Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

1072.
John Robert Barrett plumber shop and personal account book 1890-1894 page 191 p 54-1072

 

website p 54 This page lists personal expenditures for beginning period when shop was opened october 1890. It lists a purchase of a book of poems, probably Moore the Irish poet and a purchase of train commuter ticket from Wyoming railroad Melrose to South Station Boston.The Buckley in-laws lived at Park and then Baxter Street in the section of Melrose near Wyoming railroad station. EXTRA COPY website guide --ENJOY+STUDY"RedHeadedStepchild"by Email or WEBSITE Sophie Meranski Barrett 1901-1987 wrote the main text of Navy family memoir "Red Headed Stepchild" beginning 1969 at 52 Emmonsdale Road, West Roxbury, her home 1947-1987. Most of the text can now be seen on website http://www.ccilink.com/barrett with more than 500 photos. Her son John B. Barrett Jr. collaborated and is typing and editing material from handwritten notebooks and recollections. Interested persons may request specific portions by E mail as they are edited, including 1924 and 1925 theses of Jack at the Naval War College Newport Rhode Island and Sophie in Economics and Sociology at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts. There are also numerous letters from Navy, Coast Guard, Marine and other friends and many relatives. A website Index and Directory begins at top of website page 75 seventy-five, and below is a more complete outline of the present organization of materials, which can be E-mailed.Reasonable copying of these materials for personal and scholarly use is very welcome and encouraged. If anyone should be interested in adapting portions of these materials for large scale publication, a financial contribution to assist further work might be appropriate -contact John B. Barrett at 113 West Third Street, Port Angeles Washington WA98362-2824 current 2000 E mail addresses include Meranski@yahoo.com--- meranski@hotmail.com--- Sophie's original writing began with a series of eight "black notebooks" mainly 1969-1974. A little later she conceived the idea of a book primarily about her husband Commander John Berchmans Barrett 1888-1969, with a chapter on his brother Bill and much material on Barrett family history. Material on Sophie's own family the Meranskis and her early years before 1928 was mainly in the black notebooks. Some of the Chapter Titles in the "Red Headed Stepchild" narrative included: I.-Barrett Family History II-Childhood and Schools IIa Boston Latin School 1902-6 -3-.Revenue Cutter Service 1909-11 4.William Joseph Barrett 1895-1967 5-Interval between Revenue Cutter Service and Regular Navy 1912-21 Naval Hydrograhpic Office DC and Reserve Officer World War I -6- Regular Navy,Destroyer TOUCEY 1921 Charleston SC -7- Battleship WYOMING 1922-3 -8-NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport 1923-4 with TACTICS thesis and related Delahanty letters -9-"Newest Ship in the Navy" Light Cruiser MARBLEHEAD 1924-1927 War Games Hawaii visit Australia-New Zealand 1925 action Nicaragua-Shanghai China 1927 many letters Phil Dahlquist, Harold Fultz, George Phillips, "Boney" Close, Jack Fradd, Edward Arroyo -TEN- Shore Duty New York 1927-9 During this time December 17, 1927 Jack was sent to sea in inadequately equipped New York Harbor tug in the desperate effort to rescue crew of submarine S-4 who were trapped alive in hopelessly deep water off Provincetown Cape Cod. This was on his mind when he wrote a January 1928 letter to New York Post under pen-name "XANTHOS" about Naval preparedness and irresponsible attitudes in United States Congress. "XANTHOS" was the name of Achilles's horse in the Iliad, which warned him of his impending doom. "XANTHOS" originally meant blond, but some of Jack's Boston Latin friends humorously applied it to his reddish hair and tendency to make grim predictions in military and naval affairs. He deplored lack of action by Hoover when Japanese attacked Mudken Manchuria 1931 and again when Franklin Roosevelt curtailed Naval Reserve program June 1933. He warned of danger at Pearl Harbor for a long time, especially the weekends, and lack of effective liaison with Army. He lost his mother in 1889 but had a happy relation with his stepmother and her children and family. But he would occasionally refer to himself as the "Red Headed Stepchild." Sophie originally considered writing a memoir 1950s of the Pearl Harbor attack under the title "I was There," but Fleet Admiral Leahy had used this title for his memoir as President Roosevelt's chief of staff, so Sophie settled on "Red Headed Stepchild" for Jack's biography,. which expanded to cover family and friends. _ELEVEN- "GREENWICH VILLAGE ROMANCE" Sophie met Jack August 1928 at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village, New York, where she sublet from social worker Anne Taylor. She describes their romance and marriage in the Red Headed Stepchild text. This material may be combined with the more extended account in the notebooks of her social work and life New York 1923-1930. -TWELVE- Destroyer TRUXTUN summer 1929-May 1930 Philippines-Yangtze Rive-Nanking. Jack Barrett wrote some recollections of the TRUXTUN in 1967 for the Commanding Officer of a new TRUXTUN then being commissioned. He also was begnning work on family history and school days.In many ways this was the beginning of the family memoir, and Jack identified many photos and recorded information on Barretts, Buckleys, Mehegans, Revenue Cutter School, Boston Latin, and Naval Hydrographic Office. --THIRTEEN- VOYAGE to the ORIENT ["SLOW BOAT TO CHINA} Sophie's long trip on Navy Transport HENDERSON from New York to Tientsin China via Oanama, California, Hawaii, Guam. -FOURTEEN- Life in the Orient November 1930-Januiary 1932 centered at Tientsin with visits to Peking, Chefoo, Wai-Hai-Wai, Shanghai- war in Manchuria -FIFTEEN- Return via Egypt and Europe- honeymoon via Dollar Line PRESIDENT PIERCE and VAN BUREN January -March 1932. -SIXTEEN - EAGLE 19 Boston drilling Navy Reservists based at Charlestown NAVY YARD MUCH CONTACT WITH BARRETT family April 1932-summer 1933 -SEVENTEEN- Survey Ship HANNIBAL 1933-1935 west coast PANAMA and Portsmouth, Virginia important letters Robert Hinckley, Richard Visser, Mervin Halstead, Dan Candler, Paul Lehman,Harry Ferguson,Ted Agnew,Ascherfelds, Boyds,Lafayette Jones, -EIGHTEEN- Command of DESTROYER CLAXTON 1935-6 landing force exercises Culebra, Puerto Rico, lunch with Sec. Ickes- drilling of Annapolis midshipmen at Gardiners Bay Long Island - letters of Admiral Orlin Livdahl,Captain Warren McClain, future CBS newsman Richard C. Hottelet, grandfather Barrett -NINETEEN Shore Duty Philadelphia 1937 -TWENTY -TANKER TRINITY to Dutch East Indies and Cavite Philippines -humorous letter of Captain Haskell C. Todd of Belfast Maine- account of Captain Fred S. Holmes and young engineer Hyman Rickover-family saw Boyds, Delahantys, Pardees in Southern California 1938-9 -TWENTY-ONE Brooklyn 1939-1941 Command of Naval Hydrographic Office NY 1940-41 - promotion to Commander -World's Fair, Jones Beach, Atlantic City letters about MARY CELESTE mystery from Charles Edey Fay and Gershom Bradford 1879-1978 -TWENTY-TWO - PEARL HARBOR, WAIKIKI, Thomas Jefferson School- This is a very long chapter. In many ways the climax of Jack Barrett's career was his effort to warn of Pearl Harbor danger while briefly assigned to War Plans July-October 1941 and then his four years service in charge of OVERSEAS TRANSPORTATION OFFICE PEARL HARBOR until after the final victory in 1945. Sophie's first treatment was in Black Notebook One recently edited May 1999- then her treatment in "Red Headed Stepchild" in 1970 and a special -November-December 1981 newspaper article prepared for fortieth anniversary of attack on the request of West Roxbury Transcript Editor Jason Korell. Sophie describes -Dedication of Aiea Naval Hospital 1943- and her surgery there May 1947- visits with Honolulu Star Bullletin editor Riley Allen and his wife 1942 and with Captain and Mrs. Samuel Wilder King 1946 - Thomas Jefferson School and Punahou- our landlod Walter Glockner and his habeas corpus situation with the military governor- Jack's court martial duty 1946- our nieghbors the Distelis, James and Edythe Needles, the Samoan tenants upstairs, wartime barbed wire, gas masks, centipedes and bombs shelters. Important letters - Wilfred Pang long active in Honolulu Chinese community describes wartime work of the Overseas Transportation office- Chaplain Maguire's book "The Captain Wears a Cross" 1943 treats the same subject=- Gen --e Mrs. PaulNelson tells of taking her two young boys to San Francisco in big convoy December 26, 1941- hero Henry Brantingham tells of arriving in Honolulu without proper uniform after being evacuated from Philippines April 1942 AND SENT TO WASHINGTON D.C. TO RECEIVE CITATION FROM PRESIDENT Rooosevelt for his unit, whose PT boats evacuated Gen. MarArthur- -TWENTY-THREE - "Over the Mountain" After planning for more than three years, the Barrett family summer 1947 toured Yosemite, redwoods, Crater Lake, Columbia River Highway, Mount Rainier, Glacier Park Montana, Yellowstone Grand Teton (with long night drive 'Over the mountain" from GrAND CANYON OF the YELLOWSTONE RIVER TO MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS-then home by northern route to Hartford and Boston. TWENTY-FOUR - "Home is the Sailor" - Barrett's stay with Jack Barrett's sister Mollie - move to West Roxbury 1947- John attended Roxbury Latin and Harvard- Jack completes law school at Boston College :Law School 1951 under G.I. Bill -Hartigan cousins help find Irish relatives. Much West Roxbury material still being prepared. Recently PART ONE has been organized from "Black Notebooks, letters, and recollections: This material is nearing final form, though gaps are being filled from Sophie's handwritten texts: As currently planned Part One will have at least five parts:--- {i} Sophie and the Meranski Family,- Hartford Connecticut and Mount Holyoke College 1901-1923 {ii} Social Work and Marriage New York-Philadelphia 1923-1930 {iii} "THE YOUNG OFFENDER AND THE CRIMINAL LAW IN MASSACHUSETTS" Sophie's 1925 Masters Thesis in Economics and Sociology at Mount Holyoke College directed by department head Amy Hewes with extensive bibliography of early historical sources. {iv} MERANSKI-GEETTER_POLLACK-Hartford-Mount Holyoke -related letters and materials Arthur Meranski, Rebekah Geetter, Jason Pollack Mollie Aronson, Ivan McCormack. John Barrett plans to reconstruct 1970s materials on Mount Holyoke alumni - much destroyed in 1993 thefts. [v] John Barrett essay "Musical Interests of Sophie and Jack Barrett" These five chapters focus on Sophie's l;ife up to 1928, when she met Jack Barrett. The Red=Headed Stepchild material will probably be reorgaNIZED, WITH PART TWO continuing the narrative of Jack and Sophie together over forty years after 1928. Then probably the early years of the Barrett family will be placed in a re-organized Part Three at the end, with much new information on relations located in the 1970s and more recently.- Most of this material will be available on the website, but can be E mailed to those who are interested in a particular topic or segment. Many recent photos and material from storage added tomay 2000.- John Barrett


 

1073.
p 54=1073 John Robert Barrett addressed envelope toJack at Navy Yard New York

 

Bron 1854 John Robert Barrett had less than a year of formal schooling but kept careful account books many years and wrote many letters in distinctive handwriting, though he never capitalized the personal pronoun "i". Both his sons Jack and Bill traveled widely -Jack in Revenue Cutter service and Navy and Bill in Army World War I, with Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 39 years 1923-1962. One time John Robert Barrett had a dream about visiting Yellowstone National Park, though he never traveled that far west. It may have been around 1927 when Jack Barrett traveled east from Seattle, Washington after being detached from light cruiser MARBLEHEAD at Shanghai China June 4,1924. Jack traveled by ship from Tokyo to Seattle on the same passenger liner with Gen Leonard Wood, who had just retired as Governor General of Philippines but died two months later.Grandfather Barrett often visited Bill in New York 1930s and Jack and Sophie and young John at Norfold l936 and Bala Cynwyd near Phiadelphia Nopvember-l936 through August 1938. Third Naval District was at South and Whitehall Strets New York, where Jack was in War Plans and Reserve Training June 1927-June 1927. During this time he attended the Bronx campus of Fordham Law School nights and met and married Sophie Ruth Meranski.


 

1074.
Sophie Barrett, Paul Kavanaugh, Bob Macdonald, Cliff Ronan at Roxbury Latin graduation 1953

 

June 1953- p 54#1074 NOTEBOOK IV-[p91] August 23, 1922 Hotel William-Wallion? Philadelphia [to] Miss Catherine Miley, Dorchester Dearest Catherine, My address will be 508 S. 44th Street instead of Ardmore. I liked Ardmore very much indeed, but it has now served its purpose, and I am moving back where things are more convenient. As for business matters, I have decided not to enter the brass foundry business. First, because to operate as we could, there wouldn't be enough money in it for the effort expended. Second, To secure equipment to operate in production - production machines would require thre times as much capital as we have. Third A study of the costs at the foundry I was to take over, and talks with people intimately associated with the business convinced me that to enter the business would give one the privilege of working for oneself as a moulder and earning a moulder's pay only. I talked with the President of the Ajax Smelting Company, the President of the Metal Manufacturers Association, and the head of a moulding machine manufacturing company, and they showed me by logical argument that under the conditions of competition found in Philadelphia - cutthroat in the brass game- I would save time, money, and worry by staying away. I could go on and show cost data to demonstrate the inadequacy of the charges possible with the competition,but the above is sufficient. But why did it look so favorable and everyone seem so enthusiastic- even people who were in a position to know - until these three men I struck at about the same time and who knew the game from A to Z? Evidently they [the others]did not know that due to the relatively small amount of capital required to enter the business, there are a large number of small shops, -seldom heard of- throughout the city and they are all out for business and will take it at almost any price. The head of Ajax said he did not know of any brass founder who had become rich from the business.While I was willing to dig in, I could not see moulding for the rest of my days. Everything considered, I concluded that it was best to stay out, even at the expense of ridicule, slams, and the like. But it hurt me and still does, for your sake, to give it usp. However, I know now that it's the best thing. Now, as to the future. I shall occupy my time with Crane Packing, who have been good enough to say, 'Come on'. But I have put out lines in other directions and shall hold out until they materialize. Under the circumstances you may do as you think best in this matter of the future. I had hoped this would settle me on my way and expected it would work out so we could be on our way together. I know now that it would not. While this was indeed discouraging,I'm not down yet and don't intend to be.As soon as this disturbance is over with and I get settled, I'll let you know how things stand for the future if you care still.- Most affectionately yours, Bill." {Not long before this Bill had helped Jack withdraw stock proceeds from Fuller stock investment company in May or June 1922. Jack was at sea on the MARBLEHEAD, and the brokerage was slow in paying out for a stock he sold. Bill went around and collected the check, so Jack avoided losing his money in the bankruptcy.] [p72] "Washington, November 11, 1931 [from] William J. Barrett The President's Commission on Unemployment Relief 1734 New York Avenue, Washington D.C. [to] Lieutenant John B. Barrett c/o Postmaster Seattle, Washington USS TULSA Asiatic Station Dear Jack,- I'm anxious to do anything possible to assure your making the grade on your promotion. I know that under ordinary circumstances there would be no difficulty, but this economy move struck me as a possible interference. I'm here in Washington for reasons I'll soon tell you, and I think I'm in a position to get things done. Senator Walsh of Massachusetts is on the Naval committee of the Senate. Tell me immediately when the time is right, and I'll see that there is everything done possible. Since the first of March I've been loaned by the Metropolitan to President Hoover's committee on unemployment. At first I was working under Colonel Woods, -now under Mr. Gifford, President of American Telephone and Telegraph Company. My job is to bring out any ideas which will make for greater stability of employment and for better future planning against such depressions as the present. I've had interviews with everybody worthwhile so it seems in the country - I had a fine talk with President Hoover - about twenty minutes in his office - then referred to his confidential advisor for a further thirty minute talk. I appeared before the LaFollette Committee of the Senate as representative of the president's committee. It's been lots of fun, and I've enjoyed every minute, although there's plenty of work trying to hold down two jobs. From the foregoing I'd like to see what we could do down here to be sure you get that half-stripe. I'll do anything you suggest. I'll go to Senator Walsh right away after hearing from you and tell him what we'd like done, and I'm pretty sure we can get it. If necessary, cable me the time when - at my New York office. Everything at home has been fine. They enjoy, as I do, hearing from you, and I know it would add ten years to Pa's life if we could tell him that you had made the promotion - besides everybody else is expecting you to make it. I'm back in New York for this week, and I'll close now and expect to hear from you soon. Regards, Bill" [John Barrett note: Jack consistently told Bill that the Navy resented any political efforts at influence on promotions or assignments, and that they usually backfired. Nonetheless, he appreciated Bill's sincere friendly intentions, especially as regards the possible effect on their elderly father. The issue came up again in 1938,when Jack was ordered to serve as Executive Officer on the tanker TRINITY, traveling to PHilippines and East Indies. Bill argued that it would be traumatic for their then eighty-three year old recently widowed father to be separated from Jack, Sophie, and his two-year-old grandson. Nonetheless Jack wanted sea duty and urged Bill not to interfere.] [p 66]postmark November 23, 1933 The Shoreham, Washington, D.C. [to] Lieutenant Commander John B. Barrett USS HANNIBAL Navy Yard Norfolk, Virginia Dear Jack, I received the Army-Navy tickets, and they are very good. I got tickets fort the Princeton game and went last Saturday. They were also excellent. Had a nice interlude after the game as Doug Brown a Princeton professor asked us to come to tea after the game at his home- just what you need after sitting out in the cold. Also, the nice box of candy arrived, for which I thank Sophie and you - here again I have no manners for not telling you long ago. I had planned to go to Boston after the Princeton game, but certain changes down here made it necessary to come back right away. I think I'll go up there this weekend after Thanksgiving. This work down here will probably end as far as I'm concerned about December 15. It's sure a merry whirl now, with lots and lots of activity. I want to get down to Norfolk soon and had hoped to before this. Last Saturday was the first I've had off for ages. Some Navy Lieutenant from your ship called me last night. I tried to tyake him to lunch, but he was apparently too pre-occupied. It's time to go to work. Regards to Sophie. Bill" [SOPHIE note: This letter seems to prove that Jack and Sophie went to Norfolk in the fall of 1933. We stayed at the Heart of Ghent Hotel in Norfolk- then lived in an apartment in Portsmouth, where Pa Barrett visited, also Mollie Barrett and Eileen Lane. At the Heart of Ghent we saw Bill Keester and Mrs. Keester of the Coast Guard, and visited them at their home in Norfolk soon after - then we moved to Portsmouth. On Christmas Day 1933 we were at 640 East Seventh Street, South Boston - stayed four days- and then were at Geetters' in New Britain New Years Eve 1933 and New Years Day 1934. We returned to Portsmouth the day after New Years Day. I remember stopping at the Shoreham in Washington to see Bill for lunch on our way down to Norfolk in the Buick in the fall. He had been loaned to the National Recovery Administration NRA by the Met and was offered a full time job in the Roosevelt administration but preferred to return to the Met.There was also a letter from Captain John Nelson at Boston Navy Yard to Jack on the HANNIBAL in Norfolk in the fall of 1933 and he sent regards to me. Captain Nelson was Jack's immediate superior at Boston Naval Shipyard 1932-1933.] [p34] New York City January 22, 1935 Dear Jack and Sophie, Sophie, if you'll let me know the exact silver you want, I'll get you quotations. My friend says that he can get the real inside at Gorham's, so all I'll have to supply is the patterns and quantities. I see by the papers that you all have arrived at your stations. I was home over the weekend, and the Times of Saturday announced the arrival of the HANNIBAL at Balboa. Everyone is fine at home. They are still talking of how much they enjoyed your visit- Pa is talking so much of Sophie that I think we have just cause to be jealous. Skippy was asking for you and semed to wonder why she didn't get more food from the seat against the wall at the kitchen table. I am enclosing [William] Perry's address [master of Lincoln school] but I know it's too late as Jack always rushes off and writes immediately about state troopers who rescue him in the rain - and why --- Perry's address is 49 Addington Avenue Brookline, Massachusetts, and he always was so fond of "Reddy". Shall I tell him to expect the letter? How is the Canal looking this year? Let's hear, but mostly, let's know how's everything. -Bill" [p53] to Lieutenant Commander J.B. Barrett USS CLAXTON c/o postmaster New York [from] Milwaukee August 11, 1936 Dear Jack, I've wired you from here today but wasn't quite sure where you'd be, so this letter. I'm on one of the U.S. Steel lake cargo boats - five hundred foot, carrying coal Detroit to Milwaukee this trip. I'm guest of Fred Erb of Detroit. It's been a beautiful trip and a wonderful vacation. Now - to get to the point. It is most important, if you can arrange it, in any way that Mr. Fred Erb get aboard the boat for the trip you are fixing for me. I'd like to have him along, and I know he'd love to go. He is the President of Eaton Erb Company of Detroit, an important subsidiary of the Eaton Manufacturing Company of Cleveland. He is a prominent citizen of Detroit and a great friend of mine.In fact, he is largely responsible for the success of the foundry survey - my first job with the Met, which I think had a lot to do with my getting known in the company. What I'd like to have is that he and I board the CLAXTON at New York Monday August 24, 1936 and go back to Norfolk and Annapolis with you. If at all possible, do this favor for me. If you get an answer before Friday, wire me c/o Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Group Division, General Motors Building, Detroit. I expect to be back there Thursday. I'm returning to New York Monday August 17. See you next week. Regards, Bill" [p 51]"July 1, 1942 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company William J. Barrett, manager Policy Service Bureau [to] Fourteenth Naval District Honolulu Hawaii, Dear Jack, I have been planning for so long to write you a letter that I am going to have to dictate it if I expect to get it to you soon. You will please excuse this. Today Mr. Frank Midkiff came in to see me at your suggestion, and I very much enjoyed my visit with him. He is an extremely well informed individual, and in fact he is well acquainted with a lot of my personal friends. We had all too short a visit. I had hoped that he could stay a little longer, but apparently having such a brief time in this country, he has practically every minute taken. It was interesting to hear that you have been asigned with Admiral Bagley. This must make it very pleasant for you. I was up home recently and found everything in good shape. Pa is holding up very well. In fact, I found him much better than I thought he would be in view of the apparent shocks which he suffered last year. He is naturally weak now and is very restive at the fact that he cannot do what he used to do, but under the circumstances I think he is in pretty good shape. We bought a house in Darien as I felt it was most advisable to hedge against what is to come and to know exactly where I was as far as the rental factor was concerned. This is not as large a piece of land as the other house, but has about an acre. It is a more practical house in many respects. I received your photographs and was very happy to see everyone looking so well. I learned tht your furniture is in Boston, and I understand that it is still on the pier, apparently there being no instructions as to what storage place to put it in. If there is anything I can do, let me know. Best regards to Sophie and John. As ever, Bill." [p.138] 1951 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company newspaper heading: William J. Barrett named Secretary picture of Bill in write-up.William J. Barrett, formerly Third Vice President was appointed Secretary of the Company on August 25th to fill the vacancy which occurred when James R. Herman passed away on July ninth. In announcing the appointment, the President said that Mr. Barrett will continue to head the Publications Division in his new capacity. He will also have responsibility for the operation and management of the Investigation Division, Filing and Tracing Division, Inquiry and Information Bureau, Mail Division, Supply Division, Transcription Division, Bronxville Hall of Records, and Kingston Hall of Records and will have Assistant Secretary Broadbent associated with him in the management of these units. In addition the Library, formerly under the supervision of the Health and Welfare Division will be transferred to the Secretary's office. Mr. Barrett joined the Company in 1923 as a member of the Policy Holders Service Bureau staff and rose to become Manager ten years later. In 1942 he was appointed an Officer of the Company with the title of Assistant Secretary. He became Assistant Vice President in 1944 and a Third Vice President in 1947. LAW OF WAR KELLOGG - BRIAND TREATY 1928 NUREMBERG trials 1946 Jack Barrett International Law study - Father Robert Drinan human rights leadership --- Nov 28, 2000 essay-by John Barrett -- AvalonProjectYaleLawSchoolNurembergTrials1945-6 To: PAULKAVA@aol.com, jgeetter@law.harvard.edu, naturalbuz@aol.com, JONPOLLACK@aol.com CC: drinan@law.georgetown.edu, R_Holloway@Brown.edu, HUGOPF@aol.com, walshth@bingham.com, bresnajj@bingham.com, socrates1978@hotmail.com, seanroot420@yahoo.com, pbeatty@earthlink.net, nath@fcs.net, jimu@ccilink.com, erobertowen@hotmail.com, thooper539@aol.com, jamesfsullivan@yahoo.com, winthrop@frontiernet.net, newtond@rferl.org, ellabanton@hotmail.com, MURPHYR4@Polaroid.com, flaggm@BC.edu Add Addresses Copies for Paul Kavanaugh, Jennifer Geetter, Tom Walsh, Jerry Bresnahan, Hugo Pfaltz, Rev. Robert Drinan, S.J., Paul Beatty, Ross Holloway, Eric Madsen, Martin Hersey, and probably others-John Barrett I do a lot of military history with my classmate General Paul Kavanaugh U.S. Army retired,whom I visited Nov 12-16, 1999 in Fairfax, Virginia.My father twice took International Law courses - 1923-4 at Naval War College, Newport Rhode Island, and during 1951-3 in masters course at Northeastern Law School Boston, where Louis Sohn's World Law text was used and Nuremberg trials were discussed. In 1958-9 I took Harold Berman's "Comparison of Soviet and American Law" at Harvard Law School and the next year his International Trade seminar [where I did a paper on General Average inmaritime law.] In 1962 I was a reference librarian at Boston College Law School, where I looked up much material for then-Dean Robert F. Drinan, who has become a major authority on human rights and arms control and has written on Nuremberg - active in 1977 Helsinki Human Rights effort and in recent years at Georgetown Univerrsity Law School. -John Barrett From John Barrett some notes relating to Nuremberg War Crimes Trials 1945-6- I found some materials on the 1945-6 Nuremberg War Crimes trials on the Internet. "The Avalon Project at the Yale Law School" cites some early historical precedents from Vittoria, Grotius, Moser are of interest. I was especially interested in the bearing of the 1928 Kellogg-Briand treaties outlawing war -- they were generally ridiculed as ineffective when adopted and up to and through the World War 2 era, but they were an important basis of the legal theory of the Nuremberg trials and those in Japan. France and Germany had signed them, so lawyers for Nazi defendants could not plead ignorance. As my father was well acquainted through a family connection with President Calvin Coolidge's longtime friend and press aide John Lambert {Hearst newspaperman native of Portsmouth New Hampshire] - I was interested to find out whether President Coolidge had a personal role in the treaty--- one Internet source lists the Kellogg-Briand Treaty as a major accomplishment of his administration -- but another indicates that the initiative came from French diplomat Aristide Briand, who more or less circumvented American Secretary of State Kellogg, and made a direct appeal over his head to the American people - then popular opinion forced the diplmats to go along. Naval authorities felt that ship limitations were imbalanced, as the United States scrapped existing ships and was forced into bad designs for new ones while Britain and other powers simply promised not to build ships they could not afford anyway. However, the outlawing of war was a step toward modern theory. One drawback is that it deals entirely in terms of sovereign states, without looking at conditions for human rights within those states,and nationality-ethnic questions - in many regions of the world subject colonial peoples had boundaries forced upon them by European colonial powers without their consent - they were prepared to fight for change. Israel had a difficult time establishing its right to exist 1947 in the wake of opposition from British diplomats under Atlee and the American Secretary of State George Marshall- many African peoples are willing to fight to throw off borders established by colonial diplomats far away - Tibet was not consulted when colonial diplomats made it part of China now Chechnyans when they were lumped inside Russia. Native Americans and Canadians, and peoples of Brazil and Siberia were not consulted when their lands were swallowed by major 'powers'. Around 1889 Brazil had a very skilled diplomat who managed to annex a great many border peoples of diverse ethnicity who were not consulted. This may have been a lesser evil in conparison with the mass casualities of the Paraguay-Bolivia war. This is a rather quick E mail draft that may be revised - the Kellogg - Briand Treaty is a noteworthy event, but in 1980s and 1990s human rights within borders is being re-examined, rather than the exaltation of the absolute sovereignty of states. -John Barrett


 

1075.
p 54-1075

 

Sophie Barrett at 1953 Roxbury Latin graduation. NOTEBOOK IV-[p91] August 23, 1922 Hotel William-Wallion? Philadelphia [to] Miss Catherine Miley, Dorchester Dearest Catherine, My address will be 508 S. 44th Street instead of Ardmore. I liked Ardmore very much indeed, but it has now served its purpose, and I am moving back where things are more convenient. As for business matters, I have decided not to enter the brass foundry business. First, because to operate as we could, there wouldn't be enough money in it for the effort expended. Second, To secure equipment to operate in production - production machines would require thre times as much capital as we have. Third A study of the costs at the foundry I was to take over, and talks with people intimately associated with the business convinced me that to enter the business would give one the privilege of working for oneself as a moulder and earning a moulder's pay only. I talked with the President of the Ajax Smelting Company, the President of the Metal Manufacturers Association, and the head of a moulding machine manufacturing company, and they showed me by logical argument that under the conditions of competition found in Philadelphia - cutthroat in the brass game- I would save time, money, and worry by staying away. I could go on and show cost data to demonstrate the inadequacy of the charges possible with the competition,but the above is sufficient. But why did it look so favorable and everyone seem so enthusiastic- even people who were in a position to know - until these three men I struck at about the same time and who knew the game from A to Z? Evidently they [the others]did not know that due to the relatively small amount of capital required to enter the business, there are a large number of small shops, -seldom heard of- throughout the city and they are all out for business and will take it at almost any price. The head of Ajax said he did not know of any brass founder who had become rich from the business.While I was willing to dig in, I could not see moulding for the rest of my days. Everything considered, I concluded that it was best to stay out, even at the expense of ridicule, slams, and the like. But it hurt me and still does, for your sake, to give it up. However, I know now that it's the best thing. Now, as to the future. I shall occupy my time with Crane Packing, who have been good enough to say, 'Come on'. But I have put out lines in other directions and shall hold out until they materialize. Under the circumstances you may do as you think best in this matter of the future. I had hoped this would settle me on my way and expected it would work out so we could be on our way together. I know now that it would not. While this was indeed discouraging,I'm not down yet and don't intend to be.As soon as this disturbance is over with and I get settled, I'll let you know how things stand for the future if you care still.- Most affectionately yours, Bill." {Not long before this Bill had helped Jack withdraw stock proceeds from Fuller stock investment company in May or June 1922. Jack was at sea on the MARBLEHEAD, and the brokerage was slow in paying out for a stock he sold. Bill went around and collected the check, so Jack avoided losing his money in the bankruptcy.] 1922 Business Card of William J. barrett Sales Engineer 15 Park Row New York City. Crane Packing Company 1800 Cuyler Avenue Chiacgo. Foundries at Chicago, and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Manufacturers of John Crane Metallic Packings.[p72] "Washington, November 11, 1931 [from] William J. Barrett The President's Commission on Unemployment Relief 1734 New York Avenue, Washington D.C. [to] Lieutenant John B. Barrett c/o Postmaster Seattle, Washington USS TULSA Asiatic Station Dear Jack,- I'm anxious to do anything possible to assure your making the grade on your promotion. I know that under ordinary circumstances there would be no difficulty, but this economy move struck me as a possible interference. I'm here in Washington for reasons I'll soon tell you, and I think I'm in a position to get things done. Senator Walsh of Massachusetts is on the Naval committee of the Senate. Tell me immediately when the time is right, and I'll see that there is everything done possible. Since the first of March I've been loaned by the Metropolitan to President Hoover's committee on unemployment. At first I was working under Colonel Woods, -now under Mr. Gifford, President of American Telephone and Telegraph Company. My job is to bring out any ideas which will make for greater stability of employment and for better future planning against such depressions as the present. I've had interviews with everybody worthwhile so it seems in the country - I had a fine talk with President Hoover - about twenty minutes in his office - then referred to his confidential advisor for a further thirty minute talk. I appeared before the LaFollette Committee of the Senate as representative of the president's committee. It's been lots of fun, and I've enjoyed every minute, although there's plenty of work trying to hold down two jobs. From the foregoing I'd like to see what we could do down here to be sure you get that half-stripe. I'll do anything you suggest. I'll go to Senator Walsh right away after hearing from you and tell him what we'd like done, and I'm pretty sure we can get it. If necessary, cable me the time when - at my New York office. Everything at home has been fine. They enjoy, as I do, hearing from you, and I know it would add ten years to Pa's life if we could tell him that you had made the promotion - besides everybody else is expecting you to make it. I'm back in New York for this week, and I'll close now and expect to hear from you soon. Regards, Bill" [John Barrett note: Jack consistently told Bill that the Navy resented any political efforts at influence on promotions or assignments, and that they usually backfired. Nonetheless, he appreciated Bill's sincere friendly intentions, especially as regards the possible effect on their elderly father. The issue came up again in 1938,when Jack was ordered to serve as Executive Officer on the tanker TRINITY, traveling to PHilippines and East Indies. Bill argued that it would be traumatic for their then eighty-three year old recently widowed father to be separated from Jack, Sophie, and his two-year-old grandson. Nonetheless Jack wanted sea duty and urged Bill not to interfere.] [p 66]postmark November 23, 1933 The Shoreham, Washington, D.C. [to] Lieutenant Commander John B. Barrett USS HANNIBAL Navy Yard Norfolk, Virginia Dear Jack, I received the Army-Navy tickets, and they are very good. I got tickets for the Princeton game and went last Saturday. They were also excellent. Had a nice interlude after the game as Doug Brown a Princeton professor asked us to come to tea after the game at his home- just what you need after sitting out in the cold. Also, the nice box of candy arrived, for which I thank Sophie and you - here again I have no manners for not telling you long ago. I had planned to go to Boston after the Princeton game, but certain changes down here made it necessary to come back right away. I think I'll go up there this weekend after Thanksgiving. This work down here will probably end as far as I'm concerned about December 15. It's sure a merry whirl now, with lots and lots of activity. I want to get down to Norfolk soon and had hoped to before this. Last Saturday was the first I've had off for ages. Some Navy Lieutenant from your ship called me last night. I tried to take him to lunch, but he was apparently too pre-occupied. It's time to go to work. Regards to Sophie. Bill" [SOPHIE note: This letter seems to prove that Jack and Sophie went to Norfolk in the fall of 1933. We stayed at the Heart of Ghent Hotel in Norfolk- then lived in an apartment in Portsmouth, where Pa Barrett visited, also Mollie Barrett and Eileen Lane. At the Heart of Ghent we saw Bill Keester and Mrs. Keester of the Coast Guard, and visited them at their home in Norfolk soon after - then we moved to Portsmouth. On Christmas Day 1933 we were at 640 East Seventh Street, South Boston - stayed four days- and then were at Geetters' in New Britain New Years Eve 1933 and New Years Day 1934. We returned to Portsmouth the day after New Years Day. I remember stopping at the Shoreham in Washington to see Bill for lunch on our way down to Norfolk in the Buick in the fall. He had been loaned to the National Recovery Administration NRA by the Met and was offered a full time job in the Roosevelt administration but preferred to return to the Met.There was also a letter from Captain John Nelson at Boston Navy Yard to Jack on the HANNIBAL in Norfolk in the fall of 1933 and he sent regards to me. Captain Nelson was Jack's immediate superior at Boston Naval Shipyard 1932-1933.] [p34] New York City January 22, 1935 Dear Jack and Sophie, Sophie, if you'll let me know the exact silver you want, I'll get you quotations. My friend says that he can get the real inside at Gorham's, so all I'll have to supply is the patterns and quantities. I see by the papers that you all have arrived at your stations. I was home over the weekend, and the Times of Saturday announced the arrival of the HANNIBAL at Balboa. Everyone is fine at home. They are still talking of how much they enjoyed your visit- Pa is talking so much of Sophie that I think we have just cause to be jealous. Skippy was asking for you and semed to wonder why she didn't get more food from the seat against the wall at the kitchen table. I am enclosing [William] Perry's address [master of Lincoln school] but I know it's too late as Jack always rushes off and writes immediately about state troopers who rescue him in the rain - and why --- Perry's address is 49 Addington Avenue Brookline, Massachusetts, and he always was so fond of "Reddy". Shall I tell him to expect the letter? How is the Canal looking this year? Let's hear, but mostly, let's know how's everything. -Bill" [p53] to Lieutenant Commander J.B. Barrett USS CLAXTON c/o postmaster New York [from] Milwaukee August 11, 1936 Dear Jack, I've wired you from here today but wasn't quite sure where you'd be, so this letter. I'm on one of the U.S. Steel lake cargo boats - five hundred foot, carrying coal Detroit to Milwaukee this trip. I'm guest of Fred Erb of Detroit. It's been a beautiful trip and a wonderful vacation. Now - to get to the point. It is most important, if you can arrange it, in any way that Mr. Fred Erb get aboard the boat for the trip you are fixing for me. I'd like to have him along, and I know he'd love to go. He is the President of Eaton Erb Company of Detroit, an important subsidiary of the Eaton Manufacturing Company of Cleveland. He is a prominent citizen of Detroit and a great friend of mine.In fact, he is largely responsible for the success of the foundry survey - my first job with the Met, which I think had a lot to do with my getting known in the company. What I'd like to have is that he and I board the CLAXTON at New York Monday August 24, 1936 and go back to Norfolk and Annapolis with you. If at all possible, do this favor for me. If you get an answer before Friday, wire me c/o Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Group Division, General Motors Building, Detroit. I expect to be back there Thursday. I'm returning to New York Monday August 17. See you next week. Regards, Bill" [p 51]"July 1, 1942 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company William J. Barrett, manager Policy Service Bureau [to] Fourteenth Naval District Honolulu Hawaii, Dear Jack, I have been planning for so long to write you a letter that I am going to have to dictate it if I expect to get it to you soon. You will please excuse this. Today Mr. Frank Midkiff came in to see me at your suggestion, and I very much enjoyed my visit with him. He is an extremely well informed individual, and in fact he is well acquainted with a lot of my personal friends. We had all too short a visit. I had hoped that he could stay a little longer, but apparently having such a brief time in this country, he has practically every minute taken. It was interesting to hear that you have been asigned with Admiral Bagley. This must make it very pleasant for you. I was up home recently and found everything in good shape. Pa is holding up very well. In fact, I found him much better than I thought he would be in view of the apparent shocks which he suffered last year. He is naturally weak now and is very restive at the fact that he cannot do what he used to do, but under the circumstances I think he is in pretty good shape. We bought a house in Darien as I felt it was most advisable to hedge against what is to come and to know exactly where I was as far as the rental factor was concerned. This is not as large a piece of land as the other house, but has about an acre. It is a more practical house in many respects. I received your photographs and was very happy to see everyone looking so well. I learned tht your furniture is in Boston, and I understand that it is still on the pier, apparently there being no instructions as to what storage place to put it in. If there is anything I can do, let me know. Best regards to Sophie and John. As ever, Bill." [p.138] 1951 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company newspaper heading: William J. Barrett named Secretary picture of Bill in write-up.William J. Barrett, formerly Third Vice President was appointed Secretary of the Company on August 25th to fill the vacancy which occurred when James R. Herman passed away on July ninth. In announcing the appointment, the President said that Mr. Barrett will continue to head the Publications Division in his new capacity. He will also have responsibility for the operation and management of the Investigation Division, Filing and Tracing Division, Inquiry and Information Bureau, Mail Division, Supply Division, Transcription Division, Bronxville Hall of Records, and Kingston Hall of Records and will have Assistant Secretary Broadbent associated with him in the management of these units. In addition the Library, formerly under the supervision of the Health and Welfare Division will be transferred to the Secretary's office. Mr. Barrett joined the Company in 1923 as a member of the Policy Holders Service Bureau staff and rose to become Manager ten years later. In 1942 he was appointed an Officer of the Company with the title of Assistant Secretary. He became Assistant Vice President in 1944 and a Third Vice President in 1947.


 

1076.
p 54=1076 Sophie Barrett 1953

 

Notebook 5 p 164 surviving in photocopy Had grade one and two at Second North School, High Street Hartford. Then entered Brown School on Morgan and Market Streets in the third grade with Miss Murphy about 1910. Harold Fultz called Van Nagell "the best dressed man in the Navy" MARBLEHEAD Hamburg Germany Jan 22,1922 Postcard to JBB reached Charlestown South Carolina February 9 forwarded to USS WYOMING. Probably a WESTERNER crewman - perhaps Torkelson? Address James Finnerty 032 State St. Springfield MA Notebook 5 p 164


 


first letter Captain Frank Delahanty USN p 54-1077 }C{

 

#09 Delahanty letter On April ll, l970 (p. 485)Captain Delahanty wrote again (from 380 Elm Street Brockton Massachusetts) Dear John,your letter of April 2 was received & I shall endeavor to give you whatever information I have retained about the various persons & ships you mentioned.Regarding the ship: I have only a hazy recollection that there was an old time cruiser named the USS MONTGOMERY. but I do not recall anything about her.I have no recollection of the USS ANNISTON(MONTGOMERY was renamed ANNISTON- We learned a little about her from Captain Richardson who was aboard her with Jack during World War I,-Sophie Barrett note). The USS WYOMING had guns removed from two turrets.(Jack served on the battleship WYOMING from January l922 to June l923, when he left for the Junior War College course.) These turrets made excellent classrooms. After the removal of the guns, the USS WYOMING was assigned to the Training Squadron and was used on midshipmen summer cruises, and Naval Reserve training cruises in the fall of each year and during the winter and early spring was utilized on Marine Corps expeditionary training exercises.These exercises (in which Jack took part in early l936 at Culebra east of Puerto Rico on the destroyer CLAXTON) resulted in the development of the present Amphibious Forces and also in the development of landing craft, which were used extensively in World War II and since then.As the Naval Academy expanded there was insufficient capacity in the Training Squadron to handle the entire student body, and destroyers were utilized for summer cruises for the freshman class. In l935 when I went to the WYOMING, that ship and the ARKANSAS were in the training squadron, and they were later joined by the USS TEXAS & USS NEW YORK. The Naval War College (attended by Jack from July l923 to June 24 at Newport Rhode Island- the Junior Course of one year) During the early days of the Naval War College studies were confined to Policy, Naval Tactics, Naval Strategy,Logistics, and International Law. The staff consisted of senior officers with long training in the subject each one handled at that time.International law was handled by a professor from Harvard.In those days it was considered necessary for a Captain to be graduated from the Naval War College if he expected to have any chance of being selected to the rank of Rear Admiral Later on after my time a Junior course was established (taken by Jack in l923).and it consisted principally of students in the rank of Commander and Lieutenant Commander. In the Junior course I believe the course was expanded to include Ordinance and perhaps a little engineering.The courses of the War College were intensive and required long hours of study.During my time it was conducted much along the line of the Harvard Graduate School of Business (case method with student recitation). Problems in the various subjects were issued, and each student had to submit a written solution. After the solutions were handed in,a critique was held under the direction of the Head of the Department.There was no hard and fast solution like the is in a problem in mathematics- but weak points in the various solutions were pointed out, and each member of the class could comment on them verbally. Also each student had to submit a thesis on Policy, Strategy, and Tactics. (We still have a copy of Jack's thesis on Strategy and Tactics.It centered on the Battle of Jutland in World War I, one of the largest Naval Battles in history, where the Germans damaged more British shipping than they incurred themselves, but they did not decisively break the British blockade. The central Admiralty tried to over-manage details of tactics - communications were chaotic, and British Admirals were overcautious & let German ships escape when they were highly vulnerable. Jack also analyzed the naval tactics of Horatio Nelson,) The end result of the training was a sort of regimented thinking, -so that a subordinate would think and act in a given situation in the same way that his superior commander would. That system permitted the Commander in chief to issue campaign orders without detailed instructions.The familiar order in the War College was, "Seek out and destroy." This of course was prefaced by a statement of enemy forces present location and probable disposition.The solution entailed first a determination of scouting and screening operations which the student had to develop.The problem was of a strategic nature and stopped upon contact with the enemy, when it became a tactical problem. The tactical problem was finally worked out on a game board. The game was manned principally by the staff of the college.The participants on each side were excluded from the game board room.They were not aware of what the enemy was doing until their side suffered loss or damage.For example one side would advise that they had opened gunfire with sixteen inch guns on the enemy or had launched a torpedo attack by certain ships against the enemy.The umpires showed a table which showed how much damage or loss would be inflicted by the method of attack.The umpires shook dice to determine what effect the attack had.This method was developed scientifically and was based on records that showed that torpedoes, for instance, proved to be "duds" and did not reach their targets in a certain number of instances out of one hundred firings.Then by shaking the dice, they determined whether or not it sank the ship.Today the war games are conducted with electronic equipment.The War College operated on the theory that writing makes an exact man, and as a consequence all students had to do considerable writing Therefore the War College probably has considerable writing by your father (we have a copy of his thesis).I do not recall anyone who was at the War College in l923-l924 other than a few of the civilian staff who have long since passed away. (Note by John Barrett-The emphasis mentioned by Captain Delahanty on the offense "Seek and destroy the enemy" had serious disadvantages in World War II in situations such as Pearl Harbor l94l, where Admiral Kimmel failed to take defensive measures in port, though he planned a spirited counterattack at Wake Island, which was cancelled when he was relieved of command - also Guadalcanal where Captain Fletcher removed his carriers quickly, leaving Marine amphibious force in great danger, and at the Battle of Leyte Gulf October l944, where the Japanese correctly anticipated that Admiral Halsey would go north to try to destroy their carriers, though they had few remaining planes -MacArthur's large amphibious operation landing on Leyte was in grave danger, but heroic escort carriers saved the day, and luck, & the attrition & exhaustion the Japanese had encountered coming up from Brunei through shallow straits near Palawan, where submarines sank large Japanese warships. Jack Barrett learned the maxim, "The best defense is a vigorous offense, but in these situations defense of amphibious operations & shore facilities sometimes proved wiser than traditional "Search and destroy tactics).Delahanty letter continued: Puleston: As I recall it, his initials were W.D.I knew him at the Naval War College & last saw him in l942 He was then retired & living in Washington.(He was Jack's Executive Officer on the battleship WYOMING l922-3 & a severe critic of Winston Churchill & the Gallipoli campaign World War I - one of his Naval Institute magazine articles l920's concluded, "Even the British empire could not survive another Winston Churchill.")He & I went to Ware Massachusetts to officiate awarding a Navy "E" to the Hampden & Ware Woolen Mills.He wanted to start ahead of time to visit with some friends in Connecticut & he wanted me to go along with him.He wrote considerable matter for the Naval Institute (magazine) & for military publications. He had a sharp mind & a sharp tongue & was very definite in his determinations.He was most decisive. When we were going to Ware,the Board of Naval Awards had a Public Relations section & they gave us the speeches we were to make. I did not like mine too well, and when Puleston came around I asked him how he liked the speech that they had prepared for him. He said, "I read it and threw it in the wastebasket." I would have liked to do the same thing but did not dare.However, I noticed the Board of Awards did not again invite him to represent them.I know he died a few years ago as I read of his death in the Armed Forces Journal. He was not exactly popular although I always got along with him- but I imagine it would be a little bit tough serving under his command. Holloway Frost (author of leading text on "The Battle of Jutland")I knew him at the Naval War College.He was an introspective type & had little to say, but he was considered to have a great potential as an expert on scouting & screening. I thought he would eventually be outstanding & would succeed Admiral Pye as an authority on scouting & screening. but he sort of passed out of the picture, & I recollected reading his death notice but I do not recall when it was (l937 at age 47).Admiral Yarnell (Just before World War II he was Commander in chief in the Asiatic Fleet & went to consult my friend MT Liang in Tientsin -Sophie Barrett note). I knew Adm. Yarnell very well.He was everything that a gentleman should be.He was most courteous,kind, considerate,a hard worker & a student. I knew him first at the Naval War College,then as Chief of Staff in the Destroyer force,Scouting Fleet, & last saw him in l939 when he was returning from C-in-C Asiatic to report as Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics.Then he stopped in for a few minutes to --p. 472 say hello to me in Washington in late l94l or early l942. He lived in Newport after his retirement & died in the l950's as I recall it.Harry Badt.(Jack's lifelong friend in the Navy).I knew Harry Badt very well as he & I served on the Naval uniform Board in Washington in l94l & l942. He later went to Geneva, New York as commanding officer of the Naval Training Station there. Harry was a native of Washington (DC) & was Jewish...He had command of a cruiser before we got into World War II & he picked up survivors of an English liner, which had been sunk by a German sub.He brought the survivors into New York & the Jewish people of New York put on a big dinner for him,& it was given wide publicity.Up to that time the Navy was known as "The Silent Service" & getting in the public eye, particularly through speech-making was considered a cardinal sin.Harry was made a Commodore while at Geneva. He was a fine person, & although I never served with him except in Washington, I am sure he was a very capable naval officer. Charleston South Carolina has a good harbor.As I recall it destroyers were tied up in groups of three, not only in the harbor,which got pretty rough at times but also in the Cooper River and in another river - I think it was the North River. The one hundred five ships in the Destroyer Force included destroyers, tenders, and tankers.Admiral Ghormley (whom Jack knew well at Pearl Harbor) I do not recall when or where I first met him. He had the command in the South Pacific and was relieved in (October) l942 by Admiral Halsey.As I recall it, things were not going so well out there- not because of anything Admiral Ghormley did or didn't do but because the people, particularly in new Zealand wee getting jittery and fearful that the Japs would invade New Zealand. I saw Admiral Ghormley in Washington upon his return, when he sought my help in getting things straightened out about his uniforms. Admiral Sellers: I knew Admiral Sellers at the Naval War College when he was a Captain.He was personally pleasant and appeared to have a keen perception of things.Smedley Butler: I met Smedley Butler first in l923 at Quantico just before he got a leave of absence from the Marines so that he could take up the duties of Director of Public Safety in Philadelphia. Our ship was in Quantico preparatory to taking the Marines on a landing force exercise.Our Dr. Dreifuss had been at Quantico previously, and I went with him to call on General Butler. He was a flamboyant character who ruled with an iron hand. All the Marines were afraid of him. In my opinion he had common sense and had little use for anyone who did not have common sense.He ended up in Philadelphia fighting with the politicians. (John Barrett note - Butler returned to active duty & played major role at Shanghai l927 when Jack was there and in l928 at Tientsin and in North China. He was scheduled to command the Marine Corps but Herbert Hoover disliked him and used his l930 criticisms of Benito Mussolini as an excuse to retire Butler.In retirement l930's Butler criticized overuse of marines to advance commercial interests in the Carribean. He also exposed a Nazi conspiracy for violence aimed at President Roosevelt and Congress,which had duped some prominent Americans into statements of support.He selected sites for Marine bases at San Diego and Quantico, Virginia and consulted surviving Civil War and Confederate veterans in re-enactments of Civil War battles near.Quantico. His father a Republican Congressman from Philadelphia had a key assignment on the committee controlling Navy and Marine Appropriations.Our friend Anita Douredoure commented recollect ing him in one of her letters.)The manager of the Officers Club at Pearl Harbor had been Assistant Manager of the Mayflower Hotel in Washington and Manager of the Hershey Hotel in Hershey Pennsylvania.He was later borrowed by Getty the oil man for use in planning a millionaires' club in Hawaii and later became manager of that club.He was a very capable hotel man who was a Reservist on active duty with the Navy and went on inactive duty to take over as Manager of the Officers Club.Admiral Richardson (In command of the Pacific FLeet before Admiral Kimmel and relieved by President Roosevelt January l941 for objecting to the concentration of the Fleet at Pearl Harbor, especially on weekends.) I knew Admiral Richardson very well. As I told you,I served in Europe with him and subsequently saw him many times.The last time I saw him was at a luncheon in Washington in l951.He came FROM TEXAS AND WAS SORT OF LACONIC. HE ALWAYS REMINDED ME OF A BIG HORSE TRADER.He had a nice sense of humor and more practical sense than you would find in a carload of people.Julius Neuberger- He was an eye doctor in the Navy and widely known. He was Jewish, a great humanitarian and a man well diversified in his profession.He was one of the first- if not the first in this country to qualify for aviation medicine.He was also one of the first to qualify in plastic surgery.He made a trip on the WYOMING when I was on it. He went over to Europe to attend an aviation medicine conference, spent the summer in Europe and came back with us.It was either l935 or l936. He would provide medical service to his friends regardless of where they were.Unfortunately, he always let the news get in the newspapers, and I always felt that was the reason he was passed over for promotion. (He was Captain - Jack visited Dr.Neuberger at Newport about l963, and Dr. Neuberger recommended "Stuartinic", a B vitamin preparation).Tipton Woodward (paymaster when Jack was on TULSA l930-l93l I knew him first in l92l when he was stationed on destroyers at Charleston (South Carolina). I probably saw him on various occasions until I went to Washington in l933 -and he was on duty at the Gun Factory there.He was a member of a study group I organized.Then he was on duty in Washington when I went back there in l939.Jayne's "Fighting Ships" will provide authentic information regarding U.S. Navy ships.Cruisers are a thing of the past- like the battleships. Destroyers have grown in size and speed until they seem to have made the cruiser obsolete.-Frank Delahanty."(Frank Delahanty;'s first cousin Edna Delahanty was a l9l9 to l923 classmate of Sophie Meranski Barrett at Mount Holyoke College. She and her sister Sarah grew up in Fall River Massachusetts and lived near the Barretts in Jamaica Plain in the l960's and l970's. Sophie saw Edna at Mount Holyoke college reunions l978 & l983. Edna was a baseball fan. This friendship lead to a close relation with Frank Delahanty and his wife Sue. Sophie and john visited them at their Brockton home in l970 when Frank was recovering from heart trouble.


 


Captain FRANK DELAHANTY letters second part }C{ p 54-1078

 

This was excerpt #10 on E mail--3:17:03 -0700 (PDT) p. 474 Ch. 26 Letters & Papers & Interviews - In researching material for these memoirs we read many letters and other papers wihch Jack had saved and we also received hundreds of letters from his friends and shipmates in reply to our detailed inquiries.Most of the letters or the material contained in them appear in this account, but some of them are not included.Since they reflect so much about Jack, about the years of his activities, and about the lives of many of his contemporaries, we are including them as a final chapter, iincluding only material not previously covered. #10 Delahanty letters February l9, and March 3l,l970 Captain Frank Delahanty now lives in Brockton, Massachusetts.For many years he was Jack's good friend in the Supply Corps and he and his wife Sue are mentioned in these memoirs as occasion warranted. On February l9, l970 he wrote,: Dear John: I hope you will not judge me to be careless in answering letters. I had a severe heart attack on November l5 last year and was immediately taken to the Cardinal Cushing hospital, where I spent a month. I was returned home by ambulance on December l5 and have had several setbacks since then. My age - seventy-nine -does not help me, and I was probably getting too much medication. Right now after discontinuing all the medication except the digitalis, I feel that I am improving.I knew several of those you mentioned in your letter- some very well and some not so well- but most of them have passed away.One whom I know well and who is still living is Lloyd A. Straits- retired Commander- of Fort Lauderdale Florida. He served on the USS TOUCEY with your dad, and I am sure he can provide you with much detail about that service.In a week or ten days I should be much better, and I hope then to break out my typewriter and give you a detailed breakdown of everything I can recall regarding your Dad and those you mentioned in your letter.We were saddened to learn of your Dad's demise, and we offer our sincere sympathy.On March 3l, l970 Captain Delahanty wrote again: "Dear John, I am sorry it took me so long to get around to replying to your letter,but it has taken me a long time to recover from that heart attack. First I was surprised to learn that the Bureau of Personnel in the Navy Department charges a fee for furnishing an address. I had Lloyd Strait's address as we have exchanged Christmas cards down through the years.I knew him first at Newport during the early part of World War I. While I was stationed in New York (Brooklyn) in early l930, he was in New York and accumulated a small fortune playing the stock market.He had no occupation and daily stood over a stock ticker and did very well until the tide turned on him.He came over to Brooklyn and had dinner with us every Sunday.Finally he told me that he had only seventeen thousand dollars left and that very good law office furniture could be bought at ridiculously low prices.He bought an outfit of law office furniture and shipped it to Ashland, Ohio and went out there and opened a law office.After World War I he got out of the Navy and went out on Shipping Board vessels as an engineering officer, but prior to going into merchant shipping he took and completed a course in law and for a while practiced law in columbia Georgia. He stayed in Ashland and practiced law for some time. He had a Congressman friend and occasionally came to Washington to see him.We reported to Washington in july l939, and he visited with us occasionally.In l941 he told me he wanted to get back in the navy,and I had him come in and got him assigned to the Office of Naval Operations, where he stayed for some time, and then became Judge Advocate of the General Court Martial Board at the Washington Navy Yard.(at the Naval Gun Factory).During late l942 or early l943 he married a girl from Ashland, Ohio.Since his retirement he has spent most of the year in Florida, but I think he goes to Ohio now for the summer.I knew many of the officers you mentioned in your first letter and some of them of course, better than others.Most of these officers have passed away.: William D> Puleston, William Calhoun,Woodward, Admiral Ghormley,Holloway Frost, George Crapo, Adolphus Andrews, David Sellers,and Dr. Julius Neuberger.I knew the following but not so well as those mentioned in the previous sentence: H>B> Price,(with Jack in command of WYOMING) CB>Carey with Jack on TRUXTUN l929 in Philippines), Edward P. Beach (on WYOMING with Jack l922-3) Martin Derx (Port Director at Pearl Harbor World War II) and Commander Keliher (commanded TRUXTUN l929-30 after Carey).I also knew Dr. James B. Moloney as he was on duty in the Dispensary at the Boston Shipyard while I was Supply Officer of the Yard.Your father told me that he grew up with him in South Boston.I first met your father in Charlestgon, South Carolina when he was on the TOUCEY. I was on the stasff of Admiral Ashley H. Robertson, who was in command of the Destroyer Force, which had about one hundred five ships- three of them tenders. I do not recall just where I met him. I knew Lyods Straits well, and it is likely he brought your Dad over to the flagship USS ROCHESTER to visit me- or I might possibly have met him whiole ashore.Then I think it was l935 while I was on the USS WYOMING we got an apartment on North Street in Portsmouth, Virginia. Your Dad was on the HANNIBAL at that time and had an apartment in the same building. It was there that we first met you mother. She saw the name Delahanty on the doorbell and called to see my wife to see if she was related to Edna Delahanty, who was a classmate of hers at Mount Holyoke (Edna and Frank are first cousins with backgrounds in Fall River, Massachusetts).In l936 I was still on the WYOMING when you mentioned that I got a pair of shoes for your Dad while he was on the CLAXTON (Frank was supposed to pick up a pair of shoes repaired for Jack in Culebra, Puerto Rico, but they had been mailed to Jack at Norfolk.)I next saw you Dad while he was on the tanker TRINITY in l939. I was officer in charge at NAVDATO in San Pedro California and the TRINITY came into Terminal Island to load oil.Your Dad sent a message oveer to me, and I went over to see him.As I recall it,he was Executive Officer of the TRINITY. I wanted him to come up and have lunch with us, but he said he would never leave the ship while oil was being pumped aboard.I next recall seeing your Dad at Pearl Harbor in l946.He was in the Naval District, and I was on the straff of the Commander-in-Chief Pacific (Adm. Nimitz). My duties were concerned with Logistics, and I had practically no contact with the Naval District.As I recall it, on two occasions Admiral Towers sent me to represent him at a conference with Admiral Hall, the Distriuct Commandant, and his staff.I remember it because Admiral Hall was a Squadron Commander in the Destroyer Force back in l921,and I sent him a rather petualant dispatch, and he came over to complain about it and was curtly told by then Admiral Yarnell who was our chief of staff to do exactly what the dispatch ordered and not to forget that the tone of the dispatch was justified by the delinquency of his command.Admiral Hall had not forgotten either, since he remarked to me, that "You and I seem to conflict both here and in the past." However, he backed off this time, and my view prevailed.It concerned the appointment and fixing of salary for the Manager of the Officers Club.He was a parsimoious soul and wanted to pay a pitiful small salary. I told him for a cheap price we will be buying inefficiency- and an adequate salary will attract an efficient operator.I told Admiral Towers about it, and he said I was right, and if Hall would not agree, he would make him agree. While at Pearl Harbor, you were a small boy, may recall coming out to Pearl Harbor at Makalapa to spend a Sunday with us.I saw your Dad a few times while I was at Boston Navy Yard. He came in to see me.As I recall it, he came over to see Dr. Moloney and then came in to see me.As I recall your Dad, he was a loyal and devoted person of sterling character with an analytic mind, and he never hesitated to offer assistance whenever he felt it was needed. With regard to the TOUCEY I think your best bet for information is Lloyd Straits. I think your first step is to obtain a copy of your Dad's offfical record.His fitness reports would be signed by his Commanding Officer in each case and would reflect their official appraisal of you Dad.Also any commendations would appear in the record.You inquired about when I went into the Service.I was employed as an archivist at the Naval War College and on the advice of officers there I enrolled in the Naval Reserve.At that time the War College staff and the students there were the top calibre of the Navy.Admiral Sims was president of the College, and the staff compruised Vogelsang, Schofield, Yarnell, and Pye - all later distinguished Admirals.I appeared destined to spend the whole World War I in Newport, but through appeal to one of the ranking officers in Naval Operations whom I knew at the War College, I got assigned to sea duty.I went to Montreal to get an overseas vessel, and the officer in charge of that place decided to keep me there.I wrote again to the Officer in Naval Operations, and he pried me loose, and I spent about a year on a cargo carrier. On my return to the UUnited States in 1919,I requested discharge to inactive duty and went back to the War College.A captain with whom I had served pestered me to come back in the Service and to stop him from annoying me, I told him I would take the examination - which was scheduled shortly- for appointment in the United States Navy.I felt that I woulds not pass the examination, but I did; and orders were issued to me to report to the USS DIXIE. It was too quick, and I did nt knw just what to do , so I put in for two weeks active duty for training and went off for two weeks in destroyers.Upon my return I went to the dock at Newport and there met the Commanding Officer of the DIXIE. He wanted to know what happened to me, and I told him. He then told me that his ship carried two supply officers - it was a destroyer tender- and one was detached - this one I was supposed to relieve and the other one shortly thereafter was sent to the hospital, so he went over to see the chiief of Staff, Admiral Yarnell, whom I knew very well at the War College- and he told himn he would arrange the prompt replacement of the two supply officers, and when I reported to send me over to him.So he took me out to the ROCHESTER in his boat, and Captain Yarnell welcomed me on board and told me they had a nice assignment for me on the staff.Since I also knew Admiral Robertson at the War College, I was in familiar company.I had various duty I went from the ROCHESTER to take over tankers from the shipping Board at Mobile, Alabama.-then spent about nine months on a tanker.Then to a cargo carrier for a number of years. I went to the Philadelphia textile school for two years. then to a division of destropyers going to Europe for two years (the prize duty in the Navy at that time) but the European cruise was cut short due to the factthat the destroyers in the Division were the only ones with sufficient speed to act as plane guards for the (carriers) SARATOGAand LEXINGTOM+N. Captain Richardson - later Admiral Richardson who got fired l94l as Commander in Chief Pacific by Roosevelt for refusing to keep the Fleet in Pearl Harbor over weekends was the boss on the European cruise and thenwent to Washington for Bureau of Personnel duties.He picked out a good job for me as Officer in Charge of the Navy Motion Picture Exchange in New York. He did that over the protest of my Bureau, and when I learned about that four months later, I asked him to let me go where my Bureau decided to send me, and he did- but he said I would not like it, and he would keep a similar job open for me on the West Coast.I got ordredt th Nval upply Dept in Brooklyn and spent about four years there.I was due for sea orforeignduty, but Admiral Peoples with whom I was associated in New York got President roosevelt to order my transfer to Wasington. My orders to Guantanamo were cancelledand a few months later Admiral Peoples came down as Cief of Bureau.He later organized and acted as head of Division of Supplies(now the General Services Administration). He wanted me to go there as his assistant.I told him I wanted to stay in the Navy and I would like to go to sea. Admiral Hayne Ellis had stopped by to see me and told me there would be a vacancy on the WYOMING shortly, and he would like to have me there So I told AdmiralPeoples I would like the WYOMING, and that is what I got- and enjoyed it.From the WYOMING I went as officer in charge at NAVDATO San Pedro(the Naval Base of Los Angeles)- from there to the Bureau inWashington- from there to the South Pacific in l942, to PortsmouthShipyard New Hampshire in l944 and to CINCPAC Commander-in-Chief staffPearl Harbor in l946 and toi Boston in l948 and to retirement inl952.I really enjoyed all my duty,l but duty in Europe in destroyersjust carrying the Flag around was better that any "Cook's tour" that could be planned.I enjoyed every minute of my Naval career and do notregret one bit of it.We have done practically no travelling since Iretired. I saw "we". I travelled plenty while with Kelley. On one tripI was gone four and a half months and I visited every nuclear set-upin the country. For quite a while I had an office in Washington andwent down there every Tuesdayt morning and returned Fridayafternoon.If I have missed any information you requested, pleaseinform me as I would like to be of help.P>S> I knew Harry Badt verywell, but he died some time ago.I did not know Read Admiral JohnWegforth. If there is anything more you think I might be able to passalong to you, please give me a list of questions, and I'' try toanswer them. - Frank Delahanty -Captain United States Navy, Retired."


 


Second part letter on Esther Meranski p 54-1079

 

9 Jul 1998 14:51:11 -0700 (PDT) Subject: EstherMeranski & Sophie material from storage This morning I talked with Herb Gitlen,husband of Carol Jane, daughter of uncle Abe and Aunt Ethyle Meranski - new address 1551 Northeast 13th Terrace, Apartment 13, Jensen Beach, Florida 34957 telehpone (561) 225-2250. They moved from Newport Rhode Island about l995 or l996. There nephew Arnie Meranski - married younger son of Ted Meranski had written that they were in Jupeiter, Florida, - which was close enough so I was able to get their phone from telephone information, and Herb gave me their current address. I will be writing them.Arnie saw Darya Geetter in Denver this past winter, and got in touch with Herb and Carol also while they were vacationining in Puerto Vallarta, on west coast of Mexico, where they have gone for a number of years. Herb is 73 & retired. He says Ted Meranski is now also retired from Miami Beach Post Office and has moved to a new apartment I must get that new address also.Things are basically ok, though Herb and Carol's son Jess, who lives near them has had two setbacks: He is divorced, and his wife and child are back in (North?) Carolina and two Jess survived a sharkbite on his leg, which required plastic surgery but is now ok.I beleive daughter Andrea is also in the Jensen Beach area. I saw all four of the Gitlens Herb, Carol, Andrea, Jess at Newport l988 and keep in touch with them except recentlly have needed to get their address. Carol and Herb attended Buzzy and michael 's wedding in Hartford June 10, l96l, as did Aunt Esther, Aunt Bertha and Uncle Sam Pollack, Uncle "Pete" ("Izzy") and aunt Jen Meranski from Baltimore and Jack and Sophie Barrett and Jack's sister Mollie , who gave Buzzy a hummel. Aunt Esther I think gave Buzzy her nickname, which she still uses in her E mail;- naturalbuz@aol.com. i am sending this message both to her and to cousin Deborah - Recently I have received a lot of material that Ben Maleson of Jamaica Plain Boston kept in storage l996. One notebook feared lost has turned up. Buzzy will remember ivan McCormack of Salem New York, whose wife Ann Taylor sublet my mother a room at 27 Commerce St. Greenwich Village l927 to l930. Mother wrote Ivan many letters l969 until he passed away l977.Sometimesthese were made into round robins - a Meranski family tradtion, which Esther, Ben, Bertha, Pete and everyone participated in for many years.There was one very long letter about Esther's romance with her bookkeeping boss at H.L. Handy co then merged into Swift and co - her ffather did not approve as he was not Jewish. I will be sending two portions in this and a second E mail. Some addirtional material not yet typed tells about the young people - teenagers in the West roxbury neighborhood, who often did errands for Mother but hung in gangs of fiteen or twenty on our streetcorner and could be troublesome at times - the letter was written Nov 2 and tells about Halloween that year and recollection of l907 when Meranskis were on Lower East side New york - that part is not yet typed, as I have so much different material to work on. But read about Esther below and in continuation. In this note book there are replies of Ivan to my mother - she had written him that we had just learned l973 from Esther and Babe that their mother came from Brody, and Ivan sent some interesting information from Ukranian friends - "There once existed in the Kiev area a horse-back riding tribe known as the BRODNIKI which survived by fishing, hose trading and by thievery. The Brodniki welcomed the Mongols and a few centuries later fraternized with the Turks. This tribe was a forerunner of the Dneiper Cossacks.. Eventually the Ukraine became the fertile breadbasket of Europe." (August 29, l973 letter excerpt- Ivan was not Russian - name was a coincidence - he was mixed Irish, English, French, perhaps Scot- grewup on Michigan farm.)Another letter Sept 3, indicates that my mother wrote about her father - who Esther says came from Brest ("Brest-Litovsk") now in Belarus on east bank of Bug River, which is the Polish border and was old Austria-Russia border l800's.However, my mother recollected him talking about Odessa - he may simply have passed through en route to Turkey- Cairo,Egypt-New York- Hartford l880's, but my mother's account was that he spent time in Odessa. Uncorroborated, she recollected he had left home at age seventeen, which would be l882, a time of major persecution. At some point his emigration from Russia was "to avoid Army service" she said, but that may be a later episode, since histories suggest the big draft was a bit later in the l880's. This September 3, l973 letter of Ivan's indicates mother wrote that her father spoke of pogroms in the Odessa area when he was there that were a factor in his emigration. It was word of mouth - at least forty, probably fifty years after the conversations she remembered, but it might be possible to link up these recollections with historical accounts. I will be trying.I had not read this material before today.In this "Notebook # 8 there are letters of cousin Arthur Meranski, Mollie Aronson, Phil Dahlquist, Harold and Charlotte Fultz, which I will be working on for some time.One hundred eighty-four photos are now on website you can see by clicking on naturalbuz@aol.com Esther Meranski -l973 letter Sophie Barrett to Ivan McCormack Date: Thu, 02 Jul 1998 13:22:25 PDT Sophie Barrett letter to Ivan McCormack in Salem New York (Sophie sublet from Mrs. McCormack l927-l930 at 27Commerce St, Greenwich Village) (1973) November 2 Friday morning VITAMIN enclosed. Dear Ivan, As Esther's birthday approaches on the nineteenth of November it occurs to me that I have neglected her shamefully in my accounts of the four sisters in my family. That is unfaiur as she was as interesting as any of us-taller than the other three with jet black hair like my mother, jet black eyes and with a better figure than Bee, Babe or me.- and from an early age she mothered us as we were eight by birth and more than fourteen by additions of motherless children who actually lived with us.Esther had more close girl friends and boy friends than we did, and with the first money she earned she bought a piano for the family as well as a record player and many records - and paid for a telephone when so few people we knew had telephones that ours rarely rang.She did well professionally because she was smart and went to a fine business college for bookkeeping, typing, and shorthand- at which she was a whiz.But her first job was at Vogel and son,a Hartford wholesale grocer. To preserve their stock there was no heat in the place - not even in her office as the men wore overcoats and sweaters at worlk and warm gloves. It was a big, profitable business that Esther enjoyed,but because she had to do bookkeeping,typing and stenography, she couldn't wear gloves while working and got frostbitten hands as well as feet! He boss liked her, so she stayed despite the cold, but when she confided to her best girl friend that her married boss was trying to make love to her- that friend told my father, who would not let her rtrun to that job- not even to collect her pay and her sweater!Soon the business college got her a job at the H.L. Handy Company,-wholesale dealer in meats, poultry and eggs. In the (p.2) office was Charles Bardous the head bookkeeper, one other male bookkeeper, and Esther.She really liked that job, was a happy girl with a piano record player, telephone,and always treated us to "college ices" -sundaes of chocolate sauce and nuts and always had a pound box of chocolates in her bureau drawer.I used to steal a few candies, which she never complained about if she knew they were gone.One night Pete was reading in bed at age fifteen, and I said to him,"Don't drop those apple cores on the floor- throw them out."-And as he chewed Esther's candies, he replied with a gleam in his eye,"Sis, there are no cores in these apples!"Esther must have known we were eating her candies, but she never stopped us or let us know she realized we were at her drawer.And when I could not see how I could pay the colllege fees, Esther and Al told me to go ahead - they would meet the expenses! Esther gave me her suitcase, her winter coat, and a lot more , and Al took me right to my room at the college (September l9l9). =And Esther was at the station to see me off in HER best clothes I was wearing. In my freshman year she came to visit and won the hearts of my classmates, who gave supper parties in their rooms for her, and the house mother invited Esther to sit with her at the head table while I waited on that table for one hundred dollars that year.Esther was so proud of me as very few women from Hartford went to the five best women's colleges in those days- certainly none of our friends except one older one who went to Brown University in Providence (earlier) but was working in Washington when I was growing up. And when I came home, Esther had a grand job for me (l921) for the summer in HER office- so we walked to and from work together every day and across the street near the lad I eventually invited to my junior prom (p 3) for a fabulously delightful weekend- a prom date with a car and a tux of his own!I was blind to the charms of Esther because she never seemed to have men come to the house for a date but yet she went out every evening, and I thought she was walking with her girl friends - who by then had telephones.One night I went to an outdoor summer dance with a girl Esther's age and was startled when she told me she was sorry for Esther. Only then did I learn that Esther and her young boss in the office were deeply in love and had been for years, but Esther would not marry him.What I did not know is that my father REFUSED to allow it and would not let Charlie come to the house, so she met him every evening on Main Street - had no place to entertain himin any weather, and that bothered Esther's close friend, as Esther told her it would be Charlie Bardous or no one. My father objected to Charles only because he was not Jewish. This went on for years while Esther saw me through college after Al married, and then Esther began to see Pete through college and medical school and mother Babe when I was away and when my mother died.Even then my father would not see Charlie.H.L. Handy sold out to Swift and Company, soEsther and Charlie were transferred to a big office force where they were never alone. Charlie then lived w8ith his aged mother, who was as opposed to a Jewish daughter-in-law (beautiful and generous and wise and kind and musical and in love with Charlie to the exclusion )(p.4) of all other men) Julius Aronson loved her for years before he finally married Mollie at an advanced age.So it went on.My father died in l933, so Esther was free to follow her heart, but Charlie's mother stayed alive.- and by the time she grudgingly agreed that Esther could live with them Esther would not marry Charlie and live with that old witch -whom even Charlie thought to be a witch- and he supported her as his duty and not for love of her.Esther could not bring herself to live under the same roof as she knew the mother would make her true love's life miserable. That mother lived until she was close to one hundred (years).I don't know what finally happened to Charles as I was so rarely in Hartford- but Esther never dated dany other men! She went to live with Babe and with Geetter to help them with the five children when Geetter went to war.She lugged home the meat and eggs after work from Swift and Company and stayed with the five babies while Babe shopped in the evening- and helped with the washing and the housework in addition to her job. Geetter said to me, "I think so much of Esther I don't know which one I married - Babe or Esther." She was always "Nan" to the children and should have had a flock of her own! Now her birthday approaches- about seventy-nine and Geetter will send the the big yellow chrysanthemum he sends every year - the flowers that will still be fresh on Thanksgiving Day. Esther and I were very close, but never once did she breathe to me the sadness of her broken romance. Maybe now you will know why I was so secretive about my marriage (p5) Continued- I expect to E mail next portion in a few minutes to cousins Deborah and Thalia best wishes Deborah for trip to Sweden. -john Barrett Second part Nov 2,'73 Sophie letter to Ivan about Esther.p. five, l973 letter to Ivan McCormack on Esther, wtc. Thu, 02 Jul 1998 14:54:07 PDT l973 letter about Esther, Pa, Ben- p. 5 to Jack - an Irish Catholic and a devout one.I knew about Esther's broken romance with a Christian, and I feared for mine even though I learned about Esther's only from her best friend who later told me Esther wept bitterly often over my father's attitude before Charles ever told his mother about Esther.So I kept my marriage secret until I was about to sail, and then I did NOT go to Hartford to see my good Dad bfore I sailed.I did not want to see him hurt that his daughter who had been so sought after by fine Jewish men should marry a Christian- even one s fine as Jack Barrett. Esther's life had been ruined, and no one was going to ruin life forjack and me.I saw my father only once after that in l932 shortly before he died, but Jack was not with me.Pa ignored my marriage and made no effort to see me in Boston and died some months later (March 29, l933).All Hartford was there (at his funeral) to hear the rabbi say "David gave his life to the unfortunate in Hartford after the expense of his own chldren, who numbered eight by birth but countless by his big heart." Esther loved him always, so she disregarded Charlie's pleas that she elope with him as she had no desire to hurt Pa.What a person. Greater than I could ever hop[e to be. I was headstrong. Even when my father came to New York to urge me to accept Bill Nuremberg and to forget the charming but poor Irish naval officer of a different faith.He came to New York only to dissuade me from Jack long before Jack proposed.What I did not know was that Jack (p.6) went (December l928) to New Haven and to Hartford to inspect naval Reserves at the armories there, had found my brother Al's home had dinner there and left Al with the impression that he was seriously interested in me.Al told Pa, who came rushing to New York to put a stop to the nonsense.She had NOT met Jack but did meet him at your apartment (27 Commerce Street) the night he lost his money to thieves in the subway.There is no doubt Pa likedJack BUT vastly preferred Bill (Nuremberg) whom he had called on atGrand Central Building that afternoon without my knowledge or consent.The father watched his daughters closely - could run Esther, Bee, Babe but found me always headstrong attractive to the Italian and Irish boys.He moved away from 25 Morgan Street (l9l6) because of the attentions of Joe Paonessa- a rich builder's son from Holy Cross who lived across the street. And on Wooster Street he told Justin McCarthy a United States sailor, that his daughter could not go out with him and could NOT accept thebeaded bag Justin had brought to me all the way from the Mediterranean. Justin went off with that bag really scared, and I never saw him again.My father was very tall- powerful, and even an Irish sailor feared his wrath.He did likeSam Pollack Dr. Geetter, and his three good Jewish daughter-in-law! All (except Pete and Jen in Baltimore) were married in his living room except Babe, who was married in his summer home ("The Shack" or "Snug Harbor" near Windsor) with Jack present (June l6, l929).A really wonderful man of principle. He did not just blindly object to marriage outsidethe faith. He believed firmly that the chance o hapiness in mixed marriages was slight but p7 above all he believed such marriage a great injustice to the children.I had a very good father and a very good mother.I believe Esther would be the first to agree.Charles Bardous was not her only chance for happiness.Julius Aronson loved her, Jack Fine loved her,Charlie Rosenblatt loved her - all had sense enough to make happy marriages with other girls- all were successful, happy men - all would have made Esther happy,and my father knew it. But she was in love with Charlie when she knew himother objected and knew that after their elopement she would have to live with her as Charlie would never desert that mother who tied him so closely for her own support.He did not earn enough as one employed bookkeeper to support two households.She was happy (later) to live with Babe and Geetter and her five nieces and nephews who adore her as she appraoches her birthday on November l9. But isn't it strange that p8- she never talked to Bee or to me or to Babe about her broken rmance and that I never heard it discussed by any of my sisters or brothers? I got it in bits and piece from her friends and from my father.One of her friends married Julis Aronson and another close friend married Charles Rosenblatt.... Phil and Peggy Dahlquist loyally support (President +Nixon) Phil lied storeies about my family - please send this to him (Round robin letters were a Meranski family tradition - also among Mount Holyoke l23csmate and Sophie often sent round robin letters l970's to Ivan McCormack, Phil and Peggy Dahlquist, Admiral Stika USCG retired, to Sophie's nephew Col. Arthur Meranki in Abede Maryland, to Gertrude and Paul Rice in Pasadena and separately a group of HANNIBAL friends - Mary Boyd, Mary Ascherfeld, Adm. Visser, Captain Mercin Halstead, the Lehmans, Candlers, and others.) Of the others my father and mother cared for in their home I have only sketchy information except for Julius Aronson and Catherine Cooper, who for years I believed were my blood sister and brother. And Catherine married Sam Aronson! He was Julius's brother -9- who almost lived with us when his mother died but went home only to sleep as we had run out of bedspace! All of us slept two in a bed- four in a room, but we ran out of space even when my two oldest brothers Harry and Ben offered to sleep on the living room floor if my parents would only keep a few of their motherless friends. One day Al stepped on Ben's hand while Ben was sleeping on thefloor, and his hand was broken.Ben needed that hand to play the saxophone when he had the vaudeville bug at an early age and left the good job in the drug store and then added gray hairs to my father's fine head of jet black hair!My father put Ben out of the house for giving up that job.Then he sent me out with fod for Ben and shut his eyes when Ben sneaked in to bed at night! - And poor Pete had the earache, and Ma got Dr. Kates to come in. He asked her what she had done for the boy, and Ma said she had heated sweet oil and put a spoonful or two in the ear.The doctor turned on Ma - a very Jewish doctor and said, "I don't want no 'hoil' in 'dat h'ear."Poor Pete was in pain, but he roared laughing, and after that we would mimic"I don't want no 'hoil' in that h'ear." I forget what he prescribed, but he did clear it up. I suppose my mother could have clogged the ear andhurt the hearing permanently. When I was small my father owned a good-sized restaurant He had a big coal stove and loved to stand near it. At times one of his customers would brew tea- strong tea there and -p 10- put it into small bottles. he claimed to be a drug salesman. I learned later that he sold that tea as eye drops from his pack of patent medicines he sold to druggists. That was about 1909.(After recent Halloween activity in West Roxbury) I am remind of l907 the one year we lived on 27th Street in the heart of the East Side of New York city in the Panicof l906 when I was five or six.In terror I stood at the window on the second floor of the tenement house and watched the boys with long stockings - wmen's black- filled with fluor hit poor passing men and other boys across the back- hit them so hard white flour showed on their overcoats. I was petrified and did not go out all day. It was traditional thenn just as trick or treat is here.- Another portion of this letter not yet typed tells about young people in the West roxbury neighborhood - amusing stories- sometimes they would help, sometimes be unruly. A very long letter of seventeen legal-sized handwritten pages was originally sentto Ivan McCormack with instructions to send it along to Lt. Commander Phil Dahlquist (and Peggy) of Eugene Oregon but also Sophiecopied most of the historical portion later into Notebook eight. This is continuation of E mail sent about 2:30 Pacific Time July 9, l998 to Deboarh sonnenstrahl and Thalia Geetter Price.- cousi John Barrett. I hope you can follow this as manydetails are interesting, especially as Buzzy met Ivan McCormack aroundl971 or l972.He knew Estherand Babe and met Grandpoa Meranski who called at Sophie's apartment at 27 Commerce Street the time he was robbed in NEW YORK SUBWAY. GRANDFATHER SOMETIMES WENT TO NEW YORK ON SHOPPING TRIPS FOR HIS GROCERY AT 4 WOOSTER ST, HARTFORD AND PASSED THROUGH ON VISITS TO PETE AND JEN IN BALTIMORE AND BERTHA AND SAM POLLACK OVERBRROK PENNA. He came through New York before settling in Hartford, but immigation re ords from l880's are lost.He lived on powerEast side part of l907 in Economic panic, when friend named Samuel Shlimbaum found him tailoring work.Shlimbaum was in Hartford directory one year abour l892. David Meranski knew Boris Thomaschevsky of Second Avenue Yiddish theater in New York, who performed at the Meranski restaurant with members of his family around l912. Aunt Babe Thalia's motherrecollects that he invited aunt Bertha to travel with his touring troup, but the family did not think it advisable.Bertha belpong to business club and singing group at Hartford Publioc high School class of l9l7 with her friends Eva Levin and one other. Their [photos are in the l9l7 Yearbook on file at Hartford Public library. I hope to get copies for website.There was no l9l9 yearbook because of paper shortage after World War I. There may be historical material on Hartford Puiblic high School and elementary Brpown school at Stow-Day House in Hartford, an important repository, and other interesting material at Jewish historical Society of Greater Hartford - thanks to cousin DavidGeetter for sending me the address.. There is atape there that rose Rosenblatt Witkower made for them. She lived to age ninety-one and remembered the Meranskis. Her husband was born in Vienna but his older brother in Brody. The Witkowers came to US in April l890. Rose Witkower's brother Charley was a very close friend of the older Meranskis. His father had been a populist candidate for governor of California in l884 - came to Hartford l885. Rose son continues Witkower Press. There is a letterin this notebbok eight from Albert Geetter and one from Saul Seidman of Hartford, descenant of Mrs. Meiselmann, another Brody emigrant and friend of Thalia goldfeld Meranski our granmother. i am very glad thisd material has survived the l993 thefts and will be typing it out. - cousin John Barrett


 

 

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