Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

1198.
Revenue Cutter School cadets with sextants on ITASCA

 

Revenue Cutter School cadets with sextants aboard training ship ITASCA 1909 or 1910 Admiral Wilfred N. Derby probably is at center of group. #1198 p 69 and this material on Thanksiving 1958-or-9is in notebook two. I also found a January l928 letter my father wrote to New York Post under pen name "Xanthos." He had recently been to sea Dec. 1927 in very poorly equipped small harbor tug PENOBSCOT when every available vessel was rushed to try to help small submarine S-4, which sank in very deep water off Provincetown Cape Cod, when S-4 surfaced without warning in front of Coast Guard cutter PAULDING, which was not proved in any way at fault - captained by my father's schoolmate at Revenue Cutter School Jack Baylis, whom I visited in New Jersey 1970. There is material on website about S-4 by my father's friend from Naval Hydrographic Office DC Gershom Bradford - native of Kingston MA 1879-1978 - he helped lay out the test course off Provincetown about 1902. and knew one of the PAULDING officers who stood up for Baylis when he was critcized. The PENOBSCOT, the tug my father was on after being called out in middle of night about 18 Dec 27 had weak radio, lacked food and blankets for long trip and was otherwise lacking equipment for high seas.. She was assigned to get in touch with another ship the CHEWINK, which was trying to recover some pontoons - someone hoped they could be used to refloat the S-4, which proved to be in water too deep for rescue, though survivors could be heard tapping for two weeks. When the modern sub THRESHER sank off Boston 1963, there was still no technology to rescue crew from great depth and pressure. My father's letter does not deal specifically with the S-4 but dealt with the general issue of presparedness and Navy budgets in the period when Hitler and Tojo were coming to power and gradually eluding the weak-minded democracies. The name Xanthos originally mean +fair+ or "blond" in Greek, but it was the name of the horse that warned the great hero Achilles who killed Trojan Hector to avenge his friend Patroclus that his turn was coming soon too -Achilles got the bad news in no uncertain terms "from the horse's mouth" as they say at the race track - then the gods intervened to hush the unnatural speech and warning. My father was considered at times a prophet of gloom and doom Pearl Harbor, etc --like the talking horse of the Iliad - and there seems to have been some fanciful allusion to his red hair - perhaps based on humor at Boston Latin in class of 1906 - though in good Greek "xanthos" means blond not red. Jack Barrett in the 1906 "Class Prophecy" was called Pyrrhus, in allusion to his sunburned freckled countenance as after mush time boating in South Boston during school years. It was natural to extend it from red face to red hair =Pyrrhus to Xanthos. The actual content of the letter has to do with Naval budgets in context of disarmament treaties, in which Britain and Japan scrapped plans to buiild ships while US gave up existing ships. German -Americans were influential through religious groups in neutralist anti-armament movements and isolationism, many people were entirely sincere - there was a Pacifist movement 1930's at Oxford, but the German government skillfully exploited the sentiments. Franklin Roosevelt had to overcome isolationism, and the support of German-Americans was vital in the war effort- In regard to the one-sidedness of 1920s naval disarmament see Admiral Knox's introduction to first volume of fifteen-volume "History of U.S. Navy in World War II." My father had several assignments in War Plans - he took junior Course at Naval War College Newport RI 1923-1924 - I am starting to type his TACTICS thesis for website - he participated in 1925 War Game Hawaii that demonstrated vulnerability of Oahu and Pearl Harbor - he was in War Plans and Reserve Training three tiimes New York 1927-9; Boston 1932-3, and Philadelphia 1936-8. He drilled a great many Naval Reservists out of Charlestown Navy Yard 1932-3 on EAGLE 19 built by Ford motors, and the Springfield Republican newspaper told of the last cruise in a front page story Sunday June 18, 1933 with photos of my father in uniform and the EAGLE 19 and members of the Springfield unit. Then President Roosevelt cut the budget attempting to keep his 1932 campaign promise to balance the budget. President Hoover built no new ships in four years. Then President Roosevelt heard about the fiscal ideas of British Lord Keynes and the Labor party that fiscal deficits are necessary to stimulate demand and employment in depression times, so he turned around and suported rebuilding the Navy, but Hitler and Tojo got an amazing headstart. (This may be happening today on FUSION ENERGY). My father saw the Atlantic war close up at Branch Naval Hydrographic Office New York, where he was in charge 1940-41 - then he was shocked at stupidity and complacency and refusal to plan when he was sent to Pearl Harbor as Assistant War Plans Officer Fourteenth Naval District July-October 1941. He was transferred to personnel Oct. and ran Overseas Transportation Office four years till October 1945. evacuating families after Dec. 7 attack -shipping very short till after Midway June 4 1942. In 1946 he was on courts martial - supported Capt. Paul Washburn who believed there was reasonable doubt when uncorroborated Reserve Officer with political connections accused career Naval officer of thefts from commissary - Nimitz and Navy Sec. Sullivan were angry - there was political pressure for conviction. Head of court Washburn found the witness evase - he was demoted by Nimitz but it was rescinded. The 1950 Uniform Code of Military Justice was suposed to reduced this type of "staff influence" pressure for conviction without fair procedure. Nimitz and staff did good job with intelligence for Battle of Midway 1942 - made good judgment permitting Orlin Livdahl gunnery officer on carrier ENTERPRISE to re-position new Swedish guns Sept 1941 to save four airplane spaces on carrier deck and increase firing angle of guns - Livdahl was friend of my father from destroyer CLAXTON 1936. Have you had chance to look through website ccilink.com/barrett ? XANTHOS letter 1928-- 1932 honeymoon trip 67-1185 Edit : XANTHOS letter to New York Post Jan 24, 1928 New York Evening Post Friday January 7, 1928 Letter was written Tuesday, January 24, 1928 by "XANTHOS" Name of talking horse in Homer's ILIAD. Latin school pseudonym of John Berchmans Barrett who thought term meant 'red-head' or facetiously applied it to his own prognostications of danger like Homer's horse. The more usual translation is "blond" or "chestnut". TITLE: "Sees Need of Strong Navy" To the editor of the Evening Post: Sir It may seem 'smart' for Senators or others to deride what they do not understand.Just because the Navy spends its best energies "on the job" instead of sobbing about the difficulties imposed upon it by incompetence and indifference of alleged statesmen when laws and treaties are made, it seems the fashion to belittle the serious effects that must be faced by the Navy if and when any other nation or group of nations decides to attempt to take forcibly things they sorely need from our plenteous supply.= So I wonder then: What would be adequate then? Is the contest between Standard Oil and Dutch Shell a type of contest for control of products which might easily lead to international difficulties? Will nations fight to get their share of the necessaries of life? Will words feed the hungry or win battles? = Can our present high standards of living, comfort, and luxury be maintained if our foreign trade is curtailed or even held stationary at present volume? Is there any better use for life than to spend it in support and defense of home and country? = Give the Navy at least half a chance to save you from your own folly by providing it with at least a few items of modern equipment that the other have. [despite their poverty] instead of spending all in wasteful luxury, rum chasing, building post offices in deserts and giving idlers useless work at fancy salaries with which to support night clubs and other sybaritic parasitical growths.= Otherwise who knows even the Navy might get discouraged and join the wasters in the last made whirl before the final SMB's Black Notebook # Two pages 277-8 Sophie comments on link to S-4 rescue effort previous month Dec. 1927. It also reflects l917 experience at Bureau of foreign & Domestic Commerce. and points toward effort to warn at Pearl Harbor in War Plans very reminiscent of "Xanthos" the horse.-p. 238- When Joe Hurley had dinner with us at the Victoria |Hotel, |April 15, [1932]his wife, Peggy Strickland Hurley, who before her marriage had been an editorial worker for the Boston Post, was in Ireland. Shortly after her return, she telephoned to me at the Victoria Hotel to introduce herself and to invite me to be her guest at a lecture she was scheduled to give at a suburban women's club that afternoon.She drove me to the club, where as a paid lecturer she gave an entertaining and instructive lecture on her experiences in Eire.She had tried to learn to speak Gaelic. Before she left me,she invited Jack and me to dinner at her home on Moss Hill Road in Jamaica Plain. The party was most enjoyable, because Peggy had -239- invited five Boston Post reporters to join us at dinner.The food was delicious, and the conversation flowed.After dinner, in the living room, Jack began a long tale about his [part in]efforts to rescue the Submarine S-4, which had gone down in Provincetown [Cape Cod] waters on December 17,1927. I had never heard the tale before and have never heard him talk about the S-4 since. But I remember him saying that he was on shore duty in New York City, living alone in an apartment, asleep one night when he was told by telephone to go to a tug immediately, as the tug was about to leave to go to the aid of the Submarine S-4. He related that the tug did not have the properequipment for the job, told in detail what they did,and how they finally had to give up.{John Barrett note- after Sophie wrote this late 1969 we found records of the New York harbor tug PENOBSCOT trying to make radio contact with CHEWINK, which was trying to recover pontoons lost at sea for use in effort to refloat S-4, which could not be rescued from great depth and pressure. We got additional information from Gershom Bradford later and Commodore Jack Baylis USCG retired. p 224 Our first stop on the PIERCE was Shanghai where we hired two rick-shaws because Jack wanted to say goodbye to some people he knew there. First we went to see Ah Sing, the ship's chandler who had entertained us at tiffen in his home in July, 1931.Then we set off to Cockeye the Tailor's establishment on Bubbling Well Road When I remonstrated with Jack for calling the man such a name, he opened his wallet and showed me a card reading "Cock Eye- Tailor" and giving addresses in Shanghai and in Chefoo. When we arrived, one of Cock Eye's sons greeted Jack warmly, told us that Cock Eye was now too old to work, but he took us to Cock Eye's quarters for a visit. Then I knew at once the derivation of his trade name because he was indeed cock-eyed. He gave me a white terry cloth kimono with a peacock embroidered on the back. They gave Jack a pongee robe. When I boarded the PIERCE at Kobe,all the clothes I wore or carried in my suitcase were winter clothes, as it was very cold in Tientsin and in Japan at that season. However, in my trunk, which was stored in the trunkroom of the PIERCE, I had sme lovely summer clothes, which I had made for me in Shanghai on my previous visit there in July 1931 - clothes to be worn in hot Manila, at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore, in Penang and Ceylon and India and at the Shepherds's Hotel in Cairo. While en route from Hong Kong to Manila, it got very hot, and I went to the trunk room to get some of my warm weather clothes.At first I was not alarmed when I could not find my trunk, but I did become worried when the trunk room man couldn't find it either. After much searching, the disappearance was reported to the purser, and I suffered in my winter clothes. Just as we approached Manila, the purser got word that my trunk had mistakenly been put ashore in Hong Kong and was on the dock there. I could not have my trunk again until we reached Marseilles in March. We tried to buy summer clothes in Manila but were unsuccessful except for two identical cheap cotton morning dresses. We had no time to have dresses made there as we were to be in Manila only one more day- when we planned to ride the rapids of Pagsanjan in canoes - a thrilling experience - [well out toward the southeast tip of Luzon island in direction of the Mount Majon volcano. Jack Barrett was amused by the pronunciation of the volcano - like "my own"- a photo of the very symmetrical cone hung in the Barrett dining room in West Roxbury from 1947 on.] So while other women appeared at dinner and dancing in lovely summer dresses, I had to wear the only one I carried in my suitcase, a black velvet dress suitable only for cold weather, and when an evening gown was not appropriate, I appeared in a cheap cotton morning dress in the Shepperd's Hotel in Cairo and the Raffles Hotel in Singapore, and at the Gardens of the Sultan of Johore, where I wore a [borrowed] man's sun helmet. While on the PIERCE we became friendly with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pardee of Saticoy, Ventura county, California/ They were on a Cook's tour of the world, traveling to try to improve Mr. Pardee's health. He had a circulatory disorder.They stayed at expensive hotels, whereas Jack and I tried to stay at "pensions" in Europe or at moderately priced hotels. We learned about foreign hotels the hard way. When we arrived in Italy, I aksed the taxi man in Naples to take us to an inexpensive hotel, making it clear to the driver, who could speak English, that I did not want to spend much for room and board. I asked the hotel clerk how much we would have to pay for a room and two meals a day PER WEEK. He quoted a price which seemed reasonable to me. When the waiter inquired after dinner, "Coffee, madame?" Jack refused, but, thinking I was paying for it anyway, I said, "Yes." I took only a few sips of the thick liquid, but every night I answered "Yes" to his "Coffee, madame?" At the end of the week we called for our bill, and I was stunned to learn that we owed the hotel seven times what I thought we owed them, plus seven cups of coffee served to me. I had no idea that the coffee was extra. They also charged for the baths I had had. I was amazed that they knew exactly how many baths I had had.-227- I argued with the clerk that he had quoted a weekly rate, but was charging it for each day, but he only shrugged and said that I had understood. Also we had to pay a tourist tax. I had learned an expensive lesson, which helped me in every other city on our itinerary except Florence, where we were too cold to enjoy anything. The Florence tea houses saw more of us than the art museums with their cold marble floors. {Jack Barrett brought home detailed guide books of the art Museum in Naples and the Louvre in Paris - he often remembered Sophie at the cold Uffizi in Florence saying "Can we PLEASE GO home?"-John Barrett note] In Naples we saw Vesuvius and went to the ruins of Pompeii but were told it was the wrong seaon to go to Capri. In Rome, our next stop, we were very fortunate to have a reasonably priced "pension" with good food, and we spent our days in the art museums, thew Colisseum, the Vatican, and the Tombs (catacombs). One day we met Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pardee on the street.Mrs. Pardee invited us to the opera. that evening, and p. 231 From Venice we went to Vienna Austria, where my mother ws born (or lived in youth). I remember our standihg up at observation windows to see the Austrian Alps in route. Jack probably thought of our trip when he bought imported Austrian Alps Swiss cheese at our local First National Stopre Supermarkets in West Roxbury Austrian Alps swiss cheese was a staple item with us in the 1950s and 1960s.1950s)


 

1199.
#1199 p 69 -2415 Ala Wai Boulevard Waikiki 1943

 

#1199 p 69 This is the best photo of 2415 Ala Wai Boulevard, Waikiki where Commander Jack and Sophie Barrett lived July 28, 1941 to June 4, 1947. Morning of Dec. 7, 1941 neighbor Jim Needles knocked on window to tell Jack all Navy personnel were ordered to duty stations because of Japanese Pearl Harbor attack. The Barretts used bomb shelter toward back of the Needles' deep yard in 1942 night air raids. Mr. Needles was a warden of the Office of Civilian Defense OCD. Landlord Walter Glockner lived upstairs - was interned by military police and FBI Dec 8, born Germany - spent war years Stevens Point Wisconsin -returned 1945. A papaya tree he planted 1941 at east side of house gave excellent fruit.Lawn had tropical species of crabgrass Digitaria. Lincoln Zephyr l937 took the Barretts to Boston via Yosemite and Crater Lake and remained in service till 1954. Lava was used in columns of semi-open garage, where tame pigeon "Quove" roosted 1942. To west at 2411 Ala Wai Mr. Glockner had four apartments, which had various tenants including the d'Auberts with cats and spaniel, Mr. and Mrs Means, Lucy Sanborn, Gerda Busck. At start of war Alfreida Watson age 14 and parents lived in high apartments in back facing Tuisitala Street - on south side of which was the famous Kaiulani banyan where Robert Louis Stevenson read to the Hawaiian princess in 1890 near the royal residence on Cleghorn St. Sophie Barrett was friendly with Mrs. Shapiro, who owned or managed the apartments in back. The Barretts walked barefoot to Waikiki Beach nearly every day - eight blocks southeast. At left of photo behind coconut palm and pink hibsicus there was a variegated panax hedge, interrupted by a red hibiscus bush on the Needles property 2421 Ala Wai. One surviving papaya tree continued to produce much fruit. Lava is visible in small porches below French front windows. The left French window went to a front bedroom with sliding door that disappeared into walls. The other three downstairs windows were on the front of the living room. The family bedroom was at back left near the papaya tree. Mr. Glockner's upstairs apartment had one large window visible here with curved top. The 1937 V-12 Lincoln Zephyr is parked in the open garage, supported by about three lava pillars. Sophie had clotheslines in the back part of the garage space. An open trellis on the west wide of the garage had large openings that John could crawl through up to age nine or ten. Purple-colored passion flower vines grew on part of the trellis. To the right was an orange-pink cement driveway for the 2411 apartments, which Mr. Glockner installed in the fall of 1941 after the Barretts arrived. Close to apartment D on the back of 2411 Ala Wai some foliage of a breadfruit tree Artocarpus appears in the picture though perhaps not recognizable. In the center of the front of 2415 there was a small, very shiny fan palm. Perennial Mexican creeper Antigonon leptopus of rhubarb family Polygonaceae grew on the iron railing of the left porch, and small allamanda and 'elephant ears'ornamental taro were near the front door of 2415 on right side, where there was a small porch, above which the tame pigeon Quove nested for months in 1941-1942. The porch and front door were entered from the west side through the open garage, and further back there was a door to the kitchen. Around the right back corner there was a door to enter the shower and bathroom on returning barefoot from Waikiki Beach, and a spigot to wash sand off feet. Mr. Glockner's entrance was at the center back. Some bright colored ginger was planted in center front of 2411 next door near entrances to Apratments B + C. By this date the Barretts had planted nasturtiums and other annuals. They gradually expanded the flower patch in the center front area, with ageratrum, alyssum, Mexican gaillardias imprecisely called "painted daisies", calliopsis, cosmos, mignonette, bachelors' buttons, and marigolds. Succulent airplant leaves Kalanchoe pinnata of family Crassulaceae were popular both in school and in the neighborhood, and new plants could be propagated from the big leaves, where they sprouted along the edge. In May 1944 John wrote a poem: "Happy Mother's Day -With its break- of-dawn bouquet - For its beauty do not fear - First snapdragons of the year. - And the painted daisy - O, the painter was not lazy, - And in flowers what greater wish - Than nasturtiums yellowish?" Around 1945 after the war ended, Jack began to grow small 'Italian plum' and 'yellow pear' tomatoes despite mildew and mold in the frost-free climate and fruit-flies, which made it necessary to put each small fruit in a paper bag right after flowering. One time a bee landed on Sophie's leg when she was sitting on a rocking chair on the east part of the front lawn near the palm tree. To avoid being stung, she sat still for ten minutes, and finally it flew away. John began doing some gardening for Mrs. Laythe, who lived a few blocks east. Jack kept "the second dollar he ever earned" bringing it to the mainland in defiance of regulations against taking the special wartime "Hawaii" currency out of the Islands. Another neighbor near Liliuokalani Street showed John how to propagate geranium cuttings by "slips" containing a "node", and we soon had fast-growing red geraniums that expanded rapidly in the frost -free climate. Purple bouganvillea bushes grew directly in front of us across Ala Wai Boulevard, and a spectacular big red royal poinciana tree Delonix regia was two houses east of us. Pink, golden, and hybrid coral shower trees Cassia of legume family were extremely abundant and spectacular in Waikiki, and 'African tulip trees' Spathodea had big orange flowers probably adapted for bird pollination. Hibiscus were partly native, though hybridized with many foreign species. For the most part we did not see the rare native Hawaiian flora, but spectacular introductions included true orchids and the legume 'orchid-tree' Bauhinia, bird-of-paradise flower, night-blooming cereus cactus at Punahou School, oleander and Thevetia 'yellow oleander', crown-flower, on which monarch butterflies feed,and Cental American frangipani used in flower leis. Our friend Pauline King brought wreaths of the fragant native maili, and Mrs. 'Tootsie' Distelli brought delicious mangoes from her mother's tree near Manoa Valley. I have recently learned she lived until 1988 to age one hundred years and nine days. Banyans Ficus, monkeypods Samanea, sausage tree Kigelia, gold tree and other Tabebuia species were interesting and familiar. Besides coconuts Royal Hawaiian, date palm, and various ornamentals were familiar. The introduced legume shrub 'koa haole' was a conspicuous weed in forested areas. We enjoyed sugar cane, pineapple, guava, macadamia locally grown.


 

1200.
Jack Barrett photo YOSEMITE FALLS June 1947 p 69-1200

 

#1200 p 69 - Three photos Jack Barrett took on Yosemite Falls a short time apart showed substantial wind effects changing shape of the high upper falls. Another of these is photo #1201 directly following this one.---Sophie Black Notebook Two p 200 When Geetter was a student a Jefferson Medical School [1925-1929] he was in class one day when an obnoxious professor talked at length about his accomplishments in his field - when Geetter suddenly was horrified to hear his own voice saying "You cockeyed wonder!" - followed by an ominous silence in which the professor glared at him and during which Geetter quaked in his boots with apprehension. For the rest of that semester Geetter was in the professor's dog house and altho he passed the course, he had an awful time because the professor gave him such difficult slides to diagnose under his microscope. He had to spend many hours puzzling over those slides - hours which might more profitably have been spent on his other medical subjects. But he was relieved to pass the course and be able to complete his medical subjects for his degree. -= When Geetter was in his second year at Jefferson, he invited me to see his small room on the top floor of his fraternity house.I was then working at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic. I told him I was being courted by a senior medical student at Hahneman Medical School, and he immediately disappointed me- saying the school was not accredited as were Jefferson Medical School and the medical school at University of Maryland. He must have alarmed my sister Babe, his fiancee, because she wrote successfully urging me to drop him. A few years later when my Hahneman friend was some sort of doctor in Oregon, he wrote asking me to marry him. I asked Jack Barrett's advioe. [1928 or early 1929]. After reading the letter he said "no" - "that man is too selfish just looking for someone to answer his phone and cook his meals." Hahneman was homeopathic - Carl Knitter died of a brain tumor not long after. RED HEADED STEPCHILD Part I Sophie Meranski early years Chapter Two Social Work and Marriage 1923-1930 New York + Philadelphia CHAPTER TWO Social Work and Greenwich Village Romance 1923-1930 JohnB Barrett Partial sequence of text: summer 1923 Lower East Side NY Edelschick-sausages- doctor. at clinic +cousin+-Hewes and thesis-Pollacks Dorchester- canneries 1925- +ANNETaylor+ Mother- +Hewes-to Clark+ BeckySmaltz p 178- Stokowski- Josephine Dana and Agnes Drummond Spring Garden - cattle -Knitter pasted from #19k Jean Morton - "Pinafore" Dr. Strecker- Almena Dawley -Frances David- +Baltimore+ Emmanuel Lyons- Jack Barrett 27 Commerce Bill Nuremberg law - Esther- sinus- Finn Pappp Brill Abe Perkins Marie Nelson Pete and Jen Woolley= shack Babe-Geetter weddingJune 16 train Macy's Cogswell Hu TEXT #19 New York I was well acquainted with Professor Amy Hewes through her course on statistics & waiting on her table.She secured a job for me with the United Hebrew Charities of New York,where I was to be a family case worker & live in the Christie Street settlement house on the Lower East Side.The job was to be permanent,but a week after the l923 Commencement I received a telegram "Would you accept position as department secretary & my assistant for two years? Letter follows.Wire reply at once.Amy Hewes."I wired acceptance & asked the United Hebrew Charities if they would accept me for summer work only.I did social work in the slums of the East Side & in the evenings taught citizenship for naturalization papers in exchange for board & room. In the morning I walked to Cherry Street to work.The men, women & children had matresses on the fire escapes to sleep & occupied them earlier in the evening to get a breath of cool outdoor air.Women hung laundry on the escapes.I had some photographs (stolen l993) of Christie Street showing the fire escapes crowded with people.As I walked back to the settlement house for lunch,I passed hundreds of pushcarts,which sold everything, usually just parked in the street up against the curb.There were very long thin Italian breads,pungent Italian cheeses & a large assortment of sausages-spaghetti & macaroni in every shape & size-I was amazed at the variety offered. Miss Minnie Edelshick,supervisor of family care work at the United Hebrew Charities in New York City gave me three families to care for-not new cases because I was scheduled to work there only two & a half months.One of my families consisted of a widow & her three children ranging in age from ten to four.Since she complained of stomach pains,my supervisor advised me to get advice at the free clinic for women held from ten to twelve each morning at the Bellevue Hospital.I gave the woman the trolley fare & told her to meet me at the clinic at ten o'clock the next morning,but she failed to appear.I went to her house (very small,dark tenement on Cherry Street) that afternoon-very hot-& she told me that by the time she had gotten the three children up & to the clinic it was closed.Also that her clock was old,unreliable=-that it was slow & she would not agree to meet me at the clinic the next morning because she couldn't see how she could get there on time.She told me that other women in that neighborhood had gone to that clinic repeatedly but had not received treatment because of the crowds.The next morning I went to her home at nine o'clock sharp, found the four of them in one bed,all sleeping in their stockings & underwear.The good-natured mother cooperated with me- they all got dressed-had a little bread & milk,& the four of us went off,by trolley car, to the Bellevue Hospital's free clinic for women where we arrived about ten fifteen. The receptionist gave us a card with a number on it,& we sat down in the waiting room, crowded with women & children pl77 I watched the hands of the clock as the time passed.My woman was patient & pleasant, but the three children were uncomforable & restless-& I don't blame them. About quarter to twelve,the receptionist announced that the doctors would take no more patients that day & told us to leave.I was hungry,hot discouraged & near tears,when I realized that the woman & her children were so much more bewildered than I was.I went alone toward the doctors' offices,& when I saw a woman emerge from one office at twelve o'clock,I just walked into find a young doctor taking off his white, starched robe, getting ready to leave.I asked him to examine my patient,explaining that I was a social worker who had waited the whole morning for service,& that the woman's three young children had waited too.He told me that he had just given two hours of free service to the clinic,wanted to go out to lunch & then to his own office.But I explained that the woman was in pain, told him I had gone to her house at nine that morning- & when I offered to take him out to lunch & pay for it if he would examine her,he smiled (that unbearably hot afternoon),put the white coat on again,& examined the woman.He gave me a prescription for medicine which he said should clear up an acid stomach condition, & I gave the woman the price of a trolley ride home.Then I asked him to take me to a very inexpensive restaurant because I did not know that neighborhood, always had lunch in my settlement house.-p178- and the truth was that I had less than two dollars in my pocket. Again this kindly doctor smiled, took me to a good nearby restaurant, ordered good lunches for two, encouraged me to talk about family case work and the settlement house, paid the bill and the tip, and listened patiently when I said the people were treated like cattle in the free clinics.[then] Consulting his watch, he said he was due at his office, and as we parted in front of the restaurant he remarked, "If I wasn't a married man and if you were not so young and attractive, I'd show you that New York is more than slums and free clinics. Bit if that medicine does not clear up Mrs. ----'s acid condition, I'll see her again at my office free of charge." So we parted, and I did not see him again as the woman's condition improved.I knew no one in New York. I had very little money to spend because I was in debt to Mount Holyoke College, so I spent many evenings just walkng along Broadway and Fifth Avenues looking in the shop windows and watching the people. One evening when I was having dinner in the Settlement House - deserted that hot August night- the cook told me that a young man was there to see me. He explained that he was graduated from Columbia Medical School in June - that he was a new intern at the Bellevue Hospital, that the doctor who had treated the woman and taken me to lunch was his cousin- and that his cousin suggested that he call on me. We had a pleasant visit, and he invited me to see the show"Seventh Heaven". Since I had never seen a Broadway musical comedy, I certainly enjoyed myself, and he took me to several shows and movies before I left New York just before Labor Day. -179- Although my path led into statistical research in the field of social work and I never returned to family case work, I always have - and still do - considered it of vital importance. {In notebook one p. 179 Emmanuel Lyons material follows here]. In the summer of l924 the day before my sister Bee married Sam Pollack in Hartford,my sister Esther saw me off for Detroit,where I was scheduled to work for the U.S. Children's Bureau in a study of retarded people who had attended special classes in Detroit's public schools.I lived with the family of my 1923 classmate Mary Patterson and her younger sister Ruth, who invited my brother Pete to her Senior prom at Mount Holyoke in the spring of 1925, when her fiance' was too far away to attend. Pete was then at senior at Trinity College in Hartford and had an opportunity to see Mount Holyoke and meet some of my frineds. In September I returned to Mount Holyoke College,where I typed book lists,Miss Hewes's letters & the exams-where I was the Statistics lab asssistant. Some of the 1925 students from the Statistics Lab remained friendly many years Emily Miller Noss, Emily Barrows,Frances Manning, Ruth Patterson. I also remember Roberta Teale Swartz Chalmers, an outstanding poet and writer originally from Brooklyn, Grace Liang Yapp from Tientsin, China, and Cherokee Rush Muskrat, who became a top official of Bureau of Indian Affairs. I studied Labor & Psychology & Criminology & in l925 received a Master's degree after oral exams & a thesis: "The Young Offender & the Law in Massachusetts. "Massachusetts innovated in l825, when Reverend Ward, a Rhode Island native, led an effort to segregate juvenile prisoners from hardened older criminals. Around l870 Massachusetts led an effort to reduce prison populations & rehabilitate offenders by supervised probations, and around l906 Judge Baker was active reforming juvenile courts & left money for reseach at a Judge Baker Foundation in Boston. I compiled an extensive bibliography and noted curious ecclesiastical crimes in colonial times. In June l925 working for the federal Children's Bureau I went from Mount Holyoke to Boston to work under Miss Channing,who was making a statistical study of delinquent children whose fathers had police records for drunkenness -she was working there temporarily transcribing at police headquarters information where children were being treated at Judge Baker foundation.We learned about Dr. Healy & Augusta Brenner- two well known personalities in the field of maladjusted children.For two weeks I lived in Dorchester on Canterbury Street with my sister Bee Pollack & her husband, Sam, and this was a chance for me to meet his parents & many of his brothers & sisters - a family of ten, who immigrated from Minsk, Belorussia between l905 & l909. Sam's grandmother Mrs.Hanapolsky led a large contingent when she was over ninety years old, as Sam Pollack's nephew describes in his historical novel, "Yonder is the Dawn," earliest of a sequence.A l920 Harvard Phi Beta Kappa graduate in chemistry in three years, Sam developed the formula for the sweet drink ZAREX & then worked at LaRoux liquers Philadelphia & later at Schenley Liquors in quality control at Cincinnati & later as a vice-president in New York,with an office in the Empire State Buiilding. Bertha & Sam left for a summer cottage on the Winthrop beach, where they rented a small room from a Boston dentist,had kitchen privileges,& ate on the porch. I rented a room at a Winthrop hotel, then was ordered to Washington DC to do statistical work.I was surrounded by congenial co=workers,& I could walk easily from my boarding house,which was a joy.The girls I worked with lived there&were friendly,& the food was excellent- especially the bacon, sausage & the corn fritters.But my Washington duty was very short-lived.Because Caroline Legge had recommended me as an investigator (I had worked for her all the summer of l924 in Detroit) Miss Nathalie Matthews in charge of Children's Bureau research,sent me to Dover,Delaware to investigate the tomato canneries there & in nearby towns.I received my regular salary plus a cost-of-living per diem rate-so financially I was better off that I had been in Boston or Washington.The Hotel Dover was a nice place to live ,but I was lonely.There were two other women investigators in the Dover job,but I saw nothing of them because they were close friends-older than I was & spent evenings in their own room writing up their reports onthe day's findings.The job itself was interesting.I could use public transportation or hire a taxi & be reimbursed.We were interested in the working conditions of the children-their ages,hours of work & wages.The canneries were out in the country as near the fields as possible.The canneries established camps & imported laborers,largely women & children,who sorted.washed & peeled tomatoes.They were engaged by scouts,who sent buses at the beginning of the season (in Delaware about July l5) & returned them home after September 30.When word got to the workers that the "inspector" was present,the children would flee while the women remained at their posts.But often I managed to enter the work rooms before the children got the word,so I saw many of them at work & interviewed many of the older children who then realized I was not there to harm them. Working conditions in Delaware were bad. Women & children stood many long hours on a soggy wet floor-their rubber aprons dripping with tomato juice.The tomatoes are sorted first to remove rotten or green ones,then sorted according to size & peeled before going to the sterilizing & canning machines. Many had cuts on their fingers from the sharp knives they had to use to peel & cut out rotten spots. When I asked one woman how she & her three children could sleep on the blanket that served as their bed in a tent,she answered, "We can't sleep good.It's too tight."We had no legal right at that time to inspect the canneries & talk to the women& children.The proprietors always admitted me.They feared Congress would forbid the employment of women & children in canneries that refused to allow Children's Bureau agents to enter. We always asked permission to go through the plant,& I was never refused.About the fifteenth of August I went to Indianapolis Indiana to inspect children's & womens labor in the corn canneries. My mother had had surgery in l92l for gall bladder cancer, which was mis-diagnosed for a long time, & it was too late to save her. She was told she had "adhesions."Her health gradually declined,though she enjoyed my Mount Holyoke graduation l923 & contined to feed & look after her husband & large family & regular guests, including Julius Aronson,whose mother had passed away,and an Irish boarder who used to sing.Her brother Jacob had some sort of speech problem-perhaps hearing related.He came with her from Austria via Hamburg in l890 or a little earlier, possibly with the Witkower family April l890. The Meiselmanns were also acquaintances from Brody.Judge Saul Seidman of Hartford is a Meiselmann descendant.After my mother passed away, my brother Ben furnished information that her parent's first names were Abel & Bertha, probably deceased before their children emigrated. After my mother's death September 8, l925 - for which I was completely unprepared, I was desperately lonely under the travel and working conditions as a child labor inspector for the Children's Bureau on the eastern shore of Maryland. My best friend there was a Goucher graduate Anne Starr Taylor, who had grown up in State College Pennsylvania. She had to write her child labor reports in the evening, and she was anxious to finish her assigned investigation as soon as possible, because she had an apartment in Greenwich Village at 27 Commerce Street in New York City, and she wanted to go back and find a job in the area. Impulsively I resigned my job and went home planning to take care of my widower father and brother Ben and two sisters Esther and Babe still living at home. In late 1925 for a time I became an unpaid maid, but I did cook the meals and keep the place clean. However, my evenings were a problem. Esther was not allowed to bring her non-Jewish boy friend Charlie Bardous to the house, though they had a serious relation many years and worked together as bookkeepers at the meat company, which became part of Swift and Company. Babe was nearly nineteen and recently out of high school and speding most evenings with her future husband Dr. Geetter, and my brother Ben was unwell. I had been away at college and at work so long [six years] that I had few close friends left in Hartford. [Classmate Joe Paonessa was losing a battle with tuberculosis]. I thought I owed it to my thesis advisor Miss Amy Hewes of Mount Holyoke College to explain why I had resigned the well-paid job she had gotten for me with the Children's Bureau, and I thought she would praise me for looking after my family. I was amazed by the speed with which she answered my letter.She advised me to employ a housekeeper at once and get out of there.She told me to go to New York City to see, by appointment,Miss Mary Augusta Clark, a [1903] Mount Holyoke College Graduate, Statistician for the Commonwealth Fund's Division of Mental Health, and also to see a man who wanted a statistician in the New York Association for Improving the condition of the Poor. I was offered both jobs and took the one with the Commonwealth Fund as Statistical Recorder in the Philadelphia [Demonstration] Child Guidance Clinic. When I wrote to my classmate Rebecca Glover Smaltz of Mount Airy, Pennsylvania to ask her to locate a temporary residence for me in a YWCA or in any inexpensive [p58,181 notebook one] l78 place, she answered immediately that she would meet me at the station in Philadelphia,& drive me to their home,where I could stay until I found permanent quarters.So I lived in their spacious home in Mount Airy, where Becky drove me to work in South Philadelphia every morning & drove me home at night. One evening we we went to hear thePhiladelphia Symphony orchestra-with Leopold Stokowski - the first symphony concert I ever attended. It was a wonderful Stokowski weekend.Although the Smaltzes were perfect hosts,who seemed in no hurry to have me leave,I kept searching for an inexpensive place to live.One of the students at the Child Guidance Clinic,Marion Pierce was living in a Settlement House in South Philadelphia within walking distance of the clinic,& as there was room for me there,I moved in,& received room & board in exchange for some evening tutoring of men about to apply for citizenship papers.Mine was a solitary job-I read records of problem children & made cards fom the records-cards to be used later in statistical studies of maladjustment.Our rooms in the settlement house were tiny.Social life was impossible there.There was no social or recreation room for thee residents.Most of the students living there had to study evenings when they were not on duty. When Josephine Dana & AgnesDrummond, who lived in the Settlement House & worked for the Children's Aid Society asked me to share an apartment with them,I was glad to. It was a small furnished apartment on Spring Garden Street;the three of us were congenial & tried to make it homelike.Josephine invited me to spend a weekend at her family home in Windsor, Vermont,where her elderly mother lived alone. Josephine hitched up the horse & buggy Saturday morning & drove it to a sale of cattle at which her two brothers were present,& they were among the bidders for the cattle auctioned. It was a new experience for me from beginning to end that I always remember wirth great pleasure. They were descendants of Richard Henry Dana author of the Pacific adventure "Two Years before the Mast." It was so interesting to listen to the auctioneer tell the cow's age,weight, when it freshened-milk production- & then listen to the bids.The bidding was lively & competitive. Another time -183-Josephine asked me if I'd like to go with her to Cape Cod for my week's summer vacation. She reserved a place for two at the private home of the Bearses in Centreville.The Bearses were very cordial old Cape Codders who gave us excellent food and played whist with us in the evening. We were within easy walking distance of Craig's Beach, one of the finest beaches in the world.On Saturday evening Walter Washburn drove to Centreville from Windsor,Vermont to visit with Josephine. -184- Soon after our return to Philadelphia, Josephine gave a tea at which Walter was present and at which she announced her engagement. After the party I left for Cleveland to work temporarily at the Cleveland Child Guidance Clinic to help clear up back statistical work piled up by the illness of their recorder. In that clinic I met two well-known psychiatrists, Drs. Carl Menninger and Dr. Lawson Lowry, who were friendly.I had a good time socially there, and when I left Dr. Lowrey, director of the Cleveland Clinic, gave me an unsolicited recommendation. When Josephine Dana married,Agnes Drummond and I continued on at the apartment. Another social worker - from the Children's Aid- joined us. Her name was Helen Goldsborough, and she came from the Deep South.She wanted to see New England in the winter, so Josephine invited Helen and me to spend a weekend in Windsor, Vermont. It was very pleasant, but Josephine gave us a large sled to use on a steep hill. Helen sat in front to steer and unfortunately steered it into a fallen log, throwing me from the sled and injuring my knee. Not long after moving into the apartment I had a telephone call from Carl Knitter,who was introduced to me by my former student at Mount Holyoke, Frances Manning, who became an economist.Carl was a Rutgers graduate attending Hahnemann Medical School, in his senior year.He was an avid fisherman, made his own colored flies for bait and often brought flies to the apartment for me to admire and brought his violin to play. We spent many pleasant evenings and weekends together, but my young sister Babe's boy friend Dr. Isadore Geetter warned me that the Hahnemann was a homeopathic medical school, not then recognized or accredited by most medical institutions such as Jefferson Medical School where he was then studying. After graduation from Hahnemann,Carl went to Oregon,to practice medicine and to fish. About a year later he wrote asking me to go out there and marry him. I refused. Not long after that he returned to New Jersey and telephoned inviting me to dinner at his parents' home. He had given up his practice because of violent headaches.Later I heard that he had died from a brain tumor..---Sophie Black Notebook Two p 200 "When Geetter was a student a Jefferson Medical School [1925-1929] he was in class one day when an obnoxious professor talked at length about his accomplishments in his field - when Geetter suddenly was horrified to hear his own voice saying "You cockeyed wonder!" - followed by an ominous silence in which the professor glared at him and during which Geetter quaked in his boots with apprehension. For the rest of that semester Geetter was in the professor's dog house and altho he passed the course, he had an awful time because the professor gave him such difficult slides to diagnose under his microscope. He had to spend many hours puzzling over those slides - hours which might more profitably have been spent on his other medical subjects. But he was relieved to pass the course and be able to complete his medical subjects for his degree. -= When Geetter was in his second year at Jefferson, he invited me to see his small room on the top floor of his fraternity house.I was then working at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic. I told him I was being courted by a senior medical student at Hahneman Medical School, and he immediately disappointed me- saying the school was not accredited as were Jefferson Medical School and the medical school at University of Maryland. He must have alarmed my sister Babe, his fiancee, because she wrote successfully urging me to drop him. A few years later when my Hahneman friend was some sort of doctor in Oregon, he wrote asking me to marry him. I asked Jack Barrett's advice. [1928 or early 1929]. After reading the letter he said "no" - "that man is too selfish just looking for someone to answer his phone and cook his meals." Hahneman was homeopathic - Carl Knitter died of a brain tumor not long after." Jean Morton, of Morton Avenue, Morton, Pennsylvania,was Executive Secretary of the Child Guidance Clinic.Her father was a doctor. One evening she invited me to be her guest at a performance of Gilbert & Sullivan,in which both she & her father sang.I knew nothing of Gilbert & Sullivan but was charmed by that amateur production of "Pinafore." & have since attended many Gilbert & Sullivan productions,especially at Camp Kabeyun,,Alton Bay,New Hampshire in the l950's.Jean & I usually had lunch together at Hughes cafeteria, where I never tired of the egg salad sandwiches. The head of the Child Guidance Clinic,Dr.Allen,encouraged me to attend Dr. Strecker's class in psychiatry at the Pennsylvania Medical School.I attended without cost & learned a great deal from that well-known psychiatrist,who was conscientiously teaching young medical students.He usually had one or two mental patients from the Pennsylvania Hospital at the class to discuss their symptoms & treatment.Although I was a statistician, not a psychiatric social worker,Miss Almena Dawley,head of the department of social work in the clinic,gave me a real case to handle-from taking the application & the social history,to arranging for psychiatric interview & the psychological tests through carrying out the treatment measures.The child guidance clinics in Philadelphia,Cleveland,Baltimore & Los Angeles were two year Demonstration Clinics paid for by the Commonwealth Fund of New York & administered by the National Committee for Mental Hygiene (also supported by the Commonwealth Fund).The Commonwealth Fund had the income of Mr. Harkness's thirty-eight million dollars to use "for the betterment of mankind."Each clinic had the services of two or three full time psychiatrists,two psychologists,six psychiatric social workers,an executive secretary, a statistical recorder,a telephone operator,& a staff of clerical & stenographic workers.The director of each clinic, a psychiatrist,had the responsibility of trying of trying to get the community to support a child guidance clinic after the demonstration clinic closed in two years.The Philadelphia clinic had a social worker & two students from the Smith School of Social Work in Northampton,Massachusetts.The clinic examined & treated children up to sixteen years of age= delinquent children & children who had personality difficulties & bad habits.These children were referred to the clinic either by their parents, by their school, by a social agency or by a juvenile court judge.A social worker investigated the family history & home & school conditions - a psychiatrist gave the child a thorough physical examination, a psychologist tested the child for I.Q., mental age,& school attainment,& the psychiatrist gave the child a careful psychiatric interview.Then there was a staff meeting of the social worker, psychiatrist, psychologist & chief social worker-also the statistical recorder, and the treatment of the child was initiated.Our Philadelphia clinic was taken over by the community on a reduced scale,& one of my Mount Holyoke classmates, Frances David, took over my job as statistical recorder as an unpaid volunteer. She had put together when we were undergraduates a collection of comic songs,"l923 College Crackers." Two I often sang for my family were: "I had a fat twin brother.We looked like one another.You ought to see the way he'd laugh At the lickings I would get. He tought it very funny To go & borrow money & watch the people chasing me do make me pay his debts.The girl I was to marry Couldn't tell us two apart.She went & married brother Jim & she nearly broke my heart.But you betcha I got even With my brother Jim.I died about a week ago & they went & buried. him." 2."Pull the shades down,Mary Ann,Pull the shades down Mary Ann-Last night by the pale moon light I saw you I saw you You were combing your auburn hair On the back of a Morris chair.If you want to keep your secrets from your future men, Pull the shades down,Mary A-aan." p.182] It was while I was working at the United Hebrew Charities l923 that I met Mr Emmanuel Lyons.He lived in Jersey City , commuted daily to his mid-Manhattan office, where he worked for an advertising firm. (He lost money publishing two books, "l00l Retailing Ideas" and its sequel "2222 Retailing Ideas") Lost photos showed me in deep snowdrifts February,l926 at his western New Jersey farm in Pittstown, New Jersey.The farm had two farm houses,one for the tenant farmer & one for Mr. Lyons & his guests.Each summer he offered the United Hebrew Charities a chance to send a family to live at his farmhouse, & on weekends he took a few social workers to the farm with him.One Friday afternoon I joined him at the railroad station with two other case workers.He paid our fare to Pittstown.where we walked from the station to the farm,where we had an abundance of fresh vegetables & milk & enjoyed good conversation at meals.It was a most welcome change after the heat & pavements of New York City,& when I wrote him a thank you note, he answered, ""For bread and butter you return cake." He became a close friend (much older) of both myself & my future husband Jack Barrett, especially when I returned to live in New York City in l927,l928, l929, in in l930 he selected my diamond ring after I hurriedly married two hours before Jack left for the Philippines.Mr Lyons visited in Philadelphia at 1927 New Year's Day, when we saw the mummer's parade, an annual Philadelphia tradition with huge numbers of festive floats. Becky Smaltz's paternal aunt "Auntie" invited me to [1926] Thanksgiving dinner at her home and also invited my brother Pete to come up from the University of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, where he was in his second year. "Auntie" Smaltz had an excellent cook and maid, and after dinner we were taken to a football game - my first "big college" game. While still in his first year at Medical School in Baltimore, my brother met his future wife, Jeanette Goldberg. Since he wanted me to know her, he invited me to a formal dance at his fraternity house - I wore my sister Babe's white formal gown with feathers at the bottom, and I stayed as a guest in Jen's home. I liked her and her family very much. I thought and still do that she should have attended that dance together. They were very much in love, and it was a real sacrifice for both of them not to be together [that evening]. {John Barrett note- earlier there is an account that spring 1925 Pete attended the Mount Holyoke Senior Prom with one of the Patterson girls of Detroit, at whose home Sophie lived summer 1924. Her fiance was too far away to attend, and Pete had an opportunity to see Mount Holyoke - this was in the year prior to meeting Jen. In the summer of 1927 -184-185- I transferred to New York City to Miss Clark's office on Forty-Second Street near Fifth Avenue. I was then in Publications. We worked on statistical data for the Division of Mental Hygiene of the Commonwealth Fund. My research at the Philadelphia Demonstration Clinic was the basis of Miss Clark's book "Statistical Reporting Techniques for Child Guidance Clinics". Although we remained good friends, and my assistance was acknowledged in the introduction, I did not get formal credit, and it was largely my work. I was unable to use the material as a subject for a doctoral thesis at Columbia University as I had planned, because they considered the material had already been published under Miss Clark's name.I also assisted on other projects, including proof-reading a textbook "The Problem Child at Home" by another author, who was grateful for the many typographical and other mistakes I removed. For a few days I occupied the apartment of one of Miss Clark's friends in Brooklyn, but the friend was returning Monday, and I had to leave. I remembered that Anne Taylor, who had worked with me on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, said she had an apartment in New York. I found her in the telephone book Saturday evening, and when I telephoned to ask her if she knew of a place where I might live, she said she could not think of one at that moment but that she would come out to see me in Brooklyn right way and bring her date with her.She came with Ivan McCormack,and when she heard my predicament,she explained that she had a small apartment with only two bedrooms- one very small. She occupied the large bedroom- her sister Eleanor occupied the small bedroom, and her sister Betty slept on a couch in the lving room.But she helped me pack that evening,saying that I could sleep in the bed with her until we found a suitable place for me. Anne worked as Executive Secretary of the Joint Vocational Service. As Anne was to be married in two weeks, Eleanor a schoolteacher and Betty a nurse moved into a tiny apartment on Twelfth Street.I liked it with Anne at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village, and didn't diligently search for a place to live. Anne married, went off on her honeymoon,and when she returned I was comfortably located in Eleanor's [former] small bedroom, and Anne agreed to let me stay there for half the rent- just the room and use of the bathroom- no food and no kitchen privileges. I was very glad to stay there. Soon after Agnes Drummond called me up inviting me to join her and two men for dinner.Her -186- dinner partner was an old friend from her home in St. Louis, while my dinner partner was Bill Nuremberg, a lumber salesman with an office in the Grand Central Terminal Building.My loneliness then came to an end. Bill's office was very near mine, so we had lunch together every noon- a much better lunch than I could afford.Often we had dinner together, and every Sunday he drove me over Storm King Highway to an inn where we enjoyed dinner and then drove home in his big Packard.Bill N'irnberg (Nuremberg) owned a moving picture camera & wasted many expensive films & much time taking my picture. He ws everlastingly telling me to act natural & was very critical of my dress,which he considered too short & too stylish.He hung a sheet in Anne's apartment,where he showed us his movies.He lived at the McAlpin Hotel. But Miss Clark moved her office to Fifty-Seventh Street into the quarters of the division of Publications of the Commonwealth Fund and took me with her- too far away for me to have daily lunch with Bill,although I continued to see him every Sunday and had dinner with him two nights a week.Miss Clark was writing a book "Reporting and Recording for Child Guidance Clinics". I wrote the first draft of nearly every chapter of that book because I had the first hand knowledge of the subject from my work in the Philadelphia and Cleveland Clinics.Miss Clark re-wrote the material in her own style, and the book was ready for publication in June 1928. Miss Clark had written the book at the suggestion of one of the first statistical public health epidemiologists, actuary Dr. Louis Dublin of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, who made early contributions to understanding tuberculosis, industrial safety, and venereal diseases. From time to time as I was working on the book, the Commonwealth Fund loaned me to the New York Board of Education to advise them on records too.I also served as chairman of the committee investigating the qualifications of New York Social Workers [and developing standards]= a study being made for Walter West of the New York Association of Social Workers and for Ralph Hurlin of the Russell Sage Foundation.Harry Hopkins was a valuable member of my committee. He was then working at the Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor in New York City. I began to wonder what I was going to do next, but Miss Clark was ahead of me in planning for me.Unknown to me she had interviewed Mr. [Taylor?] Smith, director of the Commonwealth Fund; and had interested him in me so that they offered to pay my salary and my tuition for the summer session of 1928 at Columbia University, - and when the summer was over I was to be a statisticain at the Institute of Child Guidance in New York, operated by the Commonwealth Fund. So I entered summer school, registered for a Ph.d and took courses in Advanced Statistics and Social Science. Anne Taylor had a young friend Harold Nelson, who came to the apartment nearly every evening lookng for a bridge game.Anne told me that Harold was the brother of her social worker friend Marie Nelson,who came from Charleston, South Carolina,and was now Mrs. Harman Rowe of Philadelphia.One Saturday afternoon late in August 1928 I was at home in my room studying for a final exam Monday morning. Anne told me that she expected Marie Nelson Rowe and Jack Barrett that afternoon- just for the afternoon, as Marie and "Barrett" expected to join another couple for dinner and the evening.-188- "Barrett" was an old friend of the Nelson family from his Naval duty in Charleston, South Carolina in the early 1920s on the USS TOUCEY. Ordinarily I would never be at home on a Saturday afternoon in New York City,but I was determined to study all weekend for the two courses,as the exams were on the following Monday & Tuesday.So I took off my street clothes after lunch (out- as I took no meals with the McCormacks with whom I lived .I put on a deep red, long kimono sent to me by a Mount Holyoke college friend who made it for me,and I told Anne McCormack that I planned to spend the afternoon in my room working on my course.Anne then told me that she expected her friend Marie Nelson from Philadelphia at any moment, because Marie was to meet "Barrett" there & go out with him later for dinner & for the evening.Hardly had I begun to work when when Anne came in to tell me I had a male caller,and she was immediately followed by "Van" - husband of one of my social worker acquaintances. I was surprised to see him,,as he had never called before, & neither he nor his wife were particular friends of mine.Also I was embarassed to be caught wearing a kimono as I rarely stopped long enough to put one on.He explained that his wife was on vacation ((like Irving Berlin's l9l0 "My wife has gone to the country=hurray,hurray! She thought it best I take a rest & so she went away.") -& that he had a bottle of Prohibition whiskey,which he would be glad to share with me. When I explained that I did not drink,I thought that he would leave,but he was lonesome & lingered without drinking or urging me to drink.As we talked,Marie arrived-I had never seen her,& a little later I heard them greet "Barrett."When Van finally decided to leave,I walked to the door with him at the exact moment that Marie & Barrett arrived at the door to depart,&I saw a beautiful Charleston (South Carolina) belle attended by a sweet looking slender redhaired man.Neither one spoke to me as they followed Van out.Van had wasted most of my afternoon & it was hot,so I went off for a walk & had my dinner before returning home for a little serious studying in my hot room.On Sunday morning I slept late,donned an old cotton dress & decided to sweep the kitchen floor about noon-anything to keep from settling down to study. As I was sweeping,the doorbell rang,& I called,"Come in."In stepped Barrett, amused to see me sweeping the floor, but I merely said to him,"Anne & Ivan are not home."Whereupon he told me that he was calling on me &that I seemed to be very much at home. Desperately I told him how pressed I was for time,how embarassed I would be if I failed those two courses,but he calmly sat down in the kitchen & took out his wallet & showed me a picture of a child about five years old, saying, "This is my baby."I was surprised, as I believed he was courting Marie Nelson,& I said,"I didn't know you were married." He said,"I'm not married,but this is an Australian child,Sheila Craig.whom I knew in l925 whe I made the Australian cruise on the Marblehead,& I have kept in touch with Dr Craig & his family ever since."He visited for some time,& when I inquired about Marie,he said she had gone back to Philadelphia.Nothing would get him out of that apartment as he insisted I would have to have Sunday dinner somewhere, sometime-so why not with him? after which I would be free to study.Whe I told him I believed he was courting Marie,he told me that Marie was married,separated from her husband,but not free to marry anyone.Barrett was living uptown at the Knights of Columbus Hotel. he was in his second year at Fordham Law School uptown campus.In the early fall of l928 I saw little of Jack. I returned to work & steady dating of Bill Nuremberg,who had spent most of the summer in Europe, which explained why I was free to go to dinner with Barrett that Sunday afternoon. But occasionally Barrett dropped into the apartment about ten o'clock at night after school & once or twice took me to dinner but complained bitterly that he couldn't spare the time from his studies to entertain me at night.So he began to appear at the subway exit nearest my office before nine most mornings, would walk to the office with me & then telephone to me during the morning to make a luncheon date. .One weekend early that fall Bill Nuremberg told me he planned on doctor's advice to spend the weekend in bed because of an ulcer.I spent the weekend with Frances Manning (Mount Holyoke l925) in Maplewood New Jersey & returned to New York after dinner Sunday evening.As I was close to Bill's hotel,I telephoned to ask if he was well enough to have me call on him,& Bill said"Yes." His tone was not cordial-his greeting was not enthusiastic,& before I could ask him how he was, he complained that someone named Barrett had telephoned twice to try to find me & wanted me to telephone him. After a short visit,I went home,& Anne also told me Barrett wanted me to call him.It was eleven o'clock.On the telephone I said, "This is Sophie,"- he sleepily replied,"What do you want?"I told him both Bill & Anne said he wanted me to telephone,but he was just too sleepy to make conversation.In December or January Barrett moved into a small sixty-dollar-a-month apartment very close to me at 48 Commerce Street.He shared it with a mouse,which he rarely saw but which certainly lived there,because it always helped itself to peanuts Jack kept in a copper bowl. The mouse would leave the empty peanut shells. About the only furniture besides the couch was a set of nested carved Chinese tables from the Jack's Shanghai visit on the MARBLEHEAD in 1927. One afternoon he telephoned to say he was feeling too poorly to go to school that night & wanted to meet me in front of my apartment, that evening at 5:30 so we could eat dinner in the Village & he could go to his hotel room to bed.So we met as arranged, & as we stood there discussing where to dine,Bill (Nuremberg) drove up in his big car & had a male guest in his front seat. Evidently Bill planned to take me to dinner,but when he saw me talking to Barrett,he stepped on the gas & took off fast, & after more than a year of dating I never saw Bill again.Jack had tried to be friendly. My father had called on Bill & liked him, but I considered him too old to be a good marriage for me. One time he gave me an excellent investment idea: he asked for a thousand dollars to buy me stock in General America Insurance Company & returned half, as it was fully subscribed. The name of the company was later changed to Safeco of Seattle.I held the stock, which in the l960's suddenly soared in value. My initial five hundred dollar investment was sold for over thirty-two thousand dollars in l972. (A l976 letter to Ivan McCormack says that Sophie's father opposed marriage of his daughters outside the Jewish faith.Sophie's sister Esther for many years had a very happy romance with a fellow accountant at Swift & Company Hartford. but "Pa" Meranski would never let him come to the house at Wooster Street. His opposition would not have prevented Esther's marriage, except for the fact that his elderly mother was highly dependent & possessive & feared any interference with her relation with her son.Her objection was not religious - she lived to a considerable age, & Esther had a long friendship with the son but never married.She lived with her brother Abe's family on Hawkins Street for many years & after World War II with the Geetters when they moved to 92 Fern St. & Babe had five young children to look after with a busy doctor husband(David l933) Albert l935 Thalia l938 Harold l940 Suzanne l942.) Pa Meranski often came to New York to buy merchandise for his grocery, & one time he was robbed of considerable cash after visiting his son Pete & wife Jen in Baltimore in l929 or l930.He often stopped to see me, I that time I had to lend him money to get home. Jack had sinus trouble & trouble with his tonsils & planned to enter the Navy Hospital in Brooklyn for surgery.To my amazement he gave me a copy of his will in which he bequeathed to me the proceeds of his ten thousand dollar government life insurance policy.It was unbelievable.But he had the surgery & I visited him in the hospital.One night he was very uncomfortable because he was propped up too high with two pillows - the extra pillow was placed there for supper, buit the nurse forgot to remove it later - but he had good results & relief of his sinus difficulties.One of Jack's professors was John F.X. Finn. The proximate cause doctrine in torts was a subject of active study, as the New York courts had severely restricted plaintiffs' rights. Judges Carzozo & Cuthbert Pound were influential. Ivan McCormack in later years sent us news of some of Jack's law school friends, especially Joe Brill, who once tried to date me, =in later years he was associated with Roy Cohn. Another classmate John Papp, helped us find an excellent apartment overlooking the Narrows in southwest Brooklyn in September l939.Late in l928 when I chaired a committee on standards for social workers in New York City for an American social workers' association, I got to know Harry Hopkins (Roosevelt friend), who took a great interest & did a lot of work.Ann Taylor McCormack my friend and landlady kept in touch with him for many years.She was with Travelers Aid later, Ivan eventually bought a pig farm in Salem, New York, near Arlington, Vermont, where John visited Anne & Ivan in June, l97l) Although I no longer dated Bill,I had other escorts & often came home to find that Barrett had preceded me & left a note inviting me to a late supper.I usually accepted,but then he complained bitterly I was using up his time & his grades were suffering.On Saturday nights we went to movies in the Village & once he took me to a long play on Broadway "Strange Interlude" but most nights he went to Fordham's law school campus school far up in the Bronx - the school declined to let him transfer his second year to their Manhattan campus-and he studied long hours as he seriously wanted to be a lawyer- probably a Navy lawyer in the Judge Advocate's office.Jack's work in New York was concerned with War Plans & the training of Reserves,& he often went off to nearby communities & to Washington,New Haven & even to Hartford, where he called on my father & my brother Abe & became acquainted with most members of my family..When in Washington DC he addressed a letter to me which he mailed with only my name & "27 Commerce." No city at all was on the envelope,but I received it in a few days. I accused him of drinking,but he said he had been interrupted when addressing the envelope & then failed to complete it.(He liked to quote the opening of Oliver Wendell Holmes "Autocrat of the Breakfast Table": "I was just going to say-when I was interrupted. At the Institute of Child Guidance my work was too simple and routine, although my salary in 1928-1929 was seventy-five a dollars a week. It was a small statistical office with only a director and another girl who planned to go on working after marriage., I was there only a few weeks when I received a telephone call from Mary Langhead, a social worker I had known in the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic,-who told me that she was working in Macy's and that there was an opening for me as Director of Personnel Research . I went at noon to see Mr. Walker, the Personnel director,- later Sales Manager at Macy's, and I was hired. I had two excellent assistants, Ms Willie Kennedy and Mildred Forman - also a labor turnover clerk who was most efficient. My primary concern was labor turnover - how to reduce it and keep the figure low. After Jack left for the orient, Willie Kennedy sublet his apartment, and I attended her 1930 marriage to Marshall Verniaux. Anne and Ivan kept in touch with them up to the 1970s. They also kept track of our friend Jimmy Jemail, who wrote the "Inquiring Reporter" column for the New York Post and became an editor there. Willie Kennedy visited me in Boston in 1932 when Macy's sent her to brief Filene's executive Lincoln Kirstein on the methods we had developed to improve employee motivation and reduce turnover. When Jack's orders came through in May l929 for duty on the destroyer Truxtun in the Philippines,he asked the Navy for a year's delay so that he could complete his law course,which he was taking at his own expense.But the Navy refused,& Jack was so upset he tried to get a civilian job with the Department of Labor & applied to Frances Perkins (a Mount Holyoke alumna later President Roosevelt's Secretary of Labor),but she had no opening for him at the time.With his full time job with the Reserves & his evening law course & his effort to compete with my "dates", the man was fully occupied & now knew he was scheduled for two-and-a-half to three years sea duty in the Orient.He went over to Philadelphia to see Marie Nelson one weekend. On Sunday June 9, l929 I went alone to Baltimore to attend the wedding of my youngest brother Pete,who had just been graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School.Pete & my youngest sister Babe's fiance Dr. Isadore Geetter had been classmates at Hartford Public High School l9l7-l92l, where Pete was active in debating, & at Trinity College l92l-25, where Pete was graduated l925,but for some reason his picture appeared in l926 yearbook. He was active many years in Trinity Maryland alumni. In l925 Pete visited Mount Holyoke college as senior prom escort for one of the Patterson sisters from Detroit,because her fiance was too far away to attend.(I had stayed at their parents' home summer l924 when I worked there for Children's Bureau U.S. Department of Labor.) On the train going up to Hartford for the wedding Sunday June l6 of my youngest sister "Babe" (Rebekah} to Dr.Isadore Geetter, who had just graduated from Jefferson Medical Schhol & was to study anesthesiology,we were greeted by Mary Woolley the l90l-l937 president of Mount Holyoke College, who was widely traveled as a speaker & one of the ten most admired women in the country according to polls. She had made an extended visit to China in l922 & later was appointed by President Herbert Hoover to a naval disarmament delegation of the United States at Geneva. Miss Woolley recognized & greeted me as I had been junior faculty l923-5 in the Statistics lab, Department of Economics & Sociology. Jack had met many of my Mount Holyoke friends during our ten months acquaintance, & he remarked to Miss Woolley, "These Mount Holyoke women are wonderful- you could put them all in a bag & pick any one, & you'd do all right."Miss Woolley replied,"That isn't a very INDIVIDUAL compliment for Sophie." Babe & Geetter had a wedding reception at "the Shack" (Snug Harbor)- a property near the FarmingtonRiver in Windsor, which my brothers Ben & Abe & their friend Julius Aronson then owned, & which the Geetters later kept in the family.Besides Jack & myself, the guests included the large Geetter family,of which Dr.Geetter was the eldest son, my brother Harry & his wife Sade (Taylor),and their son Arthur & daughter Pearl, my brother Abe & his wife Ethyle (Berenson) & their son Ted & their friend Julius Aronson,my sister Esther, my sister Bertha & her husband Samuel Pollack, a l920 Phi Beta Kappa Harvard alumnus in chemistry and their young son Jason & my newly-wed youngest brother Pete & his new wife Jen Goldberg of Baltimore,whose family had helped Pete greatly at University of Maryland in Baltimore..They were on their honeymoon. Jack was scheduled to leave New York for Chicago & San Francisco on Friday June 2l, so when he was at my sister's wedding, he invited my brother & his bride to have dinner with him at Longchamp's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue on Thursday evening June 20,as Pete & Jen had theatre reservations for that evening in New York City..We had a pleasant dionner,& when Pete & Jen left,Jack & I walked the few blocks to my apartment building when he said goodbye as he was leaving the next afternoon & still had a lot of packing "I'll be at your office at noon sharp to take you to lunch before I shove off at three."I had recently changed jobs & became Director of Personnel Research at Macy's stores at 34th Street.Jack came into my private office as my assistants were out to lunch that Friday noon..Without a word of warning he asked,"Will you marry me?" Unknown to me he had previously obtained a marriage license, listing his occupation as "seaman." He told me about the vicissitudes of the service for the wife of a Navy line officer, saying he liked the life at sea, but that frequent separations were hard on many wives and that he had seen the marriages of some very fine Navy line couples founder on the rocks, principally because the wife had to make so many adjustments.If she had a profession or a job, she couldn't readily follow him from station to station, and if she gave up her job, she had too much leisure. Also if she refused invitations to social events when he was at sea,the Navy wife suffered intolerable loneliness. He warned too that Naval officers pay was very moderate and that his expenses for white uniforms and for blue uniforms were prohibitive.. Even more important than any of these causes was the uncertainty of the line officer's promotion and his ultimate retired pay.But he did say a Navy wife could have a lot of fun and adventure if she had the right attitude and zest for adventure.Though he candidly discussed many frustrations and problems in the lives of Navy wives,he convinced me to marry him,& I made no reply except to suggest that we go to lunch.We went to the Hotel McAlpin. Suddenly he got up,paid the waiter,took me by the hand. It was 1:30 in the afternoon, and he was to leave for Chicago by train at three p.m. to make connections already reserved for San Francisco, where he had to sail on the NITRO for Manila on June 25. We rushed off into the subway for New York City Hall, where we were married about two o'clock, with two strange passersby as witnesses. Then Jack rushed for the subway for the railroad station, arriving at 2:45. He had to get his suitcase and spent a few moments telephoning his brother at the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in New York. He told Bill that he was leaving for China but did not say he was married. As he emerged from the booth, the porter was yelling "Last call for the three o'clock train for Chicago". Jack grabbed his bag and rushed off.He left without a kiss or even a handshake. I returned to Macy's secretly Mrs. John B.Barrett. I did not see him again for for nearly seventeen months,until November l3,l930 at Chingwantao in desolate North China, near Manchuria,(& when I finally arrived there, he told me that his ship would sail again at crack of dawn the next day for several weeks of fleet maneuvers.)Dazed after Jack left New York.I took a walk around and then returned to my office, where I said no word about my marriage until I resigned in August,l930.But my younger sister Babe read in the Hartford paper that I had married a seaman named Barrett,&they sent best wishes.Romantic-no! But after we really joined forces,life was one long romantic adventure,I would do it again if given the choice. So my sister in Hartford knew I was married,but very few of my friends in New York knew of the marriage except Anne and Ivan and Mr.Lyons. People asked me for dates - I declined to date Jack's law school classmate Joe Brill,- but a youing dentist persuaded me to have Thanksgiving dinner 1929 at his mother's home. The lady took a liking to me and tried to promote a romance, so I cut back on accepting social invitations. In my work at Macys, I had considerable contact with Jesse Straus & one of his brothers,who together managed the store at that time. They advised & assisted New York governor Franklin Roosevelt on many projects.Their parents Mr. & Mrs. Isador Straus were victims of the sinking of the TITANIC in l9l2 when Mrs. Straus would not go in a lifeboat without her husband, & he refused to take a seat from young women & children.A sister of my Mount Holyoke l922 friend Harriet Cogswell was working at Macy"s & corresponded with Harriet who was teaching at Gin=Ling missionary college Nanking & later married consular diplomat Paul Meyer.Jack Barrett later met Harriet & her fiance when the destroyer TRUXTUN was at Nanking on Yangtze River patrol in February-March l930,. & the TRUXTUN officers were guests at the American embassy.One of Harriet's students Dr. S.Y. Hu later did Ph.d work at Radcliffe on hollies & became Harvard's herbarium curator of Chinese plants for many years & wrote widely on Hong Kong flora,daylilies, & Chinese food plants & the rediscovered Metasequoia glyptostroboides. Harriet's sister in l980's gave Mount Holyoke College twelve boxes of historically interesting photos of Chinese live in l920's & l930's. mainly around Nanking & Peking.In May l930 the New York Times published an extended article on the personnel policies of Macy's stores. The main objective was to increase efficiency by reducing employee turnover.The report quoted psychologist Dr. V.V.Thompson on the effort to match the employee talents to the job & not "put a round peg in a square hole."


 

1201.
69-1201-Jack Barrett photo June 1947 Yosemite Falls - one of group of three.

 

#1201 p 69 Yosemite Falls - one of group of three photos by Jack Barrett June 1947 showing substantial changes in shape of upper fall because of wind. Sophie visited Yosemite Valley late September 1930 while en route to Tientsin China on transport HENDERSON, but falls were seasonally dry at that time. She prchased a handcolored photo of Bridal Veils Falls that was stolen 1993. #65A with p. l20 added summer l947#65 for disk summer l947 Crater Lake Ch. 24 O-V-E-R T-H-E M-O-U-N-T-A-I-N page 120 On the GENERAL RANDALL en route from Honolulu to San Francsico we had some very congenial Navy people at the table with us I I enjoyed having someone else prepare & serve our food.I well remember a most kindly Navy Captain who remarked after we had been at sea for three days that he had been concerned about the state of my health when he first saw me (after my operation) but was delighted to see how well I looked.It was an uneventful trip. Jack took complete charge of John as I was recuperating from major surgery performed only a week previously.As we had reservations at the Hotel Californian June 10-17 in central San Francisco, we registered there to await our car & to wait for the arrival of Jack's sister Mary Barrett-John's aunt Mollie -to arrive by plane from Boston to join us for our tour of the National Parks & for the trip across the country to her home in South Boston, where we planned to live until we could find our own quarters.Our first meal at the Californian was lunch - without Jack, who was off trying to locate our Lincoln Zephyr on the San Francisco dock- that car had to take us across the country to Boston.John & I enjoyed the fish & vegetables served at lunchat a most reasonable price-about sixty-five cents.The Californian was an excellent hotel.We stayed there a week while Mollie came from Boston & Jack got the car ready for the long trip. We drove all around San Francisco- up the Twin Peaks for the View,around the coastline & the Presidio- & at the Golden Gate Park we saw rabbits,which do not run wild in Honolulu. Also there was white clover - not found where we lived in Hawaii. John picked a clover leaf at random- which proved to be a four-leafed clover.We enjoyed riding the cable cars. One afternoon after telephoning we went to a San Francisco hospital where Marion Taylor my oldest brother Harry's sister in law, a native of Hartford Connecticut, was a nurse.She was delighted to see us. We (p. l2l....insert later. p. l22": The next morning we had breakfast at a pleasant restaurant of the Pine Cone Doughnut chain.We drove to Yosemite that day taking our time on the uphill route to avoid overheating.Jack bought a special water can to keep in the car with an excess supply of water for the radiator.The Wawona hotel was twenty-two miles south of Yosemite Valley,& we had engaged it on the American plan. The Ahwanee in Yosemite seemed out of our price range (I had stayed there September l930 while the HENDERSON was being overhauled ar Mare Island before its journey to China) & everything else was booked up, so we became quite familiar with the road back & forth from Wawona to the vallley.We visited Hetch Hetchy Valley one day on the Tuolumne River - flooded l9l3- but a painting in Mount Holyoke art museum shows it as it was in l880's.We looked around the sequoia grove near Wawona- the road went through one of the big trees-& twice we visited Glacier Point high on the South rim above the valley.Jack took photos ofVernal & Nevada Falls.We had the Sawyer's Viewmaster stereo photo of the Fire Fall,which formerly was produced by dumping glowing charcoal off Glacier Point, but we did not see it on our visit.We had though of visiting Lake Tahoe,but the Tioga Pass Road across the Sierra Nevada crest was still blocked by snow.We drove in for a close look at BridalVeil Falls & photographed El Capitan, Yosemite Falls,the foot bridges on the Merced River, Half Dome, the Three Brothers,, Mirror Lake and Mount Watkins. We hiked to the Happy Isles area on the Merced River, and Jack& Mollie went up further for a view of Vernal Falls.Our troubles with the radiator were by no means over. On the ride into Yosemite it was necessary several times to fill the water can from the Merced River.As Jack's left shoulder was stiff & painful, Mollie gallantly went to the river to fill the water can.Going to Monterey we left Yosemite by a different road.Jack was interested in the agricultural area around Salinas & the Monterey peninsula with its seventeen-mile drive & Carmel.There was a special development for retired naval officers at Monterey,& Jack thought about settling there.After a very lovely day we arrived at San Francisco the evening of June twenty-fourth.The California Hotel had no room that night,but I think we ate there while sleeping at a less well-known hotel nearby.The next day we drove across the Golden Gate casting a look out to sea toward Hawaii-& proceeded up the Redwood highway.Jack stopped to see friends, & that night we got as far as Ukiah,which we remember for its amber sodium lights.The next day we drove as far as Crescent City.On the way we stopped to see a redwood which in l947 was the tallest tree yet discovered.Other taller redwoods were discovered -also in Northern California-in the early l960's- so that tree cannot longer be considered the tallest.June 27 we left Crescent City & drove into Oregon after stopping at the California border agricultural inspection station.We proceeded to Crater Lake,encountering huge lumber trucks, one of which forced us into a ditch north of Grants Pass.Eventually with the help of the truck driver & a lot of passing motorists we got back on the road. After we arrived at Crater Lake National Park we began to see flakes of falling snow & accumulations in shaded area under trees along the road.Jack stopped the car to let John go over & look at the snow, because we had not seen snow since we left Brooklyn six years earlier.As it turned out, we need not have stopped,because we soon found ourselves in a full-fledged snowstorm that afternoon of June 27,l947,.Jack had to stop & ask questions for fear of driving over the rim & into the Crater lake (never having been there).Using our chains we had no great difficulty arriving at the Crater Lake Lodge, a cheerful large building that claimed to have the largest fireplace in the state of Oregon.Our rooms were satisfactory,& the food was good.Only the southern third of the Crater Lake Rim Road was open,but we enjoyed some fine views & good weather the next three days.We got a very good photo of Mollie over near Kerr Notch on the southeastern side of the Lake, with the Lake & Phantom Ship a small twisted lava island in the background.We also saw the symmetrical cone of Wizard Island (with whitebark pines), & the "Old man of the Lake" (a tree stump which floats in a vertical position) & numerous ground squirrels.About June 30 or July l we headed for Portland Oregon reminiscing that in Eagle l9 days l932-3 in Maine we once drove a long ways back from Bar Harbor with a hitchiking passenger who kept asking "Do you think we'll get to Portland tonight?"- this became a standing family joke.We retraced our steps to Grants Pass & went up the Williamette Valley through Eugene & Salem, the state capital.We stayed at the Portland Rose Motel, and Portland, the Rose City,certainly had its flower gardens in full bloom.Jack & John had scheduled a swing over toward the Olympic Peninsula for a couple of days hoping to visit Olympic National Park near the Washington coast.Mollie &I voted for a couple of quiet days doing washing, so this was the first major departurefrom the trip plan.One day we did take a short drive down the Columbia river toward its mouth aT Astoria.Then July 3 we made a leisurely drive along the Columbia River Highway to the Dalles, where we had reservations over the third & Fourth of July. As planned we took a careful look at the remarkable series of waterfalls along the Oregon side.Multnomah Falls is the highest, but many of the smaller falls such as Horsetail & Latourette have highly individual features & can be approached closely.The Columbia River was one of the earliest scenic highways dating from l927. Many of the waterfalls are shown in the Sawyer Viewmaster stereo series.We looked at the fish ladders at Bonneville Dam. There were a rodeo & parade & fireworks at The Dalles & American Indians in the parade.Jack was impressed by the cherry & apple orchards near Mount Hood.July five to seven we visited the southwest section of Mount Rainier National Park. We had only about seventy-five minutes of clear weather in two & a half days, but Jack was ready when the opportunity came and took a few good color pictures of Mount Rainier.The rest of the time the mountain was obscured by clouds. Subalpine firs show iin the photos.About July 8 we went through Olympia & Tacoma to Seattle where an old Navy friend Adolph Bloom then in the lumber business in Tacoma came to see us at our Seattle motel. July 9 we drove east across lava flats into the Inland Empire region of rich soil & excellent crops around Spokane.In cooler weather the region would be attractive. We hit it on a very hot day & kept our eyes on the radiator gage.To avoid planning an excessive mileage in one day we took reservations at a small motel in Ritzville rather than trying to drive to Spokane to the east.The four of us competed to get into the shower first.After supper we took a walk around the town & remember the many hollyhocks.We made a start at daybreak & had breakfast in Spokane.I think this is the town where Jack reached in the sugar bowl at breakfast & found after a bit that he had put flour in his coffee rather than sugar. With the early start we made substantial mileage that day-over three huhndred miles.The Pend Oreille lake region of the Idaho panhandle was cool &pleasant, but we pushed on through Thompson Falls to Kalispell, Montana.A bright yellow mustard plant covered large areas of the grazing land in this part of western Montana.It provided a refreshing change of view.The roads from Spokane to Glacier Park are very roundabout as they follow stream contours- but this would be interesting country to explore at leisure.A restaurant called Hennessy's in Kalispell served fish & hamburger of excellent quality. Jack enjoyed the fish.The next day we drove across the Continental Divide on the spectacular Going=-to-the Sun Highway in Glacier Park.We stayed at Swift Current cabins on the northeast slope of the park, where the rivers drain toward the Arctic through Hudson Bay. One day John & Mollie hiked to the blue-green cold waters of Iceberg Lake. on a ranger-conducted tour.Mollie & I had some clothes on the line outside the cabins,& two women artists included them in their paintings.When we started to take the clothes in,they asked us to wait until they had completed their painting- in a couple of hours.Jack & I enjoyed the lovely wild spring flowers that grew atop a tall hill near our cabins & talking with the Minneapolis school teacher who ran the cabins. After a leisurely stay till about July l4we proceeded toward Yellowstone,spending a night near Helena & driving over to look at Butte, the city on "the richest hill in the world," a great hill of copper mixed with gold and silver.We stayed about three nights at Mammoth Hot Springs near the North Yellowstone entrance. summer l947 dcbr7@yahoo.com, #66 Yellowstone l947:Our first full day at Yellowstone was an extremely full one.We began by looking at the brightly colored travertine limestone terrace at Mammoth Hot Springs, drove by the obsidian cliff of black glass,& sampled some Apollinaris spring mineral water.We looked at the Riverside & Old Faithful geysers in eruption & steaming Grotto Geyser ( where another day we observed extremely brilliant sunset orange colors).We continued down the west side of the main figure-eight loop road to the South Entrance & arrived near Grand Teton National Park & Jackson Hole in good early afternoon weather for spectacular views & started back in late afternoon.Somewhat apprehensively Jack acquiesced in the wishes of the family to return via the east side of the figure-eight loop.We passed by West Thumb & saw Yellowstone Lake briefly & enjoyed gorgeous volcanic dust effects in the sunsets.We observed the very last rays of the Sunset at Artists Point on the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. Already we had put in a very full day.After losing some time on a side road used mostly by Park staff,thinking we were on the forty-mile road north back to Mammoth, we found ourselves making a small loop & reversing direction in total darkness.Jack was thoroughly baffled. At this point another car appeared, and Jack asked directions.The other driver replied,"I'm just as lost as you are." It turned out that both cars had taken a turn onto the spur road to Inspiration Point, a blind alley road that leads only to a rise which is one of the two main viewing points for tourists at the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (Artist's Point in the other] At the parking area here the road ends in a loop designed for reversing direction, & here it was we found ourselves.The other drtiver needed gasoline,& fortunately we were able to direct him to a gasoline station a short way south.When we asked him the way to Mammoth, he said,"You have to go over the mountain."We did drive over the mountain, a disxtance of forty-four miles to Mammoth Hot Springs,with only one intersection, the Tower Junction about half way along the route- which was the only place we saw people in the forty-four mile drive.There was spectacular lightning along the highest part of the route above eight thousand feet.Jack remembered seeing the eyes of animals along the road reflecting the light of the headlights- often we did not know if they were snunks or bears.Mollie kept talking to Jack because she thought he might be sleepy. No major difficulties were encountered.The next day wee retraced the unfamiliar >road we had driven that night,stopping to see the pertified tree in the northern part of the park, then spending considerable time at Inspiration Point,which has a very fine view by day of Yellowstone Falls & the bright cliffs around it- although we had not found it particularly attractive by night far from our quarters.We revisited Old Faithful & saw Morning Glory Pool and the Fountain Paint Pots.We climbed a hill to get a good view & I asked Mollie to go over to see what a small sign on the hill said.She came right back when the sign said, "Danger, keep off."This may have been the afternoon of the spectacular sunset at Grotto Geyser,with its high steam cloud.One night Mollie had an unsettling experience with black bears when coming back to her cabin from the separate toilets. Jack had advised her to make a loud noise in the event of encountering bears, and sure enough they went away when she clapped her hands and spoke loudly.We left the park via the Northeast entrance & l0,942 foot Beartooth Mountain pass with its many hairpin turns & steady uphill climbs. We had to stop frequently & attend our thirsty radiator.We continued down the Yellowstone River route as far as Forsyth,Montana that Saturday night July l9.Having no reservations & being in a very thinly populated area we made inquiry at Forsyth & found that certain church groups arranged to have people stay as paying guests of private families.We were very fond of Mr. & Mrs. Guy Gray who took us in for the night for five dollars & gave us without charge some bread, butter & tea when I said I was too hungry to sleep.John played the theme of the first movement of the Mozart A major piano sonata K. 33l, a piece which he had memorized for Miss Canafax [Punahou School sixth grade].Mollie went to church n Forsyth on the morning of July 20, & we proceeded to Dickinson, North Dakota, where we had reservations at a small motel recommended by the American Automobile Association.As this country was thinly populated we were glad to have advance reservations.We were adhering rigidly to an eastward schedule during the trip because Mollie was an employee of more than four years standing at the Metropolitan Life branch office in South Boston, & her six weeks would be up about July 28.On Tuesday July 22 Jack drove our car to a stop at the main intersection of Mandan,North Dakota on the west bank of the Missouri River.A loud CLANK was heard.When he tried to start up again,the speedometer needle climbed cheerfully to thirty-five miles per hour, but the car sat still.A gasoline station was alongside us at our right hand, & we had to be towed in there with a broken rear axle.Mollie caught a train to Boston, arriving at work on time by the next Monday.We stayed about three days in Mandan,-a new axle cost six dollars,but telegrams to obtain it from Minneapolis cost more than the axle itself.We made one long day's trip through Fargo,North Dakota to Brainerd. Minnesota, where baffling radiator difficulties stmped the experts while we sweltered in local-record high temperatures of l04 degrees for more than a week.We were about ready to walk east but finally proceeded into cooler terrain around Duluth & Superior,Wisconsin.We spent three nights in Michigan at Ironwood & Saint Ignace on the upper peninsula & at Port Huron near the Canadian border north of Lake St. Clair.We cut across from Port Huron to Buffalo.The generator conked out,& a new one was installed in London,Ontario.Canada was observing beefless days at this time because of the postwar shortages in Europe,& we had a very good chicken dinner at Niagara Falls O ntario.In the late afternoon we observed the Falls from the Canadian side.After dark we enjoyed the American falls in colored lights until about ten pm. We planned to drive east to Rochester but found that streets were blocked off because of an American Legion convention, & all traffic was forced south to Buffalo.We were thoroughly exhausted & found ouselves foced to rent extravangtly expenbsive rooms at an ancient Buffalo hotel about three A.M.In the morning we attempted to leave Buffalo & found the urban streets incredibly confusing.Finally we pointed the car east,& by nightfall were in West Winfield, New York where we took a chance on a local inn recommended by Duncan Hines.From here the next day we drove through Albany & Great Barrington, Massachusetts & surprised my folks in Hartford by stopping in at Babe & Getter's home at 92 Fern Street.It was the first of many pleasant visits there.Before we went to Babe's house we stopped in at Swift & Company to see my oldest sister Esther, still working there as an accountant.That night after stopping aT THE OLDEST ORIGINAL HOWARD JOHNSON'S RESTAURANT in Quincy,we arrived at Mollie's home at 640 East Seventh Street South Boston. It was probably around August eleven, early in the evening.We stayed there a little over three months until Thanksgiving Day l947.We soon became acquainted with Mr. & Mrs. Alphonse & Catherine Roche dowstairs & their sons Raymond, Alphonse, & Donnie ages about ten, eight & four- alsi Billy Sullivan & Bobby Adams in neighboring houses.They would come in the kitchen & play "high'low-jack"& other card games including an unusual variant of whist & "slapjack"{ & "fish."Frequently Mr. Roche would provide Mollie with fresh fish on Friday from his catch as a fisherman.Mollie often baked chocolate brownies.We would take the neighbors on rides to the Arnold Arboretum or Castle Island.The Arnold Arboretum at that time had beautiful exhibits of flowering cherry, >apple & other fruit trees, -lilacs, azaleas,rhododendrons, >magnolias,daffodils, jonquils,narcissus, honeysuckle & bright-leaved >copper beeches.In the autumn the blue-purple berries of Callicarpa japonica attracted our notice the first autumn, l947.


 

1202.
Jack Barrett and other Revenue Cutter School cadets on ITASCA 1909 p69-1202

 

#1202 p 69 Jack Barrett left-center as Revenue Cutter School cadet on ITASCA training cruise.Cadets appear to be studying charts.---RED HEADED STEPCHILD Part I Sophie Meranski early years Chapter Two Social Work and Marriage 1923-1930 New York + Philadelphia CHAPTER TWO Social Work and Greenwich Village Romance 1923-1930 JohnB Barrett Partial sequence of text: summer 1923 Lower East Side NY Edelschick-sausages- doctor. at clinic +cousin+-Hewes and thesis-Pollacks Dorchester- canneries 1925- +ANNETaylor+ Mother- +Hewes-to Clark+ BeckySmaltz p 178- Stokowski- Josephine Dana and Agnes Drummond Spring Garden - cattle -Knitter pasted from #19k Jean Morton - "Pinafore" Dr. Strecker- Almena Dawley -Frances David- +Baltimore+ Emmanuel Lyons- Jack Barrett 27 Commerce Bill Nuremberg law - Esther- sinus- Finn Pappp Brill Abe Perkins Marie Nelson Pete and Jen Woolley= shack Babe-Geetter weddingJune 16 train Macy's Cogswell Hu TEXT #19 New York I was well acquainted with Professor Amy Hewes through her course on statistics & waiting on her table.She secured a job for me with the United Hebrew Charities of New York,where I was to be a family case worker & live in the Christie Street settlement house on the Lower East Side.The job was to be permanent,but a week after the l923 Commencement I received a telegram "Would you accept position as department secretary & my assistant for two years? Letter follows.Wire reply at once.Amy Hewes."I wired acceptance & asked the United Hebrew Charities if they would accept me for summer work only.I did social work in the slums of the East Side & in the evenings taught citizenship for naturalization papers in exchange for board & room. In the morning I walked to Cherry Street to work.The men, women & children had matresses on the fire escapes to sleep & occupied them earlier in the evening to get a breath of cool outdoor air.Women hung laundry on the escapes.I had some photographs (stolen l993) of Christie Street showing the fire escapes crowded with people.As I walked back to the settlement house for lunch,I passed hundreds of pushcarts,which sold everything, usually just parked in the street up against the curb.There were very long thin Italian breads,pungent Italian cheeses & a large assortment of sausages-spaghetti & macaroni in every shape & size-I was amazed at the variety offered. Miss Minnie Edelshick,supervisor of family care work at the United Hebrew Charities in New York City gave me three families to care for-not new cases because I was scheduled to work there only two & a half months.One of my families consisted of a widow & her three children ranging in age from ten to four.Since she complained of stomach pains,my supervisor advised me to get advice at the free clinic for women held from ten to twelve each morning at the Bellevue Hospital.I gave the woman the trolley fare & told her to meet me at the clinic at ten o'clock the next morning,but she failed to appear.I went to her house (very small,dark tenement on Cherry Street) that afternoon-very hot-& she told me that by the time she had gotten the three children up & to the clinic it was closed.Also that her clock was old,unreliable=-that it was slow & she would not agree to meet me at the clinic the next morning because she couldn't see how she could get there on time.She told me that other women in that neighborhood had gone to that clinic repeatedly but had not received treatment because of the crowds.The next morning I went to her home at nine o'clock sharp, found the four of them in one bed,all sleeping in their stockings & underwear.The good-natured mother cooperated with me- they all got dressed-had a little bread & milk,& the four of us went off,by trolley car, to the Bellevue Hospital's free clinic for women where we arrived about ten fifteen. The receptionist gave us a card with a number on it,& we sat down in the waiting room, crowded with women & children pl77 I watched the hands of the clock as the time passed.My woman was patient & pleasant, but the three children were uncomforable & restless-& I don't blame them. About quarter to twelve,the receptionist announced that the doctors would take no more patients that day & told us to leave.I was hungry,hot discouraged & near tears,when I realized that the woman & her children were so much more bewildered than I was.I went alone toward the doctors' offices,& when I saw a woman emerge from one office at twelve o'clock,I just walked into find a young doctor taking off his white, starched robe, getting ready to leave.I asked him to examine my patient,explaining that I was a social worker who had waited the whole morning for service,& that the woman's three young children had waited too.He told me that he had just given two hours of free service to the clinic,wanted to go out to lunch & then to his own office.But I explained that the woman was in pain, told him I had gone to her house at nine that morning- & when I offered to take him out to lunch & pay for it if he would examine her,he smiled (that unbearably hot afternoon),put the white coat on again,& examined the woman.He gave me a prescription for medicine which he said should clear up an acid stomach condition, & I gave the woman the price of a trolley ride home.Then I asked him to take me to a very inexpensive restaurant because I did not know that neighborhood, always had lunch in my settlement house.-p178- and the truth was that I had less than two dollars in my pocket. Again this kindly doctor smiled, took me to a good nearby restaurant, ordered good lunches for two, encouraged me to talk about family case work and the settlement house, paid the bill and the tip, and listened patiently when I said the people were treated like cattle in the free clinics.[then] Consulting his watch, he said he was due at his office, and as we parted in front of the restaurant he remarked, "If I wasn't a married man and if you were not so young and attractive, I'd show you that New York is more than slums and free clinics. Bit if that medicine does not clear up Mrs. ----'s acid condition, I'll see her again at my office free of charge." So we parted, and I did not see him again as the woman's condition improved.I knew no one in New York. I had very little money to spend because I was in debt to Mount Holyoke College, so I spent many evenings just walkng along Broadway and Fifth Avenues looking in the shop windows and watching the people. One evening when I was having dinner in the Settlement House - deserted that hot August night- the cook told me that a young man was there to see me. He explained that he was graduated from Columbia Medical School in June - that he was a new intern at the Bellevue Hospital, that the doctor who had treated the woman and taken me to lunch was his cousin- and that his cousin suggested that he call on me. We had a pleasant visit, and he invited me to see the show"Seventh Heaven". Since I had never seen a Broadway musical comedy, I certainly enjoyed myself, and he took me to several shows and movies before I left New York just before Labor Day. -179- Although my path led into statistical research in the field of social work and I never returned to family case work, I always have - and still do - considered it of vital importance. {In notebook one p. 179 Emmanuel Lyons material follows here]. In the summer of l924 the day before my sister Bee married Sam Pollack in Hartford,my sister Esther saw me off for Detroit,where I was scheduled to work for the U.S. Children's Bureau in a study of retarded people who had attended special classes in Detroit's public schools.I lived with the family of my 1923 classmate Mary Patterson and her younger sister Ruth, who invited my brother Pete to her Senior prom at Mount Holyoke in the spring of 1925, when her fiance' was too far away to attend. Pete was then at senior at Trinity College in Hartford and had an opportunity to see Mount Holyoke and meet some of my frineds. In September I returned to Mount Holyoke College,where I typed book lists,Miss Hewes's letters & the exams-where I was the Statistics lab asssistant. Some of the 1925 students from the Statistics Lab remained friendly many years Emily Miller Noss, Emily Barrows,Frances Manning, Ruth Patterson. I also remember Roberta Teale Swartz Chalmers, an outstanding poet and writer originally from Brooklyn, Grace Liang Yapp from Tientsin, China, and Cherokee Rush Muskrat, who became a top official of Bureau of Indian Affairs. I studied Labor & Psychology & Criminology & in l925 received a Master's degree after oral exams & a thesis: "The Young Offender & the Law in Massachusetts. "Massachusetts innovated in l825, when Reverend Ward, a Rhode Island native, led an effort to segregate juvenile prisoners from hardened older criminals. Around l870 Massachusetts led an effort to reduce prison populations & rehabilitate offenders by supervised probations, and around l906 Judge Baker was active reforming juvenile courts & left money for reseach at a Judge Baker Foundation in Boston. I compiled an extensive bibliography and noted curious ecclesiastical crimes in colonial times. In June l925 working for the federal Children's Bureau I went from Mount Holyoke to Boston to work under Miss Channing,who was making a statistical study of delinquent children whose fathers had police records for drunkenness -she was working there temporarily transcribing at police headquarters information where children were being treated at Judge Baker foundation.We learned about Dr. Healy & Augusta Brenner- two well known personalities in the field of maladjusted children.For two weeks I lived in Dorchester on Canterbury Street with my sister Bee Pollack & her husband, Sam, and this was a chance for me to meet his parents & many of his brothers & sisters - a family of ten, who immigrated from Minsk, Belorussia between l905 & l909. Sam's grandmother Mrs.Hanapolsky led a large contingent when she was over ninety years old, as Sam Pollack's nephew describes in his historical novel, "Yonder is the Dawn," earliest of a sequence.A l920 Harvard Phi Beta Kappa graduate in chemistry in three years, Sam developed the formula for the sweet drink ZAREX & then worked at LaRoux liquers Philadelphia & later at Schenley Liquors in quality control at Cincinnati & later as a vice-president in New York,with an office in the Empire State Buiilding. Bertha & Sam left for a summer cottage on the Winthrop beach, where they rented a small room from a Boston dentist,had kitchen privileges,& ate on the porch. I rented a room at a Winthrop hotel, then was ordered to Washington DC to do statistical work.I was surrounded by congenial co=workers,& I could walk easily from my boarding house,which was a joy.The girls I worked with lived there&were friendly,& the food was excellent- especially the bacon, sausage & the corn fritters.But my Washington duty was very short-lived.Because Caroline Legge had recommended me as an investigator (I had worked for her all the summer of l924 in Detroit) Miss Nathalie Matthews in charge of Children's Bureau research,sent me to Dover,Delaware to investigate the tomato canneries there & in nearby towns.I received my regular salary plus a cost-of-living per diem rate-so financially I was better off that I had been in Boston or Washington.The Hotel Dover was a nice place to live ,but I was lonely.There were two other women investigators in the Dover job,but I saw nothing of them because they were close friends-older than I was & spent evenings in their own room writing up their reports onthe day's findings.The job itself was interesting.I could use public transportation or hire a taxi & be reimbursed.We were interested in the working conditions of the children-their ages,hours of work & wages.The canneries were out in the country as near the fields as possible.The canneries established camps & imported laborers,largely women & children,who sorted.washed & peeled tomatoes.They were engaged by scouts,who sent buses at the beginning of the season (in Delaware about July l5) & returned them home after September 30.When word got to the workers that the "inspector" was present,the children would flee while the women remained at their posts.But often I managed to enter the work rooms before the children got the word,so I saw many of them at work & interviewed many of the older children who then realized I was not there to harm them. Working conditions in Delaware were bad. Women & children stood many long hours on a soggy wet floor-their rubber aprons dripping with tomato juice.The tomatoes are sorted first to remove rotten or green ones,then sorted according to size & peeled before going to the sterilizing & canning machines. Many had cuts on their fingers from the sharp knives they had to use to peel & cut out rotten spots. When I asked one woman how she & her three children could sleep on the blanket that served as their bed in a tent,she answered, "We can't sleep good.It's too tight."We had no legal right at that time to inspect the canneries & talk to the women& children.The proprietors always admitted me.They feared Congress would forbid the employment of women & children in canneries that refused to allow Children's Bureau agents to enter. We always asked permission to go through the plant,& I was never refused.About the fifteenth of August I went to Indianapolis Indiana to inspect children's & womens labor in the corn canneries. My mother had had surgery in l92l for gall bladder cancer, which was mis-diagnosed for a long time, & it was too late to save her. She was told she had "adhesions."Her health gradually declined,though she enjoyed my Mount Holyoke graduation l923 & contined to feed & look after her husband & large family & regular guests, including Julius Aronson,whose mother had passed away,and an Irish boarder who used to sing.Her brother Jacob had some sort of speech problem-perhaps hearing related.He came with her from Austria via Hamburg in l890 or a little earlier, possibly with the Witkower family April l890. The Meiselmanns were also acquaintances from Brody.Judge Saul Seidman of Hartford is a Meiselmann descendant.After my mother passed away, my brother Ben furnished information that her parent's first names were Abel & Bertha, probably deceased before their children emigrated. After my mother's death September 8, l925 - for which I was completely unprepared, I was desperately lonely under the travel and working conditions as a child labor inspector for the Children's Bureau on the eastern shore of Maryland. My best friend there was a Goucher graduate Anne Starr Taylor, who had grown up in State College Pennsylvania. She had to write her child labor reports in the evening, and she was anxious to finish her assigned investigation as soon as possible, because she had an apartment in Greenwich Village at 27 Commerce Street in New York City, and she wanted to go back and find a job in the area. Impulsively I resigned my job and went home planning to take care of my widower father and brother Ben and two sisters Esther and Babe still living at home. In late 1925 for a time I became an unpaid maid, but I did cook the meals and keep the place clean. However, my evenings were a problem. Esther was not allowed to bring her non-Jewish boy friend Charlie Bardous to the house, though they had a serious relation many years and worked together as bookkeepers at the meat company, which became part of Swift and Company. Babe was nearly nineteen and recently out of high school and speding most evenings with her future husband Dr. Geetter, and my brother Ben was unwell. I had been away at college and at work so long [six years] that I had few close friends left in Hartford. [Classmate Joe Paonessa was losing a battle with tuberculosis]. I thought I owed it to my thesis advisor Miss Amy Hewes of Mount Holyoke College to explain why I had resigned the well-paid job she had gotten for me with the Children's Bureau, and I thought she would praise me for looking after my family. I was amazed by the speed with which she answered my letter.She advised me to employ a housekeeper at once and get out of there.She told me to go to New York City to see, by appointment,Miss Mary Augusta Clark, a [1903] Mount Holyoke College Graduate, Statistician for the Commonwealth Fund's Division of Mental Health, and also to see a man who wanted a statistician in the New York Association for Improving the condition of the Poor. I was offered both jobs and took the one with the Commonwealth Fund as Statistical Recorder in the Philadelphia [Demonstration] Child Guidance Clinic. When I wrote to my classmate Rebecca Glover Smaltz of Mount Airy, Pennsylvania to ask her to locate a temporary residence for me in a YWCA or in any inexpensive [p58,181 notebook one] l78 place, she answered immediately that she would meet me at the station in Philadelphia,& drive me to their home,where I could stay until I found permanent quarters.So I lived in their spacious home in Mount Airy, where Becky drove me to work in South Philadelphia every morning & drove me home at night. One evening we we went to hear thePhiladelphia Symphony orchestra-with Leopold Stokowski - the first symphony concert I ever attended. It was a wonderful Stokowski weekend.Although the Smaltzes were perfect hosts,who seemed in no hurry to have me leave,I kept searching for an inexpensive place to live.One of the students at the Child Guidance Clinic,Marion Pierce was living in a Settlement House in South Philadelphia within walking distance of the clinic,& as there was room for me there,I moved in,& received room & board in exchange for some evening tutoring of men about to apply for citizenship papers.Mine was a solitary job-I read records of problem children & made cards fom the records-cards to be used later in statistical studies of maladjustment.Our rooms in the settlement house were tiny.Social life was impossible there.There was no social or recreation room for thee residents.Most of the students living there had to study evenings when they were not on duty. When Josephine Dana & AgnesDrummond, who lived in the Settlement House & worked for the Children's Aid Society asked me to share an apartment with them,I was glad to. It was a small furnished apartment on Spring Garden Street;the three of us were congenial & tried to make it homelike.Josephine invited me to spend a weekend at her family home in Windsor, Vermont,where her elderly mother lived alone. Josephine hitched up the horse & buggy Saturday morning & drove it to a sale of cattle at which her two brothers were present,& they were among the bidders for the cattle auctioned. It was a new experience for me from beginning to end that I always remember wirth great pleasure. They were descendants of Richard Henry Dana author of the Pacific adventure "Two Years before the Mast." It was so interesting to listen to the auctioneer tell the cow's age,weight, when it freshened-milk production- & then listen to the bids.The bidding was lively & competitive. Another time -183-Josephine asked me if I'd like to go with her to Cape Cod for my week's summer vacation. She reserved a place for two at the private home of the Bearses in Centreville.The Bearses were very cordial old Cape Codders who gave us excellent food and played whist with us in the evening. We were within easy walking distance of Craig's Beach, one of the finest beaches in the world.On Saturday evening Walter Washburn drove to Centreville from Windsor,Vermont to visit with Josephine. -184- Soon after our return to Philadelphia, Josephine gave a tea at which Walter was present and at which she announced her engagement. After the party I left for Cleveland to work temporarily at the Cleveland Child Guidance Clinic to help clear up back statistical work piled up by the illness of their recorder. In that clinic I met two well-known psychiatrists, Drs. Carl Menninger and Dr. Lawson Lowry, who were friendly.I had a good time socially there, and when I left Dr. Lowrey, director of the Cleveland Clinic, gave me an unsolicited recommendation. When Josephine Dana married,Agnes Drummond and I continued on at the apartment. Another social worker - from the Children's Aid- joined us. Her name was Helen Goldsborough, and she came from the Deep South.She wanted to see New England in the winter, so Josephine invited Helen and me to spend a weekend in Windsor, Vermont. It was very pleasant, but Josephine gave us a large sled to use on a steep hill. Helen sat in front to steer and unfortunately steered it into a fallen log, throwing me from the sled and injuring my knee. Not long after moving into the apartment I had a telephone call from Carl Knitter,who was introduced to me by my former student at Mount Holyoke, Frances Manning, who became an economist.Carl was a Rutgers graduate attending Hahnemann Medical School, in his senior year.He was an avid fisherman, made his own colored flies for bait and often brought flies to the apartment for me to admire and brought his violin to play. We spent many pleasant evenings and weekends together, but my young sister Babe's boy friend Dr. Isadore Geetter warned me that the Hahnemann was a homeopathic medical school, not then recognized or accredited by most medical institutions such as Jefferson Medical School where he was then studying. After graduation from Hahnemann,Carl went to Oregon,to practice medicine and to fish. About a year later he wrote asking me to go out there and marry him. I refused. Not long after that he returned to New Jersey and telephoned inviting me to dinner at his parents' home. He had given up his practice because of violent headaches.Later I heard that he had died from a brain tumor..---Sophie Black Notebook Two p 200 "When Geetter was a student a Jefferson Medical School [1925-1929] he was in class one day when an obnoxious professor talked at length about his accomplishments in his field - when Geetter suddenly was horrified to hear his own voice saying "You cockeyed wonder!" - followed by an ominous silence in which the professor glared at him and during which Geetter quaked in his boots with apprehension. For the rest of that semester Geetter was in the professor's dog house and altho he passed the course, he had an awful time because the professor gave him such difficult slides to diagnose under his microscope. He had to spend many hours puzzling over those slides - hours which might more profitably have been spent on his other medical subjects. But he was relieved to pass the course and be able to complete his medical subjects for his degree. -= When Geetter was in his second year at Jefferson, he invited me to see his small room on the top floor of his fraternity house.I was then working at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic. I told him I was being courted by a senior medical student at Hahneman Medical School, and he immediately disappointed me- saying the school was not accredited as were Jefferson Medical School and the medical school at University of Maryland. He must have alarmed my sister Babe, his fiancee, because she wrote successfully urging me to drop him. A few years later when my Hahneman friend was some sort of doctor in Oregon, he wrote asking me to marry him. I asked Jack Barrett's advice. [1928 or early 1929]. After reading the letter he said "no" - "that man is too selfish just looking for someone to answer his phone and cook his meals." Hahneman was homeopathic - Carl Knitter died of a brain tumor not long after." Jean Morton, of Morton Avenue, Morton, Pennsylvania,was Executive Secretary of the Child Guidance Clinic.Her father was a doctor. One evening she invited me to be her guest at a performance of Gilbert & Sullivan,in which both she & her father sang.I knew nothing of Gilbert & Sullivan but was charmed by that amateur production of "Pinafore." & have since attended many Gilbert & Sullivan productions,especially at Camp Kabeyun,,Alton Bay,New Hampshire in the l950's.Jean & I usually had lunch together at Hughes cafeteria, where I never tired of the egg salad sandwiches. The head of the Child Guidance Clinic,Dr.Allen,encouraged me to attend Dr. Strecker's class in psychiatry at the Pennsylvania Medical School.I attended without cost & learned a great deal from that well-known psychiatrist,who was conscientiously teaching young medical students.He usually had one or two mental patients from the Pennsylvania Hospital at the class to discuss their symptoms & treatment.Although I was a statistician, not a psychiatric social worker,Miss Almena Dawley,head of the department of social work in the clinic,gave me a real case to handle-from taking the application & the social history,to arranging for psychiatric interview & the psychological tests through carrying out the treatment measures.The child guidance clinics in Philadelphia,Cleveland,Baltimore & Los Angeles were two year Demonstration Clinics paid for by the Commonwealth Fund of New York & administered by the National Committee for Mental Hygiene (also supported by the Commonwealth Fund).The Commonwealth Fund had the income of Mr. Harkness's thirty-eight million dollars to use "for the betterment of mankind."Each clinic had the services of two or three full time psychiatrists,two psychologists,six psychiatric social workers,an executive secretary, a statistical recorder,a telephone operator,& a staff of clerical & stenographic workers.The director of each clinic, a psychiatrist,had the responsibility of trying of trying to get the community to support a child guidance clinic after the demonstration clinic closed in two years.The Philadelphia clinic had a social worker & two students from the Smith School of Social Work in Northampton,Massachusetts.The clinic examined & treated children up to sixteen years of age= delinquent children & children who had personality difficulties & bad habits.These children were referred to the clinic either by their parents, by their school, by a social agency or by a juvenile court judge.A social worker investigated the family history & home & school conditions - a psychiatrist gave the child a thorough physical examination, a psychologist tested the child for I.Q., mental age,& school attainment,& the psychiatrist gave the child a careful psychiatric interview.Then there was a staff meeting of the social worker, psychiatrist, psychologist & chief social worker-also the statistical recorder, and the treatment of the child was initiated.Our Philadelphia clinic was taken over by the community on a reduced scale,& one of my Mount Holyoke classmates, Frances David, took over my job as statistical recorder as an unpaid volunteer. She had put together when we were undergraduates a collection of comic songs,"l923 College Crackers." Two I often sang for my family were: "I had a fat twin brother.We looked like one another.You ought to see the way he'd laugh At the lickings I would get. He tought it very funny To go & borrow money & watch the people chasing me do make me pay his debts.The girl I was to marry Couldn't tell us two apart.She went & married brother Jim & she nearly broke my heart.But you betcha I got even With my brother Jim.I died about a week ago & they went & buried. him." 2."Pull the shades down,Mary Ann,Pull the shades down Mary Ann-Last night by the pale moon light I saw you I saw you You were combing your auburn hair On the back of a Morris chair.If you want to keep your secrets from your future men, Pull the shades down,Mary A-aan." p.182] It was while I was working at the United Hebrew Charities l923 that I met Mr Emmanuel Lyons.He lived in Jersey City , commuted daily to his mid-Manhattan office, where he worked for an advertising firm. (He lost money publishing two books, "l00l Retailing Ideas" and its sequel "2222 Retailing Ideas") Lost photos showed me in deep snowdrifts February,l926 at his western New Jersey farm in Pittstown, New Jersey.The farm had two farm houses,one for the tenant farmer & one for Mr. Lyons & his guests.Each summer he offered the United Hebrew Charities a chance to send a family to live at his farmhouse, & on weekends he took a few social workers to the farm with him.One Friday afternoon I joined him at the railroad station with two other case workers.He paid our fare to Pittstown.where we walked from the station to the farm,where we had an abundance of fresh vegetables & milk & enjoyed good conversation at meals.It was a most welcome change after the heat & pavements of New York City,& when I wrote him a thank you note, he answered, ""For bread and butter you return cake." He became a close friend (much older) of both myself & my future husband Jack Barrett, especially when I returned to live in New York City in l927,l928, l929, in in l930 he selected my diamond ring after I hurriedly married two hours before Jack left for the Philippines.Mr Lyons visited in Philadelphia at 1927 New Year's Day, when we saw the mummer's parade, an annual Philadelphia tradition with huge numbers of festive floats. Becky Smaltz's paternal aunt "Auntie" invited me to [1926] Thanksgiving dinner at her home and also invited my brother Pete to come up from the University of Maryland Medical School, Baltimore, where he was in his second year. "Auntie" Smaltz had an excellent cook and maid, and after dinner we were taken to a football game - my first "big college" game. While still in his first year at Medical School in Baltimore, my brother met his future wife, Jeanette Goldberg. Since he wanted me to know her, he invited me to a formal dance at his fraternity house - I wore my sister Babe's white formal gown with feathers at the bottom, and I stayed as a guest in Jen's home. I liked her and her family very much. I thought and still do that she should have attended that dance together. They were very much in love, and it was a real sacrifice for both of them not to be together [that evening]. {John Barrett note- earlier there is an account that spring 1925 Pete attended the Mount Holyoke Senior Prom with one of the Patterson girls of Detroit, at whose home Sophie lived summer 1924. Her fiance was too far away to attend, and Pete had an opportunity to see Mount Holyoke - this was in the year prior to meeting Jen. In the summer of 1927 -184-185- I transferred to New York City to Miss Clark's office on Forty-Second Street near Fifth Avenue. I was then in Publications. We worked on statistical data for the Division of Mental Hygiene of the Commonwealth Fund. My research at the Philadelphia Demonstration Clinic was the basis of Miss Clark's book "Statistical Reporting Techniques for Child Guidance Clinics". Although we remained good friends, and my assistance was acknowledged in the introduction, I did not get formal credit, and it was largely my work. I was unable to use the material as a subject for a doctoral thesis at Columbia University as I had planned, because they considered the material had already been published under Miss Clark's name.I also assisted on other projects, including proof-reading a textbook "The Problem Child at Home" by another author, who was grateful for the many typographical and other mistakes I removed. For a few days I occupied the apartment of one of Miss Clark's friends in Brooklyn, but the friend was returning Monday, and I had to leave. I remembered that Anne Taylor, who had worked with me on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, said she had an apartment in New York. I found her in the telephone book Saturday evening, and when I telephoned to ask her if she knew of a place where I might live, she said she could not think of one at that moment but that she would come out to see me in Brooklyn right way and bring her date with her.She came with Ivan McCormack,and when she heard my predicament,she explained that she had a small apartment with only two bedrooms- one very small. She occupied the large bedroom- her sister Eleanor occupied the small bedroom, and her sister Betty slept on a couch in the lving room.But she helped me pack that evening,saying that I could sleep in the bed with her until we found a suitable place for me. Anne worked as Executive Secretary of the Joint Vocational Service. As Anne was to be married in two weeks, Eleanor a schoolteacher and Betty a nurse moved into a tiny apartment on Twelfth Street.I liked it with Anne at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village, and didn't diligently search for a place to live. Anne married, went off on her honeymoon,and when she returned I was comfortably located in Eleanor's [former] small bedroom, and Anne agreed to let me stay there for half the rent- just the room and use of the bathroom- no food and no kitchen privileges. I was very glad to stay there. Soon after Agnes Drummond called me up inviting me to join her and two men for dinner.Her -186- dinner partner was an old friend from her home in St. Louis, while my dinner partner was Bill Nuremberg, a lumber salesman with an office in the Grand Central Terminal Building.My loneliness then came to an end. Bill's office was very near mine, so we had lunch together every noon- a much better lunch than I could afford.Often we had dinner together, and every Sunday he drove me over Storm King Highway to an inn where we enjoyed dinner and then drove home in his big Packard.Bill N'irnberg (Nuremberg) owned a moving picture camera & wasted many expensive films & much time taking my picture. He ws everlastingly telling me to act natural & was very critical of my dress,which he considered too short & too stylish.He hung a sheet in Anne's apartment,where he showed us his movies.He lived at the McAlpin Hotel. But Miss Clark moved her office to Fifty-Seventh Street into the quarters of the division of Publications of the Commonwealth Fund and took me with her- too far away for me to have daily lunch with Bill,although I continued to see him every Sunday and had dinner with him two nights a week.Miss Clark was writing a book "Reporting and Recording for Child Guidance Clinics". I wrote the first draft of nearly every chapter of that book because I had the first hand knowledge of the subject from my work in the Philadelphia and Cleveland Clinics.Miss Clark re-wrote the material in her own style, and the book was ready for publication in June 1928. Miss Clark had written the book at the suggestion of one of the first statistical public health epidemiologists, actuary Dr. Louis Dublin of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, who made early contributions to understanding tuberculosis, industrial safety, and venereal diseases. From time to time as I was working on the book, the Commonwealth Fund loaned me to the New York Board of Education to advise them on records too.I also served as chairman of the committee investigating the qualifications of New York Social Workers [and developing standards]= a study being made for Walter West of the New York Association of Social Workers and for Ralph Hurlin of the Russell Sage Foundation.Harry Hopkins was a valuable member of my committee. He was then working at the Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor in New York City. I began to wonder what I was going to do next, but Miss Clark was ahead of me in planning for me.Unknown to me she had interviewed Mr. [Taylor?] Smith, director of the Commonwealth Fund; and had interested him in me so that they offered to pay my salary and my tuition for the summer session of 1928 at Columbia University, - and when the summer was over I was to be a statisticain at the Institute of Child Guidance in New York, operated by the Commonwealth Fund. So I entered summer school, registered for a Ph.d and took courses in Advanced Statistics and Social Science. Anne Taylor had a young friend Harold Nelson, who came to the apartment nearly every evening lookng for a bridge game.Anne told me that Harold was the brother of her social worker friend Marie Nelson,who came from Charleston, South Carolina,and was now Mrs. Harman Rowe of Philadelphia.One Saturday afternoon late in August 1928 I was at home in my room studying for a final exam Monday morning. Anne told me that she expected Marie Nelson Rowe and Jack Barrett that afternoon- just for the afternoon, as Marie and "Barrett" expected to join another couple for dinner and the evening.-188- "Barrett" was an old friend of the Nelson family from his Naval duty in Charleston, South Carolina in the early 1920s on the USS TOUCEY. Ordinarily I would never be at home on a Saturday afternoon in New York City,but I was determined to study all weekend for the two courses,as the exams were on the following Monday & Tuesday.So I took off my street clothes after lunch (out- as I took no meals with the McCormacks with whom I lived .I put on a deep red, long kimono sent to me by a Mount Holyoke college friend who made it for me,and I told Anne McCormack that I planned to spend the afternoon in my room working on my course.Anne then told me that she expected her friend Marie Nelson from Philadelphia at any moment, because Marie was to meet "Barrett" there & go out with him later for dinner & for the evening.Hardly had I begun to work when when Anne came in to tell me I had a male caller,and she was immediately followed by "Van" - husband of one of my social worker acquaintances. I was surprised to see him,,as he had never called before, & neither he nor his wife were particular friends of mine.Also I was embarassed to be caught wearing a kimono as I rarely stopped long enough to put one on.He explained that his wife was on vacation ((like Irving Berlin's l9l0 "My wife has gone to the country=hurray,hurray! She thought it best I take a rest & so she went away.") -& that he had a bottle of Prohibition whiskey,which he would be glad to share with me. When I explained that I did not drink,I thought that he would leave,but he was lonesome & lingered without drinking or urging me to drink.As we talked,Marie arrived-I had never seen her,& a little later I heard them greet "Barrett."When Van finally decided to leave,I walked to the door with him at the exact moment that Marie & Barrett arrived at the door to depart,&I saw a beautiful Charleston (South Carolina) belle attended by a sweet looking slender redhaired man.Neither one spoke to me as they followed Van out.Van had wasted most of my afternoon & it was hot,so I went off for a walk & had my dinner before returning home for a little serious studying in my hot room.On Sunday morning I slept late,donned an old cotton dress & decided to sweep the kitchen floor about noon-anything to keep from settling down to study. As I was sweeping,the doorbell rang,& I called,"Come in."In stepped Barrett, amused to see me sweeping the floor, but I merely said to him,"Anne & Ivan are not home."Whereupon he told me that he was calling on me &that I seemed to be very much at home. Desperately I told him how pressed I was for time,how embarassed I would be if I failed those two courses,but he calmly sat down in the kitchen & took out his wallet & showed me a picture of a child about five years old, saying, "This is my baby."I was surprised, as I believed he was courting Marie Nelson,& I said,"I didn't know you were married." He said,"I'm not married,but this is an Australian child,Sheila Craig.whom I knew in l925 whe I made the Australian cruise on the Marblehead,& I have kept in touch with Dr Craig & his family ever since."He visited for some time,& when I inquired about Marie,he said she had gone back to Philadelphia.Nothing would get him out of that apartment as he insisted I would have to have Sunday dinner somewhere, sometime-so why not with him? after which I would be free to study.Whe I told him I believed he was courting Marie,he told me that Marie was married,separated from her husband,but not free to marry anyone.Barrett was living uptown at the Knights of Columbus Hotel. he was in his second year at Fordham Law School uptown campus.In the early fall of l928 I saw little of Jack. I returned to work & steady dating of Bill Nuremberg,who had spent most of the summer in Europe, which explained why I was free to go to dinner with Barrett that Sunday afternoon. But occasionally Barrett dropped into the apartment about ten o'clock at night after school & once or twice took me to dinner but complained bitterly that he couldn't spare the time from his studies to entertain me at night.So he began to appear at the subway exit nearest my office before nine most mornings, would walk to the office with me & then telephone to me during the morning to make a luncheon date. .One weekend early that fall Bill Nuremberg told me he planned on doctor's advice to spend the weekend in bed because of an ulcer.I spent the weekend with Frances Manning (Mount Holyoke l925) in Maplewood New Jersey & returned to New York after dinner Sunday evening.As I was close to Bill's hotel,I telephoned to ask if he was well enough to have me call on him,& Bill said"Yes." His tone was not cordial-his greeting was not enthusiastic,& before I could ask him how he was, he complained that someone named Barrett had telephoned twice to try to find me & wanted me to telephone him. After a short visit,I went home,& Anne also told me Barrett wanted me to call him.It was eleven o'clock.On the telephone I said, "This is Sophie,"- he sleepily replied,"What do you want?"I told him both Bill & Anne said he wanted me to telephone,but he was just too sleepy to make conversation.In December or January Barrett moved into a small sixty-dollar-a-month apartment very close to me at 48 Commerce Street.He shared it with a mouse,which he rarely saw but which certainly lived there,because it always helped itself to peanuts Jack kept in a copper bowl. The mouse would leave the empty peanut shells. About the only furniture besides the couch was a set of nested carved Chinese tables from the Jack's Shanghai visit on the MARBLEHEAD in 1927. One afternoon he telephoned to say he was feeling too poorly to go to school that night & wanted to meet me in front of my apartment, that evening at 5:30 so we could eat dinner in the Village & he could go to his hotel room to bed.So we met as arranged, & as we stood there discussing where to dine,Bill (Nuremberg) drove up in his big car & had a male guest in his front seat. Evidently Bill planned to take me to dinner,but when he saw me talking to Barrett,he stepped on the gas & took off fast, & after more than a year of dating I never saw Bill again.Jack had tried to be friendly. My father had called on Bill & liked him, but I considered him too old to be a good marriage for me. One time he gave me an excellent investment idea: he asked for a thousand dollars to buy me stock in General America Insurance Company & returned half, as it was fully subscribed. The name of the company was later changed to Safeco of Seattle.I held the stock, which in the l960's suddenly soared in value. My initial five hundred dollar investment was sold for over thirty-two thousand dollars in l972. (A l976 letter to Ivan McCormack says that Sophie's father opposed marriage of his daughters outside the Jewish faith.Sophie's sister Esther for many years had a very happy romance with a fellow accountant at Swift & Company Hartford. but "Pa" Meranski would never let him come to the house at Wooster Street. His opposition would not have prevented Esther's marriage, except for the fact that his elderly mother was highly dependent & possessive & feared any interference with her relation with her son.Her objection was not religious - she lived to a considerable age, & Esther had a long friendship with the son but never married.She lived with her brother Abe's family on Hawkins Street for many years & after World War II with the Geetters when they moved to 92 Fern St. & Babe had five young children to look after with a busy doctor husband(David l933) Albert l935 Thalia l938 Harold l940 Suzanne l942.) Pa Meranski often came to New York to buy merchandise for his grocery, & one time he was robbed of considerable cash after visiting his son Pete & wife Jen in Baltimore in l929 or l930.He often stopped to see me, I that time I had to lend him money to get home. Jack had sinus trouble & trouble with his tonsils & planned to enter the Navy Hospital in Brooklyn for surgery.To my amazement he gave me a copy of his will in which he bequeathed to me the proceeds of his ten thousand dollar government life insurance policy.It was unbelievable.But he had the surgery & I visited him in the hospital.One night he was very uncomfortable because he was propped up too high with two pillows - the extra pillow was placed there for supper, buit the nurse forgot to remove it later - but he had good results & relief of his sinus difficulties.One of Jack's professors was John F.X. Finn. The proximate cause doctrine in torts was a subject of active study, as the New York courts had severely restricted plaintiffs' rights. Judges Carzozo & Cuthbert Pound were influential. Ivan McCormack in later years sent us news of some of Jack's law school friends, especially Joe Brill, who once tried to date me, =in later years he was associated with Roy Cohn. Another classmate John Papp, helped us find an excellent apartment overlooking the Narrows in southwest Brooklyn in September l939.Late in l928 when I chaired a committee on standards for social workers in New York City for an American social workers' association, I got to know Harry Hopkins (Roosevelt friend), who took a great interest & did a lot of work.Ann Taylor McCormack my friend and landlady kept in touch with him for many years.She was with Travelers Aid later, Ivan eventually bought a pig farm in Salem, New York, near Arlington, Vermont, where John visited Anne & Ivan in June, l97l) Although I no longer dated Bill,I had other escorts & often came home to find that Barrett had preceded me & left a note inviting me to a late supper.I usually accepted,but then he complained bitterly I was using up his time & his grades were suffering.On Saturday nights we went to movies in the Village & once he took me to a long play on Broadway "Strange Interlude" but most nights he went to Fordham's law school campus school far up in the Bronx - the school declined to let him transfer his second year to their Manhattan campus-and he studied long hours as he seriously wanted to be a lawyer- probably a Navy lawyer in the Judge Advocate's office.Jack's work in New York was concerned with War Plans & the training of Reserves,& he often went off to nearby communities & to Washington,New Haven & even to Hartford, where he called on my father & my brother Abe & became acquainted with most members of my family..When in Washington DC he addressed a letter to me which he mailed with only my name & "27 Commerce." No city at all was on the envelope,but I received it in a few days. I accused him of drinking,but he said he had been interrupted when addressing the envelope & then failed to complete it.(He liked to quote the opening of Oliver Wendell Holmes "Autocrat of the Breakfast Table": "I was just going to say-when I was interrupted. At the Institute of Child Guidance my work was too simple and routine, although my salary in 1928-1929 was seventy-five a dollars a week. It was a small statistical office with only a director and another girl who planned to go on working after marriage., I was there only a few weeks when I received a telephone call from Mary Langhead, a social worker I had known in the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic,-who told me that she was working in Macy's and that there was an opening for me as Director of Personnel Research . I went at noon to see Mr. Walker, the Personnel director,- later Sales Manager at Macy's, and I was hired. I had two excellent assistants, Ms Willie Kennedy and Mildred Forman - also a labor turnover clerk who was most efficient. My primary concern was labor turnover - how to reduce it and keep the figure low. After Jack left for the orient, Willie Kennedy sublet his apartment, and I attended her 1930 marriage to Marshall Verniaux. Anne and Ivan kept in touch with them up to the 1970s. They also kept track of our friend Jimmy Jemail, who wrote the "Inquiring Reporter" column for the New York Post and became an editor there. Willie Kennedy visited me in Boston in 1932 when Macy's sent her to brief Filene's executive Lincoln Kirstein on the methods we had developed to improve employee motivation and reduce turnover. When Jack's orders came through in May l929 for duty on the destroyer Truxtun in the Philippines,he asked the Navy for a year's delay so that he could complete his law course,which he was taking at his own expense.But the Navy refused,& Jack was so upset he tried to get a civilian job with the Department of Labor & applied to Frances Perkins (a Mount Holyoke alumna later President Roosevelt's Secretary of Labor),but she had no opening for him at the time.With his full time job with the Reserves & his evening law course & his effort to compete with my "dates", the man was fully occupied & now knew he was scheduled for two-and-a-half to three years sea duty in the Orient.He went over to Philadelphia to see Marie Nelson one weekend. On Sunday June 9, l929 I went alone to Baltimore to attend the wedding of my youngest brother Pete,who had just been graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School.Pete & my youngest sister Babe's fiance Dr. Isadore Geetter had been classmates at Hartford Public High School l9l7-l92l, where Pete was active in debating, & at Trinity College l92l-25, where Pete was graduated l925,but for some reason his picture appeared in l926 yearbook. He was active many years in Trinity Maryland alumni. In l925 Pete visited Mount Holyoke college as senior prom escort for one of the Patterson sisters from Detroit,because her fiance was too far away to attend.(I had stayed at their parents' home summer l924 when I worked there for Children's Bureau U.S. Department of Labor.) On the train going up to Hartford for the wedding Sunday June l6 of my youngest sister "Babe" (Rebekah} to Dr.Isadore Geetter, who had just graduated from Jefferson Medical Schhol & was to study anesthesiology,we were greeted by Mary Woolley the l90l-l937 president of Mount Holyoke College, who was widely traveled as a speaker & one of the ten most admired women in the country according to polls. She had made an extended visit to China in l922 & later was appointed by President Herbert Hoover to a naval disarmament delegation of the United States at Geneva. Miss Woolley recognized & greeted me as I had been junior faculty l923-5 in the Statistics lab, Department of Economics & Sociology. Jack had met many of my Mount Holyoke friends during our ten months acquaintance, & he remarked to Miss Woolley, "These Mount Holyoke women are wonderful- you could put them all in a bag & pick any one, & you'd do all right."Miss Woolley replied,"That isn't a very INDIVIDUAL compliment for Sophie." Babe & Geetter had a wedding reception at "the Shack" (Snug Harbor)- a property near the FarmingtonRiver in Windsor, which my brothers Ben & Abe & their friend Julius Aronson then owned, & which the Geetters later kept in the family.Besides Jack & myself, the guests included the large Geetter family,of which Dr.Geetter was the eldest son, my brother Harry & his wife Sade (Taylor),and their son Arthur & daughter Pearl, my brother Abe & his wife Ethyle (Berenson) & their son Ted & their friend Julius Aronson,my sister Esther, my sister Bertha & her husband Samuel Pollack, a l920 Phi Beta Kappa Harvard alumnus in chemistry and their young son Jason & my newly-wed youngest brother Pete & his new wife Jen Goldberg of Baltimore,whose family had helped Pete greatly at University of Maryland in Baltimore..They were on their honeymoon. Jack was scheduled to leave New York for Chicago & San Francisco on Friday June 2l, so when he was at my sister's wedding, he invited my brother & his bride to have dinner with him at Longchamp's Restaurant on Fifth Avenue on Thursday evening June 20,as Pete & Jen had theatre reservations for that evening in New York City..We had a pleasant dionner,& when Pete & Jen left,Jack & I walked the few blocks to my apartment building when he said goodbye as he was leaving the next afternoon & still had a lot of packing "I'll be at your office at noon sharp to take you to lunch before I shove off at three."I had recently changed jobs & became Director of Personnel Research at Macy's stores at 34th Street.Jack came into my private office as my assistants were out to lunch that Friday noon..Without a word of warning he asked,"Will you marry me?" Unknown to me he had previously obtained a marriage license, listing his occupation as "seaman." He told me about the vicissitudes of the service for the wife of a Navy line officer, saying he liked the life at sea, but that frequent separations were hard on many wives and that he had seen the marriages of some very fine Navy line couples founder on the rocks, principally because the wife had to make so many adjustments.If she had a profession or a job, she couldn't readily follow him from station to station, and if she gave up her job, she had too much leisure. Also if she refused invitations to social events when he was at sea,the Navy wife suffered intolerable loneliness. He warned too that Naval officers pay was very moderate and that his expenses for white uniforms and for blue uniforms were prohibitive.. Even more important than any of these causes was the uncertainty of the line officer's promotion and his ultimate retired pay.But he did say a Navy wife could have a lot of fun and adventure if she had the right attitude and zest for adventure.Though he candidly discussed many frustrations and problems in the lives of Navy wives,he convinced me to marry him,& I made no reply except to suggest that we go to lunch.We went to the Hotel McAlpin. Suddenly he got up,paid the waiter,took me by the hand. It was 1:30 in the afternoon, and he was to leave for Chicago by train at three p.m. to make connections already reserved for San Francisco, where he had to sail on the NITRO for Manila on June 25. We rushed off into the subway for New York City Hall, where we were married about two o'clock, with two strange passersby as witnesses. Then Jack rushed for the subway for the railroad station, arriving at 2:45. He had to get his suitcase and spent a few moments telephoning his brother at the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in New York. He told Bill that he was leaving for China but did not say he was married. As he emerged from the booth, the porter was yelling "Last call for the three o'clock train for Chicago". Jack grabbed his bag and rushed off.He left without a kiss or even a handshake. I returned to Macy's secretly Mrs. John B.Barrett. I did not see him again for for nearly seventeen months,until November l3,l930 at Chingwantao in desolate North China, near Manchuria,(& when I finally arrived there, he told me that his ship would sail again at crack of dawn the next day for several weeks of fleet maneuvers.)Dazed after Jack left New York.I took a walk around and then returned to my office, where I said no word about my marriage until I resigned in August,l930.But my younger sister Babe read in the Hartford paper that I had married a seaman named Barrett,&they sent best wishes.Romantic-no! But after we really joined forces,life was one long romantic adventure,I would do it again if given the choice. So my sister in Hartford knew I was married,but very few of my friends in New York knew of the marriage except Anne and Ivan and Mr.Lyons. People asked me for dates - I declined to date Jack's law school classmate Joe Brill,- but a youing dentist persuaded me to have Thanksgiving dinner 1929 at his mother's home. The lady took a liking to me and tried to promote a romance, so I cut back on accepting social invitations. In my work at Macys, I had considerable contact with Jesse Straus & one of his brothers,who together managed the store at that time. They advised & assisted New York governor Franklin Roosevelt on many projects.Their parents Mr. & Mrs. Isador Straus were victims of the sinking of the TITANIC in l9l2 when Mrs. Straus would not go in a lifeboat without her husband, & he refused to take a seat from young women & children.A sister of my Mount Holyoke l922 friend Harriet Cogswell was working at Macy"s & corresponded with Harriet who was teaching at Gin=Ling missionary college Nanking & later married consular diplomat Paul Meyer.Jack Barrett later met Harriet & her fiance when the destroyer TRUXTUN was at Nanking on Yangtze River patrol in February-March l930,. & the TRUXTUN officers were guests at the American embassy.One of Harriet's students Dr. S.Y. Hu later did Ph.d work at Radcliffe on hollies & became Harvard's herbarium curator of Chinese plants for many years & wrote widely on Hong Kong flora,daylilies, & Chinese food plants & the rediscovered Metasequoia glyptostroboides. Harriet's sister in l980's gave Mount Holyoke College twelve boxes of historically interesting photos of Chinese live in l920's & l930's. mainly around Nanking & Peking.In May l930 the New York Times published an extended article on the personnel policies of Macy's stores. The main objective was to increase efficiency by reducing employee turnover.The report quoted psychologist Dr. V.V.Thompson on the effort to match the employee talents to the job & not "put a round peg in a square hole."


 

1203.
Sails of ITASCA Revenue Cutter School training ship 1909

 

#1203 p 69 Sails added about two knots to speed of Revenue Cutter training ship ITASCA and afforded opportunities for cadets to learn ancient skills of sailing as well as modern power. QUIX I - 31 DON QUIXOTE VOLUME ONE CHAPTER 31 ANDRES RETURNS -Sancho gives him food CHAPTER XXXI OF THE DELECTABLE DISCUSSION BETWEEN DON QUIXOTE AND SANCHO PANZA,HIS SQUIRE, TOGETHER WITH OTHER INCIDENTS "ALL that is not unsatisfactory to me," said Don Quixote. "Go on;thou didst reach her; and what was that queen of beauty doing?Surely thou didst find her stringing pearls, or embroidering some device in gold thread for this her enslaved knight." "I did not," said Sancho, "but I found her winnowing two bushels of wheat in the yard of her house." "Then depend upon it," said Don Quixote, "the grains of that wheat were pearls when touched by her hands; and didst thou look, friend? was it white wheat or brown?" "It was neither, but red," said Sancho. "Then I promise thee," said Don Quixote, "that, winnowed by her hands, beyond a doubt the bread it made was of the whitest; but go on;when thou gavest her my letter, did she kiss it? Did she place it on her head? Did she perform any ceremony befitting it, or what did she do?" "When I went to give it to her," replied Sancho, "she was hard at it swaying from side to side with a lot of wheat she had in the sieve,and she said to me, 'Lay the letter, friend, on the top of that sack, for I cannot read it until I have done sifting all this." "Discreet lady!" said Don Quixote; "that was in order to read it at her leisure and enjoy it; proceed, Sancho; while she was engaged in her occupation what converse did she hold with thee? What did she ask about me, and what answer didst thou give? Make haste; tell me all, and let not an atom be left behind in the ink-bottle." "She asked me nothing," said Sancho; "but I told her how your worship was left doing penance in her service, naked from the waist up, in among these mountains like a savage, sleeping on the ground, not eating bread off a tablecloth nor combing your beard, weeping and cursing your fortune." "In saying I cursed my fortune thou saidst wrong," said Don Quixote;"for rather do I bless it and shall bless it all the days of my life for having made me worthy of aspiring to love so lofty a lady as Dulcinea del Toboso." "And so lofty she is," said Sancho, "that she overtops me by more than a hand's-breadth." "What! Sancho," said Don Quixote, "didst thou measure with her?" "I measured in this way," said Sancho; "going to help her to put a sack of wheat on the back of an ass, we came so close together that I could see she stood more than a good palm over me." "Well!" said Don Quixote, "and doth she not of a truth accompany and adorn this greatness with a thousand million charms of mind! But one thing thou wilt not deny, Sancho; when thou camest close to her didst thou not perceive a Sabaean odour, an aromatic fragrance, a, I know not what, delicious, that I cannot find a name for; I mean a redolence, an exhalation, as if thou wert in the shop of some dainty glover?" "All I can say is," said Sancho, "that I did perceive a little odour, something goaty; it must have been that she was all in a sweat with hard work." "It could not be that," said Don Quixote, "but thou must have been suffering from cold in the head, or must have smelt thyself; for I know well what would be the scent of that rose among thorns, that lily of the field, that dissolved amber." "Maybe so," replied Sancho; "there often comes from myself that same odour which then seemed to me to come from her grace the lady Dulcinea; but that's no wonder, for one devil is like another." "Well then," continued Don Quixote, "now she has done sifting the corn and sent it to the mill; what did she do when she read the letter?" "As for the letter," said Sancho, "she did not read it, for she said she could neither read nor write; instead of that she tore it up into small pieces, saying that she did not want to let anyone read it lest her secrets should become known in the village, and that what I had told her by word of mouth about the love your worship bore her, and the extraordinary penance you were doing for her sake, was enough; and, to make an end of it, she told me to tell your worship that she kissed your hands, and that she had a greater desire to see you than to write to you; and that therefore she entreated and commanded you, on sight of this present, to come out of these thickets, and to have done with carrying on absurdities,and to set out at once for El Toboso, unless something else of greater importance should happen, for she had a great desire to see your worship. She laughed greatly when I told her how your worship was called The Knight of the Rueful Countenance; I asked her if that Biscayan the other day had been there; and she told me he had, and that he was an honest fellow; I asked her too about the galley slaves,but she said she had not seen any as yet." "So far all goes well," said Don Quixote; "but tell me what jewel was it that she gave thee on taking thy leave, in return for thy tidings of me? For it is a usual and ancient custom with knights and ladies errant to give the squires, damsels, or dwarfs who bring tidings of their ladies to the knights, or of their knights to the ladies, some rich jewel as a guerdon for good news,' and acknowledgment of the message." "That is very likely," said Sancho, "and a good custom it was, to my mind; but that must have been in days gone by, for now it would seem to be the custom only to give a piece of bread and cheese; because that was what my lady Dulcinea gave me over the top of the yard-wallwhen I took leave of her; and more by token it was sheep's-milk cheese." "She is generous in the extreme," said Don Quixote, "and if she did not give thee a jewel of gold, no doubt it must have been because she had not one to hand there to give thee; but sleeves are good after Easter; I shall see her and all shall be made right. But knowest thou what amazes me, Sancho? It seems to me thou must have gone and come through the air, for thou hast taken but little more than three days to go to El Toboso and return, though it is more than thirty leagues from here to there. From which I am inclined to think that the sage magician who is my friend, and watches over my interests (for of necessity there is and must be one, or else I should not be a right knight-errant), that this same, I say, must have helped thee to travel without thy knowledge; for some of these sages will catch up a knight-errant sleeping in his bed, and without his knowing how or in what way it happened, he wakes up the next day more than a thousand leagues away from the place where he went to sleep. And if it were not for this, knights-errant would not be able to give aid to one another in peril, as they do at every turn. For a knight, maybe, is fighting in the mountains of Armenia with some dragon, or fierce serpent, or another knight, and gets the worst of the battle, and is at the point of death; but when he least looks for it, there appears over against him on a cloud, or chariot of fire,another knight, a friend of his, who just before had been in England, and who takes his part, and delivers him from death; and at night he finds himself in his own quarters supping very much to his satisfaction; and yet from one place to the other will have been two or three thousand leagues. And all this is done by the craft and skill of the sage enchanters who take care of those valiant knights; so that, friend Sancho, I find no difficulty in believing that thou mayest have gone from this place to El Toboso and returned in such a short time, since, as I have said, some friendly sage must have carried thee through the air without thee perceiving it." "That must have been it," said Sancho, "for indeed Rocinante went like a gipsy's ass with quicksilver in his ears." "Quicksilver!" said Don Quixote, "aye and what is more, a legion of devils, folk that can travel and make others travel without being weary, exactly as the whim seizes them. But putting this aside, what thinkest thou I ought to do about my lady's command to go and see her? For though I feel that I am bound to obey her mandate, I feel too that I am debarred by the boon I have accorded to the princess that accompanies us, and the law of chivalry compels me to have regard for my word in preference to my inclination; on the one hand the desire to see my lady pursues and harasses me, on the other my solemn promise and the glory I shall win in this enterprise urge and call me; but what I think I shall do is to travel with all speed and reach quickly the place where this giant is, and on my arrival I shall cut off his head, and establish the princess peacefully in her realm, and forthwith I shall return to behold the light that lightens my senses, to whom I shall make such excuses that she will be led to approve of my delay, for she will see that it entirely tends to increase her glory and fame; for all that I have won, am winning, or shall win by arms in this life, comes to me of the favour she extends to me, and because I am hers." "Ah! what a sad state your worship's brains are in!" said Sancho."Tell me, senor, do you mean to travel all that way for nothing, and to let slip and lose so rich and great a match as this where they give as a portion a kingdom that in sober truth I have heard say is more than twenty thousand leagues round about, and abounds with all things necessary to support human life, and is bigger than Portugal and Castile put together? Peace, for the love of God! Blush for what you have said, and take my advice, and forgive me, and marry at once in the first village where there is a curate; if not, here is our licentiate who will do the business beautifully; remember, I am old enough to give advice, and this I am giving comes pat to the purpose; for a sparrow in the hand is better than a vulture on the wing, and he who has the good to his hand and chooses the bad, that the good he complains of may not come to him." "Look here, Sancho," said Don Quixote. "If thou art advising me to marry, in order that immediately on slaying the giant I may become king, and be able to confer favours on thee, and give thee what I have promised, let me tell thee I shall be able very easily to satisfy thy desires without marrying; for before going into battle I will make it a stipulation that, if I come out of it victorious, even I do not marry, they shall give me a portion portion of the kingdom, that I may bestow it upon whomsoever I choose, and when they give it to me upon whom wouldst thou have me bestow it but upon thee?" "That is plain speaking," said Sancho; "but let your worship take care to choose it on the seacoast, so that if I don't like the life, I may be able to ship off my black vassals and deal with them as I have said; don't mind going to see my lady Dulcinea now, but go and kill this giant and let us finish off this business; for by God it strikes me it will be one of great honour and great profit." "I hold thou art in the right of it, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "and I will take thy advice as to accompanying the princess before going to see Dulcinea; but I counsel thee not to say anything to any one, or to those who are with us, about what we have considered and discussed,for as Dulcinea is so decorous that she does not wish her thoughts to be known it is not right that I or anyone for me should disclose them." "Well then, if that be so," said Sancho, "how is it that your worship makes all those you overcome by your arm go to present themselves before my lady Dulcinea, this being the same thing as signing your name to it that you love her and are her lover? And as those who go must perforce kneel before her and say they come from your worship to submit themselves to her, how can the thoughts of both of you be hid?" "O, how silly and simple thou art!" said Don Quixote; "seest thou not, Sancho, that this tends to her greater exaltation? For thou must know that according to our way of thinking in chivalry, it is a high honour to a lady to have many knights-errant in her service,whose thoughts never go beyond serving her for her own sake, and who look for no other reward for their great and true devotion than that she should be willing to accept them as her knights." "It is with that kind of love," said Sancho, "I have heard preachers say we ought to love our Lord, for himself alone, without being moved by the hope of glory or the fear of punishment; though for my part, I would rather love and serve him for what he could do." "The devil take thee for a clown!" said Don Quixote, "and what shrewd things thou sayest at times! One would think thou hadst studied." "In faith, then, I cannot even read." Master Nicholas here called out to them to wait a while, as they wanted to halt and drink at a little spring there was there. Don Quixote drew up, not a little to the satisfaction of Sancho, for he was by this time weary of telling so many lies, and in dread of his master catching him tripping, for though he knew that Dulcinea was a peasant girl of El Toboso, he had never seen her in all his life.Cardenio had now put on the clothes which Dorothea was wearing when they found her, and though they were not very good, they were far better than those he put off. They dismounted together by the side of the spring, and with what the curate had provided himself with at the inn they appeased, though not very well, the keen appetite they all of them brought with them. While they were so employed there happened to come by a youth passing on his way, who stopping to examine the party at the spring,the next moment ran to Don Quixote and clasping him round the legs,began to weep freely, saying, "O, senor, do you not know me? Look at me well; I am that lad Andres that your worship released from the oak-tree where I was tied." Don Quixote recognised him, and taking his hand he turned to those present and said: "That your worships may see how important it is to have knights-errant to redress the wrongs and injuries done by tyrannical and wicked men in this world, I may tell you that some days ago passing through a wood, I heard cries and piteous complaints as of a person in pain and distress; I immediately hastened, impelled by my bounden duty, to the quarter whence the plaintive accents seemed to me to proceed, and I found tied to an oak this lad who now stands before you, which in my heart I rejoice at, for his testimony will not permit me to depart from the truth in any particular. He was, I say,tied to an oak, naked from the waist up, and a clown, whom I afterwards found to be his master, was scarifying him by lashes with the reins of his mare. As soon as I saw him I asked the reason of so cruel a flagellation. The boor replied that he was flogging him because he was his servant and because of carelessness that proceeded rather from dishonesty than stupidity; on which this boy said, 'Senor, he flogs me only because I ask for my wages.' The master made I know not what speeches and explanations, which, though I listened to them, I did not accept. In short, I compelled the clown to unbind him, and to swear he would take him with him, and pay him real by real, and perfumed into the bargain. Is not all this true,Andres my son? Didst thou not mark with what authority I commanded him, and with what humility he promised to do all I enjoined, specified, and required of him? Answer without hesitation; tell these gentlemen what took place, that they may see that it is as great an advantage as I say to have knights-errant abroad." "All that your worship has said is quite true," answered the lad;"but the end of the business turned out just the opposite of what your worship supposes." "How! the opposite?" said Don Quixote; "did not the clown pay thee then?" "Not only did he not pay me," replied the lad, "but as soon as your worship had passed out of the wood and we were alone, he tied me up again to the same oak and gave me a fresh flogging, that left me like a flayed Saint Bartholomew; and every stroke he gave me he followed up with some jest or gibe about having made a fool of your worship, and but for the pain I was suffering I should have laughed at the things he said. In short he left me in such a condition that I have been until now in a hospital getting cured of the injuries which that rascally clown inflicted on me then; for all which your worship is to blame; for if you had gone your own way and not come where there was no call for you, nor meddled in other people's affairs, my master would have been content with giving me one or two dozen lashes, and would have then loosed me and paid me what he owed me; but when your worship abused him so out of measure, and gave him so many hard words, his anger was kindled; and as he could not revenge himself on you, as soon as he saw you had left him the storm burst upon me in such a way, that I feel as if I should never be a man again." "The mischief," said Don Quixote, "lay in my going away; for I should not have gone until I had seen thee paid; because I ought to have known well by long experience that there is no clown who will keep his word if he finds it will not suit him to keep it; but thou rememberest, Andres, that I swore if he did not pay thee I would go and seek him, and find him though he were to hide himself in the whale's belly." "That is true," said Andres; "but it was of no use." "Thou shalt see now whether it is of use or not," said Don Quixote; and so saying, he got up hastily and bade Sancho bridle Rocinante, who was browsing while they were eating. Dorothea asked him what he meant to do. He replied that he meant to go in search of this clown and chastise him for such iniquitous conduct, and see Andres paid to the last maravedi, despite and in the teeth of all the clowns in the world. To which she replied that he must remember that in accordance with his promise he could not engage in any enterprise until he had concluded hers; and that as he knew this better than anyone, he should restrain his ardour until his return from her kingdom. "That is true," said Don Quixote, "and Andres must have patience until my return as you say, senora; but I once more swear and promise not to stop until I have seen him avenged and paid." "I have no faith in those oaths," said Andres; "I would rather have now something to help me to get to Seville than all the revenges in the world; if you have here anything to eat that I can take with me, give it me, and God be with your worship and all knights-errant; and may their errands turn out as well for themselves as they have for me." Sancho took out from his store a piece of bread and another of cheese, and giving them to the lad he said, "Here, take this,brother Andres, for we have all of us a share in your misfortune." "Why, what share have you got?" "This share of bread and cheese I am giving you," answered Sancho;"and God knows whether I shall feel the want of it myself or not;for I would have you know, friend, that we squires to knights-errant have to bear a great deal of hunger and hard fortune, and even other things more easily felt than told." Andres seized his bread and cheese, and seeing that nobody gave him anything more, bent his head, and took hold of the road, as the saying is. However, before leaving he said, "For the love of God,sir knight-errant, if you ever meet me again, though you may see them cutting me to pieces, give me no aid or succour, but leave me to my misfortune, which will not be so great but that a greater will come to me by being helped by your worship, on whom and all the knights-errant that have ever been born God send his curse." Don Quixote was getting up to chastise him, but he took to his heels at such a pace that no one attempted to follow him; and mightily chapfallen was Don Quixote at Andres' story, and the others had to take great care to restrain their laughter so as not to put him entirely out of countenance.


 

1204.
ITASCA cadets with monkey from Gibraltar

 

#1204 p 69 Revenue Cutter School


 

1205.
Revenue Cutter School cadets in rowboat Lisbon Portugal June 1909

 

#1205 p 69


 

 

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