niece Thalia and Bob Klein: Friday 27 June, 1986 Dear Teddy and Bob, On Friday June 20 Babe [was]busy packing for two weeks of fishing at Belgrade lakes in Maine she and Geetter enjoy so much with Harold, Ava, and their girls Jennifer nine and Lauren seven there for one week. The girls are good students, even at summer school, play piano, clarinet and cello. - Babe wrote me an informative letter of thanks for my June 10 letter for her 57th wedding anniversary June 16.[round robin] She mailed my long account of Meranski, Pollack, Geetter weddings mostly in June to Buzzy Price for aunt Jen in Baltimore and for my nephew in Aberdeen, Maryland, Colonel Arthur Meranski and wife Betty. Arthur is sixty-six, lives at 836 Randolph Drive, Aberdeen, Maryland, 21001. Jen is at 20 Warren Park Drive, Baltimore, Maryland - her son Dan's wife works in governor's office, and child, baby Diane, is a gem. Dan is a psychologist working with problem boys. In writing Babe for her fifty-seventh Jen enclosed a newspaper account of "remarkable Ph.d candidate at NYU Deborah Meranski Sonnenstrahl, zealous worker, public speaker and writer for benefit of deaf." The article has a good picture of Debbie, whom we admire. Ask Jen for a copy. = I wrote Babe that about 1919 our oldest, loved brother Harry married privately his longtime sweetheart Sadie Taylor. We were not present because her mother had health problems, but I loved her Dad. My brother Ben and sister Esther never married. Abe married lovely Ethyle Berenson privately as her working widowed mother could not afford a formal marriage reception. Harry had two children, Colonel Arthur, and Pearl, who never married.On a June Sunday in 1924 in our Wooster Street home Bee [Bertha] Meranski married Sam Pollack 1920 Harvard junior Phi Beta Kappa. She was lovely, beautiful - he very happy. On Sunday June 9, 1929 I enjoyed Jen and Pete's well-attended formal wedding [in Baltimore]. I saw them soon again on their honeymooon June 16, 1929 when Jack and I attended Babe's wedding [traveling] from New York. At Babe's outdoor wedding [at 'The Shack' near the Farmington River] Lieutenant Jack Barrett met honeymooning Jen and Pete and invited them to dinner in New York the following Thursday night June 20, when they had theater tickets. He took them to Longchamps Restaurant. Jack and I afterward walked to my apartment [27 Commerce Street]. When I invited him in, he said, "I still have a lot of packing to do as I leave by train at three [pm] tomorrow for the west coast and sail for three years sea duty." I expected sadly never to see him again. But he said, "I'll take you to lunch tomorrow". At noon he entered my office - Friday June 21, 1929. He asked, "Will you marry me?" Stunned, I was silent. We went to a hotel for lunch, then by subway to City Hall. He had a license. We hurried to the railroad station just in time for his train.One year and five months later we met in North China. In 1957 we went to Baltimore for June wedding of Jen and Pete's gril Debbie [to Alfred Sonnenstrahl]. In Brooklyn New York twenty-eight years ago we saw David Geetter marry Joan Trouboff. They have two girls {Darya and Erica] in graudate study.Twenty-five years ago June 10, 1961 in Hartford I saw Buzzy [Thalia] Geetter marry Michael Price- three children Eric 22, Jessica 18, Hilary 15. I did not attend weddings of Albert, Harold or Suzy Geetter but know their mates and children [from Thanksgiving 1984]. Albert's son Josh is climing Andes i Peru. We hope you both and Ken's family [Klein], Keith [Klein], Anne, Jason, Jon, Richard and wife are well [Pollacks]. Buzzy's family go to Cape Cod very soon. Love - aunt Sophie (and John). P.S. Darya Geetter David's older girl - a second year New York University Law student- is happy this summer in Philadelphia working for a distinguished appellate judge. David's younger girl Erika Yale 1985 summa cum laude Phi Beta Kappa is in Heidelberg...." Draft of 1986 letter to Teddy and Bob Klein by Sophie Barrett


 

1066.
p 53-1066 class of l954 Class VI Connors Sanderson Lee? Spectre Ford Watson Brandt Curran Valtz - Connolly -2 McGreenery - Latham Murray Regan Goldberg --- McIntosh Basius -3 Rivkin Dodge Collins barry Moog Mazzuchelli Bernsen fron Diamond Hennessy Johnst

 

One of few surviving letters from 1925 friends the Craig family, who were in Melbourne at time of MARBLEHEAD visit with U.S. Fleet - later on sheep ranch "Pine Hills" Harrow in western Victoria. Born 1920, Sheila was five when the MARBLEHEAD visited, and her sister Belle slightly older. Their father was born in Scotland. NOTEBOOK FOUR p 285 [To] First Naval District, Boston [from] Weeroona, Queenscliff, Fourth January, 1933. My dear Mr. Barrett, Thank you very much for your lovely Christmas present. I love animals. It was very kind of you to send them. Belle is in England now, and is having a marvelous time. I have just had my appendix out, on the fourth of December, 1932. I had a great time in hospital. I have got two dogs, a cocker spaniel and a terrier. I call them Jip and Skeater. Mummie is enjoying the bird book very much, as she has lots of birds, and is very keen on them. I love the books. Bob is a jackaroo on a station just out of Hay. He has been there for about seven or eight months. Ken has just walked to Robe in South Australia with another boy. Do you know when you will be coming out to Australia again? I do hope you wil come soon. I am twelve now. Mummie said to tell you that she has sent the "Bulletin" to you. We are staying down to Queenscliff now for the holidays. Thanking you again for your beautiful books. -With much love from Sheila Craig." NOTEBOOK 5 p 255 from loose photocopy " Rear Admiral S.P Jenkins USN mentioned by McCrosky letter "5385 Hudson Street Vancouver 13, British Columbia, Canada, February 4, 1971, Dear Mrs. Barrett, Your letter of January 2 finally arrived after being forwarded from four addresses. I can't understand why the Bureau of Personnel didn't know my correct address, as I receive quite a few handouts from them. I have been racking my brain trying to think of something of interest I could send you about your husband. Our dates andlocations don't seem to jibe very well. I went out to the Asiatic Station in May of 1930 and took command of the MINDINAO on the South China Patrol. We based at Hong Kong and made frequent trips up the West River as far as Wenchow. After six months of this I was transferred to the HELENA, which moved only between Canton and Hong Kong. The summer of 1931 I was given command of the STEWART, a destroyer which followed more or less the movements of the Fleet, altho it seemed we were on detached duty most of the time in China coast ports. We were in Shanghai several times but never went up the Yangtze. We were in Swatow, Amoy, Pagoda Anchorage, Foochow, Tsingtao, and Chefoo. Undoubtedly we met up with the TRUXTUN at some of these places, but I can't remember of any instance which might be of any interest to you. My files of those days are all at Iron Bottom Bay {sunk at Guadalcanal 1942), and what I have told you is entirely from memory. Several years ago I saw Paul Rice in Pasadena. and as far as I know he is still alive. He might be able to fill you in on some of Jack's TULSA duty. The above address is my permanent one. I am writing from address on envelope- am very sorry I cannot be of more help. Sincerely, S.P Jenkins." 53=1066 airmail letter received July 10, 1961, by JBB from Sheila Craig Ellis "Pine Hills" Harrow Victoria 3 July 1961 Dear Commander Barrett, We are all very thrilled with your wonderful Christmas books - thank you so much.= I wanted to tell you Dad died about ten days ago. He broke his hip last August and had it pinned, but has been in the hospital ever since. He was ninety-one.Mum was wonderful but must feel very lonely now. Dad had a military funeral, and there were quite a number of his old battalion present.= The children are growing fast now.We have a governess for them now who has been with us for the past two and a half years, but will be leaving at the ennd of the year when Sally and Tim will start at boarding school. Sally is going to the Convent of the Sacred Heart in Melbourne, and Tim is going to Geelong Grammar. I might try to teach Mary myself with the Correspondence School which is very good. We don't like the thought of them going away, and the house will seem very quiet without them. They are both very keen riders at present, and are really most useful at sheep or cattle work- only hope they will settle down well at school. =On the twenty-fourth we are going to Queensland unti the end of September.- we have taken a house by the beach at Surfers' Paradise. We were there last year for about two months and loved every minute of it, and we were all very brown and fit when we came home. The children continue school as usual, and spend the ret of the time on the beach. We are trying to get Mum to come up for about a month as I think the change and the wearm climate would do her a lot of good. She and Dad were there about fifteen years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. Belle may come too. In November Tom and I hope to go to Hong Kong, Bangkok, Saigon, and Malaya for about a month. We shall fly all the way. Would much rather go by ship, but wouldn't like to leave the family for so long. Air travel is so easy now you should visit Australia again, ewe should be delighted to have you stay with us and would show you as much as possible. Also I would love you to see the children, and we would all love to see you again. You wuld notice a vast difference in this country now. -it has really developed tremendously since the war, and altho there is a lot of talk around the city about the "Credit Squeeze" unemployment etc- I think it is mainly bringing the hire purchase people back to the field and most other things are pretty steady.We have a very good season here, as there is over most of Australia,altho parts of Queensland and New South Wales need rain very badly. Undfortunately it is very dry where Davy and Ken are. = We had a very hectic time here during the May holidays with our own children and five others staying with us. I foud nine children in the house, with their ages ranging from fourteen to two and a half very noisy and tiring,but I think they all had a very good time. We had enough bikes and ponies that the boys couod have the bikes in the mornings and the girls in the afternoons and vice versa- so actually we only saw them at meals and in the evnings. I think they are all coming back agin for the May holidays next year. Their only outing for the holidays is to a race meeting at the next town of Coleraine on the final Saturday It is a sort of picnic meeting,and the children adore it. = Belle now has a house of her own, very small, but most conveniently located.I think she gets pretty lonesome living by herself though. She has just had Mary to stay with her for a fortnight, for Mary had to go to Melbourne for that time to see a specialist about a rash she had on her feet. They both had a very good time.Belle is really marvelous to the kids, it will be very nice for Sol having her in Melbourne when she iis at school there, as I mimagine she will always be hungry at school, and will be able to have some good meals with Belle at the weekends.= Will write you from Queensland and send you some photos of the kids. I do hope you are in better health by now- our thoughts here have been with you a lot even though I haven't written. with love from us all, Sheila Craig Ellis." + Mailed July 10, 1961: First World War MD Dies at Ninety-One - Dr. William Bannerman Craig of St. Kilda, who won the Distinguished Service Order for gallantry and devotion to duty in the first World War, died yesterday. He was ninety-one. Born and educated in Scotland, Dr. Craig studied native customs in New Zealand and the South Pacific Islands before coming to Australia. He practicsed in Warrnambool before enlisting as Regimental Medical Officer of the Twenty-Second Battalion, Australian Infantry Force. On his return to Australia he became a medical officer in the Repatriation Department. Survived by his wife, three sons and two daughters.


 

1067.
Sophie in rickshaw 1931 China

 

p 53 -1067 This may be Nemo, the rickshaw man in Peking, whom Jack predicted to Sophie would locate them as soon as they arrived. He helped them with purchases.


 

1068.
Sophie Meranski Barrett with blanket at Court Hotel

 

p 53-1068 part of "CHILDHOOD & SCHOOLS chapter p 283 He attended the Gooch School in Melrose for the first grade and probably for half of the second grade year. His recollection is that he transferred to the South Boston schools on Valentines Day, February 14, 1895 or 1896. Year 1895 seems probable because of the date of his father's second marriage, November 1894. Jack lived a short distance east of Spot Pond, Melrose,and remembered skating there as a child. His Buckley grandparents were very fond of him. His grandmother died in December, 1896, when Jack was eight years old, not long after his move to South boston. His aunts Minnie and Maggie continued to take an interest in his welfare. An ambiguity in the will of his grandmother created some consternation in his family. Sh left her piano and one hundred or one-hundred-fifty dollars to my grandson, John Berchmans Buckley." She probably meant her grandson John Berchmans Barrett, and the lawyer selected by Jack's uncle may have been responsible for the mistkae. Jack's mother is buried with her parents in Old Calvary Cemetery Boston, and the tombstone lists her as Catherine Agnes Buckley, though her married name was Catherine Agnes Barrett. The money went to Jack's cousin John Buckley, whose middle name was not Berchmans.Some coolness developed between Jack's father and the Buckleys. Minnie and Maggie continued to be among Jack's fondest admirers and gave him many books and presents in the period around 1900. They gave him many of the Henty series of boys' adventure tales, of which he was very fond. These include, "With Wolfe in Canada", "With Lee in Virginia", "True to the Old Flag", "The Lion of Saint Mark" and dozens more. Minnie also gave "Gulliver's Travels", "The Collier Encyclopedia", and natural history books. Minnie and Maggie also gave books to Jack's half-brother Bill, of whom they were fond even though he was not a relative of theirs. Minnie and Maggie worked at the Converse Rubber company in Malden. Jack's uncle John Buckley was a pattern maker in shipbuilding many years at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Jack last saw him in June,1921 when the destroyer TOUCEY visited the Navy Yard, with Jack in acting command. The younger Buckley cousins were very fine people, and I wish Jack had known them better. He saw more of his second cousins the Hartigans 284 than he did of his own first cousins the Buckleys, because the Hartigans lived in South Boston from 1890 to 1917. Mr. Hartigan was a newspaperman originally in Philadelphia and Baltimore. His daughter Gertrude was born in Philadelphia and his duaghter Mary [May] in Baltimore in February 1886. After a period in Roslindale he moved to the home of his brother-in-law John Donovan at D and Third Streets South Boston to reduce commuting to the boston Traveler on Newspaper Row downtown near Pi Alley when he developed bone tuberculosis, which killed his oldest sons Jeremiah and James. Jeremiah also had a football injury at Bsotn college. Mr. Hartign senior died in 1899. Around 1905 Jack Barrett became very friendly with James Hartigan, who was severly crippled but managed to work as a newspaper reporter at various times in Biunghamton, New york and in 1907 at Bath Maine. James died in 1912 but theirmother bornin Ireland 1852 and Gertrude, May1886 , the priest Father Edward 1889 and Law John 1893 all lived to good ages. = Father Edward Hartigan was attended Boston College High School and played football as a member of the Boston College Class of 1911. He then was appointed to West Point Military Academy and completed freshmen year 1911-12 as a member of the 1915 class, which included World War II Generals Dwight Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and James Van Fleet. After the death of his brother James in 1912 he felt needed at home and resigned.He went to St. John's Seminary, Brighton, Massachusetts, and was ordained in 1917. He had early duties in Everett, then was pastor in North Weymouth for many years and appointed Pastor of Immaculate Conception Church in Everett 1953-1970. In 1920s he founded Cedar Crest camp at Green Harbor Marshfield on the shore shore originally for boys and girls of the Everett parish, but children from other areas attended over many decades of operation up to 1960s. It provided an affordable summer change of scene and chance to exercise and develop skills for children of many families of moderate means. His siters Gertrude and Mary usually spent the summer at Green Harbor, and during the winter while May was teaching mathematics at Washington Irving school in Roslindale, they would go down there for Wednesday supper. Gertrude and May and their mother lived at 80 Brown Avenue, Roslindale near Sacred Heart Church on Cummins highway. May often saw the Buckley cousins especially Gertrude and Alice in Melrose, who attended Father Hartigan's fiftieth jubilee in 1967.At the suggestion of Jack's aunt Minnie Buckley in February 1910, May visited Jack at the Revenue Cutter School at Arundel Cove, South Baltimore, where she remembered clamshells in the pavements. Lawyer John Hartigan and his wife and four or five chidren lived across the street from the camp. They were married in 1922, and John Hartigan was a lawyer at 8 Beacon Street in Boston until his death from lip cancer in 1963. Jack Barrett used to see him downtown and at Chelsea Naval Hospital. Picking up the thread of John Robert Barrett now that we have introduced some of his ancestors and devoted some time to his first wife's family, we may note that on being orphaned on the death of his mother in 1863, he preferred to live at the home of the baker Mr. Mchael Thompson at 640 East Seventh Street South Boston rather than go live with his aunt Ellen Barrett Mehegan on East Fourth Street near I St. Ellen had adopted his sisters Mary and Kate in 1862 even before the death of their mother, because she had contagious tuberculosis. Jack used to say there was some resentment of the children being taken from their mother, but it was probably necessary. Their landlord on Goddard Street, which became West Eight Street was Miuchael A. ring, dealer in junk, gunny cloth and paper, whose son Thomas was one of the founders of the St. Vincent de Paul Society in Boston. There are indications he knew Mrs. Welch, sister of the baker Micahel Thompson. She and another sister Mrs. McGlinchy appeared in John Robert Barrett's family photo album, as did Civil War veteran George Varnum who lived at 640 East Seventh Street at time of 1870 federal census - he appears in civil War uniform in two photos. Others in photos were William S. Locke, the plumber to whom John Robert Barrett was apprenticed and his brother Ned Locke,plumbing inspector Cornelius Crowley, Sidney Bryant, couins Kate and Robert Mehegan, and a frined Wally Sweeney. Memebers of the Bukcley family also appeared and included Tom Buckley and one of the women relations in Milford, Massachusetts.John Robert Barrett's second wife Mary Lane was one of eight chidren.The family originated in Kenmare in southern Kerry, Ireland.Her mother was one of elevenchildren of the Lynch family.Mrs. Lynch had been a Palmer, and her mother Mrs. Palmer, had been a Sullivan-Christian.The Lane and Lynch families settled in thre Portsmouth New Hampshire area in the 1950s, and Jack's stepmother was born there, though some elder brothers were born in Ireland. The Lane famioy moved to 147 Grove Street, Melrose in 1886 and Mary Lane married John R. Barrett in Melrose November 1894.A letter by elen Lynchy give a good synopsis of the Lane and Lynch families. One of Ma Lane's brothers Tate was a very large and strong person who went to the Pacific and was killed on a island there atttempting some prodigious rescue of a team of horses from aditch.Several of the other brothers were plasterers in Melrose.A brother Bill had five children, - Myles, Francis, John, Bill and Eileen Lane. Myles played baseball for Huntington school played football and hockey at Dartmouth College 1926, played professional hockey with New York Rangers, for a time attended Boston College Law School, served in the navy in World War II, and is now a New York state judge. The other four remained in Melrose. A sister of Ma Barrett, Kate became Mrs. Kernan and had two daughters. My husband was very fond of the Lane family and frequently visited Melrose in his youth and knew John Lambert, a Lynch relative who was a newspaperman and advisor to Calvin Coolidge particularly well. The Lamberts were still resident in Portsmouth New Hampshire in the 1920s and 1930s.289 Jack attended Second and Third grade in South Boston and in fourth through ninth grades 1897-1902 attedned Frederick T. Lincoln School on north side of Broadway between I + K Streets where branch public library was located later.His teachers there included Vodisa Comey in the fifth grade with her distinctive methods of teaching the students to pound their chests at key points as they practiced elocution,Josephine Simonton, Principal Maurice White and master William E. Perry native of Chelsea- later principal also. Ed Illingworth of Emerson Street was a classmate of Jack's both at the Lincoln School and later at Boston Latin. He studied music in Europe with composer Ferruchio Busoni and was an organist, pianist, and teacher. His wife's name was York - she came from L st. The moved to 64 Hastings Street, West Roxbury about 1917 and were neighbors from 1947 to 1967. p 290 Jack received a Sunday School certificate about 1905. He tells a story of a teacher reciting, "God helps those who help themselves." and a student overheard remarking, "And God help those who get caught helping themselves." Jack attended choir but was expelled when his friend Joe Buckley was caught with Jack's water pistol. They both were considered guilty and explelled from the choir. Jack took piano lessons and gave a concert when hewa tne years old. The teacher advocated practicing with a stiff wrist and a coin balanced on top of the hand during practice. Admiral Dewey was something of a hero to the family. After 1898 they had a little book "With Dewey in Manila" which Jack liked. The familya lso admired General Benjamin Butler of Civil War fame and later Governor of Massachusetts 1883. After "General Butler's Book" was published in 1892, John Robert Barrett bought two copies of the book - one for himself and one for his brother-in-law John Buckley. =Jack had three or four formal portraits as a small child and another one when he was about ten years old.One picture is dated April, 1892 and cost $ according to theplumbing shop records. Two tintypes were made in the yard at 634 East Seventh Street around 1901. In one of these grandpa Barrett appears with his four children. in the other are Jack and hiss brother Bill. There are a number of good pictures of Bill, Mollie and Kate around this date. Then there is a 1902 portrait of the ninth grade class at Frederick T. Lincoln School with Jack and Ed Illingworth. At the Boston Latin School Jack appears in three photos, - the 1906 class as seniors, an individual portrait, and their 1908 dinner. -=The area in South Boston where Jack lived is now a densely buiilt-up area of housing. In his youth however, there were apple orchards and open spaces and only about five houses in the three blocks between Seventh Street and the water of the harbor to the south. Jack felt a very fine residential area could have been developed with proper planning to avoid overcrowding. #640 East Seventh Street was one of the oldest houses in the area, going back before 1860. The house next door at #642 was transported to its present site from another location on L Street to make room for a school near Fifth Street. For years it was the home of the Kinnaly family. Mr. Kinnaly was also a plumber, and his three children Edward, Dan, and Katherine Kinnaly were close friends of the Barretts from 1912 although somewhat younger. All through the years Katherine Kinnaly was one of Mollie Barrett's closest friends. Danny Kinnaly frequently visited us here in West Roxbury and visited Bill Barrett in Darien, CT. Eddie Kinnaly was a merchant seaman, away from Boston most of the time.The property at #640 had facilities for a considerable number of horses during Mr. Thompson's occupancy 1860-1902. When the Barretts finally moved to #640 from #634 in May, 1903, they made considerable additions to the house, enlarging it perhaps a third, with bay windows on the front and a new kitchen and rear steps at the back of the house. East Seventh Street runs precisely east-west, and the house is on the north - inland side. The downstairs flat was rented, and the Baretts occupied the second floor. Jack slept in a small front room near the front stairs in an area only partially heated. He studied there, and in the attic, which had two rooms, unheated.= Jack enjoyed handball at the old L Street bath house. He lived about [one-third] 1/3 block east of L Street, three blocks from the shore and Columbia Road.He and his friend Joe Buckley enjoyed rowing in a dory, which they jointly owned. A newspaper had a contest for a story to be entitled, "The Best Meal I Ever Ate" - Jack wrote up an adventure in which he and Joe Buckley had rowed for hours to get to a forest fire where they planned to volunteer their services for pay a long way from home. They had started out on the expedition with one nickel belonging to Jack, which he spent for a box of Uneeda biscuits. Joe Buckley got cold feet because of the length of the expedition and bcause his father would be furious. They were hungry and caught a fish, pulled up on shore, and cooked the fish over an open fire and ate it with the Uneeda biscuits. Then they went home. Apparently the big fire was put out without their assistance. When Jack read of the newspaper contest, he submitted his fish and crackers story and won the prize. = After Boston Latin Jack worked as a checker for newspaper deliveries for the Boston Traveler going around the city making sure deliveries were properly completed. He started in December 1906 and kept a notebook that lists his travel and all sorts of personal jottings such as football scores, swimming, addresses, and phone numbers. At some point he went swimming at L Street every morning for a whole year, winter and summer. Someone bet him that he would never make more than eighteen dollars per week.His father was not interested in having him work for the plumbing business, although Jack would have liked to learn the trade. At certain times Jack did work on bill collecting for his father. + In 1907 or 1908 Jack played a certain amount of informal football with a local South Boston group. In one of the games his neighbor and Boston Latin School friend Dr. Jim Moloney then only about fifteen years old fractured his collar bone (clavicle) but played the rest of the game. Jack broke his nose on one occasion but was told to"snuff it up." He also liked to play catcher in baseball until required to wear a face mask, which took all the fun out of the game in his opinion. He suffered several finger injuries as a catcher. He and Joe Buckley challenged all comers at handball and beat some well known players. As far as fights were concerned, Jack had two contradictory comments, - he sometimes said, "The little guy always gets the worst of it", but on other occasions he said, "The bigger they are, the harder they fall." I don't think he ever quite made up his mind which side was correct. He used to say, "It never ccurred to me that size was an advantage." At some point he worked briefly for Jordan Marsh Company but either was fired when they heard he made inquiry about employment elsewhere or else he quit one day planning to go elsewhere and was told the next day it was too late to reconsider.In 1912,after the Revenue Cutter School he worked for George d. Emerson Company wholelsalers. This was probably the place where he told of enjoying the smell of the coffee but quit for fear of hurting his back carrying the heavy sacks. Jack was the alternate candidate for the Naval Academy in his district one year around 1907. He had fully qualified for adission and expect to attend, when at the last moment the first choice candidate changed his mind and decided to accept the appointment. We recollect a story that Jack then went to see Congressman James M. Curley at his Fenway residence where he was treated with grat courtesy although Curley a member of the opposition party could not obtain an appointment for him. Around 1905 while a student at Boston Latin School Jack dated Helen Cochrane, who lived on East Fourth Street near the Manning sisters, who in 1960s-70s lived on Linnet St. West Roxbury and were active in West Roxbury Historical Society and remembered her. Helen Cochrane sent Jack Barrett the following letter in 1937 when he lived in Cynwyd: ........Notebook 4 p 61 "To Lieutenant Commander John B. Barrett c/o Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelhia, Pennsylvania -[from] 378 Columbia Road, Dorchester Massachusetts April 8, 1937 Dear Jack, I am sure you will be very much surprised to hear from me, and I hope not angry at me for writing. My mother has just passed away, and so I have been trying to straighten things out here. = While going through some boxes today, I found all the many pleasant letters you had written as far back as 1910 (my - I'm old). Mother had them all neatly tied and marked, and after reading some of them, I thought I would just drop you a line. = Trust you have been well and happy all these years. Sometime would like so much to say "Hello" if you ever happen to be in this locality. = With kindest regards and pleasant memories of a past friendship, I am - Sincerely, Helen P. Cochrane."


 

1069.
Sophie Barrett and John l946 Oahu p 53-1069

 

probably on car ride near Nuuanu Pali with one of the stuffed animal collection ++ Sophie Barrett Black Notebook One text p 283 He attended the Gooch School in Melrose for the first grade and probably for half of the second grade year. His recollection is that he transferred to the South Boston schools on Valentines Day, February 14, 1895 or 1896. Year 1895 seems probable because of the date of his father's second marriage, November 1894. Jack lived a short distance east [south] of Spot Pond, Melrose,and remembered skating there as a child. His Buckley grandparents were very fond of him. His grandmother died in December, 1896, when Jack was eight years old, not long after his move to South Bston. His aunts Minnie and Maggie continued to take an interest in his welfare. An ambiguity in the will of his grandmother created some consternation in his family. Sh left her piano and one hundred or one-hundred-fifty dollars to my grandson, John Berchmans Buckley." She probably meant her grandson John Berchmans Barrett, and the lawyer selected by Jack's uncle may have been responsible for the mistake. Jack's mother is buried with her parents in Old Calvary Cemetery Boston, and the tombstone lists her as Catherine Agnes Buckley, though her married name was Catherine Agnes Barrett. The money went to Jack's cousin John Buckley, whose middle name was not Berchmans.Some coolness developed between Jack's father and the Buckleys. Minnie and Maggie continued to be among Jack's fondest admirers and gave him many books and presents in the period around 1900. They gave him many of the Henty series of boys' adventure tales, of which he was very fond. These include, "With Wolfe in Canada", "With Lee in Virginia", "True to the Old Flag", "The Lion of Saint Mark" and dozens more. Minnie also gave "Gulliver's Travels", "The Collier Encyclopedia", and natural history books. Minnie and Maggie also gave books to Jack's half-brother Bill, of whom they were fond even though he was not a relative of theirs. Minnie and Maggie worked at the Converse Rubber company in Malden. Jack's uncle John Buckley was a pattern maker in shipbuilding many years at the Charlestown Navy Yard. Jack last saw him in June,1921 when the destroyer TOUCEY visited the Navy Yard, with Jack in acting command. The younger Buckley cousins were very fine people, and I wish Jack had known them better. He saw more of his second cousins the Hartigans 284 than he did of his own first cousins the Buckleys, because the Hartigans lived in South Boston from 1890 to 1917. Mr. Hartigan was a newspaperman originally in Philadelphia and Baltimore. His daughter Gertrude was born in Philadelphia and his duaghter Mary [May] in Baltimore in February 1886. After a period in Roslindale he moved to the home of his brother-in-law John Donovan at D and Third Streets South Boston to reduce commuting to the boston Traveler on Newspaper Row downtown near Pi Alley when he developed bone tuberculosis, which killed his oldest sons Jeremiah and James. Jeremiah also had a football injury at Bsotn college. Mr. Hartigan senior died in 1899. Around 1905 Jack Barrett became very friendly with James Hartigan, who was severly crippled but managed to work as a newspaper reporter at various times in Binghamton, New York and in 1907 at Bath Maine. James died in 1912 but their mother born in Ireland 1852 and Gertrude, May born 1886 , the priest Father Edward 1889 and Law John 1893 all lived to good ages. = Father Edward Hartigan attended Boston College High School and played football as a member of the Boston College Class of 1911. He then was appointed to West Point Military Academy and completed freshmen year 1911-12 as a member of the 1915 class, which included World War II Generals Dwight Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and James Van Fleet. After the death of his brother James in 1912 he felt needed at home and resigned.He went to St. John's Seminary, Brighton, Massachusetts, and was ordained in 1917. He had early duties in Everett, then was pastor in North Weymouth for many years and appointed Pastor of Immaculate Conception Church in Everett 1953-1970. In 1920s he founded Cedar Crest camp at Green Harbor Marshfield on the shore shore originally for boys and girls of the Everett parish, but children from other areas attended over many decades of operation up to 1960s. It provided an affordable summer change of scene and chance to exercise and develop skills for children of many families of moderate means. His sisters Gertrude and Mary usually spent the summer at Green Harbor, and during the winter while May was teaching mathematics at Washington Irving school in Roslindale, they would go down there for Wednesday supper. Gertrude and May and their mother lived at 80 Brown Avenue, Roslindale near Sacred Heart Church on Cummins highway. May often saw the Buckley cousins especially Gertrude and Alice in Melrose, who attended Father Hartigan's fiftieth jubilee in 1967.At the suggestion of Jack's aunt Minnie Buckley in February 1910, May visited Jack at the Revenue Cutter School at Arundel Cove, South Baltimore, where she remembered clamshells in the pavements. Lawyer John Hartigan and his wife and four or five chidren lived across the street from the camp. They were married in 1922, and John Hartigan was a lawyer at 8 Beacon Street in Boston until his death from lip cancer in 1963. Jack Barrett used to see him downtown and at Chelsea Naval Hospital. Picking up the thread of John Robert Barrett now that we have introduced some of his ancestors and devoted some time to his first wife's family, we may note that on being orphaned on the death of his mother in 1863, he preferred to live at the home of the baker Mr. Mchael Thompson at 640 East Seventh Street South Boston rather than go live with his aunt Ellen Barrett Mehegan on East Fourth Street near I St. Ellen had adopted his sisters Mary and Kate in 1862 even before the death of their mother, because she had contagious tuberculosis. Jack used to say there was some resentment of the children being taken from their mother, but it was probably necessary. Their landlord on Goddard Street, which became West Eight Street was Michael A. Ring, dealer in junk, gunny cloth and paper, whose son Thomas was one of the founders of the St. Vincent de Paul Society in Boston. There are indications he knew Mrs. Welch, sister of the baker Micahel Thompson. She and Mrs. McGlinchy appeared in John Robert Barrett's family photo album, as did Civil War veteran George Varnum who lived at 640 East Seventh Street at time of 1870 federal census - he appears in civil War uniform in two photos. Others in photos were William S. Locke, the plumber to whom John Robert Barrett was apprenticed and his brother Ned Locke,plumbing inspector Cornelius Crowley, Sidney Bryant, couins Kate and Robert Mehegan, and a frined Wally Sweeney. Mts. McGlinchy was a sister of the Locke plumbers, who lived near the L-M Street neighborhood. Members of the Bukcley family also appeared and included Tom Buckley and one of the women relations in Milford, Massachusetts. John Robert Barrett learned the plumbing business from William S. Locke, a master plumber and member of the Charitable Mechanics Association with an office downstown - he resided in South Boston. After his apprenticship, Jack's father went for a year or so with his older brother in cattle or butchering in mid-West. After he turned twenty-one in November 1875, he began paying annual Boston poll taxes, and we still have his poll tax receipts for 1875, 1876, and 1877 at East Seventh street, his address in those years. He was working as a plumber then. After his marriage in April 1884 he moved frequently renting properties on Thomas Park street on Dorchester Heights and on Sixth Street. In 1890 he began to keep detailed financial records and opened his own plumbing shop on Atlantic Avenue 1890-96 Atlantic Avenue 1897-1905 Harrison Avenue neasr present Tufts Dental 1906-16 Hudson St. 1918-1924 and Tyler Street 1925-6.He gave up his shop in 1926 partly because of high labor costs but continued to do some work particularly for old customers. He had a very thorough knowledge of the underground area in downtown Boston and was often consulted in his old age when there was a leak in the underground mains especially near the subway system. One one occasion he stopped a leak at Park Street station. = In 1888 Sister Mary Joseph selected the middle name Berchmans,which was given to my Jack.Saint John Berchmans was a Belgian child saint, who was canonized in 1887, and aunt Mary Joseph then in Snoma, California, sent pamphlets telling his history.These we still have among a variety of religious objects she sent from the San Francisco Bay area. Apparently she and her sister Kate knew Jack's mother before they left for San Francisco 1871 on the railroad opened 1869. They always took a particular interest in him because of the loss of his mother. They never met their brother's second wife, and they found Jack was more of a letter writer than his brother Bill or his sisters Mollie and Katie. The California aunts followed Jack's Revenue Cutter School summer cruises with great interest and his Latin School studies and Hydrographic office duties and World War I service. He wrote them more regularly than the other nieces and nephews. In the 1890s Sister Mary Joseph was at a Presentation Convent in Sonoma, California and sent newspaper clippings about a fire that destroyed much church property there. 287 Later she was Mother Superior of the Presentation Convent and Girls school at Berkeley. She sent much literature about the town of Berkeley, already and educational center and about the convent and girls' school and Presentation order.We have pictures of her and the faculty and school buildings. A photo of Kate is earlier with writing "taken in San Francisco 1871". Kate lived with her aunts Johanna Hession and Margaret Barrett on Polk Street, San Francisco. They had three houses, which were destroyed in the fire following the earthquake in April, 1906. Only one of the houses was rebuilt.The aunts had been quite healthy but were now along in years.Kate's letters are extant only from after 1911.Mary Joseph's go back further but are mainly on religious subjects.She advised the family on a book about the Jesuits and frequently filled her letters with abbreviated Latin quotations such as "AMGD" ad maiorem gloriam Dei. Kate wrote a long letter to Jack while he was at the Hydrographic office in Washington. He attneded the first Woodrow Wilson Inauguration March 1913 and marched in the second March 1917 as officer of D.C. Naval Militia. Aunt Kate was interested that Wilson's press secretary Joseph Tumulty was one of the first Irish Americans appointed to a prominent federal post. Jack hoped to get out west to see his aunts, particularly in 1920, when he crossed the Pacific Panama-Hawaii-Japan-Shanghai-Manila as officer on commercial ship WESTERNER, but his ship did not call at San Francisco, and his aunts died in 1923, Kate in May and Mary in November. Mary wrote from 1404 Mason Street on the death of Kate. She explained complicated wills under which the immigrant Johanna Hession left half her property to her own grandson Roebert Fahrbach and half to her niece Catherine Barrett, who had lived with her over fifty years and helped manage her property. Catherine Barrett and her first cousin Kate Kerrigan, who came from Ballymartle Cork 1897, remained in the Polk Street home until Kate Barrett died 1923 and Kate Kerrigan 1926. Kate Barrett and her sister Mary had been adopted in 1862 by her aunt Ellen Mehegan, and she left half of her property to Ellen's Boston granddaughter Nell Craig - for the remainer of the property a life interest was created for Kate Kerrigan, and a remainder to Jack Barrett. Johanna Hession's widower son-in-law Emil Fahrbach, an executive of Dinkelspiel stores, acted as executor, and Jack received three thousand dollars in 1926. Then for the first time in mid-1923 Sister Mary Joseph was sent south to a Presentation Convent in Los Angeles, where she died and was buried in November.The nuns there wrote the Barrett famiy in Boston and sent a photograph of the grave.She must have had considerable force of character to be selected as a Mother Superior.It was in September-October 1911 that Ellen Mehegan's grandson Robert Mehegan junior visited the Barrett relatives in San Francisco and his father Robert Joseph Mehegan wrote the two and one- half typewritten pages that serve as a basis for the opening pages of Barrett family history. Robert Mehegan junior worked 1910-1911 at the Federal Land office in Evanston, Wyoming and corresponded with Jack and his brother Bill. He lived in Roslindale in 1912 on Seymour Street, and May Hartigan recollects him from her early years in Roslindale. In September 1911 he sent Jack a message suggesting they get together September 22. The card contained a view of the Clarendon Hills between Roslindale and Hyde Park. At this time Mehegan must have retruned home from Wyoming, and Jack Barrett was on leave from the Revenue Cutter School after an abbreviated 1911 ITASCA cruise that visited Marseilles and the Azores but encountered a cholera quarantine at Gibraltar. Mehegan worked during World War I as a cvilian at Boston Army base despite spinal tuberculosis. I He kept in touch with Elvira LaRiviere, whom he had met in Evanston, where her father worked on the railroad, and they were married in 1920 and had four children born in Boston, Eileen, John, Edmund, and Paul between 1920 and his death in 1933. Robert Mehegan junior had a sister Annie of Dorchester, later Arlington, who worked for the telephone company a number of years. Elvira retruend to Evanston Wyoming in 1934 and raised her children while teaching school until 1963. April 27, 1914 the immigrant Johanna Hession, then in her mid-eighties wrote her nephew John Robert Barrett saying he would be surprised to hear from her after many years, and she sent twenty-five dollars for each of her grandnieces, Mollie and Katie. This letter found in 1967 was stolen in 1993. for married John Robert Barrett's second wife Mary Lane was one of eight chidren.The family originated in Kenmare in southern Kerry, Ireland.Her mother was one of elevenchildren of the Lynch family.Mrs. Lynch had been a Palmer, and her mother Mrs. Palmer, had been a Sullivan-Christian.The Lane and Lynch families settled in the Portsmouth New Hampshire area in the 1950s, and Jack's stepmother was born there, though some elder brothers were born in Ireland. The Lane family moved to 147 Grove Street, Melrose in 1886 and Mary Lane married John R. Barrett in Melrose November 1894.A letter by elen Lynch give a good synopsis of the Lane and Lynch families. One of Ma Lane's brothers Tate was a very large and strong person who went to the Pacific and was killed on a island there atttempting some prodigious rescue of a team of horses from a ditch.Several of the other brothers were plasterers in Melrose.A brother Bill had five children, - Myles, Francis, John, Bill and Eileen Lane. Myles played baseball for Huntington school played football and hockey at Dartmouth College 1926, played professional hockey with New York Rangers, for a time attended Boston College Law School, served in the navy in World War II, and is now a New York state judge. The other four remained in Melrose. A sister of Ma Barrett, Kate became Mrs. Kernan and had two daughters. My husband was very fond of the Lane family and frequently visited Melrose in his youth and knew John Lambert, a Lynch relative who was a newspaperman and advisor to Calvin Coolidge particularly well. The Lamberts were still resident in Portsmouth New Hampshire in the 1920s and 1930s.289 Jack attended Second and Third grade in South Boston and in fourth through ninth grades 1897-1902 attedned Frederick T. Lincoln School on north side of Broadway between I + K Streets where branch public library was located later.His teachers there included Vodisa Comey in the fifth grade with her distinctive methods of teaching the students to pound their chests at key points as they practiced elocution,Josephine Simonton, Principal Maurice White and master William E. Perry native of Chelsea- later principal also. Ed Illingworth of Emerson Street was a classmate of Jack's both at the Lincoln School and later at Boston Latin. He studied music in Europe with composer Ferruchio Busoni and was an organist, pianist, and teacher. His wife's name was York - she came from L st. The moved to 64 Hastings Street, West Roxbury about 1917 and were neighbors from 1947 to 1967. p 290 Jack received a Sunday School certificate about 1905. He tells a story of a teacher reciting, "God helps those who help themselves." and a student overheard remarking, "And God help those who get caught helping themselves." Jack attended choir but was expelled when his friend Joe Buckley was caught with Jack's water pistol. They both were considered guilty and explelled from the choir. Jack took piano lessons and gave a concert when hewa tne years old. The teacher advocated practicing with a stiff wrist and a coin balanced on top of the hand during practice. Admiral Dewey was something of a hero to the family. After 1898 they had a little book "With Dewey in Manila" which Jack liked. The familya lso admired General Benjamin Butler of Civil War fame and later Governor of Massachusetts 1883. After "General Butler's Book" was published in 1892, John Robert Barrett bought two copies of the book - one for himself and one for his brother-in-law John Buckley. =Jack had three or four formal portraits as a small child and another one when he was about ten years old.One picture is dated April, 1892 and cost $ according to the plumbing shop records. Two tintypes were made in the yard at 634 East Seventh Street around 1901. In one of these grandpa Barrett appears with his four children. in the other are Jack and hiss brother Bill. There are a number of good pictures of Bill, Mollie and Kate around this date. Then there is a 1902 portrait of the ninth grade class at Frederick T. Lincoln School with Jack and Ed Illingworth. At the Boston Latin School Jack appears in three photos, - the 1906 class as seniors, an individual portrait, and their 1908 dinner. -=The area in South Boston where Jack lived is now a densely buiilt-up area of housing. In his youth however, there were apple orchards and open spaces and only about five houses in the three blocks between Seventh Street and the water of the harbor to the south. Jack felt a very fine residential area could have been developed with proper planning to avoid overcrowding. #640 East Seventh Street was one of the oldest houses in the area, going back before 1860. The house next door at #642 was transported to its present site from another location on L Street to make room for a school near Fifth Street. For years it was the home of the Kinnaly family. Mr. Kinnaly was also a plumber, and his three children Edward, Dan, and Katherine Kinnaly were close friends of the Barretts from 1912 although somewhat younger. All through the years Katherine Kinnaly was one of Mollie Barrett's closest friends. Danny Kinnaly frequently visited us here in West Roxbury and visited Bill Barrett in Darien, CT. Eddie Kinnaly was a merchant seaman, away from Boston most of the time.The property at #640 had facilities for a considerable number of horses during Mr. Thompson's occupancy 1860-1902. When the Barretts finally moved to #640 from #634 in May, 1903, they made considerable additions to the house, enlarging it perhaps a third, with bay windows on the front and a new kitchen and rear steps at the back of the house. East Seventh Street runs precisely east-west, and the house is on the north - inland side. The downstairs flat was rented, and the Baretts occupied the second floor. Jack slept in a small front room near the front stairs in an area only partially heated. He studied there, and in the attic, which had two rooms, unheated.= Jack enjoyed handball at the old L Street bath house. He lived about [one-third] 1/3 block east of L Street, three blocks from the shore and Columbia Road.He and his friend Joe Buckley enjoyed rowing in a dory, which they jointly owned. A newspaper had a contest for a story to be entitled, "The Best Meal I Ever Ate" - Jack wrote up an adventure in which he and Joe Buckley had rowed for hours to get to a forest fire where they planned to volunteer their services for pay a long way from home. They had started out on the expedition with one nickel belonging to Jack, which he spent for a box of Uneeda biscuits. Joe Buckley got cold feet because of the length of the expedition and bcause his father would be furious. They were hungry and caught a fish, pulled up on shore, and cooked the fish over an open fire and ate it with the Uneeda biscuits. Then they went home. Apparently the big fire was put out without their assistance. When Jack read of the newspaper contest, he submitted his fish and crackers story and won the prize. = After Boston Latin Jack worked as a checker for newspaper deliveries for the Boston Traveler going around the city making sure deliveries were properly completed. He started in December 1906 and kept a notebook that lists his travel and all sorts of personal jottings such as football scores, swimming, addresses, and phone numbers. At some point he went swimming at L Street every morning for a whole year, winter and summer. Someone bet him that he would never make more than eighteen dollars per week.His father was not interested in having him work for the plumbing business, although Jack would have liked to learn the trade. At certain times Jack did work on bill collecting for his father. + In 1907 or 1908 Jack played a certain amount of informal football with a local South Boston group. In one of the games his neighbor and Boston Latin School friend Dr. Jim Moloney then only about fifteen years old fractured his collar bone (clavicle) but played the rest of the game. Jack broke his nose on one occasion but was told to"snuff it up." He also liked to play catcher in baseball until required to wear a face mask, which took all the fun out of the game in his opinion. He suffered several finger injuries as a catcher. He and Joe Buckley challenged all comers at handball and beat some well known players. As far as fights were concerned, Jack had two contradictory comments, - he sometimes said, "The little guy always gets the worst of it", but on other occasions he said, "The bigger they are, the harder they fall." I don't think he ever quite made up his mind which side was correct. He used to say, "It never ccurred to me that size was an advantage." At some point he worked briefly for Jordan Marsh Company but either was fired when they heard he made inquiry about employment elsewhere or else he quit one day planning to go elsewhere and was told the next day it was too late to reconsider.In 1912,after the Revenue Cutter School he worked for George d. Emerson Company wholelsalers. This was probably the place where he told of enjoying the smell of the coffee but quit for fear of hurting his back carrying the heavy sacks. Jack was the alternate candidate for the Naval Academy in his district one year around 1907. He had fully qualified for adission and expect to attend, when at the last moment the first choice candidate changed his mind and decided to accept the appointment. We recollect a story that Jack then went to see Congressman James M. Curley at his Fenway residence where he was treated with grat courtesy although Curley a member of the opposition party could not obtain an appointment for him.


 

1070.
John Robert Barrett 1892 Christmas presents to Buckley children Melrose

 

p 53-1070 of website p 185 of John Robert Barrettt account book for years 1890-1894 with entries of personal expenditures including Christmas presents for mother-in-law Mrs. buckley and nephew Fred and nieces Frances, Gertrude, Kate Buckley. ++++Letter from Rebekah Geetter August 25,l970-92 Fern Street,Hatford Connectict Dearest Sophie & John, 8:30 in the morning We all went off on our yearly summer vacation for a week up in the Belgrade Lakes region of Maine fishing, swimming & spending a good deal of time in the rowboat on the lake.Now it's "back to the salt mines' again,but the change of pace was just great.On contacting the Bureau of Vital Statistics here I learned that Mother & Dad were married on August 8, l890 here iin Hartford by a Rabbi M. Elkins.Mother was 20 years old, & Dad was 24..The original spelling of the name at the time the marriage license was issued was David Merenisky & Tally Goldfield.The spelling of the last name on the mariage certificate signed by the Rabbi is shown as Meirinski,which is slightly different from that of the marriage license.Dad was shown as having been born in Russia & Mother in Austria.We have no way of determining what Mother did before she was married since all her contemporaries have passed away.It is entirely possible that she helped some of the local tailors & in that way might have been introduced to Dad.There are no records of (her brother Jacob Goldfield but I think he was a few years younger than Mother & of course always lived at our house (25 Morgan Street, where Hartford directories indicated he remained with a group of tailors after David Meranski & family autumn l9l6 moved to 4 Wooster Street..He spent his late years as a resident of the local Hebrew Home for the Aged (then on Washington Street,,later Tower Avenue).In Maine Geetter,Sis (Esther) & I occupied a cottage.David,Joan,Darya & Erica were nearby.Geetter's brother Nathan & his wife Lillian had a cottage,& Joan's mother (Mrs. Trouboff occupied a fourth cottage.Albert,Millie,Joshua,Adam & Thora will go to Martha's Vineyard the week after Labor Day.Note by John Barrett There was a large exodus from Russia in l882, when David Meranski was seventeen years old.He may have lefty Brest (Litovsk) at this time -he spoke of Odessa, where he may have lived for a time or passed through in route to Turkey & Egypt. Pete Meranski's father-in-law came from Odessa probably l890's for foot surgery in Baltimore. His wife was born in Baltimore. They lived with Pete,Jen, Deborah, & Danny on Dolfield Avenue Baltimore,where I saw trhem September l960.One of Jen's aunt lived there also.Brody was the site of an American mission to aid Jewish refugees from Russia in l882- it was in Austrian Galicia near the border.The Geetter family emigrated from Stryj, Lemberg province Galicia after their eldest son Isadore was born January l902. Letter from Rebekah Geetter "Thursday afternoon September 3,l970 92 Fern Street,Hartford Connecticut 06l05"Dearest Sophie & John- I called the Hartford Public Library & learned that Pa was listed in the l890 directory as having a business address at 8 American Row in Hartford (listed as tailor) & living at 224 Front Street.There was no information as to who he boarded with at the Front Street address before he was married.There is no information at all about Mother,but it is very posssible she lived with the Meisselman family on Charles Street before she was married.Both Sis (Esther) & I recall that Mother came over on the ship with a Mrs. Meisselman,& it was under her wing that both she & "Yonkel"(her younger brother Jacob Goldfeld,who was resident of Hebrew Home in l930) made the voyage.The 1890 directory lists a Solomon Meisselman at 46 Charles Street,which as you might recall was in the same East Side neighborhood as Front Street.The whole East Side neighborhood has been demolished for redevelopment & is now called Constitution Plaza- a large complex of insurance buildings,banks, Broadcasting station & elegant shops. That shoud answer your feeling of curiosity about her crossing the ocean at such a young age,especially with a handicapped young brother.(Note by John Barrett l998: Fire destroyed immigration records for New York for this period-Ellis Island opened l892 Meiselmann descendants in Hartford l970's included bankruptcy judge Saul Seidman & Mrs. Silverberg -both family friends, who relected the Meisselmans were from Brody Galicia, as were other friends, the Witkowers, who came over in April l890 = the older Witkower boy was born in Brody, but his younger brother, Rose Rosenblatt & was a publisher at Witkower Press was born in Vienna -he published a book on nutritional value of cod liver oil- Mrs.Witkower sent us a copy in l974.)-Sis remembers visiting with Mrs. Meisselman on Warren Street when she was a young girl (before either you or I were born apparently).Warren Street is several streets away from the Wooster Street area,& is now part of a slum clearance project.As you can see, Hartford as you knew it is fast changing,& many of the streets are no longer in existence.Sade Meranski (Mrs. Harry Meranski) is at the Hebrew Home for the Aged. I talked with Minnie Deutsch a couple of days ago (Sade's older sister),& she said that she and"Sister"(Pearl Meranski,daughter of Harry & Sade) visit with Sade practically every day.Sister lives alone but as you know has worked many,many years in the printing (later photo laboratory) department of the Travelers Insurance Company.Minnie's address is 11 Miamis Road, West Hartford, Ct. I learned from her that the Rausch company where Arthur (Lieutentant Colonel Arthur Meranski retired from Army l967 after 28 years service mainly tanks -Normandy invasion l944 & Inchon landing Korea September l950) works is in Columbia, Maryland. That's all the address she had.Also Arthur's home is in Aberdeen, Maryland,& she thought mail would reach him there.Incidentally I do know that Harry's birthdate was May 20,l89l.Perhaps Minnie could tell you when he & Sade were married.I know that he was serving in the Army at the time during World War I.As for Pa's remarriage,I think it was either l926 or l927, since Mother died in September of l925.He married Mrs. Anna Adelman, a widow with two children whose names were Rachel -about 8-eight& Eva about eleven.(Two grown boys did not live with the family).Pa kept the store till about l930, when he quitclaimed the house & store to the bank,since he was unable to keep up with the mortgage payments.His tenants were shiftless & unreliable,& it was torment for him to try to collect the rents.Anna was always out of the house tending to her business of credit buying (her customers would charge merchandise to her account & then she was always out collecting from the on installments.He minally moved out & went to live with a friend of his,Mr. Fishman (8 Magnolia Street).We helped to pay for his board & room & what little he needed for clothing.He left everything in the house at #4 Wooster Street for Mrs. Adelman to do with as she wishes, &I guess she sold everything=even our cherished red plush album which had pricelesss pictures of Pa in his fez in Turkey.& other memorabilia of Pa & Ma.In June of l929 I moved out of #4 at the time of my marriage.After about l93l for two years before his death Pa lived with his friend Mr. Fishman & spent considerable time with Sam & Bee (Pollack) in Philadelphia.A trip to Baltimore to attend the birth of Pete & Jen's first son Arthur resulted in his catching (lobar) pneumonia,& he passed away at the New Britain General Hospital on March 29,l933.(Ben & Abe's friend) Julius Aronson is doing very well,& I understand his (cataract) operations have been successful. I talk with him over the phone practically every week.I do know that he & Abe & Ben used to go to the Good Will Club Camp at Lake Terramugus in Marlboro,Connecticut & spent many happy summers there. You will recall that Mary Hall & her brother (I think his name was Bill) founded the Good Will Club for Boys in Hartford, & that many of our leading citizens in the community were at one time members in their youth.I must get off now & fix something for dinner this evening or I'll probably be ruled out of the party.Stay well-hugs & kisses from all. All our love.-Babe."(Abe Meranski stated his father David Meranski was born in Russia,March,l865-buried Zion Hill Cemetery.) ++Mollie Aronson information received Oct 4,l973 =written Oct 1 Julius's [Aronson's] brother who married Catherine Cooper was Sam. Died many years ago. Meyer only one left at eighty-one. Lives with a son in Hartford. "You mentioned Mrs. Witkower in your letter, and they had a bookstore on Asylum Avenue. St. Mr. Witkower passed away, and she lived on the next street to us, and now lives in California with a sister. Mrs. Witkower is Charlie Rosenblatt's sister. I also knew the Meiselmans girl and the Seidmans from Sunday school. Saul Seidman is an attorney and his mother passed away a short time ago. Thought you might like the enclosed pictures taken at the Shack and you would know some of them like Celia, Rosenblatt, Charlie Rosenblatt, Jack Noll, Dora Johnson and Julius. When Julius and I were in Florida one year we spent the day wuth Teddiee and Aleen and their children and had a nice time. Can't imagine that they have married children. Julius and I went to their wedding at the Bond Hotel. Of course I knew Abe and also Ben and Charlie rosenblatt and Julius owned the Shack on the river at Windsor and had many good times there. Yes, Babe is a wonder and she does so much and has such a large house to take care of and is always the same. I saw Albert recently, and he looks good and both he and David have nice practices. Julius used to get such a kick when at the hospital and Dr. David, Dr. Albert, and Dr. Isadore Geetter would come in to visit Uncle Julius. I knew that Harold and Ava had bought a home in West Hartford and were staying with Babe. Now they are in their own home. I knew that Bee and Sam had gone to Boston to a bar mitzvah and had gone to visit you.They both look good, and I saw them last year when I was in Florida.They drove up to see Babe and family from Great Neck and tried to call me.I think I was at my sister's home and missed them. They love being in Florida and have a lovely apartment. Guess Julius used to call Bee(looks like) Mrs. Vanderbit, and she always looks stunning and is so bubbly. I stopped by to see Babe,Esther, and the doctor oon Saturday to wish them a Happy New Year-and all look good. I also took your letter along for Babe to read. We keep in touch with each other and speak on the phone each week. (Oc l,l970 Separate item. -, PO=Oc 8, l9l5 JBB postcard to Bill - Wa never mind about the Remsen's Must get a later edition.- ... Rear Adm & Mrs. Williams invited Barrett to a tea for the War College class of l924 Friday July 6, l923 Dec31'73 Rose Rosenblatt Witkower letter to Sophie Mrs. Rose Witkower 14 Regency Drive Bloomfield Connecticut 06002 - "Shalom Monday December 31, l973 My dear Sophia- Your letter came as a golden nugget today, a cold blear December day.for it brought back to me a rush of memories of days that were priceless- Days when one never heard of welfare- the poor- housing or all the other dismal "isms."for we lived in the midst of all of them and still found that all was Good.How vividly you wrote of my dear mother-in-law Saura Witkower. I wish I had the sense of value then as I now have for if I had been more patient and interested, my mother-in-law would have told me all about her experiences in Europe and in America.But I a busy mother of two children had no desire or time to listen.'Twas the same when my father a Civil War Veteran tried to tell us about some of his experiences suchg as when he became Representative of San Francisco, California in l879 Legislature and the arrival of the Jewish people in Hartford- but we were not interested.How well I remember the many, many times my mother-in-law went over to see Mrs. Meranski- wher3e she knew she would find a kindred soul who loved her and would listen to her chatter-there in the brick housae on the corner of Canton and Wooster Street.She would be served with home made chicken soup,with fresh noodles, a pice pof chick and szimar and of course tea and kuchen.Hundreds of times - and what love she received from the whole family- the children eagerly waiting for the peppermint lozenges she took from her handbag.- and your Mother- how I remember the day I drove my mother-in-law to your home.She prevailed on me to go upstairs to say "hello" to her dear friends.Up I went and was rewarded with such a gush of love that it warmed the heart of an American girl who was losing the warmth of expressive love. Then we had tea-in--a-glass and butter coffee-cake.As I looked around the room I saw a number of children - her's and neighbors' children.That must have been about l9l5 (actually after Meranskis moved to Wooster Street autumn l9l6).The joy of her eyes sparkled when she spoke of her daughter Sophie who was going to graduate from high school and go on to college.Well, that was something that keenly interested me.Learning was my goal, and thus far I had only received seventh grade schooling.My mother-in-law kept me posted on your achievements- as proud of you as if she was your Mother.Mrs. Meiselman was a small, very active woman who helped her husband in their small grocery store.A finer person never lived.She gave to everyone who needed help;So did her children. They adopted my mother-in-law as their own.Not blood relations.There were two boys born to my mother-in-law.As I remember the story, she married a man who worked in a bank in Vienna.I believe she was born in Brody, Austria.That name rings a bell.Am quite sure thast your mother was not born there (?) They may have met on the boat coming over to America, and my motrher-in law took care of her after they landed.I called Jennie Weinstein to find out what she knew, but she knew nothing.She sends her love.She told me of meeting your dear family - hopes you all are well.Israel Witkower (ROSE'S HUSBAND) was owner of a bookstore for fifty years on Asylum Street - formerly Warfield's.He started as an errand boy- later became the owner. am sure you traded in the store. Israel spoke very highly of the Meranski family. Charlie Rosenblatt (Rose's brother) told me much about the summer house down near the river.The gang had much fun there.He dearly loved Ben.We have two children - Irma and Bernard (Witkower).- five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.Thank god! Israel was born March 27,l889 - passed away on September 2,l968.- After spending four extremely happy, restful years in lovely Leisure World, California, a perfect community for Seniors, on my eighty-fourth birthday I decided to return home - West Hartford- to be close to my children.I have a very cozy three room apartment just a five minute drive from my daughter Irma, wife of Dr. Albert Reiner Deulert SPELLING??? Deutcib? Sorry I could not give you more information, but I am sure your dear mother was not born in Austria(cum granu salis). Thank you for the interesting letter. May God bless you- Yours - Rose Witkower. Sophie Barrett note l974 "Charles Rosenblatt married Celia Weinstein - Esther's chum." Postcard from Rose Witkower : received Feb 26, l974 (recommended book): Hartford Jews 1659-l970 by Rabbi Morris Silverman - mentions Capital City Lodge #119 - 1900 David Meranski Treasurer. Dr. Geetter's picture and factual item is in this book on page 351(John Barrett note July l998- Rose Witkower's recollection of Sophie's mother at Wooster Street is of great interest, but she clearly did not know whether Thalia Goldfeld Meranski was born in Vienna or Brody, Austrian Galicia, now in Ukraine. In Boston l970's Sophie and John spoke with a widow Celia Goldfield of Milton (employed at Jordan Marsh Boston)- Celia's husband was from Rovno on the same railroad line as Brody. Goldfeld or Goldfield is not a common name, but I found about thirty in a survey of telephone directories of larger American cities.On Portland Street, Hartford l909 accoring to directories a newly arrived Goldfield family lived near the Meranskis for about a year. Any connection is unknown.Sophie said her mother's parents were deceased when her mother came to Hartford along with her younger brother Jack, who was hard of hearing, worked as a tailor, added a letter i to his name changing from Goldfeld to Goldfield l9l6. if directory is accurate. He lived at 25 Morgan Street with Meranskis l9l0-l9l6 and stayed there according to directories for several years when they moeved to Wooster Street late l9l6. He was a resident of Hebrew Home l931 accding to directory.It was the custom to name children for deceased relatives , so Thalia's parents Abel and Bertha Goldfeld in Austria would have been deceased when their grandson Abe was born l896 and granddaughter Bertha July 23, l898.


 

1071.
final board payments 1894 p53-1071

 

p 53-1071 Notebook Four p. 138 1951 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company newspaper heading: William J. Barrett named Secretary picture of Bill in write-up.William J. Barrett, formerly Third Vice President was appointed Secretary of the Company on August 25th to fill the vacancy which occurred when James R. Herman passed away on July ninth. In announcing the appointment, the President said that Mr. Barrett will continue to head the Publications Division in his new capacity. He will also have responsibility for the operation and management of the Investigation Division, Filing and Tracing Division, Inquiry and Information Bureau, Mail Division, Supply Division, Transcription Division, Bronxville Hall of Records, and Kingston Hall of Records and will have Assistant Secretary Broadbent associated with him in the management of these units. In addition the Library, formerly under the supervision of the Health and Welfare Division will be transferred to the Secretary's office. Mr. Barrett joined the Company in 1923 as a member of the Policy Holders Service Bureau staff and rose to become Manager ten years later. In 1942 he was appointed an Officer of the Company with the title of Assistant Secretary. He became Assistant Vice President in 1944 and a Third Vice President in 1947.


 

 

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