Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 


p 56 #1091 RED HEADED STEPCHILD Part I Sophie Meranski Barrett early years 1901-1930 Chapter SIX MUSICAL INERESTS OF JACK + SOPHIE BARRETT

 

Musical Interests of Jack & Sophie Barrett,first part After the death of his mother June l889 John Berchmans Barrett lived on Park and Baxter Streets in Melrose until 1894,when his father remarried and returned to South Boston.Maternal Buckley aunts and grandparents lived next door- grandparents Dan Buckley and Mary Ann O Farrell were emigrants from Moskeigh and Kilbarry Templemartin parish Cork about 1851.It was probably at this time Jack learned Alfred Tennyson's lullaby "Sweet and Low" and another "Sleep,baby sleep Thy father watches the sheep The stars look do..wn on thee-sleep, baby sleep"; grandmother had a piano,and she apparently intended Jack to inherit it, but the will inadvertently named "John Berchmans Buckley" and the piano went to a first cousinJohn Buckley -l896 although his middle name was not Berchmans.While living at 634 East SeventhStreet between L and M Streets in South Boston in the late l890's, Jack Barrett was a member of the choir at Gate of Heaven church near I and East Fourth Streets, until his friend Joe Buckley not a relative,but a neighbor at M and Eighth streets was caught with a water pistol that belonged to Jack,and they both were expelled from the choir. Jack took piano lessons at a time when some instructors favored a stiff wrist, and recollects practicing with a quarter coin balanced on each wrist.At Boston Latin School l902-l906 he learned "Adeste fideles" and "Gloria in excelsis deo"- Christmas carols.Prior to his marriage Jack dated several serious students of piano and voice including Lucile Nelson from Charleston,South Carolina, who studied in Paris with Madame Calve and toured in cast of Sigmund Romberg's "Blossom Time" a fictionalized treatment of Franz Schubert's life.In Hawaii l927Jack purchased a small ukulele.While demobilized temporarily from the Navy after World War I Jack went round the world as an officer of the commercial ship WESTERNER and in London he saw ballerina Pavlova in her best-known role as the swan in Camille Saint-Saens "Le Cygne."Jack was amused by the name of the musician Ossip Gabrilowitch,son-in-law of Mark Twain and he often played Jan Paderewski's "Minuet a l'Antique", '"Le Secret" of Gautier,"Andante Cantabile" from Tchaikowsky string quartet, Mendelssohn's "Consolation" and selections of Chaminade,Chopin Liszt,Grieg,Macdowell, Thomas,Delibes,Thome, Massanet,Schumann.He had a great enthusiasm for violinist Fritz Kreisler and must have heard him perform, possibly in WashingtonDC l9l3-l9l8 or New York l920's.He knew "The Old Refrain and "Caprice Viennois"and in the l950's we obtained Kreisler's performance of Beethoven's violin concerto in D with Sir John Barbirolli conducting, and Liebesfreud and Liebeslied recordings and Kreisler's performances of Stephen Foster's "Old Folks at Home" and Ethelbert Nevin's "Rosary."In later years Jack often practiced the four pieces of Ethelbert Nevin's Giorno in Venezia"-Day in Venice with its subtlies of ornamentation and rubato.When I was learning to talk l937-8 in Philadelphia,Jack used to sing (author unknown?) "She was just a sailor's sweetheart But she loved her sailor lad -Though he left her broken-hearted -He was all she ever had. But she still believes in sailors; and she's true- to the Red, White, and Blue, And although she's barred from the navy yard, She loves her sailor boy, positively."He also knew 'the Old Oaken bucket","You take the High road and I'll take the low road (Loch Lomond), and "Barnacle Bill the sailor." In his last years l967-l969 Jack and I (John junior) TOOK JOINT PIANO LESSONS WITH GIUSEPPE DELELLIS OF NEWTON, WHO HAD GIVEN ME PIANO LESSONS 1947-1951 AND WAS A GRAD OF LONGY SCHOOL AND NADIA BOULANGER.GIUSEPPE TAUGHT AT roxbury Latin and Beaver School and Dean Junior College.Rossini was a special enthusiasm of his along with Mozart,Chopin,Schubert,and Rachmininoff.. We made a number of tapes,but the technology changed, and I have been unable to find equipment to see if anything is left playable on the tapes.Onr of Jack's l906 Boston Latin classmates Edward P. Illingworth became an organist after studying with Ferrucio Busoni. He moved about l9l7 from South Boston to 64 Hastings Street, West Roxbury, and his daughter Geraldine was an pianist.SOPHIE MERANSKI BARRETT l90l-l987 Her mother Tolley Goldfeld came fromBrody,Galicia a town with strong musical traditions,but there is no evidence of direct influence.Around l90l the Meranskis were neighbors of Sophie Tucker's father on Front Street, Hartford,and a Meranski family tradition states that David Meranski's restaurant at 25 Morgan Street l9l0-l9l5 was a continuation of one started by Sophie Tucker's father Charles Abuza,with Jewish singers and performers.Mother's sister Rebekah Geetter l906-l990 recollected Boris Thomaschevsky of the New York Second Avenue Yiddish theater performing and eating at the Meranski restaurant, with members of his family on tour.These contacts may date from l907,when the Meranskis moved to Lower East side, New York for a few months near Third Avenue and Twenty-Seventh Street.A friend named Samual Schlimbaum found David Meranski work as a tailor,but it proved temporary,and he returned to Portland Street, Hartford l908-l909 custom-tailoring overcoats for Gimmel Burnham,until he opened the restaurant.From this time may date certain short parody fragments Sophie used to sing:"I care not for the Hartford Times;I dare not read the Evening Post; I do not want the Journal - One cent and the World is mine" - "Moving day, moving day- Take your oil stove from the floor Take your stove, and there's the door." probably parody of Sophie Tucker's "Moving Day in Jungle Town l909,which spoofed Theodore Roosevelt's hunting expedition in Africa - "Oil, oil, kerosene oil- my oil is better than Finnegan's oil. Finnegan's oil is water. mine's kerosene oil" - this may parody a l907 song about the anti-trust action and Standard Oil.Another fragment Sophie sang may be a non-standard of Sophie Tucker's performed at Springfield l908 'Gay Young Masqueraders' from which I remember the line, "Last of all comes the clown, almost tumbling down."In this period the Meranskis clearly came under the spell of Irving Berlin, l888-l989, as I remember my mother singing nineteen of his songs,especially the unihibited early songs- more comic and more yiddish than when he became famous -"My wife has gone to the country hurray hurray!" "Cohen owes me ninety-Seven dollars" "Call me up some afternoon, and we'll arrange for a quiet little spoon""I'll leave the moon above to those in love when I'll leave the world behind""The Girl on the Magazine Cover" (which Sophie's brother Harry played on the occharina -"Tell me pretty gypsy what the future holds for me- Kindly cross my palm with silver and I'll try to see-tell me is there someone In the days that are to be - there's a boy for every girl in the world -there must be someone for me.""Alexander's Ragtime Band" - "Oh how I hate to get up in the morning- I'll put my uniform away I'll move to Philadelphia-ay And spend the rest of my life in bed." "Remember? Remember the night- the night you said I love you? Remember? Remember you vowed by all the stars above you? remember we found a lovely spot and after I learned to care a lot You promised that you'd forget me not, but you forgot to remember." Some sunny day, with a smile upon my face I'll go back to that place far away Back to that shack, where my red-headed hen will say where have you been? And go back to the hay and lay me my breakfast." Sophie used to sing a prologue to Albert von Tilzer's 1907 "Take me out to the Ball game" -"Katy Macy was baseball mad - Had the fever, and had it bad. On a Saturday her young beau Came to see if she wanted to go to the show. Katie, she said, "No..- Take me out to the ball game....." Hartford's Brown school had a good music program,and Sophie doubtless learned Stephen Foster's "Old Black Joe", "Suwanee River", "O Susanna", and "Massa's in the Cold,cold Ground", and George Root's Civil War songs "We shall meet, but we shall miss him, "Rally round the flag" ""Battle Cry of Freedom" - "In the prison cell I sit"."When you come to the end of a perfect day" was popular at this time also. Sophie sang "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" by Albert Gumble l9l3 "There's a girl in the heart of Maryland l9l3 In the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginina l9l3 "Are You from Dixie?" Cobb-Yellen l9l5 "They'll never believe me " Jerome Kern l9l5 "Auf Wiedersehn" Sigmund Romberg l9l5 Danny boy l9l5, Roses are blooming in Picardy, a World War I song.Her l9l9 class song at Hartford Public High School has a melody close to the Chopin A-Flat Polonaise with the words," NINEteen , dear old NINEteen, Fairest class of old NINEteen. Fairest class at Hartford high- Love for you will never die- NINETEEN dear old NINEteen, Fairest class of Old NINE - teen."When the Meranskis moved to 4 Wooster Street,fall l9l6, sister Esther bought a piano and Babe{Rebekah} took extensive lessons. Phonograph records became widely available about l920, with Eddie Cantor and Al Jolson the early favorites. Sophie knew Con Conrad's "Ma he's making eyes at me- Ma he's getting bolder- ma he's sitting on my shoulder" from the Eddie Cantor repertoire, and Sophie's brother Ben (he took the middle name Franklin- he played the saxophone and was interested in vaudeville and theater) collected Al Jolson records at home- "O April Showers They come your way- California Here I come" "Where did Robinson Crusoe go with Friday on Saturday night?" and the Al Jolson theme song, "You ain't Heard Nuthin' Yet." ("and when the lights are turned down low I hug and kiss my pet.Now she'd get sore if I told ya more, But you ain't heard nuthin' yet."Back around l9l4 Sophie's eldest brother Harry Meranski under the stage name Harry Moran wrote some songs with his friend Martin Kupperstein, and they performed publicly as "Cooper and Moran." Harry played an occharina, a small wind instrument.The largest number of songs I remember my mother singing (total over four hundred) were learned at Mount Holyoke l9l9-l925 and in New York l920's.Although my mother Sophie was one of the very few Jewish girls at rural Mount Holyoke in South Hadley.,she enjoyed the compulsory Sunday chapel in which President Mary Woolley and distinguished visiting speaker participated, and learned many hymns such as "Holy,holy, holy" "Abide with me" "May we like Magdalene Lay at thy feet" "Onward.Christian Soldiers", "O Mother dear, Jerusalem".In Hawaii during World War II I remember Sophie singing from memory the college song "O Mount Holyoke we pay thee devotion with the fervor of youth that is strong The courage of right is thy garland- Our lives alma mater thy song - So from east and from west now we gather United in firm love to thee - Our years are as one, Our years and our hopes and our glorious faith Shall answer, Mount Holyoke To-o-o thee Shalt answer, Mount Holyoke to thee. Through the heart of the new day's endeavor Breathes the light of the old days that live - For what thou has given we honor, but we love the for what WE can give - Though in a whisper thou callest - our years , our hopes and our glorious faith Shall answer Mount Holyoke to thee."She also frequently sang the Evening song "Robed in sunset girded round by the deepening evening light stands our well-loved alma mater While we sing our soft 'goodnight.' Night winds whisper, whisper softly round the world and back to you, bearing gently from your daughters hopes and dreams and memories true.-To be woven in our singing 'good night, Holyoke, good night." Days of doing press upon us days of strving for thy fame Still at twilight here we gather whisper to the winds your name..."The l923 class song was "The Sphinx" with words by archaeologist Marion Nosser {born Turkey; lived in Brooklyn} and music by Ruth King Dunne " Wind hushed, the desert lies dreaming Under the far eatern sky Only the Sphinx keeps its vigil Waiting for daylight to die Now 'neath the warm blue of Heaven, Rousing itself with a sigh Softly it speaks and its whisper Floats to the dome of the sky.-Hark! Don't you hear the far echo Borne on the night wind to us Now has the Sphinx told its secret NON SIBI SED OMNIBUS.' Faithful, we''ll guard it forever, Marching beneath it unfurled until the age-long secret Lies in the heart of the world. [Latin means "for all, not self"]"During ths period after World War I there was great enthusiasm for group singing,and the class of l923 did very well in interclass competition under leadership of Mildred Holt,who later taught music in Great Neck, Long Island and was associated with Robert Shaw chorale.With the help of college history librarian at Williston library Mrs. Elaine Trehub I find details of the materials they sang, including various medleys. Probably at this time Sophie learned a setting to Verdi's Triumphal chorus in Aida of the words,'Where peace and freedom reign,the happy songs of children rise- the desolate of all the ear-earth find here there sorrow dies.and future years we pray fo=or thee America America, keep thou our land for-e-ever great and glorious and free." [Musical Interests, Jack and Sophie Barrett second part] [words Sophie sang to tune of Aida's TRIUMPHAL CHORUS from "COMPETITIVE SING" class activity at Mount Holyoke. At a meeting of the Massachusetts State Poetry Society in l979 Sophie sang a little "Fund-Raiser" comic song Mildred Holt and several classmates wrote in l921: (World War I had interrupted the usual fund-raising,Mount Holyoke always needed money for loans for poor students like Sophie, and fires in college buildings increased the needs: "Holyoke's raising COLLEGE-BRED (bread) from the FLOWER (flour) of the land; From YEAST (east) and west, With plenty of SPICE She makes a superior brand- We KNEAD (need) a lot of DOUGH To RAISE the fund 'tis said, But WE are KNEADED (needed) too, you see, For WE are COLLEGE-BREAD (bred)."-Capitalized words have double meanings.The more formal academic programs were led by organist Mr. Hammond - a prominent figure for decades in campus life - and l923 classmate Ruth Douglass currently l994 & l998 in Granville New York taught voice and choral music for forty-four years at Mount Holyoke until l967 retirement. She and her sister Mrs. Anna Haldeman lived in retirement on a large beautiful dairy farm with a plantation of black walnut trees and have helped document many aspects of college life and music from the l920's. Junior year Sophie's friend Brenda Glass had a lead part in a musical "Hyacinth." Sophie tried to tutor Brenda in economics, but she had problems with Ricardo and Taussig.Sophie used to recite,"Corn is not high because rent is dear. Rent is dear because corn is high."A classmate McKown from Philadelphia published a collection of comic songs entitled "l923 College Crackers" unfortunately not listing composers-lyricists. Sophie used to sing:" I had a fat twin brother - We looked like one another- You ought to see the way he'd laugh At the lickings I would get - he thought it very funny to go and borrow money And Watch the people chasing me to make me pay his debts. The girl I was to marry Couldn't tell us two apart- She went and married brother Jim, and she nearly broke my heart - But you betcha I got even With my brother Jim - I died about a week ago - And they went and buried him."..."Pull the shades down Mary Ann- Pull the shades down Mary Ann! Last night - by the pale moon light - I saw you - I saw you! You were combing your auburn hair On the back of a Morris chair - If you want to keep your secrets from your future men - Pull the shades down, Mary A-ann!" Possibly from ballad classes Sophie would sing "Where have you been all day? Henry my son? Where have you been all day, my loving one?" -"Down to my grandmother's -down to my grandma's - I have a pain in my side - And I want to lie - right - down!" -"What did she give you there? Henry my son? What did she give you there? my loving one?" - "Nothing but poison - Nothing but poison! I have a pain in my side - And I want to lie - right - down." Sophie spoke a German dialect at home with her mother (from Austrian Poland - Galicia-and she did well in the subject in high school and college. Her German teacher was Grace Bacon, who went to France around the end of the War with the Red Cross, Possibly through Grace Bacon Sophie learned, "Du, Du..." and "Alsace is sighing Lorraine is crying Your mother France looks to you Our hearts are bleeding Are you unheeding? Come with that flame in your glance. Through the gates of Heaven do they bar your way? Souls who passed through yesterday? Joan of Arc, Joan of Arc! Do your eyes from the skies see the foe? Can't you see the droooping fleurs-de-lis? Can't you hear the cries of Normandy? Joan of Arc- may your spirit guide us through Come lead your France to Victory! Joan of Arc, they are calling you!"A mystery song about which I have few clues - part of the melody resembles Johann Strauss's Wine, Women and Song in rhythm and whole-step pitch intervals: "Who loves not song, Music Song - Will live u-un-blessed his whole life long. O come O come and let us sing With hearts so bright a song of spring - O raise your voices high (two lines repeat) The birds that flit from tree to tree Are not so full of joy as we Though we alone know why (repeat) E'evn though a storm cloud may lower E'en though it follow a shower Sunshine belongs to the day Smiles we remember for aye. What a pity it is for a man who is born With a soul that is deaf Who holds music in Scorn So unblessed by the Best What a life he must lead without song Life is long- Is long indeed. Let us sing praise of spring caroling with music blessed Spring is here all the year if we sing 'O hail to Spring.""Possibly connected are these words to similar melody: "Sang at their toil Songs of the Soil - Courage they ga-athered so Singing in paean (pain?) A Gentle Refrain Melody soft and low - O from their paradise echoes the loving song Taught in the times of their peace singing that never shall cease- Until there is chaos again." [l998 addition-Two additional clues suggests that an old German drinking song used by Johann Strauss in an l868 Waltz "Wine Woman and song" were adapted perhaps for girls' chorus to the praise of song, omitting 'wine' and 'women." About 1823 it is reported Vienna composer Franz Schubert wrote on a friend's napkin this stanza: "Who loves not wine, women, and song, Remains a fool his whole life long." [words probably quoted, not written by Schubert]. In the l860's Johann Strauss the younger became famous for instrumental waltzes, notably Blue Danube, Tales from the Vienna Woods,and Wine,Women and Song. Until 2000 we did not know whether words were attached to these melodies, but his wife was a singer, and in the l870's he turned his main attention to operettas, including "Die Fledermaus" (the Bat).In l871 he was a guest conductor in Boston, and it is possible some vocal arrangement from his melody was produced.This was one of the most substantial mysteries in unidentified tunes the Barrett family sang, until the year 2000, when material prepared by the Honorary Secretary of the Johann Strauss Society of Great Britain confirmed that "Wein, Weib, und Gesang" had four German stanzas in praise of wine, women, song, and Martin Luther, reputedly the author of the words quoted by Schubert in 1825. For women's choruses, sometime arranged an English version in praise of song, retaining references to spring, sunshine, and storms from the German original. Sophie lived in Philadelphia l926 and half of l927 while developing Statistical Reporting Techniques for Child Guidance Clinics at a Commonwealth Fund Demonstration Clinic funded by Albert Harkness.Letters mention hearing Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia orchestra and a performance of Gilbert and Sullivan's PINAFORE. For a time she lived with an aunt of classmate Rebecca Smaltz,and it was likely at this time she heard Gaskill and Shisler's 1912 "I'm the guy who put the DOUGH in the DOUGHNUT and the CUSS in CUSTARD too - did you ever stop to wonder Who put the noise in Thunder? Look at ME -I'm the GUY>"Becky wrote a parody, "I'm the guy who put the GERM in the German and the ME in MEASLES too Did you ever stop to think Where they got the Rash so pink? Look at me! I'm the Guy." Sophie's youngest brother Pete went to University of Maryland Medical School after graduation from Trinity l925 and married a Baltimore girl Jen Goldberg -Sophie attended the wedding June 9, l929. This may partly explain Sophie's fondness for the chorus "There's a girl in the heart of Maryland With a Heart that belongs to me -When I told her of my love, the ORIOLE above Sang from the old Apple tree And Maryland was fairyland When she promised my bride she'd be - There's a girl in the Heart of Maryland with a Heart that Belong to ME!" Sophie also sang a parody to the same tune (source unknown - there may be more words?- ) "There's a MAN in my room! ' cried Mary Ann - 'Put him out put him out!' cried Sue. 'I'm afraid, I'm afraid' cried another little maid, 'What shall we all ever do?' .....(much younger man?).. 'Who do you sup=po-ose that he may be?' - 'No you don't put him out' cried Mary Ann - "What's in my ro-om belongs to me!'", Sophie knew at least ten songs of the comic team Sam Lewis (originally Levine) and Joe Young including two with Bert Grant melodies "If I Knock the 'L' out of Kelly" and "Arrah go wan. I want to go back to Oregon." The words are "Timothy Kelly who owned a big store Wanted the Name Painted over the Door One day Pat Clancy the Painterman Came Tried to Be Fancy and Mis-Spelled the Name. Instead of a KELLY with a Double - L, Y - He painted 'KELY', but one 'L' was shy -Pat says it looks right, but I want no pay - I figured it out in my own little way - If I knock the 'L' out of Kelly, It would still be 'KELLY" to me - Sure a single 'L", 'Y' or a DOUBLE 'LL" 'Y' Should look the same to any Irishman's eye- eye -eye Knock off the 'L' from Killarney- Still Killarney it always would be - But if I knock the 'L' out of KELLy, he'll knock the 'ell out of me.!" Also - "Pat McCarthy, hale and hearty Living in Oregon He heard a lot of talk about the great New York - So he left the farm where all was calm, and he landed on old Broadway - He took the little Mary-Ann into a swell cafe - 'Arrah go wan! I want to go back to Oregon! Arrah go wan I want to go back to stay! I could feed the horses many a bale of hay For all that is costs to feed one chick on old Broadway! Arrah go wan! Go witcha - go 'way go wan - Arrah go wan I want to go back to Oregon!"When the Barretts lived at 2415 Ala Wai Boulevard, Waikiki nearly six years l941 to l947 with blackouts, gas masks, barbed wire, and air raids, Sophie sang a great deal,and many of her favorites were from New York in the l920's - Jerome Kern's "Moonlight in Kailua" Rudolf Frilm's "Rose Marie I love you" Vincent Youmans-Irving Caesar "I Want to Be Happpy" and "Tea for Two" Hirsch "Just a Love Nest" Billy Rose "It Happened in Monterey a Long Time Ago' "Barney google with the goo-Goo-Googledy Eyes" Sigmund Romberg "One Alone","Your Land and My Land", and l930's "When I Grow too Old to Dream"- also a favorite of President Franklin Roosevelt.Sophie knew several amusing New york nightclub "Hawaii" songs l9l5 Hello Hawaii-a? How are you?I want to talk to Honolulu Lou - to ask her this - Give me a kiss - give me a kiss by wireless Please state I can't wait to hear her reply. I had to pawn every little thing I own to talk from New york by the wireless telephone hello Hawaii-a How are you? goodbye." -.. "They're wearing them higher in Hawaii-a Higher, higher, higher, higher in Hawaii-a! The beautiful beach at Waikiki Is not the only pretty sight that you will see. Hula maids are always full of pep - All the old men have to watch their step. They're wearing them higher in Hawaii-a Going up Growing up every day!" During the war Sophie liked to attend band concerts weekly at Waikiki's Kapiolani Park near the bird collections - with an Argentine rhea and crowned African crane. Jerome Kern-Otto Harbach's l933 "Smoke Gets in your Eyes" was a favorite of Sophie's and so was Edgar Leslie and Wright l927 "Some letters tied in blue A photograph or two I find a rose from you among my Souvenirs a few more tokens rest within my treasure chest and though they do their best bring me consolation I count them all apart,and as the Teardrops start I find a broken heart among my souvenirs."Sophie lived in China l930-l931 and loved the Chinese people, who were surviving times of extreme hardship, war, and poverty. Sophie lived mainly in Tientsin but traveled to Peking,Shanghai,Wei=hai-wei, and out-of the way places near Chefoo. I hope no Chinese reader will be offended when I recollect Sophie singing the second verse of the navy song "The Monkeys Have No Tales in Zamboanga" -: "They wear clothespins on their noses in North China -They wear clothespins on their noses in North China - They Wear Clothespins on their noses for Chefoo doesn't Smell Like Roses -They wear clothespins on theiir noses in North China." Sophie lived in Chefoo for a week with goats just outside theWineglass boardinghouse during Asiatic Fleet l93l gunnery exercises, and these lines bring her vividly to life in my memory. On the radio l940's Sophie liked Metropolitan Opera, Kate Smith in "I Threw a Kiss to the Ocean" and"God Bless America"; - Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition -"There'll be BlueBirds over the White Cliffs of Dover Tomorrow when the World is Free" - and postwar "Don't Fence me in" and "Buttons and Bows."The Barretts bought an upright Baldwin spinet piano on Jack's birthday,August 28, l940 at Macy's stores while living at 96l5 Shore Road,Brooklyn, and John memorized,"pussycat,pussycat,, where have you been?" from Williams's "Teaching Little Fingers to Play" - but the piano went into storage over six years when the Barretts went to Pearl Harbor July l941.In l943 John occasionally played the piano on Ohua Street at the home of Celestine and John Barbour -(Mrs. Barbour taught first grade at Thomas Jefferson School). In l946 the Barretts rented a violin, and John took lessons from Laura Canafax and William Rusinak at Punahou School. Jack and John tried to interest Sophie in the piano, but she played only a two-finger octave arrangement of "My country, tis of thee" in which she filled in intervening notes where the melody rises a fifth C to G - she would play in each hand in octaves c,d,e,f,g,, very distinctive.I have already mentioned the close family relationship since l947 with our piano teacher Giuseppe deLellis and his wife Connie and family.Jack Barrett also did a great deal of elocution and public speaking at lincoln School South Boston l897- l902 - Boston Latin School l902-l906 Revenue Cutter School l909-l9ll , and Gonzaga University, District of Columbia l9l7, and in Navy and law school. He recited "Sheridan's Ride" "Wonderful one-hoss shay" of Oliver Wendell Holmes - "the Raven" of Poe and comic poems of James T. Fields - "The Owl Critic" and "The Nantucket Skipper>" Once in a Boston Latin declamation, he was four lines from the end of a Thomas B. Read poem, "And it was War, War, War...." when his time expired and he had to sit down. Shortly after arriving in Boston from China in l932, he judged a public speaking contest at Cambridge Latin School in which the audience laughed at one of the contestants who overemphasized the name "Minnehaha" in Longfellow's "Hiawatha." To mention a few more of Sophie's favorites "Tiptoe through the tulips with me" "If you don't like your uncle Sammy", .."They built a little garden for the rose And they called it Dixieland They put a summer breeze to keep the snow far away from Dixieland They built the finest place I know when they built my hone sweet home Nothing was forgotten in the Land of cotton From the clover to the honeycomb And then they took an angel from the skies and they gave her heart to me They put a bit of heaven in her eyes Just as blue as blue can be They put some fine spring chicken in the landAnd taught my mammy how to use a frying pan, They made it twice as nice as paradise And THEY CALLED IT DIXIELAND." In conversation Sophie often used the title of a Jerome Kern song "Once in a Blue Moon." Jack remembered the cold weather in Egypt when they visited the Sphinx January 1932 - he was reminded of the song "Till the Sands of the Desert Grow Cold" - "They WERE cold!" he said.


 


p 56 #1092 GERSHOM BRADFORD chapter Hyrdographic Barrett friend 1913-1978 photo on web page 10

 

.---Gershom Bradford 1879-l978 nautical author, Editor Notices to Mariners, U. S. Naval Hydrographic office l935-l942. p 10 #76 Born Kingston, Massachusetts May 10, l879, Gershom Bradford studied at a schoolship that was forerunner of Massachusetts Maritime Academy. In l900 he helped lay out a deepwater navigational test course off Provincetown Cape Cod, where in l927 the submarine S-4 surfaced without warning in front of the Coast Guard cutter PAULDING. The Submarine sank as a result of the collision, in which Jack Barrett and many others were sent to sea in rescue efforts. Gershom Bradford went to Naval Hydrographic office Washington D.C. 1908 and was a valued friend of Jack Barrett there l9l3-l9l6 and kept in touch with Jack and family thereafter.Gershom's wife Mary Lightfoot's family owned property at4701 Reservoir Road NW Washington D.C where the German embassy was their next door neighbor l970. She lived to age 103, and her niece Mrs. LaRoe of Toledo,Ohio gave the Barretts this photo. Gershom wrote several editions of "A Dictionary of Sea Terms" and many articles for American Neptune Magazine, published by his friend Walter Whitehill at maritime Peabody Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.More than twenty of these articles were colllected in two books published by Barre press "Yonder is the Sea" and "In with the Sea Wind."Gershom's father Gamaliel had been in whaling in California and Pacific l850's. Then he was active in fighting in Union Navy in Civil War.Gershom's uncle-by-marriage Frederick Knapp was assistant to Frederick Law Olmstead on Sanitary Commission, which cared for sick and wounded Union soldiers in Civil War - comparable to later American Red Cross. Sophie Barrett's l923 Mount Holyoke classmate Rebecca G.Smaltz of Phiadelphia got to know Gershom because her cousin Laura Wood Roper published some information from Gershom in "F.L. O." - her biography of Frederick Law Olmstead remembered primarily for his conservation work at Yosemite and Niagara Falls and landscape architecture at 500 parks and Arboreta.Both Gershom's parents were descendants of colonial Pymouth colony governor Robert Bradford, and he did a great deal of colonial history, also wrote about Admrial Horatio Nelson compelling a Cape Cod fisherman to pilot him through shallow waters l782 during the American Revolution - much about whaling, Cape Horn, seamanship, and the l872 disappearance of the crew of Mary Celeste New Bedford fishing boat near the Azores, which he attributed to a waterspout frightening the crew.Bradford's mother's family were Phipps of Bridgewater. Both his grandfathers were clergymen. Bradford in the l970's did research on his great-uncle General Edward Wild,his nother's mother's brother, who lost a leg at Antietam 1862 but commanded Negro troops with remarkable success in l864. Gershom also remembered seeing Mosby, of the l864 Confederate "Mosby's Raiders" of Virginia, who later was appointed to positions in the federal government and was still active when Bradford went to Washington l908.Gershom accepted honorary membership in Sons of Union Veterans l978. His second cousin Dr. Charles Bradford also writes history on Merimac-Monitor ironclads l862 and Lexington= Concord + Dorchester Heights in Revolution. Dr. Bradford's father was dean of Harvard Medical School near World War I and developed the Bradford orthopedic frame. Gershom wrote many articles for weekly Duxbury Clipper and the home of his great-grandfather in Kingston has become a historic site. - B-R-A-D-F-O-R-D chapter from 81- Fri, 6 Aug 1999 14:59:29 -0700 (PDT) 81-GERSHOM BRADFORD was a friend of Jack Barrett beginning 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office. He lived to 1978 and his letters cross-reference to many periods and chapters of "RED HEADED STEPCHILD." These include early Colonial Plymouth, Admiral Horatio Nelson 1782, Civil War Gamaliel Bradford, Sanitary Commission, Generals Benjamin Butler, and Edward Wild, the disappearance of MARY CELESTE 1872,Jack Barrett's 1926 project for an Antacrtic expedition, the December, 1927 sinking of submarine S-4 in collision with Coast Guard Cutter PAULDING near Provincetown, 1933 letter when Jack Barrett was assigned to survey ship HANNIBAL, 1939-1941 contacts with Felix Riesenberg and Charles Edey Fay when Jack was in charge of New York Branch Hydrographic Office, Bradford's American Neptune Magazine articles and books "A Dictionary of Nautical Terms" three editions and "Yonder is the Sea" and "In With the Sea Wind" Barre Press and Bradford's letters to Sophie and John Barrett 1970-1979.Bradford was editor of U.S. Naval Hydrographic office "Notices to Mariners" 1935-1942. His second cousin Dr. Charles Bradford Harvard 1926 also wrote extensive history including battles of Lexington and Concord and Dorchester Heights in Revolution and MERRIMAC and MONITOR Civil War ironclads. With narrative below appear 1926 and 1933 letters to Jack Barrett about Antarctica project and Hannibal Panama survey work,an April 1941 letter about problems of up-to-the minute Hydrographic radio Broadcasts from New York, Boston, and Washington DC offices during the U-boat crisis, and a group of letters to Sophie and John Barrett 1970 to 1975. Of this postwar group the earliest surviving letter is March, 1970:-"4701 Reservoir Road, Washington DC March 4, 1970 Dear Mr. Barrett, I have your letters of February 19 and 24th before me.Your father's activities are most impressive. I have no thoughts on THRESHER. I do feel that there are plenty of deep currents, especially when a "low" passes over. I was in "Sailing Directions" in "Hydro" [-graphic] from 1908 to 1917; in "Pilot Charts" from 1923 to 1935; in "Notices to Mariners" 1935-1942 - writing stuff for mariners in all. I retired for health in June, 1942, and after some recuperation, voluntarily held classes in Navigation in my home for Naval Reserve officers.I guess you know that. For Yangtze River information [find] an old copy of a China Sea Directory published by Hydrographic Office.-Of the Maldive Islands I know nothing. [Jack kept navigation notes from passing through Eight North passage spring 1920 en route Singapore to Suez on comercial ship WESTERNER with Captain Mal Richardson]. I have heard the "Nantucket Skipper" story [humorous poem by James T. Fields].[Felix] Riesenberg was in the Revenue Cutter Academy but resigned when they raised the term. + I stood out half the night to see Halley's Comet, with no result [1910].- Caimanera is outside of Guantanamo.- [I] know nothing of Cooper River naval set-up in 1921 or now.- Yes, I got a card for research at Archives - they were most helpful.This was ten years ago.Your family has been here a long time.= [I have] nothing about SS ANDREW JACKSON.= Heard Island:Here I have some information. You will find it in my "Secrets of MARY CELESTE and other Sea Fare" under "Land Ho" - my last book - Library will have it - I hope.= Admiral Dewey was a hero of mine too. Mr. Keller [Kelly?] comes to mind as in "Hydro"[-graphic] and had been in sailing ships- a splendid gentleman. In the PENOBSCOT-CHEWINK affair [S-4 rescue attempt December 1927] the 'Canal' could not have been Cape Cod--I don't suppose so,but know of no canal in New York area [refers to radio messages as PENOBSCOT sought to contact CHEWINK] = The S-4 was sunk in collision off Provincetown, Cape Cod.I assisted in laying out that trial course in which she was lost.= - Yes - we [Hydrographic Office] were under Navigation [Bureau]; our appropriations came from the Bureau.= No remembrance of Harry Badt= In 1918 Riesenberg and I were in the Merchant Marine Reserve. [I] know nothing of people in the Regular Navy in 1927-1929. In 1927 I was asked to join here [District of Columbia], but was turned down physically. Riesenberg was in area [New York] but not in service that I know of. I can not think of a meeting with your father not already mentioned to you.= He certainly got around the world in his time and into a lot of things.- Best wishes- sincerely- Gershom Bradford." Gershom Bradford letters l972-5--- 4701 Reservoir Road NW Washington DC 20007 May 1972 Dear Mrs. Barrett and John,It was thoughtful of you to note my birthday.I had a pleasant day, but they come too fast. If I were of any help in compiling your manuscript, I am pleased.I know the work you are going through to get it in shape.If anyone thinks that getting copy ready for a printer is not work, I wish they would try it.Laying out the first draft is the pleasantest part.At the moment I am immersed in reading proof of my "Dictionary of Sea Terms."-it is the third edition.I am pleased to have it published because at ninety-three it will live some time after me.It is so concentrating that I can work only one hour at a time without tiring.Then I have to use a reading glass.I only hope for no bad errors.- In the fall or winter I will have a story of Daniel Webster's son Fletcher in the "New England Galaxy", published by Old Sturbridge Village. - I want to keep on doing a little of this work as one hates to drop out of sight entirely.However, it is inevitable. Brook Farm? Yes - I think it is a worthy project for the West Roxbury Historical Society. You can hardly believe I knew a Brook Farmer. - Not exactly.- Willard Saxton was the printer's devil there as a boy.He was a Major in the Civil War, and he went to our church.I knew him well until he was over one hundred years old. He remembered a kin of mine there, George Partridge Bradford.If that is the Reverend Samuel(?) Ripley related to Emerson,- he married Sarah Bradford, daughter of Captain Gamaliel Bradford l763 to l824 or l825. They lived in the Old Manse at Concord. (This was answer to Barrett letter- which probably spoke of George Ripley of Brook Farm, whose wife was Sophia.-not the same but related.) = I recently quoted a remark - with some acid in it- by Louisa Alcott."When it came harvest time Emerson packed up his Over Soul and went home." May not be an exact quote.That oversoul to me is his greatest essay.I am glad John's friend (Bob Wenger,who worked in delicatessen at Roche Brothers grocery, Centre Street West Roxbury)has been admitted to Massachusetts Maritime Academy. I cannot realize that this splendid institution has grown out of my schoolship, from which I graduated in l900. Yes - (and) a graduate was in the PAULDING in the S-4 accident.- We too have had a late, cloudy,drizzly spring, but better now.We stagger or dodder about,simplifying chores- some days better than others, but good friends help us with errands and such. Maimie (his wife) is ninety-eight! With best wishes- Gershom Bradford P.S. Helping to lay out that Naval Trial Course at Cape Cod in the summer of l902 was one of my pleasantest jobs. June 13, l973 Dear Mrs. Barrett and John,Today is a day to write a letter.For some ten days the humidity has been intolerable. All one desired was to find the least objectionable spot and do nothing.It is beautiful today - only eighty-five degrees and low humidity.- There is not much new with us. I plod along with the biography of my great-uncle- a colorful Brigadier General in the Civil War.His disposition was to be irked by restraints and as a result occasionally got into trouble.The Army does not condone too much freedom of action in subordinates, and one-star Brigadiers have two-star Major Generals above them.So this makes uncle Edward more interesting. He was a striking figure on his horse - empty left sleeve- arm lost at Antietam and right hand crippled at Fair Oaks in l862. - You mentioned the disappointing lowly place of the Red Socks.The Washington Senators were in the cellar most of their team's seventy years - all but once - l924. - One of the most remarkable years in baseball- Washington won the pennant and the series against New York.In the series the games zigzagged until three each and tied in the ninth I think. The excitement was at the highest pitch in my memory.President Coolidge made the remark that the United States Government had ceased to function. It came to the situation as I recall - Washington a run ahead and New York (Giants) coming to bat.We were electrified by the announcement, "Walter Johnson in the bullpen warming up." He had played heavily already - was our hero. He took his place on the mound and struck three men out!! The Watergate is the most remarkable situation I have seen here in my sixty-five years (he came to Naval Hydrographic office in l908 from Kingston, Massachusetts). It is unbelievable that men of position could be so involved in such business. The President will work magic if he succeeds in clearing himself of knowledge of what was going on.I guess you heard this in the hearings of the Senate.-It would be nice if John could go to Ireland again.I suppose for many tourists the devalued dollar will make European visits more expensive.We never expected our dollar to be in trouble.We only travel thirty or forty miles from home now.With our best wishes- sincerely- Gershom Bradford October 14, l973 Dear Mrs. Barrett and John,The story of the Admiral and his two warrant officers out in Shanghai was very amusing. That Admiral intended to show that he was o.k. and called an "Admiral's inspection" to prove it.While it was funny to us, it was not to "Doc"the First Lieutenant who had to put up with the Admiral's changed disposition. -That was an interesting story of the Dahlquists' trip to Alaska. It helped me in my determination not to travel more than forty miles from our home.There is too great a chance of getting into a jam.Several of my friends have had disagreeable, even dangerous situations.- Professor Morison gave good advice,but to find a publisher is a tough job. "Yonder is the Sea" went to sixteen publishers. I was lucky I got several good breaks.Of course, if there is money to subsidize a book, that is another story. I expect my cousins are going to pay for publishing the biography I am still working on.I hope they realize what it would cost.My progress is very slow.The summer cut me down a lot, but I am coming back with this fine fall weather. Some of the biography has been difficult.The General was restive under the Army regulations and tradition, and - being of a free-lance disposition-got into trouble at times.My cousins tell me to"tell it as it was" - which helps, but still there are times when it is hard to handle.Professor Morison on his eighty-fifth said he could only write two hours a day. I find that is plenty - I tire so easily.The end is in sight, but there is Christmas coming, then Income Tax - two time-consuming periods. The old house in Duxbury, built by my great-grandfather, a sea captain, has been restored, and I hear it looks nicely inside and out.My brother ninety- a bachelor lawyer is very ill in Providence. He had a mild stroke and can talk but little.I have had to ask for a conservator to adjust his tangled affairs.He is my last relative of my generation. We both go monthly to the doctor for a look over and keep going on a limited scale.We do something and lie down; get up and do something else.I hope you too are enjoying good fall weather. Sincerely - Gershom Bradford. Letter from Gershom Bradford 3333 Wisconsin AvenueWashington D.C.200l6 April 2, l975 -So this makes the publication of the biography of General Edward A Wild that I worked on for two years much in doubt.That was my last work. It was my most difficult writing- I don't see how I did it, but then although I was over ninety I was much more capable than now - I tire easily. It was difficult because the General was an excessive advocate of the Negro (in the view of his superiors, so he ) got into lots of trouble.So when I and my cousins wanted to tell it as it was , it took many versions to arrive at what I thought was a fair appraisal. - Gershom Bradford - Regretfully my publisher the Barre Publishing failed a year ago.Mr. Johnson's fine idea took him into financial difficulties. From Gershom Bradford 3333 Wisconsin Avenue, Washington D.C.200l6 postmarked 23 July l975 Dear Mrs. Barrett and John, Life in a nursing home is dull, and if you allow it, depressing. Yet with us happily together and blessed with loyal friends, we enjoy breaks in the monotony. such as getting out to lunch and having callers drop into our little caboose. WE make these calls interesting and light if not really folly, so they will call again, - and they do. I think of you following the Red Socks ups and downs. A friend loaned me a SONY TV "as long as I wanted it" so I have watched one or two games.We do not use it much but like the news - big events like the space spectaculars and Sundays "Meet the Press" and Lawrence Welk. The food is not much like home, but doing so little we need less, and I believe we have enough, though I have lost much weight.I seem to crave fats.I have been interested in the wide publicity given to the "Bermuda triangle" so-called. It is an area of rough seas owing to the storm waves fighting the great flow up the Gulf Stream. Confused seas are the result, and occasionally a built-up tremendous wave.There are many disappearances, but no mysteries- all go down by the same natural cause.All seafaring men I know believe this.- yet by introducing mystical influences at least these authors have had best sellers. In l920 I got a blow-by-blow account of the foundering of a steamer down there from the sole survivor - the second mate.He launched a lifeboat - it immediately capsized. he clung to the keel, went unconscious- was hauled ashore on the coast of Florida, sent to hospital. In ten days he was able to travel to Boston, where he told me his story- no mystery - the story of scores of vessels where there were no survivors.- I hope, John, you got to Ireland- I know how much you enjoy it.Nothing moving with my General Wild (no E) manuscript,and I do not expect.The chance was lost when Barre publisher failed.I was their third book, and my Mariners'Dictionary Third Edition was near their last - very sad.Mrs.Bradford, past one hundred one is doing well considering the years- very well -goes out to lunch and enjoys it. With the hope that all goes well with you, we send our best wishes. Sincerely- Gershom Bradford." NOTE Among Gershom's writings was an article "The MARY CELESTE- no- not again!" He believed a waterspout was the most probable reason the five man crew abandoned their New Bedford-based fishing vessel November l872 apparently in good condition one morning near the Azores- they got into their small boats and disappeared. The region has frequent waterspouts at that season - local tornados that draw water and sometimes fish high in the air. Gershom grew up in Kingston, Massachusetts. His father Gamaliel had been a whaler l850's in Pacific, and was Union Navy Captain in Civil War.Both Gershom's parents were descendants of Plymouth colony first Governor Robert Bradford l620, and he wrote many stories about Squanto and the Plymouth settlement.. I believe both Gershom's grandfathers were clergymen, and his mother's surname was Phipps.His great-grandfather was also named Gershom, and his home in Kingston or Duxbury has been preserved at a historic site.A uncle by marriage Frederick Knapp was an assistant to Frederick Law Olmstead on the Sanitary Commission, which treated sick and wounded Union soldiers in the Civil War. Laura Wood Roper [cousin of Becky Smaltz, Mount Holyoke 1923] interviewed Gershom about the Sanitary Commission, and the material appears in a footnote in the Olmstead biography "F.L.O." Olmstead is principally remembered as America's leading landscape architect, who designed more than five hundred parks including Boston's Arnold Arboretum and New York Central Park. A native of Connecticut, Olmstead managed a California goldmine and persuaded President Lincoln to give Yosemite Valley to the state of California for a park,which later was made part of Yosemite National Park l890.Gershom Bradford worked at the Naval Hydrogrphic office l908 to l942 and was editor of their "Notices to Mariners" l935-l942, when he retired for health reasons.He was very kind to Jack Barrett l9l3-l9l6, when Jack worked primarily on revision of Bowditch Navigational tables and also answered "Inquiries from Mariners."They continued correspondence about mutual friends and nautical and scientific and weather topics for more than fifty years.Around l9l9 Gershom married Mamie Lightfoot of an old District of Columbia family, and they lived on the Lightfoot property at 4701 Reservoir Road NW until about l974 - the German embassy was next door in the l970's. Mamie lived to age one hundred three, and Gershom, born May 10, l879, lived one month short of age ninety-nine to April l978. He accepted honorary membership in Sons of Union Veterans from James Marley not long before he died. Gershom studied and taught at a Massachusetts schoolship that was forerunner of Massachusetts Maritime Academy. He helped lay out in l902 a Naval trial course at Provincetown, where in December l927, the Navy submarine S-4 collided with the Coast Guard cutter PAULDING and sank.Around World War I Gershom was also an instructor at some sort of Maritime School in New York State.Gershom was well acquainted with Walter Whitehill of Boston, many years editor of American Neptune Magzine, published at Peabody Museum of Salem, Massachusetts.Gershom wrote many articles for American Neptune Magazine, and some were included in two books "Yonder is the Sea" and the sequel "In with the Sea Wind."He also published three editions of "A Dictionary of Sea Terms" Third edition Barre press l972.Gershom was a friend of Felix Riesenberg senior and junior - author of "Under Sail", "Cape Horn", "The Pacific Ocean". In later years Gershom wrote many articles for the weekly "Duxbury Clipper." Until advanced years Gershom usually spent some time in the summer in Duxbury or Kingston,and Jack Barrett visited him there about l948. in letters Gershom mentioned an article about Daniel Webster's son he wrote for Old Sturbridge Village magazine. Daniel Webster lived in Marshfield some years. Bradford's last research was on his mother's uncle, Brigadier General Edward A. Wild, who commanded black troops in the Civil War and was commended by General Butler.My recollection is that Gen. Wild hanged a Confederate for atrocities against black Union soldiers,though he may have exceeded his authority. Mrs. Bradford's niece Mrs.LaRoe of Toledo Ohio gave the Barrett family a photo of Gershom Bradford, which appears on the memoir website at http://www.ccilink.com/photobook among barrett photos. Any further information on Gershom and his writings and family will be appreciated. The Barrett family became acquainted with Gershom's second cousins Dr. Charles Bradford and his brother Robert and sister Elizabeth. Dr.Charles Bradford, son of a dean of Harvard medical School who invented the Bradford orhthopedic frame, has written many historical articles including "Battle Row - Lexington-Concord" - "Dorchester Heights", and an account of the Civil War ironclads MERRIMAC and MONITOR. ---Gershom Bradford l926 on Antarctic project== Letter from GERSHOM BRADFORD to JACK BARRETT Dec. 31, 1926- In 1926 Jack Barrett and a friend Jack Fradd on In l926 Lieutenant Jack Barrett and a friend on the Light Cruiser MARBLEHEAD were hoping to get backing for an Antarctic expedition such as Richard E. Byrd later took.Jack had worked l9l3-l9l6 at the Naval Hydrographic Office and wrote his friend Gershom Bradford, who worked there starting l908 and was editor of Notices to Mariners l935-l942. He received this reply dated New Year's l926-l927 from "4701 Reservoir Road, Washington,D.C." (Gershom called Jack "Doc"]: "Dear 'Doc', Well- well it was good to hear from you again.Your expedition sounds most interesting, and you ought to get a kick out of it. I feel complimented that you would consider taking me along, but fear my physique is not up to a strenuous proposition like that. It would be the high water mark of a man's life to cruise the Antarctic ice pack.--I have not looked over conditions there as completely as I shall, but - here are the high points I have in mind as valuable for hydrographic scientists: If possible when in on the land get all tidal data that you can. A controversy is breaking out again on the tidal thing. It has been the subject of disputes for centuries, and finally [l9l0] Dr. R.A. Harris an estimable gentleman whom I knew, combating all European theories, brought out a new proposition known as the stationary wave. He ideas were most generally accepted- the Germans among them. Now came our office with a pamphlet- by a Captain Lee USN espousing the ideas of Whewell, an Englishman, - advanced long ago and from my knowledge rather generally discarded, I thought. This thing is that all tides originate with the westward moving tidal wave of the Southern Ocean. I feel it a bit too bad to throw an American's work into dispute in favor of a foreigner's after he had practically won a valiant struggle single handed and without the aid of financial power, social prominence or high position.He got $1800 (a year) in the Coast Survey when I knew him. So you see tidal data might prove valuable in the Southern Ocean. Next I suggest a careful study of ocean currents.This is the subject they know very little about.Some say winds- some rotation, some differences in ocean heat and some barometric pressure. I line up with the latter, though it has few adherents. That sounds egotistical, but after watching thousands of current reports - coupled with a small amount of practical experience - I find the currents run any and every way - shift without apparent cause in a few hours - two currents running in opposite directions infringing on each other in the open ocean is not uncommon. Even the Gulf Stream stops occasionally - not in the Straits of Florida - at least on the surface. Such things all point to very transient changes, and the only element of course that changes quickly is barometric pressure.I am preparing an article on this subject - if it ever gets completed, I will send you a copy.Another feature of Antarctic conditions which would be interesting to study is the size of icebergs. We have the most extravagant estimates from merchant masters and others,-and you know how prone we all are to overestimate such things.To take a log distance and establish distance,then measure with sextant would be simple and sufficiently accurate.This study could be carried further.I am not very contented with my work in the office, but I should be, for they are paying me three thousand dollars (a year],and I own my own home.They have me on the simplest routine stuff, and I feel after twenty-five years of living with ships and nautical stuff I ought to be using my time better.However, I want to stay a few more years- then I dream of getting out and doing more what I want to. In the meantime I enjoy my home and friends, have a car,and really am most fortunate. I have a little nautical dictionary coming out in March.I have worked on it for a long time."Yachting" Publishing is bringing it out.I must send the last of the page proof today.Mrs. Bradford joins me in New Year's greetings to you and yours. Sincerely,as ever - Brad - P.S. "Plum" (Plummer) is in the Coast Guard, but have not heard from him for a long time." [Copied by Sophie Barrett notebook #5 pages 134-136 surviving in photocopy] NEXT LETTER 1933 RELEVANT TO H-A-N-N-I-B-A-L P-A-N-A_M-A H-Y-D-R-O-G-A-P-H-I-C . p 5- 173 to Lt [Cdr] J.B. Barrett USN,- USS EAGLE 19, Navy Yard, Boston Mass. -- [from] Gershom Bradford 4701 Reservoir Road, Washington D.C. August 29, 1933-- Dear "Doc".- Your letter was forwarded from the Office to Duxbury where I was on leave. I was sorry not to be able to get up and see you at the Yard, but my time was too much taken up.I am glad that you have the assignment to the [survey ship] HANNIBAL, and feel it is a good duty. = Here in Pilot Charts, of which McManus is civilian chief, we are greatly interested in the new dynamic method of determining ocean circulation. It is used by the Coast Guard on the [Grand?] Banks in their estimation of probable drift of [ice] bergs and by other scientific organizations. McManus got the Admiral interested and procured considerable equipment for use on the HANNIBAL last winter. I expect that there will be considerable work along this line that will be laid out for the next season. = This dynamic sounding makes a lot of work for the "exec." [Executive Officer] , and I guess it will not prove very popular with that officer. However, it is work we should keep abreast of, if we are going to amount to anything at all in a scientific way. = You are obliged to stop the ship and take soundings to a great depth, and it requires a great deal of care as there is from three thousand dollars worth of equipment, or more, on the line. I guess you know about it.= The office is not the same as it used to be. There are twenty-two officers, I believe, now, and we naturally are submerged with supervision. I have more of it after twenty years than I did then on one-third the money.However, no one is disagreeable, and I work for the money, not for fame. I am better known to the maritime community than to the officers in the office, so I get some satisfaction in that. The money is vastly better-'..." end page 173 Notebook Five Sophie Barrett- letter incomplete from Gershom Bradford. -1941-Problems of getting up-to-date information from New York and Boston branches into widely disseminated Washington D.C. Hydrographic radio broadcasts {Jack was in Charge of NewYork Branch Hydrographic Office, and Gershom was then Editor of 'Notices to Mariners'] Black Notebook 2 -p 157 Gershom Bradford Letter:"April 10, 1941 - 4701 Reservoir Road, Washington DC To. Commander John B. Barrett, Branch Hydrographic Office, New York, N.Y. Dear Doc: It was very kind of you to call attention to the discrepancies between the New York and Boston broadcasts. This matter does not come under my section, but I was glad to bring it to the attention of Watt, who is in charge of Pilot Charts. = He explains to me that the first broadcast, either New York or Boston, is used as a basis for the Washington broadcast. It is considered here that the mailgram would be too late for a radio broadcast from here. It seems that errors in transmission occasionally creep in, for recently the latitude of one of these submarine areas was given as twenty-one degrees --the requested repeat still came twenty-one degrees - which was, of course, an obvious error. = In the case of forty degrees thirty minutes instead of forty degrees fifty minutes the larger area was chosen for the reason you advanced - for being on the safe side. Watt emphasizes the fact that he takes either your broadcast or that of Boston, - whichever comes first into the office, - and the mailgram is too late. The Coast Survey has placed these areas on their charts at our particular request,and what we are looking to do is to be able, after a time,to simplify the broadcasts by using the letters. This, I think, will be done as soon as the new charts beome thoroughly disseminated in the Navy and merchant marine. = The office is very busy here, as you may well imagine, but the work is increasingly interesting. I keep going pretty well and hope to see you if you make a trip this way. Be sure I appreciate your letter. Sincerely, s/Brad --P.S. Watt has just shown me a radiogram from Branch Hydrographic Office New York ... "between Latitudes forty - fifty northward and eight North and twenty-one twenty North. " We sent for a report, and it came back o.k except 'Latitude twenty-one". In the spring of 1941 not long before the Barretts left for Hawaii Jack Barrett and Charles Edey Fay interested GERSHOM BRADFORD in MARY CELESTE PROBLEM 1941: first part from p 39 caption of Jack photo of NY Branch Hydrographic Office-- Jack was stationed at New York Branch Hydrographic Office September 1939 through June 1940 and replaced retiring Captain Baggaley in charge spring l940. He considered his promotion to Commander an "Irish promotion." as he was scheduled for retirement June l940, but all retirements were cancelled June 1940 because of World War II emergency. Charts and weather information were made available not only to Navy ships to to commercial ship captains of all nations, who in turn submitted information the Branch Office collected on winds, weather and hazards to navigation, including wartime mines and military operations, which were forwarded to the Hydrographic office in Washington, where Jack's old friend Gershom Bradford was editor of Naval Hydrographic Office "Notices to Mariners." In the spring of 1941 Jack was consulted by Charles Edey Fay of Connecticut,who had access of Atlantic Insurance Company records of the disappearance of the five man crew of the New Bedford fishing schooner Mary Celeste November, 1872. Fay wanted Jack's interpretation of certain navigational notes of the MARY CELESTE near the Azores. He suggested the crew suddenly abandoned ship and got into small boats because they feared AN EXPLOSION OF ALCOHOL VAPORS FROM CARGO. Jack called the problems to Gershom's attention, and he did considerable research on weather history in the area near the Azores. Gershom Bradford published in American Neptune magazine his theory that waterspouts are frequent near the Azores in November - local severe tornados that draw water and sometimes fish high in the air and threaten small ships.Jack kept four of Fay's letters from around the time the Barretts left for Pearl Harbor mid-l941. The Branch Hydrographic office was in the New York Customs House but had to be relocated - Jack helped obtain an accessible new location where sea captains would continue to find visits convenient, as their information was often useful to the Navy.Jack's former teacher at Revenue Cutter School Captain Dempwolf US Coast Guard considered the issue important and wrote letters supporting many commercial shipping companies in keeping the office at a convenient location. This was one of many contacts Jack Barrett maintained all his life with friends from Revenue Cutter School l909-l911, which became modern Coast Guard Academy.The motto of the Coast Guard was "Semper paratus" - Jack applied this motto in his efforts to avert the Pearl Harbor disaster December 7, l941. --May1971 Gershom Bradford Gen.Wild,S-4,Baylis PAULDING w1284 B-R-A-D-F-O-R-D p 79 On May 6, l97l Mr. Gershom Bradford, Jack's lifelong friend from Naval Hydrographic Office days l9l3-l9l6 a prolific writer of sea stories, wrote from Washington DC,"Dear Mrs. Barrett & John: You surely have done a splendid job in canvassing "Doc"'s old shipmates & in the process turned up some good stories.I liked the last about the wounded sailor aboard the sinking YORKTOWN with Dahlquist cutting him adrift & later meeting him.Also the Lieutenant (Brantingham) who ran for the last plane out of Mindanao with unofficial clothes. He was lucky to meet an officer like "Doc".It was singular that John should reach into my writing for the NEPTUNE- all ten of them apparently.But most of all that somewhat critical review of "MARY CELESTE". I was taken to task for not expanding my stories.That's just what I try NOT to do. One celebrated writer said 'to say what you have to say in the simplest manner possible.I got my first lesson from Captain Felix Riesenberg, who, who Christopher Morley thought the best sea writer of his time.Only once or twice have I asked for assistance. Not that I did not need it, heavens knows- but I feel it an imposition. But I had a story back in l9l8 & asked Riesenberg if he would read it. He said, "Come in my cabin at ten."I did. He placed it on the table in front of him saying, 'Now we'll cut out twenty-five per cent of this'.- 'Why I've said-'when you have not looked at it!' - 'Because', hhe replied 'You tend to be redundant, so we may take out more.' he struck out paragraphs- sentences, saying they added nothing to the story- words that did not strengthen.From there I tried to be concise, & no less a person that Walter Whitehill has complimented the clarity of my work.So that fellow was off base.When one writes for so much a word, that is different. I want to write a good story English-wise if I can.The American Neptune magazine pays no compensation. I am not writing much now at (age) ninety-two- have lost the zest to work at it- largely because all the editors who used to take my stuff are gone.Only I do something occasionally for the local paper in Duxbury (Duxbury Clipper).That was a nice family snapshot you sent- splendid of your Jack- thank you.Unhappily we have lost our household helper who has been such a help to us. It is not easy to get one who is what you want, even at good pay & easy job. Perhaps we shall have good luck again.Our niece (Mrs. LaRoe of Toledo, Ohio) will be with us for a little while. My wife is ninety-seven-Gershom Bradford." In l977 Mr. Bradford worked on recollections of his great-uncle Gen. Wild, who commanded Black troops in the Civil war. He lived to April l978 one month short of age ninety-nine & his wife lived to age one hundred three & his brother in Rhode Island over age ninety.Shortly before his death he talked with James Marley of Sons of Union Veterans and accepted honorary membership in the organization in recognition of his writing about many Civil War topics, - nautical battles, experiences of his father Gamaliel Bradford in the UnionNavy, his uncle Frederick Knapp on the Sanitary Commission working with Frederick Law Olmstead (now remembered as landscape architect) on care of Civil War sick & wounded) & on General Wilde.He wrote extensively about the Plymoth colony & Duxbury & Kingston. At one time around or during World War I he ran a maritime schoolship in New York state.His second cousin Robert Bradford was governor of Massachusetts l947-8, & the governor's brother Dr. Charles Bradford was an orthopedic physician many years at Faulkner Hospital Jamaica Plain in Boston. Dr. Bradford played football Harvard l926 served in World War @ & after retirement also wrote history & poetry - he wrote pamphlets on Lexington & Concord "Battle Road" -battle of Dorchester Heights South Boston March l776 & the MERRIMAC & MONITOR l862 ironclads.Dr. Charles Bradford opposed the transfer of the Gilbert Stuart painting of George Washington from the Boston Museum of Fine Arts to Washington DC, & he served on a commission on statutes in Boston.The father of Governor Robert & Dr. Charles Bradford was dean of Harvard Medcial School areound l9l5 & made orthopedic inventions including the "Bradford frame".-Material concerning Bradford's great uncle from Butler's Book"-"place, which was held only by two regiments of Negros under General Wild.Accordingly before he began, he sent a summons to surrender, informing the commanding officer that if he surrendered, the officers and Negro troops should be treated as prisoners of war, but if they did not and he captured the place, he would not be answerable for their treatment. That treatment was stated in Davis's proclamation to be that the Negros should be returned to their masters, and the officers sent to the governors of their states, to be there tried for inciting Negro insurrection.. The noble answer of General Wild to these propositions was, "We will try that. "Thereupon Fitzhugh Lee did his best. The Negroes held firmly, and Lee retired beaten, in disgrace,leaving his dead on the field. It will be observed from the instructions which I gave General Hinks who commanded the troops holding Fort Powhatan, that I was exceedingly anxious for the safety of that point, because that was the weak point of my whole position for although it was some twelve miles below City Point on the James (River)- yet if it were once in possession of the enemy, it would be impossible to get any troops up the river, as the channel ran close under it.My experience with Vicksburg, which is on a bluff high above the possible range of the guns of the fleet- which were not mortars- told me that if Fort Powhatan were once captured by the rebels, it could be easily held against the naval vessels. I was anxious lest it should be taken by surprise and therefore almost from day to day I persisted in... (see page 299A) cautioning Major General Hinks,who was in command. He was a very excellent and able officer with but a single drawback -and that was very infirm health arising from the wounds received in the Army of McClellan before Richmond. It may be asked why if it was of so much importance, I entrusted its defence to a garrison of Negro troops. I knew that they would fight more desperately than any white troops, in order to prevent capture, because they knew - for at that time no measures had been taken to protect them- that if captured they would be returned into slavery under Davis's proclamation, and the officer commanding them might be murdered, so there was no danger of a surrender. Wild's answer to Fitzhugh Lee, and the gallant fight of his Negroes at Fort Pocahontas, Wilson's Wharf, when threatened that this should be done to the Negroes if they did not surrender- made me cartain that nothing but a surprise would get that position - and nobody ever did get it." (From Butler's book") 13'' Sophie Barrett notes on l3 Dec. l927 S-4 sinking & rescue effort #13 NY l927-l929- S-4 (p. 371) Commodore Baylis who was at the Revenue Cutter School with Jack invited John l970 to his home in NewJersey to see his Coast Guard records and paraphenalia.They had a good opportunity to discuss the S-4 disaster that occurred off Provincetown on December l7, l927. At the time Jack was on shore duty in New York City, and lived at the Knights of Columbus hotel where he had no real sea-going clothes, such as rubber boots and a good raincoat and warm gloves.He received a telephone call late at night to go aboard the tug PENOBSCOT in New York Harbor and proceed aboard to the rescue effort for the sunken submarine S-4. The PENOBSCOT worked with the CHEWINK to try to recover pontoons lost by another ship (the IUKA?) which we thought needed to refloat the S-4 from very deep water.But the PENOBSCOT was short of food and fuel and had not enough space for the crew, so rescue efforts were hampered. Also the coastal waters were very rough,and the weather very cold. The rescue attempt was unsuccessful, with the greatest loss of life in peacetime in the Navy's history. Every available craft was sent to assist, and messages came for days from the men trapped in the S-4 until their oxygen ran out. Even in l963 when the submarine THRESHER sank near Boston,no technology existed to raise survivors from great depths.Since the PENOBSCOT was only a harbor tug, we are told no ship log would be available from it.Jack discussed the tragedy and lack of planning and equipment with Boston Post newspaper reporters at the home of his friend Joe Hurley when we returned to Boston from China in l932.On his New Jersey visit John discussed the event with Commodore Baylis, and learned to his surprise and some embarassment that Commodore Baylis had been in command of the Coast Guard ship PAULDING,which collided with the S-4 when the submarine unexpectedly surfaced= close in front of his ship.After exhaustive inquiry Commodore Baylis and the PAULDING were completely exonerated as the S-4 had no flag showing and no submarine tender. Forty men were lost on the S-4. Understandably Baylis was the subject of some questioning and grumblings, as the following letter from Gershom Bradford of Kingston and the Naval Hydrographic Office recounts: "March 31, l970, Dear Mrs. Barrett...There are a lot of questions that I cannot answer, but I can give some details of the loss of the S-4. was attached to the Coast Survey steamer BACHE and ordered to Provincetown to assist a Captain Marinden, who was to lay out the Naval Trial Course. It lay between Woodend and Race Point Lighthouse; over a vein of deep water.It was one of the nicest details I ever had.It was summer of l902 and Provincetown was really interesting then.After we had the course all set up, I was sent in a little schooner to take current observations on the course. My next connection with the course involved the S-4. I was at a Massachusetts Schoolship Alumni meeting, and Commander Henry Hartley USN was the speaker.He had worked up from an apprentice boy. He got the Navy Cross or the Distinguished Service Medal for his work in raising the S - 4. He also was involved deeply in the raising of the SQUALUS (spelling?). He was my chief in the Hydrographic Office in l939. He made the mistake of saying (from my memory). "That Coast Guard Destroyer (PAULDING) came at full speed with the Captain down below and a young fellow on the bridge not dry behind the ears." We held our breaths, for "that fellow not dry behind the ears" was present - (then) Commander Morrill. Our Chairman came to the rescue by saying that Commander Morrill was present.Then Morrill, fine officer that he was, quietly said (again from my memory) "Commander Hartley, I shall have to correct you. Captain Baylis was down on the main deck and not below." - Hartley simply said without turning a hair, "I'm glad to hear that." ....Gershom Bradford." On l6 April l970 John received a letter from Commodore Baylis; "Thanks for your interesting and informative letter of 9-l0 April enclosing a letter of Captain Leo C. Mueller. Don't forget I'm expecting you to peruse my files at your convenience. Kindest regards - Jack Baylis." When we were researching the disaster of the S-4 sinking in December l927 (577) we wrote to many Naval officers for their recollections.Commander Miles Finley wrote that he had no first hand information but suggested I write to an experienced submarine man, Vice Admiral McCann, whose daughter was the wife of Finley's Navy Captain son. I wrote to Admiral McCann who like so many other senior Naval officers sent a careful reply.At the time of the S-4 disaster he was in submarines on the West Coast. But later he developed the Submarine Rescue chamber and used it to save the lives of thirty-three men on the SQUALUS (check spelling) sunk near Portsmouth New Hampshire -I relate this to stress the whole-hearted and careful response we received to our many inquiries. Even Admiral Rickover replied when John wrote him about his father's meeting with him at Cavite in l939, though he added no details- when Captain Holmes wanted the tanker TRINITY fumigated p 580 When Jack was trying to help rescue the S-4 om December l927 he sent a message on December 20, l927 to the Commander of the Central Force: "will start back at once to try to assist CHEWINK (minesweeper- but need food, probably fuel soon.PENOBSCOT ( New York harbor tug Jack was aboard- has been used forharbor duty only, has no proper communication books or call, only one very small anchor, food for only one more day, poor charts, poor compass, other defects, only one unreliable feed pump and emergency crew without proper bedding or quarters.Will do all we can.What is call for CHEWINK? Will try to reach (Cape Cod)canal about 9:30 tonight. Please ask pilot to meet us there. Our radio very weak. Sent to Mohave nto and forwarded to Commander control force but no acknowledgement has been received."The attempt to rescue the S-4 is written up in more detail in the chapter on the Revenue Cutter School, as the Coast guard cutter PAULDING collided with the S-4. Jack on the PENOBSCOT was trying to help the CHEWINK recover pontoons lost from the IUKA as they were needed to refloat the S-4. Picture Caption from web p 10- Born Kingston, Massachusetts May 10, l879, Gershom Bradford studied at a schoolshhip that was forerunner of Massachusetts Maritime Academy. in l900 he helped lay out a deepwater navigational test course off Provincetown Cape Cod, where in l927 the submarine S-4 surfaced without warning in front of the Coast Guard cutter PAULDING. The Submarine sank as a result of the collision, in which Jack Barrett and many others were sent to sea in rescue efforts. Gershom Bradford went to Naval Hydrographic office Washington D.C. 1908 and was a valued friend of Jack Barrett there l9l3-l9l6 and kept in touch with Jack and family thereafter. Gershom's wife Mary Lightfoot's family owned property at 4701 Reservoir Road NW Washington DC where the German embassy was their next door neighbor l970. She lived to age 103, and her niece Mrs. LaRoe of Toledo,Ohio gave the Barretts this photo. Gershom wrote several editions of "A Dictionary of Sea Terms" and many articles for American Neptune Magazine, published by his friend Walter Whitehill at maritime Peabody Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.More than twenty of these articles were colllected in two books published by Barre press "Yonder is the Sea" and "In with the Sea Wind."Gershom's father Gamaliel had been in whaling in California and Pacific l850's. Then he was active innfighting in Union Navy in Civil War.Gershom's uncle-by-marriage Frederick Knapp was assistant to Frederick Law Olmstead on Sanitary Commission, which cared for sick and wounded Union soldiers in Civil War - comparable to later American Red Cross. Sophie Barrett's l923 Mount Holyoke classmate Rebecca G.Smaltz of Phiadelphia got to know Gershom because her cousin Laura Wood Roper publioshed some information from Gershom in "F.L. O." - her biography of Frederick Law Olmstead remembered primarily for his conservation work at Yosemite and Niagara Falls and landscape architecture at 500 parks and Arboreta.Both Gershom's parents were descendants of colonial Pymouth colony governor Robert Bradford, and he did a great deal of colonial history, also wrote about Admrial Horatio Nelson compelling a Cape Cod fisherman to pilot him through shallow waters l782 during the American Revolution - much about whaling, Cape Horn, seamanship, and the l782 disappearance of the crew of MARY CELESTE New Bedford fishing boat near the Azores, which he attributed to a waterspout frightening the crew.Bradford in the l970's did research on his uncle General Edward Wild, who lost a leg at Antietam 1862 but commanded Negro troops with remarkable success in l864. He also remembered seeing Mosby, of the l864 Confederate "Mosby's Raiders" of Virginia, who later was appointed to positions in the federal government and was still active when Bradford went to Washington l908.Bradford accepted honorary membership in Sons of Union Veterans l978. His second cousin Dr. Charles Bradford also writes history on Merimac-Monitor ironclads l862 -Lexington= Concord in Revolution. Dr. Bradford's father was dean of Harvard Medical School near World War I and developed the Bradford orthopedic frame. Gershom wrote many articles for weekly Duxbury Clipper and the home of his great-grandfather in Kingston has become a historic site.Dorothy Wentworth later continued Gershom's writing in Duxbury Clipper and worked on some of his materials.


 


#1093 p 56 World War I and 1912-1920 Jack Barrett Hydrographic + Navy Reserve

 

#1093 p 56 83-1318 -l9l2-l920 Hydrographic Office & World War I #08 In 1911 Jack made the cholera-shortened ITASCA cruise to Marseilles, France, Gibraltar, and the Azores. Admiral Earl G. Rose reviewing Revenue Cutter School history notes considerable discomfort for cadets when new facilities were occupied at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut in the move from Arundel Cove, South Baltimore in 1910. Jack resigned from the school in November, 1911 but continued many close friendships among the ITASCA shipmates. From November 1911 to August 1912 he lived with his family in South Boston for the last time residing in Massachusetts until 1932. He had several temporary jobs, including one at George Emerson coffee company. Jack saw a great deal of his second cousins the Hartigans at D and Third Streets, South Boston. His mother's mother Mary Ann O Farrell had a sister Margaret who married Jeremiah Donovan near Bandon, county Cork, and their daughter born 1852 in Cork came to Boston when about five years old. She married a native of Baltimore, Maryland, Edward Hartigan who worked as a newspaper stereotyper in Baltimore, Philadelphia and then Boston, but he died of tuberculosis in 1899, leaving four sons and two daughters. Jack's Buckley grandparents had boarded with the Hartigans and Donovans at D and West Third Streets South Boston for about a year 1877 before buying a house of their own at 469 West Eighth Street, where the Buckleys lived until they moved to Melrose in 1884. Jack did not know the oldest Hartigan boy, "Miah" [Jeremiah] who died of tuberculosis after playing football at Boston College, but for several years Jack was very close with the second son James Hartigan born 1880 and severely crippled for some years before passing away in 1912. James worked as journalist in Bath Maine around 1907 and for a period in upstate New York, probably Binghamton. Their mother and sisters Gertrude and May kept in frequent touch with Jack's aunts in Melrose,Minnie and Maggie Buckley. James Hartigan died in 1912,and his younger brother Edward after four years at Boston College 1907-1911 and one at West Point Military Academy as a freshman classmate of Dwight Eisenhower and Omar Bradley 1911-12, decided to enter the priesthood and attended St. John's Seminary, Brighton. Their youngest brother John served in the military in World War I and became a lawyer Their mother adopted a daughter Dorothy and moved to 80 Brown Avenue Roslindale near Sacred Heart Church in 1917. Father Hartigan was parish priest many years in Everett and North Weymouth and then pastor 1953-1970 of Immaculate Conception Churcn Everett. In the 1920s he started a well-known childrens' camp "Cedar Crest" at Green Harbor,Marshfield, and the Barretts were frequent visitors there through the 1970s when his sisters Gertrude, May, and Dorothy moved there from Roslindale. May Hartigan 1886-1979 was an early South Boston High School graduate, attended teachers college and taught seventh and eighth grade mathematics at Washington Irving School in Roslindale. In March 1912 Jack's aunt Minnie Buckley died of tubercular meningitis after several days of severe illness when she could not speak.Jack remembered sitting at her side for two days talking to her without being able to tell whether she was conscious and understood him, though her eyes appeared open.She and her younger sister Maggie had looked after Jack by day 1889-1894 while his father commuted to his plumbing shop. One time around 1894 Jack traveled with her by train to visit Buckley cousins in Milford, Massachusetts, who were bootmakers,and she frequently wrote letters to her father's brother Michael 1834-1918, who was on the family farm in Moskeigh.Aunts Minnie and Maggie Buckley worked some years at Converse Rubber Company in Malden. Jack kept Minnie's leather address book, which seems to have been used 1903-4. Among the entries; 'Mr. Michael Buckley, Moskeigh, Bandon, county Cork Ireland-- Miss Katie L. Buckley 38 Parkhurst St., Milford, Massachusetts-- and Mollie Manning E. Fourth Street, South Boston (later Mrs. Charles Curtaz of Linnet St., West Roxbury, who lived to age ninety and remembered her neighbor Helen Cochrane attended Girls Public Latin and dated Jack Barrett 1905). Some time after Maggie's death in 1921, her brother John sent Jack Barrett offering him a selection of any or all or Minnie's books he wished to keep. The handwritten letter had some humorous comments.John married Jennie Cain born Warrenton, near Liverpool, England. He worked as a pattern maker at Charlestown Navy Yard,and they had nine children.Jack saw his uncle John Buckley in 1921 when Jack came into Charlestown Navy Yard as an officer of the destroyer TOUCEY on its fall trip north from South Carolina.Jack also was in contact 1910-1912 with his Mehegan cousins near the Roslindale- Hyde Park line. Robert Mehegan junior had worked 1910-1911 in Federal Land Office Evanston Wyoming and in September-October 1911 visited Jack's aunts and other relatives in California. LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE in Maine 1912 From September to December l9l2 Jack worked for the Lighthouse Service aboard the Lighthouse Tender ZIZANIA under Captain Herma Ingalls. They encountered cold weather and very rough seas. The tenders were named for various types of grasses, as the skipper's widow Mrs. Herman Ingalls of Bucks Harbor, Maine explained to us.Zizania is an American grass known as "wild rice" used as food by native Americans and imporant for birds and wildlife.Mrs. Haskell C. Todd of Belfast, Maine, whose husband served on the Tanker TRINITY l938-l939 sent us a postcard picture of the ZIZANIA. My Mount Holyoke l923 class president Marion Lewis Smart used to spend summers in Bucks Harbor and later lived there after her husband Vin retired from law practice in New Jersey and New York.Captain Haskell Todd's wife is the daughter of a lighthouse keeper. She well remembers the many occasions when she was a young girl, and the ZIZANIA brought out coal, oil, groceries, and frequently other supplies. Jack later commented the weather and conditions were demanding and required seamanship and small boat proficiency and physical hardiness. See ZIZANIA photos web pages 47-#1006 and 49-#1025 and Marion Lewis Smart letter below at end of this chapter. NAVAL HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE WASHINGTON At this time Jack took many civil service examinations resulting in taking a job with the Naval Hydrographic Office in Washington in January l9l3.He found a home with a family of Christian Scientists on A Street southeast, who gave him a fine big private room where he was allowed to keep his window open constantly regardless of the weather.He also got three excellent meals a day there & was pleased that it was within easy distance of his office at the State, War & Navy Building (where he used to see President Wilson's Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan),but he was embarassed by the teen-age daughters who used to run their fingers through his wavy red hair. He was active & on one occasion Easter Sunday March 23, 1913 walked forty-four miles between Baltimore, Maryland, & Washington without stopping to eat or sleep. He lived in the house for several years but finally had to move out reluctantly when lightning struck the house - the storm damaged the roof so badly a great deal of water came in. This was the period when the Barretts heard from immigrant Aunt Johanna Hession aged eighty-five years, who in April 1914 sent twenty-five dollar presents to his sisters Mollie & Kate (April l9l4) & Jack's father's sister Kate Barrett who lived with her aunts at 2043 Polk Street San Francisco wrote Jack a long letter about the San Francisco World's Fair l9l5-her interest in women's suffrage & in President Woodrow Wilson's Irish-American press Secretary Joseph Tumulty - one of the first Irish to hold prominent national office- & her concern with the violent activities of the International Workers of the World ("I hope they go to Kamchatka or Patagonia - I don't care which," she wrote. Postcards from Jack to South Boston were numerous - he followed his brother Bill's progress at Boston Latin School, where they had most of the same teachers.Jack came home to Boston most holidays.His work was largely mathematical revising the tables in Bowditch's American Practical Navigator. Occasionally they answered "Inquiries from Mariners" by letters that were sometimes published. This was the period he got to know Gershom Bradford, C.C. Ennis & other Hydrographic staffers he kept in touch with for many years. The Hydrographic Office was begun in 1840s by Matthew Fontaine Maury, who took the confederate side in the Civil War. George Littlehales was one of the better known hydrographers. Jack took a public speaking course at Gonzaga College & spent much time at the District of Columbia Carroll council Knights of Columbus.He saw chess champions Albert Lasker & Jose Capablanca at the Capitol City Chess & Checker Club. He memorized a poem, "If you would ruin a man, Dagger & bomb are archaic- Teach him - Inoculate him with chess. It is fortunate perhaps that chess is seldom well taught -Or we should have (the world) going to rack & ruin while statesmen pondered (their chessboards) & taxicabs made knights' moves from Charing Cross to Picadilly- & Every now & then a suicide would turn up with this tragic message pinned to its breast -'Alas- I checked with my queen too soon.'" Jack recounted one incident of a man who had & evening date & came in "for a quick game" & was glued to the chessboard five hours later, having forgotten all about the date. BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE In December 1916 Jack transferred from Naval Hydrographic Office to the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce in Department of Commerce, where he worked until activated April 1917 as Naval Reserve officer at American entry into World War I.The Bureau was concerned with promoting United States exports and trade interests and developing new markets.Jack's linguistic experience at Boston Latin School was helpful, and he remembered translating a number of languages, particularly Rumanian, which retained a strong resemblance to classical Latin.Among his friends there he kept in touch with Chauncy Snow, a nephew of New York state's Senator Chauncy Depew, a well known wit and public speaker. In the 1960s Jack Barrett still exchanged Christmas cards with Chauncy Snow's son, an Episcopal minister. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA NAVAL MILITIA In l9l5 Jack always interested in the sea, joined the District of Columbia Naval Militia.Among the l9l6 members we found the name of Miles Finley, now a retired Navy Commander. On October 23, l970 Commander Finley wrote: "Dear Mrs. Barrett,Your interesting letter of September 27th was forwarded to me by Bureau of Personnel, arriving just as we were leaving for San Francisco (his home is in San Diego, California).My connection with the D.C. Naval Militia was fairly brief.As I recall the chain of events was something like this: I had served in the War Department as a Quartermaster clerk at Fort Flagler,Washington, & at Fort Riley,Kansas August l908 to January l9ll.I was again in Federal Service, Office of Postmaster General,starting August l9l2.I marched up Pennsylvania Avenue,heading a squad of telephone girls & charwomen in the Preparedness parade, passing in review before President Wilson. As the War Clouds began to roll up, I discussed personal war plans with my good friend, Lieutenant C.G.A.Johnson, P.A. Pay (clerk) D.C. Naval Militia DCNM headed by Captain MacGruder. I had thought of applying for a commission in the Quartermaster Corps, U.S.Army, but Carl asked me to go with him one Sunday morn to the DCNM Armory- Water and O Streets for an interview with Lieutenant Commander R.B. Bruninant (spelling?)DCNM, the commanding officer - he was chief clerk Bureau of Ordinance Navy Department. I think it was the next Monday that Carl telephoned me to go buy a uniform, that I had been commissioned Ensign, DCNM (Assistant Paymaster).- & this was followed promptly by orders to a session of Naval pay Officers' School Sept.l5-October l4, l9l6.I qualified for the National Naval Volunteers by attending this school & proving my ability.(Jack Barrett also became a member of the National Naval Volunteers by examination - Sophie Barrett note).I attended drill regularly & made one cruise in the USS SYLVIA Thanksgiving weekend l9l6 when we took Adjutant general J.C. Costner commanding D.C. Militia to the Colonial Beach area. He went duck hunting.Bunks in officer country were all filled, & I spread a mattress in a passageway.(Jack Barrett made this cruise on the SYLVIA). Sorry these XEROX prints are so poor,but you will note 'Recruiting Campaign begun" in the 'Ready for Service' story.I was that recruiting officer, under orders of March 28, l9l7 for the purpose of making necessary preliminary arrangements for mobilization' an endorsement of April 6, l9l7 reads." You will discontinue duty under these orders received to mobilize Naval Militia."April 6, l9l7 other orders directed me to report at the Naval Militia Armory forthwith- turn over federal equipment & proceed to Naval Yard Norfolk. I then received orders to proceed to such port as the USS YANTRON may be (at) & report to the Commanding officer for duty as ordered.I remember your husband, but we met only at drills. I did not march in the March 4, l9l7 Inaugural Parade, I had not yet acquired `an overcoat. Carl G.A. Johnson did march. (Jack Barrett marched & kept postcards of the Inaugural March on March 4, l9l7.) I had a cozy seat to watch the event at a window in the old Post Office Building, Pennsylvania Avenue.I know the boys towed a field piece up the Avenue, & many sets of colors were riddled by the strong cold rain.-Miles Finley." From XEROX material D.C. Naval Militia Ready for Service. Men could turn out fully equipped a few hours after call received.In a very few hours after a call for mobilization is received at the Naval Militia Armory at the foot of Water & O Streets Southwest, that organization could turn out, fully equipped one (hundred) sixty fighting men= men who knew at least the rudiments of work aboard a man-of-war.A plan of the Navy Department to call out the Naval Militia to relieve officers and men of the regular Navy for service aboard the first-line ships of the Navy is awaiting the signature of the President.The one hundred sixty men now on the rolls are thoroughly interested- as all men who have not attended drills regularly have been dropped. These men participate in the Thursday night drills & participate in the practice cruises aboard the USS SYLVIA, the training ship loaned to the organization by the Navy.Four officers have taken the examination required by the Navy for the National Naval Volunteers. They are Lieutenant C.G.A. Johnson, assistant paymaster, Lieutenant,P.D. Johnston commanding the First Division, Ensign J. B. Barrett commanding the Second Division, & M.R. Finley assistant Paymaster. The other officers are expected to take their examinations in a short time, & the examinations of the men are now being held.A recruiting campaign has just been inaugurated in order to recruit the organization to its full strength of 445 men. Prizes have been offered by the staff officers of the battalion for the men who bring in the most recruits.Every officer & man now in the organization is fully equipped for service afloat & the Supply Department of the local organization has on hand enough outfits to completely equip two hundred men immediately.The local organization is fully equipped to handle any large number of recruits that might come in as a result of a mobilization order." (End Finley's XEROX). Jack Barrett's service chronology: December l9l5 Served as A.S. 2M 3c & O.M. 2c in the Naval Militia of Washington DC till August l9l6. -July 15-26, 1916 Jack served as Quartermaster First Class on battleship ILLINOIS XBB7 368 feet length - 72.5 feet breadth, 23 feet6 inches draft,11,552 tons, steel constructed 1901 Newport News, Virginia Vertical 3 EXP engines eight mosher boilers, General Electric Company. COMMISSIONED ENSIGN, NAVAL MILITIA August l9l6 commissioned Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February l9,l9l7 passed examination as Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February 24, l9l7 Ensign National Naval Volunteers- accepted & executed oath of office.March 28, l9l7 Commissioned Ensign in the National Naval Volunteers dating from February 24, l9l7.==ACTIVE SERVICE WORLD WAR I April 7,l9l7 Called into the service of the United States & to Navy Yard,Washington DC for duty aboard the USS SYLVIA(a converted yacht). --l9l7 November 8- Detached SYLVIA to duty USS MONTGOMERY as Navigator. Name changed to ANNISTON March 14, 1918 while Jack was aboard. The ship was camouflaged & did convoy duty in Carribean.Authorized 1888, this cruiser (no. 9) was built at Columbia Iron Works, Baltimore, Maryland - stricken from Navy rolls August 25, 1919, sold November 13, 1919) l9l8-January l- Jack became Lieutenant junior grade (jg) National Naval Volunteers for temporary service duty dating from January l, l9l8- May l7, l9l8 accept & executed oath of office. Granted two days leave from June l0 to June llth l9l8. June l3 detached USS ANNISTON to duty Naval Training Station Norfolk Virginia. - l9l8 July 1 Lieutenant in Naval Reserve Force, class two - transferred to Naval Reserve Force by act of Congress approved July 1, l9l8 - July l0 admitted to Naval Hospital Hampton roads Va for treatment (sinus/?) Discharge July 23. Nov, 23, l9l8 given the provisional assignment with rank & grade of Lieutenant LDO in the Naval Reserve Class two to rank from July 1,l9l8. Assignment expires Feb. 23, l920- Dec. 2, l9l8 accepted & executed oath of office. From the Commandant of the First Naval District "There is forwarded herewith a Victory Medal conferred upon you in accordance with the provisions of an Act of Congress approved May l3, l908 directing the preparation & distribution of badges to the officers & men of the Navy & Marine Corps of the United States who participated in engagements & campaigns deemed worthy of such commemoration.The badge is issued to you by the Bureau of Navigation in recognition of your services in the World War." #04 World War I era-April l0, l9l7 to October 22, l9l7 executive officer, navigator & watch officer on USS SYLVIA Fifth Naval District.Oct. 22 to Oct. 25 temporary duty Kazeruna (spelling?) October 25 to November l5, back to SYLVIA. November l5, l9l7 to June 16, l9l8 navigator USS MONTGOMERY later named ANNISTON along Atlantic seaboard between Newport Rhode Island, Charleston, South Carolina, & Bermuda. The ANNISTON was camouflaged & did convoy duty in the Carribean (not clear if Lieutenant Barrett was aboard at that time). INSTRUCTOR OFFICER MATERIAL SCHOOL, HAMPTON ROADS, VIRGINIA: From June l7, l9l8 to March 2l, l9l9 Jack Barrett was an instructor in Seamanship & Regulations at the Officer Material School, Norfolk (Hampton Roads,?) Virginia under Captain Quimby. On one occasion Jack Barrett received a commendation for volunteering special skills:"One of the naval overseas vessels that were sailing had to return to port Saturday night because of the condition of the compasses.It was rather difficult under the circumstances to get an expert to compensate the compasses without considerable delay to the ship.Lieutenant (jg) Barrett was communicated with & the circumstances explained to him.He very gladly offered to go out to the ship & compensate the compasses. I want to express my appreciation for the work that he did, as it was a saving to the government & it prevented a delay of at least one day's sailing of the vessel. Signed W.S Whitted, Commander United States Navy, Retired." Captain Quimby sent a letter to the Bureau of Navigation:"It gives me pleasure to forward the enclosed letter of commendation in regard to the compass work of Lieutenant J.B.Barrett & suggest that such matters should be placed in the record of Lietenant Barrett, & letter of commendation should be returned to Lieutenant JB Barrett from the Navy Department."On February l7, l9l9 Jack received orders to proceed to Washington DC for a three day course of instruction at the Naval Observatory.On November l4, l9l8 Lieutenant HL Crawford USN Retired, wrote to the Steamboat Inspectors at Tampa Florida:"This is to certify that JB Barrett served as Quartermaster first class in the USS ILLINOIS from July l5, l9l6 to July 26, l9l6, also as Executive & Navigating Officer on the USS SYLVIA from April 10, l9l7 to November 15, l9l7, performing all duties assigned to him in an efficient manner. he was found to be a sober, capable, & industrious office, & I take great pleasure in recommending him as such. We have the graduation programs of the classes of the Officer Material School in which Jack was an instructor l9l8, & they list the names of the graduates.After prolonged search we located one member of those classes Commander Arthur Edwin Uber, born in l897 now retired & living in Butler, Pennsylvania: On May 4, l97l he wrote,"Mrs. Barrett: Yes! I am the same A.E. Uber who was graduated from the officer Material School at the Naval Operating Base in Norfolk, Virginia on 12 March l9l9. Our school was the old Pennsylvania Building constructed for the Jamestown Exposition held in l907.Captain "Jack" Quimby as you mention was in charge of the school.Strange as it may seem, your late husband's name was the only other name I can remember among all the instructors & students in the school.You must remember this is all about a period fifty- two years ago.Tiny fragments of the time, if any at all,come back to me now. I am quite sure any of my recollections would be of little value to you.He was not tall - rather thin- But the name sticks. A group of us were standing out in front of the building, across from the sea wall on the other side of the street.Someone said, "Here comes 'Salty' Barrett. We saluted.He returned it!!!- Put on a big grin & waved back. He evidently had on his number three work uniform, since the braid was well tarnished with a greenish line.Among us in those days an officer who showed evidence of practical experience & sea duty was much admired & respected.See what I mean? Just a little bit of the past= 52 years ago- of no particular value.I still have my "Knight's Seamanship", which is falling apart & also my little "Bluejacket's Manual.I remember going up to Yorktown one weekend on the PAMLICO ((training ship for students in Officer Material School). Quarters were crowded or non-existent.Many swung their hammocks outside on deck. It was cold - but turned warm during the night & rained.That precipitated a rush to get under cover- you can imagine..-A.E. Uber." TROOPSHIP USS SEATTLE commanded by Captain J.R. Y. Blakely under Admiral Gleaves_March l9, l9l9 Jack Barrett was detached from Fifth Naval District where he had served as Instructor of Seamanship & Regulations at Officer Material School Norfolk. He reported next to the Commander, Cruiser & Transport Force, New York for assignment to USS SEATTLE. - l9l9 March 31: To duty as Navigator on board the USS Seattle. Made three (four?) round trips Brest (Brittany, France) to Hoboken New Jersey with returning troops. Smedley Butler US Marine Corps was in charge of a large base at Brest with Marines & other troops awaiting transportation. Jack was interested in Butler's career & may have seen him at this time & at Shanghai l927. It is possible Jack's acquaintance with Pacific Fleet Chaplain William Maguire (Captain USN in l940's) may date from this time also. Some notes in Jack's handwriting stolen l993 gave chronology of an incident April l9l9 at Brest, where local civilians stole eggs from the battleship about three o'clock in the morning, leading to an investigation.There were severe food shortages in France & other parts of Europe at this period in aftermath of the Great War. Two well known World War I Naval leaders were aboard the SEATTLE who had been in the thick of the convoy effort - the SEATTLE was the flagship of Admiral Gleaves, who organized and led the first American convoy in 1917, which went to St. Nazaire to surprise the Germans, who expected the convoys to go to the large convenient port of Brest at the time of the Brittany peninsula - and Captain John Russell Y. Blakely was the SEATTLE's Captain. Gleaves wrote a book about the convoy operations and unprecedented movement of personnel thousands of miles at sea. The number of ships involved reached a maximum in 1919, as there was haste to "bring the boys home." The SEATTLE was 504 feet 5 inches length - breadth 72 feet ten inches 25 feet draft displacement 14,500 tons- tons per inch immersion 59.7 - fuel 2062 tons coal -masts one cage one military - mess 19 wardroom officers, 14 junior officers, 38 chief petty officers - marines 64- other enlisted 820. Engines Bert 3EXP. 16B+ W boilers. Horsepower 27463 General Electric turbines. Guns: four ten-inch 40 caliber sixteen six-inch 50 caliber Anti-aircraft two three-inch. Four twenty-one-inch torpedoes. Five inch hull armor New York SB Company built $4,035,000. Authorized July 1, 1902. Launched 1905. Commissioned August 7, 1906. Out of commission Feb. 14, 1921. Speed 22.27 knots. -l9l9: June l9 Detached USS SEATTLE & relieved of all active duty. This was the period of the popular song, "How're ya going to keep 'em down on the Farm after they've seen Paris? How're ya going to keep them away from Broadway, painting the town? - That's a mystery." Around this time early 1919, Jack's friend William W. Paca as an Army Military Police Officer was arresting deserters who were hiding in Paris sewers and did not want to return home to the United States. There was no arrangement for American troops to be discharged in France, and they had to come home. Grace Bacon, who became Sophie Barrett's Professor for three years of German language study at Mount Holyoke, was in France with the Red Cross some months in 1919. Troop morale during World War I was helped by entertainers like Ernestine Schumann-Heinck, famous for her rendition of the carol "Silent Night". Even she, after the end of the war was concerned for her son to be released from service so he could help with her concert tours. DEMOBILIZATION Jack left active Naval Reserve duty early in August, 1919, and investigated employment opportunities. Jack briefly signed up on a ship WEST CORUM but reansferred to be first officer of the commercial ship WESTERNER (previously a troopship) from November l5, l9l9 to September l0, l920.The Commander, Mal Richardson from Virginia, was one of Jack's closer & more congenial friends & correspondents for nearly fifty years, & he & his sister-in-law Mrs. Kane kept in touch with the Barrett family until l972, when he passed away. Jack made his first trip through the Panama Canal, opened l9l4. The visited Hawaii, & Japan, where Jack took photographs of the Inland Sea & sent them to the Navy department, which was interested in precise information on foreign ports & waterways.He wrote his father a long letter from Shanghai - his first visit to China. They took on timber & cordage materials as cargo in Manila. Until l993 we had a notebook with Jack's detailed navigational calculations of stars, latitudes & longitudes passing through the eight-degree-north channel in islands south of India. Before the advent of radio, it was important to be able to recognize many navigational stars, as only a few might be visible in cloudy weather.With somewhat less cargo than hoped they proceded through Suez & arrived Liverpool May l920. Jack could see the Irish shore, from which his grandparents had emigrated, but there was political tension in the time of the "troubles" as Ireland sought independence from Britain, & this was the closest Jack ever came to the homeland of his ancestors.The ship was bothered by thefts on the dock,& Jack as first mate complained to the police. One policeman said to him, "You'll stand by me, mate?"Jack believed he was asking for a bribe but offered him nothing.One of the officers Jack remembered pleasantly was a Norwegian named Torkelson.In London Jack saw Pavlova danced her favorite ballet role as the Swan in Camille Saint-Saens's "Le Cygne". It was probably on this trip (or in Washington) that Jack saw Sarah Bernhardt play Shakespeare's "Shylock" in her older years after having a leg amputated.He mentioned this a number of times in conversation. Having already been in England several times, Jack began to know his way around fairly well and found he was accepted practically as a native and seldom spotted as an American unless he volunteered the information. He was fond of saying that the speech habits of New Englanders and Virginians were closer to those of England than the speech habits of other Americans. He found his acceptance as a native curious and sometimes embarassing. His impish nature got the better of him one time when he was asked in London, probably in the subway by a traveler, "Is Picadilly Circus this way?" Tired of making explanations that he was a foreigner, Jack just pointed somewhere and said, "That way." He later realized that he had probably been ninety degrees in error, but he turned it into a very funny story, though we were somewhat scandalized. FOLLOW-UP on HERMAN INGALLS and 1912 LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE MAINE: Sophie located Mrs. Herman Ingalls 1970 at Starboard,Bucks Harbor, Maine and learned her Mount Holyoke classmate Marion Lewis Smart and her husband Vin went there summers (they settled there year-round later, when Vin retired from New York law practice). This letter of Marion's describes her enjoyable visit with spry Mrs. Ingalls:---NBK 8 p 204-207 September 23, 1975 Starboard Bucks Harbor Maine 04618 [from Marion Lewis Smart Dear Sophie What a pleasant experience I had last week when I called on Mrs. Captain Ingalls in Howard Cove. She is a delightful lady of eighty-eight. She had just returned from a birthday party for someone who was ninety years and said, "I am completely stuffed with good Down East cooking." He home is charming-one that had been Captain Ingalls's grandfather's- and she and the Captain reclaimed it mostly themselves on his retirement. She lives all soul alone, much to the displeasure of her only living daughter and her grandchildren. She has six great-grandchildren. When they left Cortland, they sold all their furniture ad purchased what she called "island furniture" beautiful pieces from the old homes on Maine's many islands- they are priceless now of course- and after his retirement they traveled, and she collected exquisite pieces of glassware and small furnishings. She was and is I guess an artist, for on the tiny dining room plaster walls she has a mural of the last schooner to sail from Machias down the river, as well as a family tree of sorts depicting the history of the land that had passed down from one Howard who held squatters' rights until Maine was separated from Masachusetts. We talked and talked about this and that, and she eagerly showed me her treasures - someone is writing about lighthouses and has taped her recollections. Very little authentic information can be found either in the archives of Washington or from the rapidly diminishing group associated with the early tending of the houses before the Coast Guard took over. Thank you for giving me a reason to call upon such a charming, agile, and up-to-date lady. She greeted me in gorgeous turquoise blue pants, gay flowered blouse, matching sweater, and perfectly coiffured hair- sparkling blue eyes, and lots of spirit. She had just finished painting a corner cupboard which has had to be repaired as the corner post had been eaten away by ants- she had still the outer wall to paint on the sun porch! Well, we're still here, leaving the end of this week when Vin will begin the racket of commuting to New York on the first. Your letter of the twelfth was forwarded to us here, taking about a week to arrive here. I have followed with interest despair and shock at the goings-on in Hyde Park but was grateful to read that when the spirit of unrest appeared in a lunch room of four hundred, student leaders calmed the crowd, and no disturbance really erupted. The black problem is so desperately complicated, and poor Boston seems to have ben torn to pieces. I went to school with blacks, white, and European races, and we all got along splendidly - however, each followed his racial mores at home and socially - we all respected the other's background - New York of course is changed in color, for thre are thousands of Puerto Ricans beside the blacks. We noticed no integration among the gulls that sail and glide about - they keep to their own group and species! The Giles situation is indeed complex and heart breaking - one does have to respect the privacy of an individual and his family as one longs to aid or help in some way. We have no connection with the Food and Drug Administration and have thought them careless in the release of some drugs and additives while frustratingly slow in accepting or releasing others. One example is the drug which has proved so successful in the treatment of arthritis- people move to California so as to be near the Mexican border and can there cross over for the treatment which has been so miraculous in results. = I am sure that Gerard [Buckley] and Jerry Murray will eventually meet [Perth Austrlia]. Our little family is head over heels involved in their University work, and recently they have acquired a small piece of land with many fruit trees on it - part of a former farm- outside of Perth -no house, just land and trees with so many possibilities ahead that they are immersed in all the quirks and trials of immediate plans and those in the future. Jerry is now in another institution, so I imagine that their University meetings are not as frequent as before, and weekends seem to be spent on the "farm" as they prune, plan and picnic. The babies love the freedom there, and the former owners, living now nearby, are more than hospitable. [Hurricane] Eloise is blowing in Alabama while we are smothered in fog and drizzle. The rain drops on the roof have a very soporific effect on me, so please forgive my wanderings on paper. Trees as an interest - that reminds me of the collections of slides and old glass photograph plates I gave to the Brattle Street Book Shop when I finally reached the boxes in the barn where my grandfather had them stored. He had photographed trees all over New England. Those photographs were famous in size, in history or peculiarity - the old photographs went, too. Grandpa used to show them with his old huge stereopticon. We have a nice large oak tree here on our New Jersey property, and the house is panelled in chestnut downstairs, dining room, hall, beams and low panels with fireplace in the living room. We love it, for it is its natural color, only aged. Most of the original houses in Mountain Lakes had chestnut woodwork as the blight had hit, and the lumber was avilable for the saw mill established for the development of the community from the wilderness in 1911. I must don wet weather clothes, yellow pants, and jacket as we must unload our boat before leaving here. We pulled the "Wrinkla" out yesterday, and she is now high and dry in a field! So glad to hear from you with all your news, which is vital to all your friends. Write again. as always -Marion [Lewis Smart 1923] During 1970-1972 Sophie Barrett corresponded with Dorothy Kane, sister-in-law of 'Captain' Mal Richardson, whom Jack served with 1917-18 on the MONTGOMERY and again 1920 on the commercial ship WESTERNER. If the 1972 obituary is accurate, it appears the WESTERNER may have been a Navy troop ship during World War I, but it was in commercial service when Jack went around the world as a ship's officer with Richardson December 1919-May 1920. This is the text Sophie preserved [black notebook one p- 249] THE VIRGINIA PILOT Feb 8, 1972 Captain Mal S. RICHARDSON 81 Retired Commander Mal S. Richardson of 1130 Manchester Avenue formerly with Merchant Marine Inspection Division died Monday evening in a hospital.Captain Richardson retired in 1952 after more than four decades as a deep water chief mate and relief master. A native of Matthias county, he lived here thirty years. He was a member of [?Batelot?] Masonic Lodge 7, Gloucester, Known by associates as 'Captain' Richardson, he began his sailing career with the Old Bay Line in 1909 as a Quartermaster. In 1910 he joined the Merchant and Miners Transportation Company as a second mate, later became chief mate running between Baltimore and Norfolk and betwen New York City and Jacksonville, Florida.In 1913 on trips between New York City, Boston, and South America he was chief mate and chief relief master. He entered the Navy on April 18, 1917 and was appointed a Lieutenant Commander and Commander of the troop transport WESTERNER and made trips around the world. He also was manager of the James River Reserve Fleet in 1923. He left this job to join the Bureau of Merchant Marine Inspection in Norfolk in 1936 with rank of Lieutenant Commander. He remained in Norfolk after his retirement.He is survived by nieces, nephews, cousins [+ sister-in-law Dorothy Kane].


 


#1094 p 56 destroyer TOUCEY 1921 Jack Barrett Regular Navy Lieutenant

 

T-O-U-C-E-Y (1921) & 1923 San Luis Obispo grounding Edit CHAPTER- REGULAR NAVY COMMISSION & SERVICE ON DESTROYER TOUCEY:- Jack had been decommissioned in July 1919 after three trips to Brest, France on cruiser SEATTLE bringing troops home from World War I.On one of these trips he was Navigator of this heavy large troopship. After investigating employment opportunities he accepted two positions as a Merchant Marine officer - briefly on WEST CORUM and then a cruise December 1919-May 1920 around the world as First officer of SS WESTERNER under his friend Mal Richardson from the ANNISTON (MONTGOMERY) during the war. He then obtained active duty December, 1920 as a Naval Reserve Officer and took exams in 1921 leading to his permanent commission in Regular Navy. His first year's duty was aboard destroyer TOUCEY based at Charleston, South Carolina,although the ship visited New England in the autumn,and there is a photograph of his sisters Mollie and Kate visiting on board October 1921 at Newport Rhode Island. He saw his mother's brother John J.Buckley of Melrose at the Charlestown Navy Yard, where his uncle John worked many years as a ship's patternmaker. The TOUCEY went as far north as Bar Harbor, Maine, where Jack repeated in letters the joke, "Bar Harbor sure lived up to its name." In January 1921 Jack traveled to Charleston aboard the USS STRINGHAM as a Lieutenant USNRF and received his orders in a message January 27 from the Bureau of Navigation:"You will regard yourself detached from your present station,will proceed and report for duty in accordance with following instructions: when directed by the Commander, Destroyer Force,Alantic Fleet detached from the STRINGHAM, proceed to the port in which the USS TOUCEY may be and report to the Commanding Officer for such duty as may be assigned you aboard that vessel." On 9 June l97l D.C. Alard, the head of the Operational Archives Branch of the Naval History division, Washington D.C. wrote, "Dear Mrs Barrett, This replies to your letter of 13 May concerning the TOUCEY. Enclosed are copies of TOUCEY's log for 19-20 March l921 when the TOUCEY was aground. TOUCEY was scrapped in l930. The attached extracts from the Navy Directory for February and April l921 list the oficers on board at that time. We believe that the only one of these individuals who is still alive is Captain Edwin D. Gibb, USN Retired.His address is General Post Office Box 9l3 New York, New York 10001. Enclosed: Log of TOUCEY for l9-20 March l921 Extracts from Navy Directory for February and April 1921." Ships Roster of Officers February 1, l921 Lieutenant Commander P.L. Carroll, commanding-- Lieutenat E.D. Gibb, engineer Ensign J.T. Acres Lieutenat jg E. F. Carr, supply officer. -- April 1, l921 Lieutenant Commander P.L. Carroll commanding Lieutenant J. E. Kenmore Lieutenant J. B. Barrett, N.R.F. (Executive officer and Navigator Lieutenant jg Straits gunnery Ensign J. T. Acres Lieutenant jg Ellery F. Carr Supply Officer. EDWIN D. GIBB LETTERS-Correspondence with Captain Gibb:#50 T-O-U-C-E-Y l92l (first letter)July l, l97l Dear Mrs Barrett I am pleased to receive your thoughtful letter of June seventh.Your reference to days on the TOUCEY take me back many,many years ago,over fifty,when the spirit of youth pervaded the very atmosphere. I do remember our delightful shipmate of long ago, your husband John.His ever pleasant smile & cheerful outlook on life will always live in my memory.A few days before the TOUCEY's departure from 236 Charleston,South Carolina on that ill-fated trip to Savannah (where she ran aground) I was detached & ordered to command the CONVERSE.In the general changeover of personnel at that time John became executive officer & navigator of the TOUCEY under the command of Carroll.Our squadron commander at the time was Captain Harry Yarnell & the Fleet commander was Rear Admiral Ashley Robertson. Upon retirement Penn Carroll taught in the University at Monterey,where he died.Carroll was a competent engineer & was engineer of the first capital ship having electric drive. Carroll's daughter is married to Rear Admiral Kenneth Wallace now on duty I believe in Washington.Oscar Holtman was a classmate of mine & died many years ago- a brilliant young officer. My memory of Foster & Sciano is vague.I was born in Roxbury on Blue Hill Avenue just below Grove Hall. Congressman Curley appointed me to the Naval Academy.I received a master's degree in engineering from Harvard during my first shore duty.I don't remember what happened to Ellery Carr,the paymaster on the TOUCEY. I'm fearful he no longer answers to muster.He was a great chap.Perhaps a specific question would jolt my memory.Believe me it is a pleasure to help you, with my best wishes-from Edwin D. Gibb." Edwin D. Gibb of San Antonio Texas (second letter) July 27,l97l:"Dear Mrs. Barrett,My impression is that you command a lot more information of the l92l TOUCEY period than I can possibly muster.I do however remember Jim TomAcree(sp?) He served as my engineer oficer when I had the destroyer CONVERSE. He was transferred from a destroyer to the CONVERSE because he was not happy.He was on the TOUCEY with me too. I lost all track of my East Coast destroyer attachments in l922 when I went to post graduate work.The last I saw of MARTIN DERX was when he was attached to the office of ship movements (Port Director) at Pearl Harbor at the time of the Blitz.I was then Division Commander of destroyers then engaged in high speed mine sweeping operations with the Pacific Fleet based in Pearl Harbor. In fact my division of destroyers had patrol duty at the entrance of Pearl Harbor at the time of the Japanese Blitz.Fortunately none of my craft was hit.I didn't know that Feddie Holmes had died (Captain Gibb & Fred Holmes were classmates in l9l8 as was Martin Derx).(SMB note)-Your letter gave me the news. The last time I had contact with him was when he was living near Jupiter Inlet,Florida.My class is getting thinned out in number.He was not only a skilled golf player but an expert at cards,& often I am told was engaged in stakes involving huge sums of money.This of course is all hearsay because I hadn't ever played with him.Those destroyer days in Charleston were very trying.There were about one hundred ten of them moored in that harbor of fast moving current.We were operating on a very reduced schedule, because our crews were reduced about fifty per cent.Even maintenance with this reduction of personnel presented serious problems. We nested six destroyers together with one craft steaming for all six. The fresh water situation was always a problem because the one steaming destroyer had to furnish all the power & water for the others.Thus the daily cry of the working ship was that the others were draining the working boat dry.However, we survived it & when we again got personnel the sky got blue.(TOUCEY was one of these Charleston destroyers-SMB note) Every year for 25 years I passed thru Charleston Harbor on my yacht en route north & again south.Each year I had vivid memories reminder of the tough old days trying to keep our heads above water with reduced crews at this very same port.With very good wishes,I am Edwin D.Gibb". TOUCEY March 19, 1921- LOG OF GROUNDING USS TOUCEY (282) 19 March l921 Log Remarks: Until 4 am Steaming as before on course 215 psc 216 true leading column standard speed twelve knots followed by DALLAS, BRECK, DALE and REID in order named. At 3:02 moon set At 3:15 vibration, called Captain and at once ordered "Left rudder." Felt slight lurch as if grazing bottom. - Slowed. 1/3 speed then STOP and "Breakdown" Light Stopped engines- ship's head swinging to port and losing way till at 3:19, after touching lightly two or three times - GROUNDED resting easily on heading 209 degrees psc. Had meanwhile signalled other ships in formation that we were aground, instructing them to stand out to deep water on easterly courses.At 3:19 began to list to port.Called all officers and chief petty officers and had them inspect ship to ascertain if any damage had been done.Called "All Hands" and had life belts handy about decks. Chief Carpenter's Mate and Chief Water Tender inspected compartments and reported no apparent damage.At 3:25 finding efforts to move ship astern or ahead by engines unsuccessful, - began discharging fuel oil overboard to lighten ship. Lowered motor sailer and whaleboat to take soundings round ship - meanwhile sounding from deck showed two fathoms.USS DALLAS standing by in deep water to the eastward.Average steam 245. Average revolutions 150. Signed -J.B.Barrett, Lieutenant N.R. F. - 4:00 to 8:00 Am Aground onshoal as before at 4:30. USS REID radioed bearing of Sapello Light as 35l degrees true. At 4:41 at high water resumed attempt to back off shoal. Starboard engine "two thirds astern" -at 4:55 stopped engine.At 5:06 both engines "Two thirds astern." At 5:10 both engines stopped. Gradually assumed a ten degree list on falling tide. Examined all watertight doors to see if they were closed and battened down all hatches.Placed life preservers and Kapok matresses conveniently on deck.Shifted port life raft to starboard - higher - side. Ship's position first approximately located about 4:30 by radio bearing from REID on Sapello Island Light and from Saint Simon after Range Light,which had shown up from the haze. Position positively located at about 5:30 when Sapello Light bore 356 degrees true and Saint Simon after Range Light 231 degrees true, showing ship to be on a shoal at the mouth of Hampton River, Little Simon Island.Latitude 31-12-30 N.Longitude 81-16-00 W - At 5:45 motor sailer from DALLAS in charge of Ensign Bricker USN transferred the following passengers to the DALLAS (The list of passengers is given in the Log remarks They were sailors from the USS HOPEWELL, USS O'BRIEN,USS COLE, USS J.F. TALBOTT, USS TAYLOR, and USS BELL. Forty-four sailors from these ships were passengers on the TOUCEY and were transferred to DALLAS by motor sailer in charge of Ensign Bricker of DALLAS.) Began rigging towing gear aft - At 7:00 tug approached DALLAS and anchored, and whaleboat was sent to direct tug towards ship's position. At 7:10 began pumping out four starboard tanks to compensate for that which had been pumped out upon grounding. At 7:25 secured number four boiler, leaving number three boiler in use for auxiliary purposes. Took soundings regularly and found all compartments dry. Up to 8:00 discharged ten thousand gallons of oil to lighten ship. Signed - C.H. Foster USN Examined by J. B.Barrett USN, Navigator approved by P.L. Carroll, captain. - 8:AM to Meridian Aground as before - ten degrees list to port. At 9:00 took soundings off all compartments, and all found dry. Sent whaleboat out with Ensign Schiano and Thompson R.R. CQM USN to take soundings in the body of water astern, which by reason of no breakers indicated depth- with the idea of delineating possible channel for getting clear of the shoal. At 11:00 took soundings in all compartments and found them dry.Made preparations with life rafts and boats in case of emergency. At 11:30 knocked off all work and served dinner and rebattened down all hatches. At ll:45 made same soundings of all compartments and found all of them dry. Signed C. H. Foster Lieutenant USN - Meridian to 4:00 pm -Aground as before. USS DALLAS standing by in deeper water in an easterly direction. At low water soundings around ship showed greatest depth of eight feet aft.Listed nine degrees to port. Boats engaged in sounding to develop water in vicinity available for working off.Planted three buoys and prepared range and bearing data on soundings referred to ship's position to delineate best chance. At 2:20 prepared to get under way and at 2:35 began working engines astern in attempt to work aft into deeper water. Worked out about fifty feet toward first buoy swinging hard to left and having three degrees list. At 3:25 began discharging fuel oil to lighten ship.Took soundings of all compartments hourly during watch, and all found dry. signed - J. B. Barrett, Lieutenant N.R. F. - 4:00 to 8:00 pm Aground as before. At 4:20 USS B tug BALDROCK anchored at mouth of apparent channel two miles eastward of ship's position. At 4:50 whaleboat returned to ship. - 6:00 whaleboat returned to ship with sixty fathoms six-inch hauser for tug BALDROCK. -7:50 whaleboat returned and secured astern after having left R.R. Thompson CQM USN from the USS TAYLOR on board tug. Soundings of all compartments and magazines made hourly during watch, and all found dry. Signed C. B. Schiano, Ensign, U. S.Navy" 8:00 to midnight Aground as before. Drift lead over the side. Resting easily with a three degree list to Port. on heading 96-30 psc. - At 8:30 tug UMPQUA stood in and anchored near Dallas. Hourly soundings taken in all compartments, and all of them found dry.All hatches except engine room battened down, and men sleeping on deck. At l0:30 low water, took soundings around ship. - At 11:15 JAMISCRAW (YANISCRAW?) stood in and anchored near DALLAS.Sea moderate. Light southeasterly wind. Breakers ahead and on either bow. Sand bar above water on starboard quarter.Sapelo Light bearing 357 degrees true.Shipping board tug BALDROCK got under way and again anchored, bearing 120 degrees psc distance three miles. Simon after Range Light bore 231 degrees true. Signed - Oscar Holtman, Lieutenant USN Examined J. B Barrett N.R.F. Lieutenant, Navigator - approved P.L.Carroll, Lieutenant Commander USN 20 March l921 Commence and until 4:00 AM Aground as before in Latitude 31-12-30 N. Longitude 81-16 W. Sapelo Light bearing 231 degrees true. USS DALLAS, USCG tug YAMACRAW and USS B tug BALDROCK standing by anchored in company three miles to the southeast. BALDROCK bearing 121 degrees psc. Boiler number three in use for auxiliary purposes. Drift lead over the side.All hatches except those of the engine room battened down, and men sleeping on the deck.Resting easily with three degree list to port.Soundings dry. Sea moderate, light southeasterly wind.Breakers ahead and on each bow. Sand bar above water on starboard quarter. Tide running to flood. At 3:10 lit off number four boiler and made preparations for getting under way.Soundings about ship increasing, and at 3:45 slid astern off shoal and backed out, anchoring with port anchor. Standing by for daylight to get under way and try to pass through channel sounded out previous day.- At 4:30 got under way and backed out toward buoy previously laid using searchlight to locate same and sounding rapidly so as to determine depth. Anchored several times when uncertain. Finally anchored at 5:04 in fifteen and a half feet of water with short scope of chain.At daybreak boats from the DALLAS and YAMSACROW reported alongside in obedience to signal and received buoys for continued laying of channel. At 6:15 got under way - backed out following DALLAS's motor sailer. Anchored several times when in doubt until 6:50,when touched ground in passing too close to one of the buoys laid.At 7:00 commenced pumping oil out of after tanks and using engines to get clear of shoal, but without avail. Total amount of oil pumped five thousand gallons. The ship again became fully grounded off the channel in a position about two hundred yards northeasterly of the point of first grounding.Took soundings during watch and found compartments dry. All compartments battened down, and crew required to remain on deck.In attempting to back off, port propeller block damaged.Signed C.H. Foster, Lieutenant, USN - 8:00 AM to Meridian Aground as before,heading 180 psc five feet of water at low tide. All compartments closed except engine room. At 8:02 UMPQUA and BALDROCK stood near DALLAS.Ship assumed a nine degree list to port. At 9:45 DALLAS motor dory and UMPQUA's motor sailer came alongside to confer with Commanding Officer as to plans. At 10:05 DALLAS's dory left the ship,running a line in direction of DALLAS. INCA stood in from sea and anchored near DALLAS at 10:30. At 11:15 low water slack- listed to port nine degrees, resting easily. No damage to Hull sustained.All compartments dry. Least depth of water five feet at number one tube,starboard side.- O.H. Holtman,Lieutenant U.SN Examined by J. B. Barrett, N.R.F. Navigator - Approved P. L. Carroll Meridian to 4:00 pm 113 TOUCEY (p. 243) Aground as before in Lat 3l-13-15 N Long 81-16 W All available boats from rescuing vessels were directed to sound around ship and to continue laying buoys in channel. Sounding compartments regularly. At 1:45 SHIP BEGAN TO BUMP SLIGHTLY on rising tide inclining at varous angles up to twenty-six degrees. All hatches and watertight door inspected. Began making preparations for getting under way at 1:00 and reported ready at 1:30. At 2:03 "General Alarm" sign sounded accidentally due to short circuit.At 2:05 "Right Rudder" and at 2:06 "1/3 astern port." At 2:07 "1/3 astern both engines." At 2:15 "stop both engines." At 2:27 anchored to port anchor and about fifteen fathoms of chain. Buoy dropped marking its position Lat. 31-13-15 N. Long. 81-16 W. At 3:10 "1/3 astern port, l/3 ahead starboard" Working off to leeward of shoal. At 3:18 afloat.Anchored to starboard anchor in seventeen feet of water. approximately three hundred yards west of previous position. All boats called alongside and given direction as to procedure in sounding out channel and in assisting ship to pass out.- J. B. Barrett Lieutenant USNRF 4:00 to 8:00 pm as before Sent out TOUCEY's whaleboat and DALLAS's motor sailer to act as guards to channel; YAMACRAW's two whaleboats used to mark limits of shoals bordering channel. At 4:20 began heaving starboard anchor using left rudder in order to swing head towards channel. At 4:25 under way using engines slowly and headed for channel on course approximately 83 psc following whaleboat which continuously took soundings at slow speed.Passed whaleboat at fifteen hundred yards previous position and then followed motor sailer. At 5:03 clear of shoals. INCA saluted with three blasts, which was answered. USS B tug BROCK, USCG Yamacrow and YUSS UMPQUA saluted and were answered. At 5:05 sighted USS CONVERSE, at 5:06 anchored starboard anchor, thirty fathoms of chain, twenty-nine feet ofwater lat 31-13 N, Long 81-14 W At 5:25 USS COVERSE anchored 350 yards to eastward. At 5:30 all ships except USS CONVERSE anchored 350 yards to eastward.At 5:30 all ships except USS CONVERSE under way. At 7:22 (TOUCEY) under way. At 7:25 CONVERSE under way. Followed CONVERSE on course 42 degrees true. Standard speed ten knots. Soundings of magazines and compartments taken during watch, and all found dry.- C. B. Schiano, Ensign USNavy. 8:00 pm to midnight Steaming as before on course 49 degrees 30' psc conforming to CONVERSE. Speed l07 revolutions, nine knots. Number three and four boilers in operation. At 8:35 standard speed eight knots to prevent excessive vibration of hull due to damaged propellor.At 9:22 Sapello Light base in port quarter distance about nine miles.At 11:45 reduced speed owing to excessive vibration, and found going comfortable. Took regular soundings of all compartments during watch and found all dry. Average steam 250 average revolution 102.- C.H.Foster, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy. Examined J. B. Barrett, NRF USN Washington - approved P.L. Carroll,Lieutenant Commander. This grounding of the TOUCEY on a shoal at the mouth of the Hampton River,Little Simon Island, Georgia, was a serious matter, necessitating Jack's staying on duty for forty-eight hours. Lieutenant Commander P.L. Carroll, the commanding officer of theTOUCEY, was very pleased with the work Jack did to get the TOUCEY off the shoal. For years after Commander Carroll wrote to Jack on the anniversary of the grounding to express his appreciation for Jack's work in getting the ship off the shoal.While on the TOUCEY on 18 November 1921 at Charleston, South Carolina Jack then in the United States Naval Reserve Force was designated as SeniorMember of a Summary Court Martial, which was convened on the USS ISHERWOOD. On January 13, l922 the TOUCEY received the message from the Bureau of Navigation:" Prior departure COLUMBUIA from Charleston Lieutenant John B. Barrett detached TOUCEY, report COLUMBIA. Upon falling in with WYOMING detached COLUMBIA- Report duty WYOMING. You will regard yourself detached from present duty- report to Commanding officer USS COLUMBIA for duty.- JB. Abbott."He was detached from the TOUCEY 13 January l922 at the Navy Yard ChaRLESTON DETACHED USS COLUMBIA 19 JANUARY 1922 GUANCANAYABO Cuba Reported USS WYOMING 19 January l922 Gulf of Guancanoyabo,Cuba to Captain H. B. Price. In l921 while on the TOUCEY Jack took the examinations for Lieutenant n the regular Navy.On the TOUCEY on 25 November l921 Jack signed:" I hereby acknowledge receipt of discharge from the U.S. Naval Reserve Force, to be effective 25 November l921, the day preceding acceptance and execution of oath of office for appointment in the Navy. On 26 November 1921 Jack wrote the Bureau of Navigation, "I hereby respectfully acknowledge receipt of a commission as Lieutenant in the Navy. I return herewith acceptance and oath of office executed this date." While on the TOUCEY the Bureau of Navigation sent a message to Jack: "The President of the United States by and with the consent of the Senate having appointed you as Lieutenant in the Navy from the third day of August l920, I have the pleasure to transmit your commission dated 7 November l921. - H.H. Crosby, November 14, l921" In May 1921 Jack sent a message to the Secretary of the Navy, "It is reported that I have this date relieved Lieutenant Commander Carroll as Commanding Officer of the USS TOUCEY. No general drills were held. inasmuch as as Executive officer I am familiar with the organization of this vessel.Signed -J.B. Barrett,Lieutenant USNRF" And on May 31, l921 Jack wrote to the Captain , P.L. Carroll "I hereby take over the general mess of the USS TOUCEY on this date. At this time there is an unusual allowance of $408.34, and stores by inventory to the amount of $1396.37. " Some papers showed that Jack had to replace a lost or stolen pair of binoculars which had been in his custody. The written professional examination for Lieutenant USN was held on16 May 1921,while Jack was on the TOUCEY. The physical exam was on May 10, l921.When Jack was made a full Lieutenant in the United States Navy in August l921 Commander Carroll wrote him a congratulatory letter saying he knew Jack would pass the examination and was delighted at how well he did. Whe Jack boarded the TOUCEY her home port was Charleston, South Carolina, At a ship's open house,he met Marie Nelson and Rolfe Druen - two very attractive girls who lived and worked in Charleston,and after that Rolfe often saw Lieutenant Oscar Holtman of the TOUCEY,and Jack saw Marie Nelson.He had a lot of Shore Patrol duty while on the TOUCEY, and when it was over he ws hungry and would go to the Nelson home where he got"the best food in Charleston" and received hospitality in a delightful home. Marie had sisters- Irene,Stella, Lucile, and a younger brother Harold, about fourteen in 1921. Mrs.Nelson liked Jack, and her husband did too. A lifelong friendship developed between Jack and the Nelson family of Charleston, South Carolina. Mr. Nelson enjoyed poker games with his friend, and they all enjoyed the sandwiches and coffee served at their games. Although Mr.Nelson let Jack watch the games and take refreshments, he would not allow him to play because the stakes were too high for the pocketbook of a young Naval officer. Jack left the TOUCEY in January l922 about the time Marie Nelson married Charles Harman Rowe of Philadelphia.When the MARBLEHEAD was being put in commission in Philadelphia in l924, Jack saw Marie Nelson Rowe in Philadelphia and also saw her later in New York City in August of l928 when she was visiting her friend Anne Taylor McCormack at whose apartment I was living. Marie had some excellent pictures of Jack in uniform during his MARBLEHEAD days.She kindly sent them to us for our research. Her sister Lucile Nelson studied voice seriously, taking lessons in France with Madame Calve.In l928 she sang in Sigmund Romburg's "Blossom Time" - a fictionalized treatment of the life of composer Franz Schubert. As Jack's guest she sang aboard a Japanese ship in New York Harbor when Jack took her aboard with him as his guest about l928. She sang in Japanese and pleased Jack when she was given a tremendous ovation on the big ship. During this period there were some genuine friendships between American and Japanese naval officers, and for a number of years Jack received remarkable letters from a Japanese Naval Officer named Toshitani Takata. In a fitness report written by Commander Carroll in l921 he wrote: "Lieutenant Barrett is a well trained seagoing oficer especially prepared in navigational subjects and seamanship. He shows close attention to duty with painstaking care in the exercise of his duties.On the occasion of the grounding of this vessel on Shoal, Georgia,March l9, l921 he showed excellent officer qualities.For a period of thirty=six consecutive hours he worked with ability and tireless energy toward getting the vessel off the shoals into safety and it is considered that his work helped directly in the safe outcome of a dangerous situation." On the twentieth of March l922 Commander P. L. Carroll wrote to Jack: "My dear Barrett: Just a line to let you know that today I have been thinking over the experience (of the TOUCEY on the shoal off Georgia) of a year ago. My thoughts are concentrated on the group of loyal officers whose courage and ability enabled us to come with some honor out of an almost hopeless situation.Your own steadfastness and loyalty were no small part in saving the ship. There is much to remember over our association.on the TOUCEY, - always we should look back with pleasure over our association with the ship. I can assure you that I will never forget our days together when we were fighting for the ship. No wreck has come to my career or reputation, - but if we had been pulled off by the aid of others, the story would have been a different one for me.So I owe much to your faith and help. So I greet you - Sincerely, Your friend -P.L. Carroll." Jack used to say, "The first hundred years are the hardest." ."Shipwrecks of the Pacific Coast" pp 263-5 and two photos between pages 167-7 tells of seven destroyers beached near Honda Point 75 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California September 9, 1923 with loss of twenty-two lives in fog. They had been "following the leader" as orders required, and at high speed [check 20? 30?? knots]. Four hours earlier commercial steamer had grounded, leading to unusual radio traffic, which disrupted navy operations. Text says this was U.S. Navy's worst peacetime disaster.Hundreds of personnel had to be resued in vicinity of Point Arguello mid California coast not far from San Luis Obispo. They were part of eighteen destroyer squadron, and other eleven ships offshore could not assist. This demonstrates the imperfect hydrography, charting, radio and fog navigation as of early 1920s.Many of Jack Barrett's Revenue Cutter School classmates and friends and contemporaries were involved in developing LORAN and other navigational aids for Fog, Ice, high wind conditions, particularly Commodore E.M. Webster, head of Coast Guard Communications some years and later an FCC Federal Communications Commissioner. The TOUCEY's March 1921 grounding near Savannah illustrates the problems but fortunately occurred at low speed in soft shoal inshore in protected area without extreme weather. When I was living with Anne and Ivan McCormack at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village 1927-1930, I knew Marie and Lucile Nelson and met their father and their younger brother Harold then twenty to twenty-two years of age.One time when the senior Mr. Nelson was up visiting from the south, Harold told him he was engaged to be married -probably a daydream. Mr. Nelson answered, "You made your bed, - now lie in it." Harold visited Anne and Ivan McCormack at their farm in Salem, New York in the nineteen seventies - we did not see Harold, but Ivan said Harold told a story that Jack Barrett sometimes put his watch on a shoestring when he did not have a regular watchchain.We knew Marie and Lucile better. Anne first knew Marie in social work, which gave the three of us a common interest. Marie corresponded from Dungan Road, Philadelphia, where she and Harman lived in the 1970s. A group of Lucile's letters in 1928 to Jack from Harrison, Maine turned up in Mollie Barrett's attic in South Boston in 1967. Lucile was hostess in the 1950s and 1960s at the famous Waldorf Towers hotel in Manhattan, where General Douglas MacArthur and Herbert Hoover resided many years. She retired to Carmel, California, and corresponded extensively with both Ivan and the Barretts in the 1970s after Anne Taylor passed away in November 1971.


 


#1095 p 56 battleship WYOMING 1922-1923 big guns

 

See photos Twelve inch guns of Battleship WYOMING, which Jack Barrett operated l922-l923 in photos webpage 41 #321-324 Sophie Barrett WYOMING chapter follows: Capt. H. B.Price ultimately endorsed JaCK BARRETT AS WELL ABLE to direct men firing of WYOMING's twelve inch guns, but when he first reported early 1922 Price wrote:He has slight stature and florid countenance, wears a very small red mustache..His voice is weak. Now he is to be put in charge of a twelve inch turret and division.."Jack carefully replied to Bureau of Navigation:"As to gunnery training I studied Fullan & Hart 1905 edition and "Naval Ordnance l910" in l909, l9l0, l911 & have since read all subsequent editions- fired 3 pr Driggs Schroeder & 3 & 6 pr Hotchkiss guns 11 or 12 years ago & since l917 have had experience with ships' guns from 1 pr to six inch - conducted elementary practice in smaller vessels- controlled fire for a destroyer SRBF and was target observer for others - but except for three round trips from Brest to New York on USS SEATTLE flagship cruiser and Transport Force as watch officer I have not served in larger ships, having spent most of my time as Executive Officer and Navigator of smaller ships. For this reason when I reported on this vessel, I stated that I lack familiarity with heavy caliber guns.SOPHIE text WYOMING CHAPTER -Battleship WYOMING January 1922-June 1923- #85 On the nineteenth of January l922 in the Gulf of Guacanayabo Jack joined the great battleship WYOMING with H.B. Price commanding.He had shore patrol duty February 25-26 , March 1-6, 14, 15, 26-27, 30-31 and April 7-8. By June 26 the commanidng officer was G. W. Laws. The ship was at Yorktown, Virginia June 25, at Hampton roads July 1. August 18 the ship was at Newport, Rhode Island where Jack had shore patrol duty. and on the sixth of December at the Navy Yard, where Jack took fifteen days leave. Jack was the Communications Officer and the Captain was very pleased when the WYOMING answered a signal from the Admiral very quickly and was commended.The WYOMING was the flagship of Admiral McDonald.From the Navy Department we obtained the roster of WYOMING officers in March l923 and wrote to as many of them as we could locate.Captain Augustus Dayton Clark of the Annapolis class of l922 who was an Ensign aboard the WYOMING when Jack was a Lieutenant wrote from New York on June 6, l97l, "My dear Mrs. Barrett, I definitely recall and remember our WYOMING COmmunications Officer. He was a heppy, cheery, hard-working member of the officer staff. My assignment was aide to the Executive Officer, Commander Puleston, whom I might say was a demanding task master and boss but able and efficient.He was for many years a very fine friend of mine.He had a habit as soon as he opened his eyes in the morning to send for me to insure I was up and around.This would be about five AM.Admiral McDonald, whose flagship was the WYOMING, commanded the (then-called) Souting Fleet.He was of the old school, & insisted on junior officer discipline.The junior officer mess was a happy mess, and the whole ship was a happy one.Plenty of spit and polish but all hands were congenial, efficient, and happy. My years in the WYOMING-looking back fifty-nine years - were I believe my happiest. Our winter cruises to Guantanamo were always busy ones - but full of fun, enjoyment, and hard work. Did Jack participate in our rum running operation? We junior officers would organize and arrange a shipment of rum by "bum boat" while in Guantanamo in the wee hours of the night.The junior officers received a gallon or more, and amazingly, many of the senior officers did also.We would arrange for the deck watch officers to be sympathetic to this operation during the middle watch.The bum boat would come alongside a lower port in the junior officers' mess and pass the gallon jugs through the port.We junior officers in turn would deliver these jugs to the various officers' cabins before dawn. This was all on the "Q.T."and never mentioned in conversation.However, I am sure every officer was aware of this questionable operation. Another activity which I recall- all officers and men were obliged while on the southern cruise to qualify in swimming.It required each person to go to the bow of the ship and jump in the water and swim around the ship to the gangway. It was a high jump and for the timid, frightening.However, everyone did it. Coaling ship was an all-hands operation, officers and men.Everyone shoveled while the band played- all were black with coal dust as well as the ship inside and out. Next day - field day. All hands participated.It was fun. If coaling was not completed in one day,many of us would sleep on a coal pile that night. Good experience. Too bad the present Navy does not have to do it. You at least caused me to go back fifty-nine years and recall many of my shipmates in theWYOMING who in later years have been fond friends. Sincerely, -A Dayton Clark" Captain Frederick Holmes of the Annapolis Class of l9l8, who was a junior Lieutenant on the WYOMING in March l922,telephoned twice from Florida where he was spending the winter of l970 as his favorite sport- golfing.Not only was he on the WYOMING with Jack, but he was Captain of the tanker TRINITY l938-9 when Jack was the Executive officer aboard. Captain Holmes talked at length with John junior about the WYOMING and the TRINITY- told John he had been wounded in the hip at Okinawa and planned l970 to have surgery in Boston or in London. He spoke highly of the Lahey Clinic.Since his home was in Newport, Rhode Island,he promised to come to the house to talk to us the next time he came to Boston. But a note from his wife at Christmas l97l told us that Captain Holmes had passed away suddenly in the fall of l970. He had said he had diabetes. His son had a distinguished record at West Point and as an Army officer.On the seventh of June l97l I received a note from Captain Luther B. Stuart from Amissville, Virginia, who was on the WYOMING as an Ensign from the Annapolis class of l922: On October l2, l922 Lieutenant J.B. Barrett was detailed as Beach Master at Yorktown, Virginia under this "Landing Force Order":Battleship Force Landing Force was landed at Gloucester Point, Monday l6 October l922. The WYOMING and ARKANSAS platoons constituted the first company.Ech company will consist of four six=squad platoons.Uniform: Blue service, gray gloves,whiye hats, leggings. The Beachmaster is charged with the management of disposition of all boats and the disembarkation and re-embarkation of the Landing Force, All officers will consider any instructions received from the Beachmaster as emanating from the Regimental Commander."On Sunday, October 31, l97l at 2:20 in the afternoon I had a telephone call from Colonel Archibald, who was in the Class of l922 at the Naval Academy and roomed with Luther Stuart on the WYOMING and is now retired from the Navy.He was assistant Navigator.He was taking a load of passengers in a small boat to the WYOMING when the boat grounded.The passengers were taken off, and eventually the boat was recovered.Jack spent a lot of time telling him what to say if he was court-martialled.But he believes Captain Laws and Commander Puleston were responsible for his not getting a court-martial.He knows Bill Ware of the WYOMING well- also our friends Dan Candlerof the HANNIBAL and Eddie Arroyo of the MARBLEHEAD. On March 25, l97l from Bethesda Maryland, Captain Edward R. Gardner Annapolis class of l922 who was Secretary of his class wrote: "Dear Mrs. Barrett, In July l922 with some twenty other Ensigns, I reported to the WYOMING on the Southern Drill Grounds some ten to twenty miles off Hampton Roads, Captain George Laws was the Commanding officer with Commander William D. Puleston as "Exec.".The latter over many years was a prominent writer and analyst of Naval affairs. The WYOMING was the flagship of the Scouting Force under Vice Admiral John B. McDonald, a large, dour individual. One of his staff (Richmond) Kelly Turner gained great fame as the (Pacific) Amphibious Commander and became an Admiral. The summer of l922 the WYOMING was engaged in training off the Virginia capes, visiting Yorktown, New York, and Newport. At the latter post I was on Shore Patrol= probably at the place mentioned by your husband.The patrol stayed on shore, sleeping on cots in a makeshift barracks, and the WYOMING sent our meals in by boat. The food was invariably cold,the sleeping accomodations miserable, and the Senior Patrol Officer from the ARKANSAS as ass. A rather unpleasant experience.Late in the year the WYOMING went into the New York Navy Yard for overhaul. In January the Fleet went to Guantanamo for three or four months training, then to Panama, transiting the Canal for maneuvers with the West Coast Battle Fleet.Then we returned to the Norfolk area where I left the ship for several months, being assigned to the Navy Rifle Team. I remember Del Valle, Nyquist, and others in the WYOMING and saw many of them over the years.She was a good ship, had a fine reputation, and as I look back now, it was a bright spot to remember. I was the Junior Officer in the Fifth Division #5 Turret, but I don't remember your husband's assignment.. I wish you every success in the memoirs.Sincerely, Edward R. Gardner." On March 25, l97l from Menlo Park, California, Rear Admiral W. Nyquist wrote, "My dear Mrs. Barrett, Your letter of 12 March was forwarded to me by Bupers. I served on the WYOMING from about a July 1921 to about 1 December 1922. In June or July 1922 I was sent to the Naval hospital in Newport, Rhode Island with pneumonia, and I did not get back to the WYOMING until late September l922.I do remember your husband, but I was in the Junior Officer mess and did not have much contact with him.I was in Pearl Harbor on December 7, l94l but spent most of my time at sea in the Guadalcanal area. `-"-Rear Admiral Nyquist. On the 27th of March l97l I wrote another letter to Captain Gardner:"My son John and I are grateful for your detailed and interesting letter, which added many new facts to our supply of information about the Battleship WYOMING.One of Jack's friends, Captain Frank Delahanty of the Supply Corps, knew Captain Puleston well and talked about him in several letters last year.John has several articles by Puleston in Jack's file of Naval Institute magazines.Puleston of course was highly critical of the Gallipoli campaign and ended one article with the comment, "It is doubtful if even the British empire could survive another Winston Churchill." John junior has found detailed coverage of the l925 war games in Hawaii;- it was Admiral McDonald who had the difficult task of attempting to defend Oahu from the superior attacking "Blue" fleet.(p. W257) -258-Jack was briefly a turret officer when he first arrived on the WYOMING in early l922 but most of the time he was Communications officer. On one occasion he was commended for a prompt answer to the Admiral when several other ships failed to answer.Several times he was in charge of selecting crewmen for special training at radio school. In Hawaii during World War II he used to train John in Morse code and various methods of use of signal flags. He was always an enthiusiast for astronomy and navigation, and during the blackout in the early years of the war, he would point out Orion, the Pleiades, and the Southern Cross, which was visible fom Waikiki Beach. We would be interested in details of the Battleship Force Landing Exercises at the Virginia Capes.On one occasion papers here show that Jack was in charege of a shore patrol party in October. One puzzle we have concerns some papers which carefully recorded each time a member of the WYOMING passed in or out of New York Harbor.These records show that Jack passed in or out eight times - probably four times in and four times out.Do you suppose that this had anything to do with qualifying as a harbor pilot or would there be some other reason for the PORT AUTHORITY KEEPING THE RECORDS?Jack was a pilot in the waters from Cape Henry to Norfolk, Virginia and renewed his commercial steam license every five years.Jack spoke highly of Otto Nimitz, the half-brother of World War II Chester Nimitz - Otto was an officer on the WYOMING.I think Captain Laws must have relieved Captain H. B. Price shortly berfore you came aboard. Captain Price(259) was listed in command on June 15, l922 in the program of the USS WYOMING Annual Banquet in the Grand ballroom of the Commander Hotel in New York.The program has a short poem "WY-O-MING" by Lieutenat Tully Shelley, USN.About four hendred enlisted men attended, and Lieutenant Commander J.J. Brady (CHC) and Ensign H. Clarke were chairman and secretary of the Reception Committee.We are sorry that your patrol duties at Newport were so distasteful.Jack did like the fine old houses in the Newport and Jamestown area.While on the WYOMING Jack also had frequent Shore Patrol duty at Caimanera, Cuba, just outside Guantanamo.On occasion he telegraphed his family, using the French telegraph line. Jack had friends in Camaguey Province, Cuba, Edgar and Ora Waterman and their daughters Bonnie and Garda. They had a dairy ranch, and Mrs. Waterman introduced Jack to the Marine writer and artist, John W. Thomason, junior - they saw each other again off Bluefields, Nicaragua Janiuary, 1927, and I met Thomason in Peking in l931. At Pearl Harbor in l943 Jack arranged transportation for Thomason, who wrote to thank him for a veritable "luxury cruise of rest, service, and good food." Thomason wrote many stories of Marine actions in China, Nicaragua, and Chile, and a collection "Red Pants."We were interested to learn that you went through the Canal for the Pacific exercises.That is the first we had heard of it, and John will look up the ship's logs on it.Jack had an old handbook with good photos of the WYOMING- her guns and statistics about her. We understand that the WYOMING was later stripped of some of her guns under the disarmament agreement and turned into a training ship, with classrooms in the forward turrets.-Sincerely yours, -Sophie M. Barrett." #86 WYOMING 1922-3 High Pressure Price #86 WYOMING 1922-3 Wed, 13 May 1998 15:43:44 PDT On June 13, l791 Rear Admiral Alan McCracken of Bethesda wrote, "Dear Mrs. Barrett,I have your recent letter..We have been quite tied up for the past three weeks by the death of Captain Gardner whom you mention after a severe stroke. They were quite close friends and live only a short distance from us, so we have been trying to help Mrs. Gardner through her difficult times. I do remember you husband _ I can visualize him but I can't remember any special incidents that would be useful to you.. I went out to the Orient in the summer of 1941 and took command of the river Gun Boat Mindanao at Hong Kong.We were ordered to Manila, and while en route Pearl Harbor happened.We were anchored off Corregidor a short time before she surrendered, and I was actually on the island at the end, following which I spent thirty-three months in a Jap prison camp.I was rescued out of the Bilibuil prison in Manila early in 1945 and came back to San Francsico via ship, and I do not remember a stop in Hawaii though it seems we must have stopped for something.I wish you the best of luck in working up your book, sincerely- - Alan McCracken" In March-April 1922 Captain H.B. Price wrote under "Remarks" on Jack's fitness report, "Mr. Barrett has technical professional ability since the Department commissioned him a Lieutenant in the Regular Navy.He came to this ship inexperienced in gunnery or battleship duties.I talked with him and encouraged him to take advantage of opportunity to learn.To that end I put him with a very capable Lieutenant who had also been commissioned from the Reserves, in a twelve-inch turret division, who considerately gave him instruction.Mr. Barrett was put on a supervised watch and as soon as possible was put on a regular watch in port.He has been earnest and hard-working.He is of a slight stature,auburn hair, florid countenance,wears a very small red mustache.His voice is weak.In general he has a natural appearance, manner and bearing that is not impressive or officer-like.Now he is to be put in charge of a twelve-inch turret and division and see what he can do.He is decidedly an unusual type, and I do not yet know whether he can be made into an efficient Naval officer. He is being given every possible opportunity and encouragement toward that end.Thus far he seems too innocuous to handle men well."Jack wrote to the Bureau of Navigation regarding the above Remarks by Captain Price."During the period covered by this report 1-l9-22 to 3-31-22 I was away from the ship on Shore Patrol duty not less than 26% of the time.When I joined the ship l9 January l922 I expected to find a cartain amount of routine detail with which I was no longer thoroughly familiar. For that reason I was not surprised at being placed on supervised watch at first, even though supervised by officers of much less Naval experience.This and the fact that I was more readily available for Shore Patrol duty that officers with long experience in important places in this ship's organization seemed but a natural consequence of the fact that I had joined the ship in Cuban waters after its organization had been completed and was working smoothly, but it is submitted that this condition did make it somewhat more difficult for me properly to fit into dhip's organization quickly. As to gunnery training, I studied Fullan and Hart 1905 edition and Naval Ordnance l9l0 in l909, l910, and l9ll and have since read all subsequent editions- fired 3 pir Driggs Schroeder and 3 and 6 pir Hotchkiss guns eleven or twelve years ago and since 1917 have had experience with ships' guns from 1 pir to six inch - conducted elementary practice in smaller vessels, controlled fire for a destroyer SRBF and was target observer for others, but except for three round trips from Brest to New York on USS SEATTLE, flagship cruiser and Transport Force, as Watch and division officer and temporary Navigator (i) have not served in larger ships, having spent most of my tme in the Service as Executive and Navigator of smaller ships.For this reason, when I reported on this vessel, I stated that I lacked familiarity with heavy calibre guns. I have in the past furled top gallant sails,passed coal for full four hour watches, walked over forty miles without a stop and without food, remained on bridge of ship for over forty-eight hours at a time in winter- stood a regular watch in three (4 to 8 AM and 4 to 8 PM) in voyage around the world in merchant service, landed in surf on coast of Maine at Halfway rock, Wood Island, Boone Island, Isles of Shoals and other points in November and December, passed through Indian Ocean, Gulf of Aden and Red Sea in latter part of May, all without ill effects.Therefore I fee l that I am physically capable of any ordinary duty.My voice has not previously been considered weak, although I have been trained to minimize loud tones,to eliminate noise and shouting.I have served on shhips where the use of more than a very subdued tone was positively forbidden on the bridge.As to handling men,I began receiving instruction in drill under arms about twenty years ago, have handled companies in close and open order infantry drill many times- have also handled men under various conditions for small arms practice with hand drawn artillery with breeches buoys in surf boats and in ships. i consider myself physically and mentally equipped to handle men anywhere." In May l922 Captain Price wrote to the Bureau of Navigation from the WYOMING: " The report was not intended to be unfavorable within the meaning of the Regulations.I was merely trying to get 'the right man in the right place' in future assignment OF THIS OFFICER TO DUTY. HE HAS BEEN VERY ZEALOUS AND EARNEST, MOST CONSCIENTIOUSLY ATTENTIVE TO his duties and anxious to improve himself professionally. On April 12 he was put in command of a twelve inch turret and division, which position he still holds.As officer of the deck he has been very alert and attentive to duty. Thus it must be observed that he has fundamental quialities of great value in addition to his extensive practical experience outlined in his statement.So it seems probable that his apparent diffidence and seeming lack of forcefulness and self-confidence in handling men will much improve as he becomes more accustomed to the duties and ways on a battleship in the Fleet." Signed,-H.B. Price May 17, l922, USS WYOMING, New York Navy Yard.In the spring of 1922 Jack was one of the watch officers when they referred to the WYOMINHG captain as "High Pressure Price". One day the Captain told the morning watch officer that he expected a senior Admiral to come aboard about noon and wanted him given every courtesy and honor..He wanted him "piped" on board and wanted to be notified the instantt the Admiral was approaching the ship so he could greet him at the gangway.By the time the Admiral appeared in full uniform with two aides also in full uniform, Jack Barrett was the Officer of the Deck, who was surprised to see the Admiral as the previous officer had said nothing to him about the expected visit and had not entered it in the log.Jack escorted the Admiral to the Captain's cabin, where the Captain appeared dismayed.As soon as the Admiral left, Captain Price in front of all the enlisted men and officers present on deck, lit into Jack, insulted him for neglect of duty in the handling of the Admiral's visit. Jack let him rave, but when the captain stopped raging Jack told him with an ironic expression on his face that the previous officer of the deck had said nothing to him of the expected visit by the Admiral.Jack chose his words carefully, and although his attitude enraged the Captain- who was blue in the face, Captain Price could do nothing against Jack, because the words were respectful.Some time later he told Jack he would take no official action against him, and the matter was dropped. Jack survived an unmerciful tongue-lashing, and won the grudging admiration of the Captain, who gave Jack responsible assignments as Turret and communications Officer. This was a crucial point in Jack's Navy career, as he won respect on large ships. He invesstigated alternate civilian employmnt around this time, but stayed in the Navy until l947, retiring withtwenty-six years Regular Navy and over thirty-three years total U.S. government service. Once when "High Pressure" Price was inspecting the crew, with Jack as his assistant, Price told a young sailor his hair was too long and not cut according to regulations. When the sailor tried to tell the Captain that his hair had been cut the previous day by the ship's barber, Price shut him up, told him to get a regulation haircut before the next week's inspection and told Jack to be sure that Price checked on the boy the next week.The boy did nothing. His hair was short and had been cut by the ship's barber.The next week when Jack pointed out the boy as the one told to get a regulation haircut, Price looked at him casually, and said, "That's much better," and dropped the matter.The crew knew the boy had done nothing to his hair and had a laugh at the captain's expense.- In June l922 Jack Barrett heard of several failures of stock brokerage houses and became suspicious when his brokerage Fuller corporation was veryt slow in sending him money fromsale of stock. As the WYOMING was at sea, he had to ask his brother Bill to go to the firm and collect the money in person. Shortly afterward the brokerage failed. Because of this experience Jack always had share certificates issued in his own name rather than having them listed under the brokerage, as has become the general practice since the Securities and Exchange Commissionh came into being l933, and various foprms of insurance have developed. In l922 when Jack's Navy chances of promotion seemed uncertain because of his age and the naval disarmament policy, he made several job inquiries, including one as editor of a technical journal. He had an interview in New Jersey with inventor Thomas Edison in person for one position, but nothing came of it.He was interested in trying to sell International Harvester equipment in Russia or in organizing ascientific expedition to Antarctica. He discussed the Antarctica idea in correspondence with Gershom Bradford at the Naval Hydrographic Office, but the movement of his ship MARBLEHEAD to China l927 interfered with any prospect of organizing something.


 


#1096 p 56 light cruiser MARBLEHEAD 1924-1927

 

From July 1923 through June 1924 Lieutenant Jack Barrett took the Junior Course at Naval War College, Newport Rhode Island, and wrote his 1924TACTICS thesis, which is part of "RED HEADED STEPCHILD" and appears on this website. He lived in Jamestown on the west side of Narragansett Bay and enjoyed visits there with Dr. Julius Neuberger USN and Warrant offcier Joseph Czarnetsky in1960s. Dr. Neuberger recommended Stuartinic, a mixture of B Vitamins and Vitamin C. From July 1924 to June 1947 Jack was First Lieutenant and Construction and Repair Officer of newly commissioned light cruiser MARBLEHEAD, which participated in war games Hawaii and fleet visit in Australia-New Zealand 1925 and was in combat situation at Shanghai 1927. MARBLEHEAD CHAPTER: chronology from notebook at -272- July 3, l924 JBB reported to Naval Inspector of Machinery , William Cramp and Sons Co Philadelphia in connction with fitting out MARBLEHEAD Arrived Navy Yard 8 AM July 16 few days - return to Cramp. Later short run down Delaware (River) First wek in August go to Rockland for full trials for ten days.eturned to Cramp yard to 30 August. 5 Sept at Navy Yard Philadelphia. Also 11 September. September letter C.C. Plummer (ex Hydrographic Office, friend of Gershom Bradford) Sept 8 . To visit Newport Rhode Island about 16 September. Then about one month New york. Ready about 29 Sep at Navy Yard New York. MARBLEHEAD Commissioned October 10. Nov 5 leave New York. Nov 20 shore patrol Murray Bay Bermuda heading toward Newport News Va Nov 21.- Dec. 2 galley hot - 6 Dec. Southampton NEngland Leave request 8 Dec. to noon Dec 9 JBB address c/o Archer 35 Vartrey Road, Stamford Hill, London. To sea Dec 12 - Marseilles Dec 24 - Villefranche Dec. 25 - Algiers Dec. 31 Jack collected many excellent large photos at Marseilles and Algiers, including two of the MARBLEHEAD in Algiers Harbor New Years Eve and many of Algerian countryside. At some time he met Ronald Bodley, author of a 1927 book on Algeria- Jack kept his Algeria address in his address book.- Jan 6 l925 JBB writes report on shakedown cruise - Jan 7 Funchal Madeira - Boston - Board of Inspection and survey at Final trials in February and necessity for completion of annual inventory of Co0nstruction and Repair equipage by 31 March. - March 23, l925 San diego - m- Feb. 18 - had already left Boston - April 6-l0 San Francisco leave plus weekend April 11 and 12 Reported back to ship 0035 MONDAY APRIL 13. April 24 Landing force exercise Molokai 27 April shore patrol Merchant and Bethel Streets Honolulu for duration of stay of fleet Reported 10 M April 28 Latter part of may JBB got ships service funds. MARBLEHEAD to fire ShortRange Director Practice off Lahaina (Maui) during week commencing 15 June untukl Thur 18 June. 1 July depart Honolulu. 6 July cross equator 165 degrees 40 minutes west.- July 25 Melbourne - July 31 Tasmania -,Hobart- Launceston-August 5 and 6 New Zealandthroigh Monday August 17th. August 30 Shore paTROL TAHITI - GALApagos - Panama =- Guantanamo 8 to 10 Nov - Dec. l925 Boston - 11 Feb. l926 Balboa Schedule of provision issues at Balb CZ MARB 18 f Refrigerated supplies 0600, fresh vegetablesaredry strores. 1300 from store ship "BRIDGE" Vessels of light cruiser division two will use all motor launches for transporting provisions.These boats will be be posted as required. JBB officer in charge of the boats. 0545. June 20, MARblehead (town) Masachusetts Hotel Rock-Mere one night Six dollars . See Boston Post story on naming dedication of ship. - 8 June NY Boston JBB request duty on European station for balance of present sea cruise. If not granted, continue present assignment. - 6 & 14 Jul M at bos - 30 S Aid to Executive Officer Alexander Sharp Construction and Repair, Ships Service. - Oc 19 Gonaives Bay Haiti O 25 Guan Bay N 6 to 16 Guan Nov 25 to 29 leave Dec. Boston New York weekend D 4-5, 11-12 - Phila D 27 JHAN 6, L927 SAILING FOR NICARAGUA - FEBV 27 HAW TILL MARCH 18 MAR 8 LAHAINA - Sailed from Pearl Harbor 24 Marc 4 PM to Shanghai Ap 2 - at Shanghai 21 April. June 4 Sh detached June 6 Pres. Madison Kobe (acqu. Harams. June 20, Seattle June 27, New York. 1927 from note outline]. Narrative from April 1925-MARBLEHEAD Lahaina l925 After Panama & the West Coast, where Jack saw his second cousin Robert Fahrbach & Fahrbach's father Emil Fahrbach,they arrived under radio silence in Hawaii April l5,l925, when the MARBLEHEAD took part in the very important war games in which the attacking "Blue" Forces defeated the defending "Black" Forces & captured the Hawaiian Islands.Admiral MacDonald in collaboration with the Army,had the defense of the Hawaiian Islands.The story is well told in the New York Times article headed "MARBLEHEAD at Hawaii War Maneuvers",Sunday,May l0,l925.Story of the swift triumph of Blue Forces on Hawaiian Defenses forced to anchor because the capital ships could enter Pearl Harbor only with difficulty because of the lack of anchorage space inside.After the War Games many departed with General Hines including Major General Neville, who commanded the Blue Mai??col Forces (some material illegible will be checked against original article when available)the senior Black umpire,a general & Lieutenant Colonel Kruger,who was the chief Army assistant to Admiral Coontz & General Hines.Several thousand persons went to the pierdecorating the officers & other passengers with leis.The ship was tied to the pier with paper streamers that cracked when the ship pulled away to the strains of "Aloha Oe" & other Hawaiian tunes.252Major General Lewis,the Hawaiian Department Commander,declined to comment on the statement attributed to Chairman Butler of the House Naval (Appropriations) Committee (Philadelphia Congressman & father of the great Marine general Smedley Butler) to the effect that appropriations would be asked to make Hawaii the strongest military outpost in the world.The General admitted that there are serious deficiencies in the defenses as they exist.General Lewis said,"I am naturally very much interested in any proposal for developing the defeses of Hawaii as they have constituted my most earnest study since my arrival in the Territory.I can assure you that it has been for some time the conservative opinion of our trained officers that these defenses are insufficient even for a reasonable security against unfortunate eventualities.And I concur in that opinion." General Lewis was asked to comment on the prevalent belief that Army garrison here should be from five to ten thousand men stronger than at present,that the air forces should be greatly increased & provided with modern equipment to enazble the Army to resist successfully such landing as that simulated in the recent maneuvers- that there should be additional modern eighteen inch guns in the Coast Defenses-that the Construction program has been seriously neglected & that the local naval protection in the form of submarines & mines is seriously deficient. Some officers wanted on hundred thousand men.The General replied that there were serious shortages in all of these respects.The details from the flagship Pennsylvania to the New York Times,April 27,l925:Now that the struggle is ended between the Blues & the Blacks for the control of the Island of Oahu-keystone in the Hawaiian Arch of the American Structure of National Defence, the story of the campaign plan of the pictors & vanquished may be told (Jack Barrett was on the MARBLEHEAD of the victors,the Blue Forces-SMB note)- it is clearly evident 253 it is evident from the progress of this major peacetime conflict that the Naval & Marines forces comprising the Blues would now be camping in Pearl Harbor after having taken the Island by direct assault in today's operation.The mission of the Blues was to recover from the Blacks possession of Honolulu & Pearl Harbor as Naval Operating Bases.That mission was certain of achievement when the umpires called a halt on the contest.The action of the umpires was founded in the conviction that the Blue forces had been able to land & advance on the north shore of Oahu,- a superior military force of Marine Sl...? troops & maneuver them in a position where the Blacks were unable to halt or defeat the advance of the khaki-clad invaders.The defeat of the Blacks does not mean that the Hawaiian Islands are not strongly defended.Both Nature & Washington with liberal hands have contributed toward the defense of the Islands against attack by enemy forces.The mountain ranges along the east & most of the west coast of Oahu are absolutely impossible for armed forces landing along these particular stretches of the shoreland.After a twelve day voyage of 2600 miles fromSan Francisco to the Hawaiian group, the Blue Fleet arrived off the northern & southwestern coasts of Oahu at midnight of April 26.The armada traveled in special screening formation en route to protect the sixteen vessels of the Fleet train (constructively representing transports) against enemy submarine attack. This formation consisted of a series of concentric circles of warships.The battleships were in the center,with the train of transports.Around the battleships steamed the smart & speeding destroyers.Beyon the -254-steamed the light cruisers (JBB in MARBLEHEAD-SMB note)& beyond that were the submarines-the furthermost outpost of the Fleet formation,which was 42 miles in diameter.Not a mishap marred the voyage.All ships that left San Francisco Harbor on April l5 in an aggregation of one hundred twenty-seven of all types of warshipsarrived at their appointed positions at the Islands of Oahu & Molokai in safety & good condition.The battleship MARYLAND,which left Puget Sound at a later date joined the main body of the battle fleet several hundred miles north of Oahu.Somewhere out in the Pacific the Blue Scouting Fleet headed by the battleship WYOMING was detached from the main formation & sent ahead so as to be able to carry out the operation of establishing an air base on the island of Molokai April 25, two days before the scheduled of Admiral Robinson for the main expedition attack on Oahu.The rest of the fleet continued on a direct route to Kaena Point at the northwestern corner of Oahu,maneuvering from day to day in th execution of Battle Problems.Radio silence was established on the seond day out from San Francisco & was not lifted until arrival of thew vessels within sight of Diamond Head late this afternoon after the execution of the mission involved in the War Games.At twelve o'clock last night when the bulk of the main battle fleet moved into position off the northern coast of Oahu,mighty searchlights from the interior & along the northern coast flashed seaward.Under cover of darkness the vessels were in position for the attack,six miles out when several minutes after midnight a bombardment of the beach was inaugurated preliminary to the landing 255--#39 MARBLEHEAD P.255 preliminary to the landing of the first wave of Marines at twelve o'clock this morning,exactly twelve hours after the bombardment began.During these twelve hours the main force made the landing on the north coast.Some of the battleships-0with destroyers were detached & sent around to the southwestern coast to carry to carry out a similar landing of Marines- this was only a secondary operation.The attack on the north was the primary one.Meanwhile the Scouting Fleet under the command of Vice ADMIRAL MCKEAN, WHICH HAD GONE WITH THE AIRCRAFT carrier LANGLEY to establish a temporary air base at Molokai Island, slipped westward to the southern coast of Oahu & endeavored to delude the Blacks into the belief that a landing force was about to be put into east of Diamond Head.It was a successful manoeuvre & in combination with the secondary landing of the Marines on the southwest coast caused the Blacks to think that the main landing was being made on the south coast.In this assumption the blacks made a fatal mistake& were not in a position to meet the shock of the primary landing of the expeditionary force when it was shoved forward on the north coast.Ideal weather conditions favored the Blues when it (the Blue Force) emerged from the long spell of radio silence & lowered the boats in which the Marines were sent through the surf to the beach.While the heavens sparkled with thousands of starts,the region between shore & coast was blanketed with that particular form of tropical semi=mist & near rain which Americans in Hawaii have come to regard as 'liquid sunshine'.It was difficult for the powerful searchlights of the Blacks to distinguish the faint shadows of the hulls (hulks?)in the darkness that enveleoped the arrival of the Fleet.The Fleet had been darkened & traveled with 256 no lights showing above decks long before reaching Oahu.When morning broke magnificiently over the island,the main section of the expeditionary force began landing on the northern & southwestern coasts,& feinting operations were progressing east of Diamond Head.On the north coast especially where no ships had stood the night before,morning disclosed the presence of a strong naval force.The big guns of seven dreadnaughts were trained on the shore.Beyond them were the transports between boats filled with Marines,& destroyers were protecting the formation against submarine attack while seaplanes were being catapulted from the decks of battleships & spinning off inbto the air for reconnaisance of the enemy positions ashore.The sea was as smooth as glass & the breakers not as heavy as usual over the coral reefs.The first wave of Marines sent ashore were met with heavy machinegun attack & suffered heavy casualties,but the defense cordon of Blacks on the north coast was weak & the second wave were pused through so far that the succeeding waves had soon charged the beachhead & soon had driven six miles from the beach.The operation was accompanied by a spectacular aircraft operation in which there were thrilling battles between enemy bombing & fighting planes & the fighting planes & scouters of the Fleet.Had not the Blues completely outgunned the Blacks in the north of the principal landing shore,it would have been difficult for the invader to have made such easy headway in pushing their Marines forward in the northern coast.Part of the time the Fleet steamed with darkened lights.& for nearly ten days it steamed the Pacific with all wireless switches pulled so as to ensure complete radio silence.Not a single letter was flashed by radio from any of the ships.The radio silence was a complete success-a real simulation of actual war conditions as near as it could be achieved in time of peace.Should the United States as a nation ever be faced with the problem of defending Oahu in time of war,it would be infinitely better257 On ther return trip In the Galapagos Islands they were surprised to see a large number of seals-hundreds of them.A rather cold current runs through them,& it seems strange to see the seals where only tropical animals would be expected.But the seals were there.p260 MARBLEHEAD itinerary departed Philadelphia l5 September l924 - arr.Sep l6 Newport RI dep.l7 Sept. -arr.l8 Sep.Navy Yard,New York dep.5 November-Arr.. 7 November Bermuda Islands dep Nov 2l arr. 23 Nov.Navy yard Norfolk Virginia dep. 28 Nov.-arr.6 December Southampton England dep 12 Dec. -arr. l7 DecMarseilles France dep 24 Dec.-arr.24 Dec Villefranche France dep 25 Dec - arr. 27 Dec. Algiers,Algeria dep.31 Decem-1924-arr. 1 January l925 Gibraltar dep. 5 Jan- arr. 7 Jan. Funchal, Madeira dep.9 January -arr. l7 Jan. Navy Yard Boston dep l0 February -arr. l0 Feb. Boston Light dep.l3 Feb. -arriv l8 Feb. Hampton Roads Virginia dep. l9 Feb.- 23 Feb. arr.Colon,CaNAL ZONE DEP 23 FEB.- arr. 23 Feb Panama Bay dep 25 Feb. arr. 12 March San Diego California dep l6 March arrive l7 March San Pedro Cal.depart 3 April - arr. 5 April San Francisco California dep. 15 April -arr. 25 April Molokai, Territory of Hawaii Honolulu Territory of Hawaii -#40 -25 Apr.l925 arr. Molokai Territoy of Hawaii dep. 25 Apr. -arr .27 Apr.Honolulu dep 30 Apr.-arr. 30 Apr. Pearl Harbor dep l May - arr. 1 May Honolulu dep.7 May - arr.9 May Lahaina,Maui dep.28 May-arr. 29 May Hilo,island of Hawaii dep.29 May - arr. 1 June Honolulu dep. l Jun-arr. 1 June Pearl Harbor dep 2 Jun -arr. 2 Jun Lahaina dep 6 June- arr. 6 June Honolulu dep.l5 June -& l July - crossed equator 6 July l925 - arr.l0 July Pago Pago Samoa dep.11 Jul -arr. 23 Jul Melbourne, Victoria, Australiadep 4 August - arr. 5 August Hobart Tasmania dep 7 Augu -arr. 11 Aug Wellington New Zealand dep.24 Aug- arr 30Aug..Pago Pago Samoa dep 3 September -arr. 8 September Papeetee Tahiti dep.ll Sep -arr. 22 Sep Galapagos Islands, Ecuador dep 24 Sep-arr.25 Sep Balboa Canal Zone dep 2 October -arr. October 4 Guantanamo Bay, Cuba dep -dep 12 Oct-arr. 12 Oct Gonaives Gulf Haiti dep. l6 Oct.-arr.l6 Oct. Guantanamo Bay Cuba dep.26 Oct.- arr.26 Oct. Gonaives Haiti dep. 30 Oct. -arr.30 Oct. Gonaives Gulf Haitidep 2 Nov- arr. 2 Nov Guantanamo Bay Cuba dep.20 November arr. 23 Nov Hampton Roads Virginia dep ? - arr30 Nov.North river New York dep30 Nov.- arr. 1 December Navy Yard Boston dep 8 January l926-arr. 9 Jan Hampton Roads Virginia dep. 10 Ja. page 262- ... arrived Bluefields Nicaragua ll January l927 - Puerto Caebas on l3 January. Jack Barrett received ribbons in l927 for being in combat areas in Nicaragua in January & Shanghai China April-June during the civil war there. He was scheduled to lead a landing force at Bluefields, but the MARBLEHEAD was shifted to the Pacific. He encountered marine writer John Thomason this time in Nicaragua & later l943 arranged his transportation to the mainland.In February in Honolulu he receieved a letter from "Chesty" Puller - who later commanded Maines in the Inchon Korea landing September, l950 - the letter stolen l993 concerned an informal evening party.- continuing chronology: MARBLEHEAD arrivewd Puerto Cabezas Jan. l3, l927 left Nicaragua 29 January = spent some tiome in Honolulu February-March departed 24 March to make record eight & a half day cruise to Shanghai with hundreds of Marines, who came under command of Gen. Smedley Butler, survivor of the Boxer rebellion in Peking l900. Jack admired Butler, who was very sucessful in China l927-9 & was slated to become Marine commandant but for the personal animosity of Herbert Hoover, who had worked in the Kailin mining operaztions in North China & object to remarks Butler had made condemning the dictatorial actions of Benito Mussolini.Butler in l930's retirement condemned over-use of Marines to serve commercial interests in foreign countries where national security was not threatened. Chaing-kai shek took the offensive against the communists at Shanghai speing l927, & both sides were strongly anti=foreigner & business interests were threated. Jack had a number of friends from l927 at Standard Oil co. Shanghai.He was detached June 4 at Shanghia & traveled Tokyo to Seattle on the same ship as General Leonard Wood, retired l920's US governor of the Philippines.Jack traveled by rail from Seattle to his home in Boston & next duty in New York June l927-l929. -#56-# 56 Fradd letter Marblehead l927 Shanghai Lactoris page M 259 responded magnificently to our letters of inquir: John F. Fradd wrote from Florida: Your two very nice letters awakened nostalgic memories of the first cruise I ever had in my thirty-five years in the Navy.Whenever MARBLEHEAD sailors get together,all we talk about is our cruise to China & back,which covered nineteen months.The MARBLEHEAD was my first ship.I joined her in June of l926 & served four years in her.I can't vouch for the correctness of dates,& l927 was a long time ago. You mentioned that Jack Barrett was mess treasurer, & so was I shortly afterward.I had the job for about three months during our cruise up the Yangtze River & after. I recall the mess bill at that time was thirty dollars a month. It was near Christmas time in l926 when we returned to Boston, her home port, from Guantanamo,Cuba.In January l927 we were ordered to proceed to Norfolk,& load our torpedoes & two scout planes & continue on to Nicaragua,where trouble was brewing.We put a company of our landing force ashore to join our Marines, who were protecting the holdings of United Fruit company from some bandit who was trying to start an uprising. The name of the place was Puerto Cabezas on the east coast.Our flagship was the USS RICHMOND, another six inch gun cruiser. We were ordered to Pearl Harbor.At the time very few of us knew about what was going on in China.We spent a month or so in the Hawaii area practicing gunnery, torpedoes,& operations,-when suddenly we were ordered to Shanghai,China.I can recall returning from libery with Lieutenant Close to find the navigator & chief engineer figuring out how fast we could make the trip without running out of fuel. M260. We got under way in the morning & completed the (Shanghai) run in the shortest time ever up to that time (eight & a half days).Our sister ship the CINCINNATI had some propellor trouble & arrived twenty-four hours later.At this point we were getting reports of civil war in China, & the names of Chiang kai-shek & Chaing Tso-lin & (Michael) Borodin were in the news.We also received a report of the Communist attack on the "foreign" embassies in Nanking,in which the USS NOAH was involved.When we arrived at Shanghai,the Whangpoa river near town was loaded with ships, so we went downstream to the juncture of the Whangpoa & Yangtze & anchored for a week or so.While there we witnessed the first naval battle many of us had ever seen. The Wonson fort at the juncture of the two rivers was held by South Chinese forces & was to be attacked by the North Chinese fleet.The commander of the fort came aboard to ask if we would move off to an anchorage to the west,as he was expecting an attack by the northern forces & did not want us in the way. So we moved.Sure enough,at 11:30 Saturday morning four gunboats appeared,standing upriver right after our Saturday inspection.They opened fire on the fort,which returned the fire.The accuracy of both left much to be desired,but we had to admire the tactics of the commander of the ships afloat.It happened an English warship was anchored in the stream-& the Northern commander took full advantage of this fact.His ship would steam within range of the fort,fire & then swing around in columns behind the English warship while they reloaded their guns. this continued for a hour, until a burst from the fort M 261 appeared to hit the bridge of the leading gunboat.This signalled the end of the battle.Shortly after this we steamed up river to just south of Shanghai & moved to the Standard Oil docks.In the city the Southern forces had taken Shanghai & moved north,although barbed wire entanglements & bunkers were still in place on the streets.The city quickly returned to normal,but brigands were active. While on liberty,most of our officers were robbed at one time or another.I relieved "Shorty" Milner as head of the baseball team, & MARBLEHEAD not only won the Shanghai league championship but had the opportunity of playing with five other teams including the Japanese. One of these was the team representing Japan in the eastern Olympics.We also played later for the championship of the Phillippines.The next episode concerned our trip up the Yangtze River to Nanking. The CINCINNATI went up first for a stay of a month,& we followed later.She was fired on by small arms from the banks & an officer was wounded,so we placed boiler plate around the bridge & other exposed positions for protection- nobody fired at us, but all guns were at the ready.The navigator measured the fall of the river every morning so we would know when we had to return down river in order to cross over some sand bars safely.Otherwise we would have had to remain upstream for months before the river rose azgain.The ship visited Tsingtao & Chingwantao later. In July a number of us took a trip to Peking.We got there aboard a Chinese troop train.Upon arrival we saw an armored train furnished by the Japanese & tried to take snapshots of it,-but guards with fixed bayonets prevented that. I did ask one of the M262 guards if I could take his picture-& he was quite pleased- we got good pictures of him -& the train! (notes on photos).- John E Fradd, Rear Admiral USN Retired."-#58 Dahlquist MARBLEHEAD l927 Commander Phil Dahlquist in commentary on Admiral Fradd's letter wrote from Eugene Oregon: "The MARBLEHEAD did not stop at Nanking, as he intimated but went on up the Yangtze River for another couple of hundred miles to Hankow.I'm sure he would recall this if he remembered all the golf he played on the course there,which was surrounded by a ten foot high (or higher) stone wall. It wasn't unusual to hear shots on the other side of the wall as we played.I think one of the sad days of that era was when "Eva" Brant was lost overboard.He was an excellent young oficer & probably one of the most popular on board. Brant went back to the after part of the ship-which was very low.The seas were coming up from astern & breaking over the deck very heavily.Brant went out to help an enlisted man & held the man with a scissors hold in his legs until others could pull him back-but a following sea washed Brant overboard.It was a very heroic act on Brant's part & typical of what one would have expected of such a man.On our trip to Australia we stopped off at Samoa going & coming.I was swimming in at the dock & missed the last boat back to the MARBLEHEAD.I waited,& the Captain's gig came in fromthe MARBLEHEAD to pick up a guest for dinner with the Captain.He was a Samoan gentleman of about fifty years.He seemed very dignified & wore a black dinner jacket,black tie, & studs in his shirt. Instead of trousers he wore a sort of wrap-around garment of excellent quality material-very neatly pressed.coming down to his kneecaps.Riding out to the ship I said I had been at a nautical school at Norfolk about three years before, & we had a Samoan classmate who acquitted himself very well- he had graduated well up in his class & had been well thought of.The man was Chief of Police in American Samoa, & we was very pleased by my story,as the boy was his son.It was the l927 Nanking incident that took the MARBLEHEAD to China in the first place.Trouble had been anticipated aapparently-& we were already out as far as Honolulu on a standby basis.Then the Nanking thing happened,& we went out the rest of the way.I think the NOAH was in on it. The american destroyer NOAH had been sent up to Nanking on a plea from some missionares who were in danger from bandits overrunning the area.The American destroyer skipper went over to call on his counterpart on an English destroyer - they agreed & laid down a barrage above the mission-then the missionaries could come out & down to the dock under cover of the barrage.This was successful,& the destroyer took them to safety.In April l97l Rear Admiral James McNally wrote,"I cannot add too much to your wonderful job of research work.Jack loved papers & kept all kinds of papers & notes.That in fact is one of the strongest memories I have of him.I remember sitting in his stateroom & he pouring through a wicker hamper full of notes to locate a paper that would settled a wardroom argument. Jack was very thoughtful & kind to us junior officers. Phillips, Brant,Van Nagell,Florence, & McNally all reported to the MARBLEHEAD azt Pearl Harbor after Naval academy graduation l925. I notice you have not mentioned John E.Florence.He lives in Charleston, South Carolina. You will have to excuse this new automatic typewriter. It writes faster than I can think, & it cannot spell.We all made the Australian cruise together.Then after leave & recreation in New York after we got back we went to the West Indies- Guantanamo & Haiti. I served on the MARBLEHEAD 23 June l925 to 25 June l926. I was first division junior officer. In that job I had lots of contact with John (Jack).John read a lot & had a good grasp of what was going on in the world.Some of his statements were prophetic.(Executive officer) Commander Alex Sharp would ask,"What has the saber-rattler to say today?" The next contact I had with john was at Pearl.Marjorie & I called on you- young John was only a baby.I was stationed at the Navy Yard & was machinery-electrical planning officer.After the attack I became the Salvage Planning officer & was in charge of preparing the plans for raising & repairing the sunken ships.John helped me get the family off to Long Beach,California.Later he assigned me transportation so I could go to Newport News Virginia to fit out & be chief engineer of p.266M YORKTOWN. The "Fighting Lady" was another wonderful ship just like the MARBLEHEAD.#57 Phillips letter MARBLEHEAD l925 Rear Admiral George L.Phillips of Maine wrote: Dear Mrs. Barrett,I well remember your husband Jack (sometimes known as "Red") from the MARBLEHEAD,which I joined in June,l925 & served in until July l926. I used to stand watches with him in station for several months until I qualified as a top watch stander.I remember the trip he arranged with a New Zealand friend of his (Haskell Anderson of Wellington & Napier) for a party (of which I was one) to spend a few days in Napier.NZ.I believe that Jack & the New Zealander had met in Newport News Virginia at the end of World War I when the latter was on his way home was on his way home from service in Europe (wounded at Gallipoli).We had a splendid cruise to Australia & New Zealand & a wonderful voyage through the south Pacific islands.I remember seeing Jack at Pearl Harbor in late l944 when I was on my way out to Ulithi for the attack on Iwo Jima & Okinawa.I called on him at his office & well remember being at your house for dinner some time in November or December,l944. I brought out a jug of maple syrup to give you.My wife came from Australia where I met her on the cruise in l925.We were married in Montreal,Canada in l928, & Jack was one of two sponsors for her entry permit into the United States.The other was Frank Maeihle (spell?) who was also on the MARBLEHEAD with Jack.I was in ooccasional touch with Captain Shackford before his death in Jamestown a few years ago."


 


#1097 p 56 Harold Fultz + Micky Ashley letters MARBLEHEAD 1927, Shanghai 1937, Hawaii 1940s New Jersey1970s

 

Harold Fultz letter from pages 508-510 Sophie memoir #12 Commander Harold Fultz, who was Jack's friend on the cruiser MARBLEHEAD in l926-l927 and also saw Jack frequently at PEARL HARBOR and in Waikiki during World War II wrote from Glen Ridge New J where he lives in retirement at age eighty-one: On April l7, l970 he wrote, "Dear Sophie, Your letter has come. I got out my scrap book, and there was the picture of Jack and me bedecked in leis. Taken 3 pm 25 March l927 as we sailed out of Honolulu for China. I shed a tear or two.Jack was a good officer and a loyal and esteemed friend. How well I remember your hospitality to me (Waikiki. You had a good home that Jack looked forward to returning to. And John what an appealing fine boy he was. He must be a real asset to you now.On the MARBLEHEAD I was assistant engineer and for a time communications officer. The run to China was a record, because of the anti-foreign trouble there.- eight and a half days, I believe - still stands We burned 450,000 gallons fuel oil, and our turbines revolved l9,584,000 times. - Six hundred miles per day - four thousand five hundred miles.The MARBLEHEAD had a superb engineering plant. Assuming you want details- One officer in the Engineering department decided he didn't want to go way off to China- so he resigned. After the ship sailed, he tried to withdraw his resignation and got turned down cold.We all chuckled and decided he got just what he deserved when he turned chicken at a time of international crisis.On 3 April l927 we steamed into the Whangpoo and moored along the Standard Oil Company at Shanghai.You would go ashore until ten PM in civilian clothes but steer clear of the native city.The people were excitable - easily influenced and there had just been a strike in the mill - in the melee a Chinese had been shot by the police, - and the hue and cry went out that foreigners were mowing everyone down.Miss Madge Ashley, Secretary to the Standard Oil boss, entertained us in her home.Born in China and having always lived there, she was well informed.She now lives nearby here in Ridgewood, New Jersey and lectures on China (Mickey Ashley and her sister Maimie were Jack's good friends in l927, and I met them later in l93l in Shanghai, with a resulting good friendship.Sophie Barrett note). I recall doing the following, and it must have been in the MARBLEHEAD (Jack left June 4, l927 to New York duty via Japan and Seattle). We went six hundred miles up the Yangtze to Hankow - the extreme limit for a ship- and sailed out of there in emergency in the night because the river was near low stage, which might have trapped us half way down. The populace were not frightened by our armament.They said our guns were of course wood, or we would sink.I recall going up the coast to Tientsin and entraining for Peking.October l9 we crossed to Nagasaki, Japan, and in the Inland Sea conducted our annual full power test, to the dismay of small craft. On November 2 we went to Manila. On May 26, l928 we achored in Heavenly Honolulu (no longer that way). On 23 June we took fuel at San Pedro - left 6 July for Boston where we arrived 26 July and cut up our "Homeward Bound" Pennant (chiffon silk $250) It did me good to think about you all again. If we journey to Boston, we'll man the 'phone. Sincerely yours, -Harold Fultz. P.S. don't recall the White Russian friends or Ah Sing or Cockeye the Tailor." p. 520 On July 29, l970 Commander Harold Fultz wrote again from Glen ridge New Jersey: "I was Executive Officer of the REPUBLIC at the beginning of the war- the big transport.We evacuated civilians from Honolulu. Had to give many of them a drink to get them aboard. No sane sould would leave Honolulu for the SA. Some of the kids we evacuated had never worn shoes. Oner of my jobs was to p,ay the piano in the large theatre space to quiet passenger nerves. Our warning to mothers that in event any child got overboard we would not stopwas not exactly a happy prospect.And I was skipper of the hospital ship COMFORT for ten months. She was bombed when I was skipper but not hit.The navigational problems of a hospital ship in wartime were amazing.Except in rare places all navigational coastal lights were extinguished, and we had to "grasp at a straw" to get around,because we were on the move day and night.Without forest fires and moonlight and lightning we would often have been in difficultyAnd in the October 20 typhoon the COMFORT came through by the grace of God. Forty nurses that night were scared to death, but not one even let their helpless patients know it. Seventy craft were lost that night." A lost letter of Harold Fultz recounts in his early years, when he was navigating on the east coast of Ireland, he was condifent he knew the exact location of all the Lighthouses, but his skipper called his attention to regualtions that required him to consult the books each time for latitude and longitude as a safety procedure and not rely on his memory.It was a lesson he never forgot.He often came to 2415 Ala Wai for swim and supper. Forrest Close#71- #7l MARBLEHEAD with Forrest Close letter for disk #12 Harold Fultz letter from pages 508-510 Sophie memoir #12 Commander Harold Fultz, who was Jack's friend on the cruiser MARBLEHEAD in l926-l927 and also saw Jack frequently at PEARL HARBOR and in Waikiki during World War II wrote from Glen Ridge New J where he lives in retirement at age eighty-one: On April l7, l970 he wrote, "Dear Sophie, Your letter has come. I got out my scrap book, and there was the picture of Jack and me bedecked in leis. Taken 3 pm 25 March l927 as we sailed out of Honolulu for China. I shed a tear or two.Jack was a good officer and a loyal and esteemed friend. How well I remember your hospitality to me (Waikiki. You had a good home that Jack looked forward to returning to. And John what an appealing fine boy he was. He must be a real asset to you now.On the MARBLEHEAD I was assistant engineer and for a time communications officer. The run to China was a record, because of the anti-foreign trouble there.- eight and a half days, I believe - still stands We burned 450,000 gallons fuel oil, and our turbines revolved l9,584,000 times. - Six hundred miles per day - four thousand five hundred miles.The MARBLEHEAD had a superb engineering plant. Assuming you want details- One officer in the Engineering department decided he didn't want to go way off to China- so he resigned. After the ship sailed, he tried to withdraw his resignation and got turned down cold.We all chuckled and decided he got just what he deserved when he turned chicken at a time of international crisis.On 3 April l927 we steamed into the Whangpoo and moored along the Standard Oil Company at Shanghai.You would go ashore until ten PM in civilian clothes but steer clear of the native city.The people were excitable - easily influenced and there had just been a strike in the mill - in the melee a Chinese had been shot by the police, - and the hue and cry went out that foreigners were mowing everyone down.Miss Madge Ashley, Secretary to the Standard Oil boss, entertained us in her home.Born in China and having always lived there, she was well informed.She now lives nearby here in Ridgewood, New Jersey and lectures on China (Mickey Ashley and her sister Maimie were Jack's good friends in l927, and I met them later inl93l in Shanghai, with a resulting good friendship.Sophie Barrett note). I recall doing the following, and it must have been in the MARBLEHEAD (Jack left June 4, l927 to New York duty via Japan and Seattle). We went six hundred miles up the Yangtze to Hankow - the extreme limit for a ship- and sailed out of there in emergency in the night because the river was near low stage, which might have trapped us half way down. The populace were not frightened by our armament.They said our guns were of course wood, or we would sink.I recall going up the coast to Tientsin and entraining for Peking.October l9 we crossed to Nagasaki, Japan, and in the Inland Sea conducted our annual full power test, to the dismay of small craft. On November 2 we went to Manila. On May 26, l928 we achored in Heavenly Honolulu (no longer that way). On 23 June we took fuel at San Pedro - left 6 July for Boston where we arrived 26 July and cut up our "Homeward Bound" Pennant (chiffon silk $250) It did me good to think about you all again. If we journey to Boston, we'll man the 'phone. Sincerely yours, -Harold Fultz. P.S. don't recall the White Russian friends or Ah Sing or Cockeye the Tailor." p. 520 On July 29, l970 Commander Harold Fultz wrote again from Glen Ridge New Jersey: "I was Executive Officer of the REPUBLIC at the beginning of the war- the big transport.We evacuated civilains from Honolulu. Had to give many of them a drink to get themaboard. No sane sould would leave Honolulu for the SA. Some of the kids we evacuated had never worn shoes. Oner of my jobs was to p,ay the piano in the large theatre space to quiet passenger nerves. Our warning to mothers that in event any child got overboard we would not stopwas not exactly a happy prospect.And I was skipper of the hospital ship COMFORT for ten months. She was bombed when I was skipper but not hit.The navigational problems of a hospital ship in wartime were amazing.Except in rare places all navigational coastal lights were extinguished, and we had to "grasp at a straw" to get around,because we were on the move day and night.Without forest fires and moonlight and lightning we would often have been in difficultyAnd in the October 20 typhoon the COMFORT came through by the grace of God. Forty nurses that night were scared to death, but not one even let their helpless patients know it. Seventy craft were lost that night." A lost letter of Harold Fultz recounts in his early years, when he was navigating on the east coast of Ireland, he was condifent he knew the exact location of all the Lighthouses, but his skipper called his attention to regualtions that required him to consult the books each time for latitude and longitude as a safety procedure and not rely on his memory.It was a lesson he never forgot.He often came to 2415 Ala Wai for swim and supper. Harold Fultz died heart attack Aug 1973 in hospital Glen Ridge NJ. That morning [before going to hospital] he looked at pictures of the Dahlquists' Alaska cruise sent by Sophie Barrett but could not read Phil's detailed account of the cruise because he thought the chest pains he was suffering were emphysema pains suffered in each attack.But whe he got no relief from all the usual treatments Charlotte Fultz telephoned the doctor who told Harold to go to Emergency in the hospital.There the doctor said he had had a heart attack, and he was put in intensive care. he seemed to be recovering but suffered a second attack in the hospital and passed away in his sleep.He did inquire about Mickey Ashley but never learned she had passed away a few days after he enterred the hospital. He was angry that his illness interfered with his voluntary tutoring of disadvantaged persons. -- 8 Ridley Court Glen Ridge New Jersey 07028 Aug 24, 1973 Dear Mrs. Barrett, Thank you for your long full letter The old China days, the young officers' friendships were all so revived and real! I just knew Harold by letter then. When he got back to Boston Navy Yard and Hingham, Massachusetts,he used to come to the city and took me out a few festive times. I was enchanted, of course-but knew he was "awfully good to" a whole list of old folks and handicapped and young folks too. But although I was still in art school and really didn't aspire so high,HE was paying attention and could tell me seventeen years later,what I wore and where we went.Too bad he felt such a heavy sense of duty that he couldn't combine care for his mother and getting married, too.Well we had twenty-five and a half years anyway. Mickey Ashley died of cancer, which he [Harold] did not know about- he thought it was her heart, like her sister's.Anyhow she died about three days after he got in the hospital. I couldn't tell him of course - too much emotional jolt.When he was a wee better,he asked me if I'd news of Mickie,and I told him that her sister-in-law had phoned- but didn't say "what" and he was just sick enough to assume it was the same old news, and let it go. So he never knew.I took care of the memorial church plantings type of gift that he had done for her sister, and that was the end of the China friends.With best wishes to you both, Charlotte D. Fultz." MADGE 'MICKEY' ASHLEY letters 1937, 1970 - #79 Ashley letter l937 war crimes Shanghai: On November l2, l937 our good friend in China Mickey Ashley wrote from 94 Canton Road in Shanghai China "During July I went to a party & an Indian juggler entertained us.The year so far had been a quiet one & I was wondering what I could put in my usual Christmas letter,so I asked the man to put his performing python around my neck- at least that would be something to write about.Now I've seen so much I don't know where to commence.The war has lasted over three months & we are still in a tight spot.We hate to see the Japanese win, but selfishly hope they will drive the Chinese a few miles out of Shanghai so that our lives & property will be safe.It is a strain to hear guns going day & night,planes droning,explosions, not to be able to sleep.The company (Standard Oil) never mentioned evacuation or took any steps in that direction regarding stenographers in spite of all the U.S. authorities were urging, so I did not evacuate & my sister would not leave without me. However,all the wives & children were sent away at the Company's expense. After the first terrible air raid when everything in Shanghai was at a standstill,with no transportation facilities, they told me to stay home for a couple of days,but we've been working regular hours ever since.Being short staffed-five girls away,three on leave,& two evacuated because they couldn't stand it any longer- we were often very rushed,especially when four fell ill.However,my sister & I took the precaution of having our pasasports ready & the necessary papers made out to enable us to have our little Chinese girl accompany us to the United States if conditions became decidedly worse.I told the office I wasn't staying if the Japs used poison gas in Shanghai. What a lot of red tape- there were so many signatures & guarantees when the Consulate knew an emergency existed & we couldn't possibly leave the (adopted) child here (their adopted daughter, the Chinese child named Topsy- Sophie Barrett note).The greatest danger was the air raids while going to or returning from the office.The horror of the first one will always live in my memory, especially as I saw the planes & heard the antiaircraft guns just as I was approaching the devastated area of "Bloody Saturday" bombing.The huge crater was roped off,but skeletons of charred cars still remained.To watch the white smaoke in the air, to hear the pounding of guns & to know that any moment your own self & car may be a similar tangled mess wasn't pleasant.My stomach felt as if a giant had squeeezed it tight in his huge hand, & only a vacuum remained.Then to know that we were driving into the danger - the Jap men-of-war were firing from the river- & upon arrival at the office to feel the building shake & hear the bang, bang, bang as if a thousand bricks were being flung against the windows- was really terrifying.That same day & during that raid shrapnel fell at Maimie's feet when she left our car.Every day one sees hordes of refugeees with their small bundles without any idea where to go in this crowded place, little lost children- poor bewildered dogs following - cats & other animals are left to wait for death- horribly wounded people, nasty-smalling coffins conveying away soldiers or victims of shrapnel- sick & weary lying on roadsides & families parked for weeks on sidewalks with only straw mats.No wonder disease is rampant.We have all had inoculations against typhoid & cholera & been vaccinated against smallpox.Already two dear friends have paid the price of staying here-they died of dysentery.One was head of the Blind school where my little "Pine Tree" was taken in. The school has been badly damaged & how frightened the blind *& deaf boys must have been.Another friend is dangerously ill with typhoid.The doctors ran short of medical supplies.The pity & tragedy of it all just because a group of men must have more power.If it were possible, I would condemn such to intense suffering the rest of their lives.So many homes had to be abandoned- palaces & cottages alike.The very best of everything was looted- but that wasn't enough.Furniture was hacked to pieces - the Japs say eventually they must buy Japanese goods. food not eaten was strewn about, & malicious damage done whever possible.In a garden section of the eastern division where we once lived, the Japs have put furniture on the sidewalks while their horses are placed in dining & drawing rooms.Mills have been dismantled & their machinery shipped to Japan for scrap iron.An old friend now seventy-three "Auntie" we call her-has lost practically everything, her beautiful collection of linen, furs, silver, stamps, books- the treasures of fifty-two years.She was so overcome over the condition of her home - her own property-that when we visited her that same evening, her face was grey with misery,& she wept- something I've never seen the little person do.Her husband was an artist & art collector- all his ivories & scrolls, stamps - his son's paintings his own embroideries were all gone.Oil paintings not taken were pierced by bayonets - doors & trunks hacked open.The Chinese had been driven out of the district long ago & the Japanese were in complete control as nobody is allowed to carry a bundle without numerous examinations by Japanese sentries-all of her things must have been carried off with the cognizance of the Japanese military.While the fighting continued in the north, & east, we were more or less safe once at home. What beautiful weather & delightful moonlit nights there were -it was difficult to believe that only a few miles away, men were being slaughtered.We preferred rain, because in fine weather planes would drone, then guns roar,-tracer bullets in gay colors would light up the sky,& anti-aircraft guns would spoil the beauty of the night.As the Japs drove the Chinese from the east & north,we in the west then came in danger,but not before those two districts were swept by fire as far as the eye could see.From a tenth story apartment we watched the destruction- our eyes glued to the holocaust-& our hearts sank with pity for those who had escaped the shells but now must run from the fire.. We thanked god fervently those two nights that there was no wind & that a creek separated us from that part of Shanghai.Every day we heard the guns & explosions a little nearer.Fortunately, from the beginning we had dismantled our pretty little home.Cases stood in the hall & only bare necessities were being used. On October 28 the nearness of guns made it imperative to move. 539 On the thirtieth while at dinner shells whizzed past the house- then I decided the hour had come.No trucks could be had at that late hour, so they were ordered for 8:30 AM. We packed until twelve & tried to sleep.I was the last to leave on my bicycle leading the dog.(Now) our one room apartment the size of Maimie's bedroom is jammed, crammed with things, but my sister is clever & has made it liveable.Some of our furnture is with friends, the balance in a garage.Where the sixty-eight thousand poorer Chinese refugees stay I don't know, though numerous refugee camps have been erected.We don't know what emergency awaits us.One morning a huge shell fell in the warehouse adjoining our office- at the same time big department stores were bombed.U.S. Naval experts say that had it exploded, it would have damaged all buildings within a radius of one acre. Our office & we would have gone up in smoke as the yard was full of drums of gasoline.We miss our home, those airy rooms,& the garden.. To be cramped into a small apartment & not even know whichbtrunk contains one's clothes isn't important- but annoying.It's funny how one can tolerate the roar of cannons & explosions & get fussed over petty things. At the office where men's nerves are raw, it is not easy to work. I've seen as many as eleven planes over our place.We are making quilts for refugees., also helping Topsy make strips for gas masks. I hope you will receive this. So many of our cards & letters have gone astray.-Mickey Ashley."In l939 or l940 Mickey Ashley left Shanghai to work for Standard Oil's New York office because the value of "Mex" (Chinese currency ) had fallen so low she could not afford to accept her Shanghai "Mex" salary.We saw her in New York. Now she is retired & lives in Ridgewood New Jersey after years of lecturing about China. #70 Ashley letter SHANGHAI "June 30,l970 from Miss Madge Ashley ("Mickey") 7l5 Hilldrest Road, Ridgewood New Jersey 07450 Dear Sophie (P.S. For twenty years I lectured before women's clubs & garden clubs on China).It is a long time since I heard from you.The last was a card from Honolulu. I hope Jack did not suffer long. I lost my dear Maimie the same year & feel very lost without her.She had a long illness- it was heart. In September l969, I suppose it was too much for me.I had an acute coronary thrombosis & was in hospital a month, two weeks in a nursing home,& had home care for three weeks.I had to learn to walk again & now am going very slowly.I have been at Cape May for a vacation.It is lovely here- so very clean-& the food is excellent. We face the ocean. About twenty years ago my sister & I bought this little house in Ridgewood,& we have been very happy in it.The number is 7l5 Hillcrest Road (not 3l5) Ridgewood, New Jersey 07450. Ridgewood is a purely residential district,& it is kept very nicely.The people were marvelous to me when Maimie died & during my illness.All the years that I worked in New York & when I retired we have kept in touch with Harold Fultz.He suffers badly from emphysema.You asked about my brother. He married a Shanghai American school teacher from Kentucky.They came to the United States over thirty years ago.They have two daughters,who are both married.One has three boys -eight.six & four (years)-& Bob her husband was a Captain in the Marines.He went to Vietnam after three years in Okinawa.He left the Marines & is now with Kodak. The other daughter lives in Dallas & is now a government accountant. They have two girls (six & four years).Brother & Dorothy l;ive in Louisville, Kentucky.I am sorry to say Maimie- who remained in Shanghai while I came to New York to get a job- never saw (her adopted Chinese daughter) "Topsy" again after she was put in the Japanese (concentration) camp where they nearly starved to death until rescued by American fliers.I am "Mickie" & Madge is my real name.You want to know how we met Harold & Jack.The MARBLEHEAD was anchored at the Standard Oil wharf Pootung.The foreigners at the installation were under my boss- therefore I met them all when they came to the office.The families would invite me for weekends, etc.,& include some Navy officers,& then they would escort me home the next day & stay for "tiffen" - lunch & dinner..Several came that way.How my father went to China is that he wanted to see the world- so went on a sailing ship as many pioneers did- & liked the Far East so much he stayed first in Hong Kong- where he met my mother & then in Shanghai.He & a fellow American started the first volunteer fire brigade in China. All the equipment- even the huge fire bellls- came from New York.There were so many civil wars that we got used to storing rice & canned goods, filling both tubs with water, & hiding the family silver.Some of our friends were killed, but Maimie only suffered when the Japanese were so rotten to all foreigners.I don't know GraceLiang. The two Russian sisters (Gala & Vera Tsirentchikoff) I hardly knew. I met Gala once at a party,& that's all.I sent your letter to my brother.He represented Lloyd's of London & two steamship companies, so he knew Ah Sing well.We knew Cockeye & "Jelly Belly" (because he had a fat tummy) the tailors.Most American gunboats went to Tsingtao - a summer resort first made beautiful by the Germans- a bit of Europe in China & after World War I taken by the Japanese. One night in Shanghai (spring l927) the MARBLEHEAD gave A CONCERT & later a dance.During the show we were asked not to applaud as "There had been a death in one of the Standard Oil families." Then Harold (Fultz) told me confidentially that little Billy Robertson (his father was manager of the installation) had died of cholera.He took ill at noon & was dead in a few hours.Had any of us known I doubt that we would have gone to the dinner & dance, as cholera is a terrible thing, especially as there were so many salads & cold food on the table. ....On November 4, l970 our friend Mickey Ashley of China days whose l937 letter appears in this chapter wrote: My sister Maimie was in the Japanese concentration camp- starved & sick with malaria, but she was never beaten. Some Americans were.Topsy came to the camp & called,'Miss Ashley, Miss Ashley' outside, but Maimie's friends advised her not to answer because the Japs would ill-treat all Chinese who favored Americans. Maimie never saw her again. We presumed she was dead. We lost ever so many valuables, & our Chinese money went to nothing overnight. Our lovely home went for seven thousand dollars U.S currency, & we were lucky to get it.- Mickey.


 


p 56#1098 Futlz + Ashley letters on MARBLEHEAD,Shanghai + Hawaii

 

Harold Fultz letter from pages 508-510 Sophie memoir #12 Commander Harold Fultz, who was Jack's friend on the cruiser MARBLEHEAD in l926-l927 and also saw Jack frequently at PEARL HARBOR and in Waikiki during World War II wrote from Glen Ridge New J where he lives in retirement at age eighty-one: On April l7, l970 he wrote, "Dear Sophie, Your letter has come. I got out my scrap book, and there was the picture of Jack and me bedecked in leis. Taken 3 pm 25 March l927 as we sailed out of Honolulu for China. I shed a tear or two.Jack was a good officer and a loyal and esteemed friend. How well I remember your hospitality to me (Waikiki. You had a good home that Jack looked forward to returning to. And John what an appealing fine boy he was. He must be a real asset to you now.On the MARBLEHEAD I was assistant engineer and for a time communications officer. The run to China was a record, because of the anti-foreign trouble there.- eight and a half days, I believe - still stands We burned 450,000 gallons fuel oil, and our turbines revolved l9,584,000 times. - Six hundred miles per day - four thousand five hundred miles.The MARBLEHEAD had a superb engineering plant. Assuming you want details- One officer in the Engineering department decided he didn't want to go way off to China- so he resigned. After the ship sailed, he tried to withdraw his resignation and got turned down cold.We all chuckled and decided he got just what he deserved when he turned chicken at a time of international crisis.On 3 April l927 we steamed into the Whangpoo and moored along the Standard Oil Company at Shanghai.You would go ashore until ten PM in civilian clothes but steer clear of the native city.The people were excitable - easily influenced and there had just been a strike in the mill - in the melee a Chinese had been shot by the police, - and the hue and cry went out that foreigners were mowing everyone down.Miss Madge Ashley, Secretary to the Standard Oil boss, entertained us in her home.Born in China and having always lived there, she was well informed.She now lives nearby here in Ridgewood, New Jersey and lectures on China (Mickey Ashley and her sister Maimie were Jack's good friends in l927, and I met them later in l93l in Shanghai, with a resulting good friendship.Sophie Barrett note). I recall doing the following, and it must have been in the MARBLEHEAD (Jack left June 4, l927 to New York duty via Japan and Seattle). We went six hundred miles up the Yangtze to Hankow - the extreme limit for a ship- and sailed out of there in emergency in the night because the river was near low stage, which might have trapped us half way down. The populace were not frightened by our armament.They said our guns were of course wood, or we would sink.I recall going up the coast to Tientsin and entraining for Peking.October l9 we crossed to Nagasaki, Japan, and in the Inland Sea conducted our annual full power test, to the dismay of small craft. On November 2 we went to Manila. On May 26, l928 we achored in Heavenly Honolulu (no longer that way). On 23 June we took fuel at San Pedro - left 6 July for Boston where we arrived 26 July and cut up our "Homeward Bound" Pennant (chiffon silk $250) It did me good to think about you all again. If we journey to Boston, we'll man the 'phone. Sincerely yours, -Harold Fultz. P.S. don't recall the White Russian friends or Ah Sing or Cockeye the Tailor." p. 520 On July 29, l970 Commander Harold Fultz wrote again from Glen ridge New Jersey: "I was Executive Officer of the REPUBLIC at the beginning of the war- the big transport.We evacuated civilains from Honolulu. Had to give many of them a drink to get themaboard. No sane sould would leave Honolulu for the SA. Some of the kids we evacuated had never worn shoes. Oner of my jobs was to p,ay the piano in the large theatre space to quiet passenger nerves. Our warning to mothers that in event any child got overboard we would not stopwas not exactly a happy prospect.And I was skipper of the hospital ship COMFORT for ten months. She was bombed when I was skipper but not hit.The navigational problems of a hospital ship in wartime were amazing.Except in rare places all navigational coastal lights were extinguished, and we had to "grasp at a straw" to get around,because we were on the move day and night.Without forest fires and moonlight and lightning we would often have been in difficulty.And in the October 20 typhoon the COMFORT came through by the grace of God. Forty nurses that night were scared to death, but not one even let their helpless patients know it. Seventy craft were lost that night." A lost letter of Harold Fultz recounts in his early years, when he was navigating on the east coast of Ireland, he was confident he knew the exact location of all the Lighthouses, but his skipper called his attention to regulations that required him to consult the books each time for latitude and longitude as a safety procedure and not rely on his memory.It was a lesson he never forgot.He often came to 2415 Ala Wai for swim and supper. Harold Fultz died heart attack Aug 1973 in hospital Glen Ridge NJ. That morning [before going to hospital] he looked at pictures of the Dahlquists' Alaska cruise sent by Sophie Barrett but could not read Phil's detailed account of the cruise because he thought the chest pains he was suffering were emphysema pains suffered in each attack.But whe he got no relief from all the usual treatments Charlotte Fultz telephoned the doctor who told Harold to go to Emergency in the hospital.There the doctor said he had had a heart attack, and he was put in intensive care. he seemed to be recovering but suffered a second attack in the hospital and passed away in his sleep.He did inquire about Mickey Ashley but never learned she had passed away a few days after he enterred the hospital. He was angry that his illness interfered with his voluntary tutoring of disadvantaged persons. --letter from Charlotte Fultz: "8 Ridley Court Glen Ridge New Jersey 07028 Aug 24, 1973 Dear Mrs. Barrett, Thank you for your long full letter The old China days, the young officers' friendships were all so revived and real! I just knew Harold by letter then. When he got back to Boston Navy Yard and Hingham, Massachusetts,he used to come to the city and took me out a few festive times. I was enchanted, of course-but knew he was "awfully good to" a whole list of old folks and handicapped and young folks too. But although I was still in art school and really didn't aspire so high,HE was paying attention and could tell me seventeen years later,what I wore and where we went.Too bad he felt such a heavy sense of duty that he couldn't combine care for his mother and getting married, too.Well we had twenty-five and a half years anyway. Mickey Ashley died of cancer, which he [Harold] did not know about- he thought it was her heart, like her sister's.Anyhow she died about three days after he got in the hospital. I couldn't tell him of course - too much emotional jolt.When he was a wee better,he asked me if I'd news of Mickie,and I told him that her sister-in-law had phoned- but didn't say "what" and he was just sick enough to assume it was the same old news, and let it go. So he never knew.I took care of the memorial church plantings type of gift that he had done for her sister, and that was the end of the China friends.With best wishes to you both, Charlotte D. Fultz." MADGE 'MICKEY' ASHLEY letters 1937, 1970 - #79 Ashley letter l937 war crimes Shanghai: On November l2, l937 our good friend in China Mickey Ashley wrote from 94 Canton Road in Shanghai China "During July I went to a party & an Indian juggler entertained us.The year so far had been a quiet one & I was wondering what I could put in my usual Christmas letter,so I asked the man to put his performing python around my neck- at least that would be something to write about.Now I've seen so much I don't know where to commence.The war has lasted over three months & we are still in a tight spot.We hate to see the Japanese win, but selfishly hope they will drive the Chinese a few miles out of Shanghai so that our lives & property will be safe.It is a strain to hear guns going day & night,planes droning,explosions, not to be able to sleep.The company (Standard Oil) never mentioned evacuation or took any steps in that direction regarding stenographers in spite of all the U.S. authorities were urging, so I did not evacuate & my sister would not leave without me. However,all the wives & children were sent away at the Company's expense. After the first terrible air raid when everything in Shanghai was at a standstill,with no transportation facilities, they told me to stay home for a couple of days,but we've been working regular hours ever since.Being short staffed-five girls away,three on leave,& two evacuated because they couldn't stand it any longer- we were often very rushed,especially when four fell ill.However,my sister & I took the precaution of having our pasasports ready & the necessary papers made out to enable us to have our little Chinese girl accompany us to the United States if conditions became decidedly worse.I told the office I wasn't staying if the Japs used poison gas in Shanghai. What a lot of red tape- there were so many signatures & guarantees when the Consulate knew an emergency existed & we couldn't possibly leave the (adopted) child here (their adopted daughter, the Chinese child named Topsy- Sophie Barrett note).The greatest danger was the air raids while going to or returning from the office.The horror of the first one will always live in my memory, especially as I saw the planes & heard the antiaircraft guns just as I was approaching the devastated area of "Bloody Saturday" bombing.The huge crater was roped off,but skeletons of charred cars still remained.To watch the white smaoke in the air, to hear the pounding of guns & to know that any moment your own self & car may be a similar tangled mess wasn't pleasant.My stomach felt as if a giant had squeeezed it tight in his huge hand, & only a vacuum remained.Then to know that we were driving into the danger - the Jap men-of-war were firing from the river- & upon arrival at the office to feel the building shake & hear the bang, bang, bang as if a thousand bricks were being flung against the windows- was really terrifying.That same day & during that raid shrapnel fell at Maimie's feet when she left our car.Every day one sees hordes of refugeees with their small bundles without any idea where to go in this crowded place, little lost children- poor bewildered dogs following - cats & other animals are left to wait for death- horribly wounded people, nasty-smalling coffins conveying away soldiers or victims of shrapnel- sick & weary lying on roadsides & families parked for weeks on sidewalks with only straw mats.No wonder disease is rampant.We have all had inoculations against typhoid & cholera & been vaccinated against smallpox.Already two dear friends have paid the price of staying here-they died of dysentery.One was head of the Blind school where my little "Pine Tree" was taken in. The school has been badly damaged & how frightened the blind *& deaf boys must have been.Another friend is dangerously ill with typhoid.The doctors ran short of medical supplies.The pity & tragedy of it all just because a group of men must have more power.If it were possible, I would condemn such to intense suffering the rest of their lives.So many homes had to be abandoned- palaces & cottages alike.The very best of everything was looted- but that wasn't enough.Furniture was hacked to pieces - the Japs say eventually they must buy Japanese goods. food not eaten was strewn about, & malicious damage done whever possible.In a garden section of the eastern division where we once lived, the Japs have put furniture on the sidewalks while their horses are placed in dining & drawing rooms.Mills have been dismantled & their machinery shipped to Japan for scrap iron.An old friend now seventy-three "Auntie" we call her-has lost practically everything, her beautiful collection of linen, furs, silver, stamps, books- the treasures of fity-two years.She was so overcome over the condition of her home - her own property-that when we visited her that same evening, her face was grey with misery,& she wept- something I've never seen the little person do.Her husband was an artist & art collector- all his ivories & scrolls, stamps - his son's paintings his own embroideries were all gone.Oil paintings not taken were pierced by bayonets - doors & trunks hacked open.The Chinese had been driven out of the district long ago & the Japanese were in complete control as nobody is allowed to carry a bundle without numerous examinations by Japanese sentries-all of her things must have been carried off with the cognizance of the Japanese military.While the fighting continued in the north, & east, we were more or less safe once at home. What beautiful weather & delightful moonlit nights there were -it was difficult to believe that only a few miles away, men were being slaughtered.We preferred rain, because in fine weather planes would drone, then guns roar,-tracer bullets in gay colors would light up the sky,& anti-aircraft guns would spoil the beauty of the night.As the Japs drove the Chinese from the east & north,we in the west then came in danger,but not before those two districts were swept by fire as far as the eye could see.From a tenth story apartment we watched the destruction- our eyes glued to the holocaust-& our hearts sank with pity for those who had escaped the shells but now must run from the fire.. We thanked god fervently those two nights that there was no wind & that a creek separated us from that part of Shanghai.Every day we heard the guns & explosions a little nearer.Fortunately, from the beginning we had dismantled our pretty little home.Cases stood in the hall & only bare necessities were being used. On October 28 the nearness of guns made it imperative to move. 539 On the thirtieth while at dinner shells whizzed past the house- then I decided the hour had come.No trucks could be had at that late hour, so they were ordered for 8:30 AM. We packed until twelve & tried to sleep.I was the last to leave on my bicycle leading the dog.(Now) our one room apartment the size of Maimie's bedroom is jammed, crammed with things, but my sister is clever & has made it liveable.Some of our furnture is with friends, the balance in a garage.Where the sixty-eight thousand poorer Chinese refugees stay I don't know, though numerous refugee camps have been erected.We don't know what emergency awaits us.One morning a huge shell fell in the warehouse adjoining our office- at the same time big department stores were bombed.U.S. Naval experts say that had it exploded, it would have damaged all buildings within a radius of one acre. Our office & we would have gone up in smoke as the yard was full of drums of gasoline.We miss our home, those airy rooms,& the garden.. To be cramped into a small apartment & not even know which trunk contains one's clothes isn't important- but annoying.It's funny how one can tolerate the roar of cannons & explosions & get fussed over petty things. At the office where men's nerves are raw, it is not easy to work. I've seen as many as eleven planes over our place.We are making quilts for refugees., also helping Topsy make strips for gas masks. I hope you will receive this. So many of our cards & letters have gone astray.-Mickey Ashley."In l939 or l940 Mickey Ashley left Shanghai to work for Standard Oil's New York office because the value of "Mex" (Chinese currency ) had fallen so low she could not afford to accept her Shanghai "Mex" salary.We saw her in New York. Now she is retired & lives in Ridgewood New Jersey after years of lecturing about China. #70 Ashley letter SHANGHAI "June 30,l970 from Miss Madge Ashley ("Mickey") 7l5 Hilldrest Road, Ridgewood New Jersey 07450 Dear Sophie (P.S. For twenty years I lectured before women's clubs & garden clubs on China).It is a long time since I heard from you.The last was a card from Honolulu. I hope Jack did not suffer long. I lost my dear Maimie the same year & feel very lost without her.She had a long illness- it was heart. In September l969, I suppose it was too much for me.I had an acute coronary thrombosis & was in hospital a month, two weeks in a nursing home,& had home care for three weeks.I had to learn to walk again & now am going very slowly.I have been at Cape May for a vacation.It is lovely here- so very clean-& the food is excellent. We face the ocean. About twenty years ago my sister & I bought this little house in Ridgewood,& we have been very happy in it.The number is 7l5 Hillcrest Road (not 3l5) Ridgewood, New Jersey 07450. Ridgewood is a purely residential district,& it is kept very nicely.The people were marvelous to me when Maimie died & during my illness.All the years that I worked in New York & when I retired we have kept in touch with Harold Fultz.He suffers badly from emphysema.You asked about my brother. He married a Shanghai American school teacher from Kentucky.They came to the United States over thirty years ago.They have two daughters,who are both married.One has three boys -eight.six & four (years)-& Bob her husband was a Captain in the Marines.He went to Vietnam after three years in Okinawa.He left the Marines & is now with Kodak. The other daughter lives in Dallas & is now a government accountant. They have two girls (six & four years).Brother & Dorothy l;ive in Louisville, Kentucky.I am sorry to say Maimie- who remained in Shanghai while I came to New York to get a job- never saw (her adopted Chinese daughter) "Topsy" again after she was put in the Japanese (concentration) camp where they nearly starved to death until rescued by American fliers.I am "Mickie" & Madge is my real name.You want to know how we met Harold & Jack.The MARBLEHEAD was anchored at the Standard Oil wharf Pootung.The foreigners at the installation were under my boss- therefore I met them all when they came to the office.The families would invite me for weekends, etc.,& include some Navy officers,& then they would escort me home the next day & stay for "tiffen" - lunch & dinner..Several came that way.How my father went to China is that he wanted to see the world- so went on a sailing ship as many pioneers did- & liked the Far East so much he stayed first in Hong Kong- where he met my mother & then in Shanghai.He & a fellow American started the first volunteer fire brigade in China. All the equipment- even the huge fire bellls- came from New York.There were so many civil wars that we got used to storing rice & canned goods, filling both tubs with water, & hiding the family silver.Some of our friends were killed, but Maimie only suffered when the Japanese were so rotten to all foreigners.I don't know GraceLiang. The two Russian sisters (Gala & Vera Tsirentchikoff) I hardly knew. I met Gala once at a party,& that's all.I sent your letter to my brother.He represented Lloyd's of London & two steamship companies, so he knew Ah Sing well.We knew Cockeye & "Jelly Belly" (because he had a fat tummy) the tailors.Most American gunboats went to Tsingtao - a summer resort first made beautiful by the Germans- a bit of Europe in China & after World War I taken by the Japanese. One night in Shanghai (spring l927) the MARBLEHEAD gave A CONCERT & later a dance.During the show we were asked not to applaud as "There had been a death in one of the Standard Oil families." Then Harold (Fultz) told me confidentially that little Billy Robertson (his father was manager of the installation) had died of cholera.He took ill at noon & was dead in a few hours.Had any of us known I doubt that we would have gone to the dinner & dance, as cholera is a terrible thing, especially as there were so many salads & cold food on the table. ....On November 4, l970 our friend Mickey Ashley of China days whose l937 letter appears in this chapter wrote: My sister Maimie was in the Japanese concentration camp- starved & sick with malaria, but she was never beaten. Some Americans were.Topsy came to the camp & called,'Miss Ashley, Miss Ashley' outside, but Maimie's friends advised her not to answer because the Japs would ill-treat all Chinese who favored Americans. Maimie never saw her again. We presumed she was dead. We lost ever so many valuables, & our Chinese money went to nothing overnight. Our lovely home went for seven thousand dollars U.S currency, & we were lucky to get it.Mickey.


 

 

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