Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 


Overseas Transportation Office after Midway 1942p 77 #1267 continues Brooklyn-H_A-W-A-I-I 1940s black notebook

 

[They lived to ages ninety-five and one hundred two-and-a-half]] Jack drove us home around three o'clock and returned to the docks as three transports were leaving that day December 25 -26 with wounded and other high priority departing personnel. They were escorted by the cruiser ST. LOUIS and four destroyers. Movements were top secret, and his office had to notify departing personnel and dependents [families], who were not to tell their friends when they were leaving but stand by and be ready to go on twenty-four-hour notice. His assistants Wilfred Pang and Violet Ho and others handled many of the secret identifying phone calls. Dr. Paul Withington, Chaplains Thornton Miller, William Maguire, and Walter Mahler,. and Port Director Martin Derx worked closely with Jack and became good friends. This was probably the most important duty of Jack's career, as he had contact with thousands of persons. There was also considerable liaison with Honolulu shipping interests- a prominent businessman Frank Midkiff worked closely with Jack. Midkiff was in charge of civilian evacuation. He had lunch with Jack's brother Bill at the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in Manhattan during a 1942 trip. Future Hawaiian Governer and Mrs. Samuel Wilder King, and Riley Allen, editor of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, became Jack's friends and appreciated the personal attention he gave many of their suggestions and requests. Jack worked under the Fourteenth Naval district Personnel Officer, Captain Lewis, who was a kamaaina permanent resident of Honolulu., who had been recalled from retirement. Soon after the attack I was troubled by pain in my gums, so one morning Jack took John and me to Pearl Harbor with him. This was the only occasion I myself saw the damaged ships at Pearl Harbor and Ford Island.I must confess that I was heartsick, but I tried to hide my sorrow and fear from John. I also hoped the Japanese would not pick that moment to return to bomb the shore installations and the oil tanks. We had to stay at Pearl Harbor all day because Jack was busy, and gasoline was rationed- we sat quietly on chairs at the back of his very active office, and he took us to the Officers Club for lunch. I was the only woman there, and John was the only child in the restaurant. The Navy dentist Dr. Grunwald advised me to see a Japanese Honolulu dentist Dr. Allen Ito on Nuuanu Avenue downtown. So John and I learned to use the buses and went to see Dr. Ito, who was our friend and dentist throughout our six years in the Islands. One of the first native Hawaiian social workers was Clorinda Low Lucas, whose father was a famous cow handler on the Parker cattle ranch near Mauna Kea. She gave Jack and the Transportation office advice on special needs of local people for evaucation., and we became acquainted when Jack told her of my previous experiene in social work. She also was involved in education and trusts administering native Hawaiian lands.Soon after the war started,the order came out for all Navy dependents to be evacuated. An exception then was made for those who declared Hawaii their permanent legal domicile and gave up any right of government transportation, so we made this declaration about June 1942. when more than ninety per cent of families had already been evacuated. In January 1942 Our family did not want to be separated, and our only home on the mainland would have been with Jack's eighty-seven-year old father.I received a letter from our old friend Mary Boyd, whose husband had served on the HANNIBAL 1933-1934. She mentioned her friend Madeleine Wagner, a Navy wife, and inquired if I knew anything about their safety. I called up Madeleine Wagner in Waikiki, and she was very glad to hear from me, as a friend of a good friend. She became very friendly with John, and before leaving gave him a favorite book,- Edward Huey's "A Child's Story of the Animal World", full of tales of the New Zealand sphenodon and other unusual animals such as hyraxes and poetry explaining how to tell antelopes from canteloups. At first Madeleine wanted to stay in the Islands and asked Jack to defer her evacuation. Then when her husband Dan Wagner got new orders, she requested evacuation and left. The great majority.. of military dependents were eager to leave Hawaii as soon as possible. A minority had special reasons for wanting to stay in the Islands - usually permanent residents.We fell in the latter category,having no place to go on the mainland unless we tried to move in with Jack's sister and eighty-seven-year old father. We were dismayed by the order for all military dependents to leave the Islands. From our point of view it was fortunate that dependent evacuation was a relatively low priority matter, and the scarce shipping was needed for wounded, special hardship cases, and military personnel reassigned to other stations. Even so, over ninety per cent of the military dependents in Hawaii on December 7, l941 had left through Jack's office within six months. Jack tried to stay out of sight of Admiral Bloch, and John and I stayed away from Pearl Harbor and hoped no high-ranking officer would "get after" Jack and force him to hurry up and send us off. One of the Admirals did inquire after us several times to Jack's discomfort. After the Battle of Midway [June 4, 1942] the orders concerning dependents were liberalized, and those families who chose to be considered permanent residents were permitted to file declarations that they did not want transportation. Therefore our family was able to stay together during six years in the Islands. We missed the rigor of mainland food rationing although certain items were scarce such as the common mainland fresh fruits and vegetables. Foods we used included Campbell's chicken soup, Bird's Eye fresh frozen broccoli, peas, and corn, mangoes, weekly roastbeef, baking potatoes from the Navy Commissary, fresh oranges when available, and ground Chase and Sanborn coffee. We switched from percolator to Silex in 1942. After the Battle of Midway insiders in the military were considerably more optimistic about the Pacific War, and the threat of invasion of Hawaii or strikes against the California coast receded.Guadalcanal and other hard fights were ahead, but Hawaii began to be a little further from the front line. An enormous volume of personnel and materiel funneled through the Hawaiian Islands and Jack's volume of outgoing Navy personnel grew steadily, and ship movements to the front were still highly secret as to time of departure.Interior Secretary Harold Ickes fumed about the lack of transportation to and from Hawaii for permanent residents, but in general such requests were ignored even when VIPs were involved.Jack had on his desk typed "crying tickets" three by five inch cards, "That slow dripping noise is my heart bleeding for you.Your troubles are unique .I have never heard anything like them. This ticket entitles you to one good cry on the shoulder of the nearest Chaplain." These cards maintained the morale of the office staff, who sometimes had to deal with very irate complaints. There was a minority of high ranking officers who complained of shipboard facilities that were inferior to those they had been accustomed to in peacetime. When possible Jack sometimes tried to give these officers a choice of two or three ships that might be available. In one case he apologized to a Captain who had a rather unsatisfactory passage on an Army transport, and said he would keep Navy officers on Navy ships in the future. On the other hand there was a very large volume of appreciative mail from persons who felt their needs had been handled in an imaginative and intelligent manner. The General Electric Corporation was really appreciative of the treatment accorded a party of their essential workers who came to Pearl Harbor with Charles E. Wilson. Their return was a real priority matter in the national interest and was handled smoothly. ==The survivors of the PRINCETON- a ship with many wounded with combat experience were evacuated as a group to the mainland in very short order and exressed their appreciation naming Commander John Barrett and Lieutenant Commander Martin Williams very specially. Jack had to be firm in expediting ship departures and overruling bureaucrats who tried to delay personnel while they checked currency and tariff and health regulations. These persons were not permitted to delay movement of personnel while performing their subordinate functions though they sometimes tried. Hawaiian currency was usedd in the Islands during the war with letters "HAWAII" printed on each dollar bill.There was a policy of requiring that these bills not be taken to the mainland. However, Jack refused to allow any unnecessary delay in personnel movements.


 


T-R-I-N-I-T-Y red cap p 77 + 35T from p 56W- #1268

 

train for San Diego where we were met by Lieutenant and Mrs. Clarence E. and Mary Boyd who took us to their home on D Avenue in Coronado. Mary Boyd's sister Margery Mrs. James Haley lived right across the street. We enjoyed the swimming pool on North Island where we spent Labor Day. We soon found a furnished apartment at the Betsy Ross at 756 D Avenue and spent a great deal of time in a small park right on D Avenue. within easy walking distance of the Betsy Ross. Soon after our arrival Jack's brother William Joseph Barrett- who had flown to the West Coast on business for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York, came to see us late on Saturday night and stayed till Sunday noon. He swam in the pool with us and the Boyds on Sunday morning. He toldme he expected to be married in October to Miss Virginia Brady of the Bronx. They went to Europe for their honeymoon, sent French books to John and a mechanical rocking horse for Christmas. Jack was out in the Pacific and Orinet most of the time on the tanker TRINITY. Our next door neighbor supplied a small Christmas tree and the decorations. Mrs. Wardrop, mother of the wife of Captain Frederick Holmes, was most generous in giving toys to John. hen the TRINITY was in port, Jack drove us around Coronado and east along the Mexican border,where we had to stop and wait for herds of cattle on the road.------- While at the ranch Jack shipped his car to Boston,, so the Pardees drove us the approximately ninety miles to our transcontinental train in Los Angeles. We ate our lunch leisurely in the station restaurant- almost missed our train but got aboard after Jack, John and I ran behind the red cap and got aboard the last car just as the train started to move. The red cap dropped the baggage, jumped off the train in motion. Later in New York we contacted that red cap and sent his tip by mail. -258- Below PASTE #35T est, Brittany end page 40 tankerTRINITY,Fred Holmes,Rickover, nipa shack #1096 p 56 Edit #35T TRINITY In the Spring of l938 Jack was named Executive Officer of the tanker TRINITY, which was being recommissioned at Philadelphia Navy Yard. Jack received a letter of commendation from Commandant Fourth Naval District for "high spirit of cooperation which has greatly facilitated and expedited the execution of the work by the Yard. The work done by the ship's force materially reduced the cost of reconditioning and has been expeditiously and eficiently performed." (Fitness report USS TRINITY June 21, l938 to September 30, l938) (p. 515 letters and papers) Shortly before she was ready to go to sea, her home port was changed to San Diego, and Jack began planning to move me and John. Jack wrote to our friends Claraence and Mary Boyd in Coronado, who offered to house John and me until we found other living arrangements.He aslo asked Sue and Frank Delahanty to meet our train in Los Angeles,where we were scheduled to change for a noon train to San Diego.Sue wrote that Frank would not be available, but she and a woman friend would take care of John and me as we changed trains.Very late in August the packer arrived, and Jack's father "Pa" Barrett came over from New York, where he was visiting his other son, Bill. As the packers pushed a big bookcase away from the dining room wall, Pa Barrett found Jack's Revenue Cutter School Cadet ring,which had been missing for a long time.Both Pa Barrett and Jack were delighted to recover the ring. After lunch Pa Barrett returned to NewYork city.Our faithful Irish maid Nellie Kelly got into the taxi with us along with the radio we gave her and her bag. She went on to her new job with a Marine family at the Philadelphia Navy Yard after Jack, John and i went into the railroad station to board the train for Chicago.In Chicago Jack took us to the zoo, then put us on a special fare train for Los Angeles as he bought space after carefully investigating the milk and food situation for a boy two yearts and four months of age.Then to john's distress, Jack left us for his trip back to Philadelphia where he tookleave to drive to New York city, visit with his brother and father and then drive his father home to boston, before he returned to live aboard the TRINITY.scheduled to sail shortly with his friend"Freddie " Holmes then commander USN as Captain. I took john to the dining car which was far from our car, but I could find very little on the menu he could eat, and the train had no milk. It was an extra fare very fast train that catrered to business men- not families and certainly not to a young child.John became sick for the rest of the journey. Sue Delahanty held John's hand in the railroad station in Los Angeles while I sat on a stool in the station lunch room to try to get a little food before Sue put us on the train for San Diego.The Boyds met us in San Diego for the ferry trip to Coronado. Mary Boyd immediately called a doctor for John. With good milk and food fit for a child John soon recoevered but sadly missed Jack, who always made up wonderful bedtime stories in Philadelphia.The Boyds had a daughter Peggy about four years old and were most hospitable. They also had a lovely wire=haired terrier " Mischief."With Clarence Boyd's help we found annexpensive but nice furnished apartment at the Betsy Ross- not an easy accomplishment as much of the Fleet was then concentrated in SanDiego,and landlords charged navy families all that the traffic would bear. When my furniture arived, I had it put in storage until Jack could find a suitable apartment or house for us. As it turned out the furniture remained in storage as we were very comfortable in the Betsy Ross, and Jack was ordered to shore duty in New York City less than ten mmonths after we arrived in Coronado. There were many hummingbirds around the Betsy Ross apartments.The storyof the TRINITY wghile Jack was aboard can best be seen through the letters to us written by the ship's Navigator, Haskell C. Todd, who was a Navy Captain living in Belfast, Maine, when he wrote three letters to us:""3 December l969 Dear Mr. Barrett Your letter regarding your father and the days of the TRINITY was received Saturday. I havevery little datta on the TRINITY except my memory and a chart on which I laid out all the trips the TRINITY made, ports visited, etc. I will dig that out in the next few days and with that data as a base I will try to give you a resume of the first two voyages to the Orient and also our trip from Philadelphia to an Diego after commissioning." (These are the periods Jack was aboard). On 13 January 1970 captain Todd wrote"...to #35...then come back here for part #35P- #35P Trinity, Pardees, Redcap #35 T TRINITY l938-9": at p 284-5: And on the 13th January l970 Captain Todd wrote: Dear Mr. Barrett: IN regard to the duties of the USS TRINITY she was under the direction of the Naval Transportation Service. There was an NTS Director in each Naval District Headquarters and they handled the routing, cargoes and passengers of Naval transports, cargo, and bulk tankers, such as the USS HENDERSON VEGA, and TRINITY.We were not a fleet tanker- fueling combat ships in port or at sea- such as the KANAWHA in thge Pacific Fleet and the PECOS with the Asiatic Fleet based at Manila.We delivered our cargo into shore tanks at so-called Naval Fueling Stations.On arriving at Manila after discharging a comparatively small amount at guam,we would go to Pier I, discharge about twenty thousand barrels,and Navy shore tanks there and then proceed across Manila Bay to the Naval Fuel Depot and Sangley Point, Cavite, adjacent to the Cavite Navy Yard and discharge the rest of the cargo.The reason fo Manila on each trip. As to handling of the USS TRINITY she was a comparatively low-powered single screw vessel with very little backing power. When fully loaded her cargo of of Saticoy, Ventura county California tellling them we were in Coronado. Immediately they sent us an invitation to visit, as we had been close friends on the President PIERCE from Kobe, Japan to Naples, Italy, and had seen them again in Rome and in Venice. But at first I refused to impose upon them with a three year old boy. They persisted, and when Jack was ordered to New Yor City in the summer of l939, we gave up the apartment at the Betsy Ross and went to their lemon ranch at Saticoy, which is not far from Los Angeles - about ninety miles northwest. I was amazed to see the really doern, expensive. beautifully furnished 287 ranch house in the extensive lemon, orange and walnut ranch even though I surmised the Pardees were wealthy as they had taken the luxury Cook's tour of the world in 1932 in the effort to overcome Mr. Pardee's circulatory difficulties.The first evening we were there they cook luscious steaks outdoors on the large patio porch and served vegetables picked fresh from the garden. But as I recall that was the only meal we had there except breakfast, for the rest of our considerable visit. They drove us out to reswtaurants and hotels in alll the small well-known towns surrounding Saticoy where everyone seemed to know Lizzie and Harry Pardee.Mr. Pardee took Jack to see the lemon processing plant while I sttayed home with John.He got pretty dirty on the dusty ground of the ranch, and I tried to keep him clean by doing his washing in the bowl in my private bathroom. This took a lot of water,and of course I tried to do some of my own washing and Jack's too, as we were going to duty in New York City, where we then had no home and might have to stay in a hotel where personal laundry would be a probelm. But Mrs. Pardee asked me to do no washing and bathe John as infrequently as possible because water on the ranch was in very short supply, and their tank water at that moment was dangerously low.So amidst all the luxury of meals and surroundings, I had the awful problem of the accumulation of soiled clothes, as I could not take John to lunch and dinner in swank restaurants in other than immaculate clothes.It was very difficult for me, and I now understood why we ate out so often- it saved water for cooking and washing dishes and for table linen and napkins. I never saw Mrs. Pardee do any laundry and never saw clothes on the line. Perhaps it was done at the home of their tenant farmer since his wife did the cleaning at the ranch. Maybe she knew how to get clothes clean by using soapsand bleaches but very little water.I mustt admit I did not envy the Pardees their lovely house as I would not want to live where I couldn't wash and bathe as frequently as I wanted to. When we finally left I had quite a bundle of soiled clothes and very few fresh ones.Since we had cross-country reservations from Los Angeles, we had to remain on the ranch until our planned day of departure.As Jack shipped his car ahead, the Pardees drove us to Los angeles to make our train to BostonMasachusetts at one o'clock.About noon they left us at the railroad station to avoid hunting for a parking place, and we went to the station restaurant where the service was maddeningly slow.In spite of leaving our dessert untouched, we had to run full speed to make the train, and the poor red cap had to jump off the moving train without waiting for the tip Jack was trying to get out of his pocket. I waw very worried lest we miss that train and have to stay at a hotel until we could get new reservations as we had found the Betsy Ross in Coronado very expensive, had always had a full time maid there and also had to pay to store our furniture.But wwe made our way to our compartment while the train was under way. Eventually I found the name and address of the Red Cap throught the Station Master at Los Angeles and sent a thank=you note as well as a generous tip. I sent Mrs. Pardee a piece of gold and red silk chinese embroidery and a most sincere thank-you letter. In July l941 Mr and Mrs. Pardee came to Los Angeles to see us off for Honolulu when we boarded the Matson line LURLINE .We had a three week visit in South boston with Jack's eighty-four year old father and his sister Mollie in very hot August weather. Finally Jack rented an apartment at 9615 Shore Road in Brooklyn apartment 2A on sec ond floor In April 1971 William J. Pugliese of California who was a petty officer on the TRINITY wrote:" Dear Mrs. Barrett, The USS TRINITY was put in commission in Philadelphia on June 30, l938. Fred Holmes was her Captain. I was chief machinist mate, helped put her in commission. I left the ship at Fremantle, Western Austalia on March 1, l943. After the ship was commission we went to Houston, Texas, from there to Guantanamo Bay Cuba then on to the West Cost to San Diego. I remember the run we made to Dutch Harbor to bring supplies to the radio station there. Wer oadg to Manila, Cavite and didg to Tandjong Oeban,Netherlands East Indies. and toSb for more oil. Incidentally the captain and your husband could have smoked in certain sections of the ship when "the smoking lamp is lit" was announced. The USS TRINITYwas the last US naval vessel to visit Japan before December 7, l941, We were in Yokohama, Japan two weeks previous to that date. During the War years the USS TRINITY ran all over the South Pacific delivering oil and loading oil. Our longest run was to Bahrein, Arabia, to Albany and Fremantle Western Australia for delivery to British warships." #68 To: dcbr7@yahoo.com, lmnkn@yahoo.com &68 After being settled in Brooklyn I wrote a letter to the Head Red Cap,LosAngeles Railroad Station telling him the exact time & date when our train left Los Angeles & explaining why we failed to tip a most helpful red cap,who had to jump off a moving train.I asked him to try to locate the red cap so that I could pay him. Very soon after we received a letter telling us the name & address of the red cap.I sent him a letter of appreciation & apology & sent him a check for five dollars.We received a thank-you note from him.The stores in Brooklyn on Third, Fourth & Fifth Streets were about five blocks walk up 97th Street from Shore Road.This was also the route to the subway Jack rode to work at the Custom House tower.There was a good meat market on Third Avenue where we bought rib roasts & chopped sirloin.We soon made the acquaintance ofthe George Rooney family on the first floor & became very good friends.For recreation we would walk to Fort Hamilton, drive to Prospect Park or Owls Head park to see the squirrels.Later on we made more ambitious trips to Jones Beach, Coney Island, & the l939-40World's Fair at Flushing.Not long after Billy Barrett was born, Bill & Virginia had trouble getting help & we glad to get Miss Caffey's name from Jack as a nurse for Billy.She was working for them in Darien Connecticut when we visited them at suppertime one day in October l939.Since Virginia expected us early in the afternoon & didn't expect us to have dinner there, I am afraid we ate Miss Caffey's hamburger- but she was mostgracious & happy to see John again.If she happens to read this, I hope she'll send her address.In l940 Bill called up to give me my first news of Jack's promotion to Commander.He also had been the first one to read the news when Jack made Lieutenant Commander early in l932.At Thanksgiving we drove to Overbrook Pennsylvania near Philadelphia to see my sister Bee. Sam Pollack worked for LaRoux liquers making cordials, & theirtwo children Jason & Thalia were somewhat older than John.Jen & Pete Meranski drove up from Baltimore for a fine Thanksgiving dinner.John was quite interested in the snow in the back courtyard at 96l5 Shore Road after the mild winter the year before in the San diego area.The paved courtyard used to have curious little whirlwinds producedby the shape of the building- his father would point them out& talk about low pressure systems.Jack explained the terms "transparent, translucent, opaque" as we has a translucent frosted bathroom window. There was a small patch of poison ivy on our back fence downstairs, & Jack would tell how his father once in autumn met some tourists who ignored his advice & collected bright-red bunches of three-leaved poison ivy, with a little stem on the middle leaf.Jack grew & photographed many amaryllis, ranunculus, anemones,tuberous begonias & other potted plants. He never had any luck with freesias.Both Christmases at Brooklyn l939-40 we devoted considerable energy to decorating small Christmas trees.One year there was a considerable problem with a leak in a tub of water that was used to prevent the tree fromdrying out. We have photos from both Christmases, & Joan Rooney age five from downstairs appears in the l940 Christmas photos.We still have l970 much of the Chinese pictures which appears in pictures in the Brooklyn apartment.Jack fashionedclothesline swings on the roof for John. In February l940 there was a spectacular display of the five planets Mercury,Venus, Mars,Jupiter & Saturn all visible shortly after sunset in the western sky over the Narrows, where there was a big red illuminated Wrigley's chewing gum advertising neon sign.We used to say we hoped Venus would'tget stuck in the chewing gum.Sometimes whenJack was tired he would say he "wouldn't go across the street to see the Statue of Liberty do a dance."We began to accumulate the Beatrix Potter series of illustatrated books Peter Rabbit, Benjamin Bunny,the Flopsy Bunnies, Mrs. Tittlemouse,the Tailor of Gloucester, Timmy Tiptoes, Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, Tom Kitten, the Roly-Poly Pudding, Jeremy Fisher, the Two Bad Mice, Johnny Townmouse, and the rest.Jack began to invent his own sequels to these stories.A little child's story "Sniffy & Mitzy" gave us a name for the stuffed toy cat "Mitzy" which our maid Nelly Kelly gave us in Philadelphia in l938- we kept it many years & took Mitzy to Hawaii.The Craig family of Melbourne sent a remarkably realistic toy koala.A candy company gave away Peter Rabbit bunnies with boxes of chocolate.We had bigger rabbits, a "saucy squirrel" a toy dog, a bear, a panda, & a cow.We also hand Tinkertoys to make windmills, & derricks - and a spring motor with the set.Aunt Esther sent several books & Uncle Bill some French children's book when he traveled to France.In the Brooklyn newspapers we would read Napoleon & unlce Elby - a comic strip about a dog, Mutt & Jeff, & Popeye *& Maggie & Jiggs in"Bringing up Father."John learned to read by watching the page as we read stories & would puzzle over the Culbertson bridge columns


 


H-Y-D-R-O-G-R-A-P-H-I-C w1269 p 77 YEARS 1911-1920 near duplicate of w1274 for BRADFORD see w 1273, 1284,941, 1933 Holtzapfel,1265Mary Celeste photo p 10 #39 S4 #1097 p56 WWI #1103 p 57 letter 63-1156 60-1131

 

08 --l9l2-l9l9 Hydrographic Office & World War I #08 At this time Jack took many civil service examinations resulting in taking a job with the Naval Hydrographic Office in Washington in January l9l3. He found a home with a family of Christian Scientists on A Street southeast, who gave him a fine big private room where he was allowed to keep his window open constantly regardless of the weather.He also got three excellent meals a day there & was pleased that it was within easy distance of his office at the State, War & Navy Building (where he used to see President Wilson's Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan) but he was embarassed by the teen-age daughters who used to run their fingers through his wavy red hair. He was active & on one occasion walked forty-four miles between Baltimore & Washington.. He lived in the house for several years but finally had to move out reluctantly when lightning struck the house - the storm damaged the roof so badly a great deal of water came in.This was the period when the Barretts heard from immigrant Aunt Johanna Hession aged eighty-five years, who in April 1914 sent twenty-five dollar presents to his sisters Mollie & Kate (April l9l4) & Jack's father's sister Kate Barrett who lived with her aunts at 2043 Polk Street San Francisco wrote Jack a long letter about the San Francisco world's fair l9l5-her interest in women's suffrage & in President Woodrow Wilson's Irish-American press Secretary Joseph Tumulty - one of the first Irish to hold prominent national office- & her concern with the violent actvities of the International Workers of the World ("I hope they go to Kamchatka or Patagonia - I don't care which," she wrote.Postcards from Jack to South Boston were numerous - he followed his brother Bill's progress at Boston Latin School, where they had most of the same teachers.Jack came home to Boston most holidays.His work was largely mathematical revising the tables in Bowditch's American Practical Navigator.This was the period he got to know Gershom Bradford, C.C. Ennis & other Hydrographic staffers he kept in touch with for many years. The Hydrographic Office was begun by Matthew Fontaine Maury, who took the confederate side in the Civil War. George Littlehales was one of the better known hydrographers.Jack took a public speaking course at Gonzaga college & spent much time at the DC. Knights of Columbus.He saw chess champions Albert Lasker & Jose Capablanca at the Capital City Chess & Checker Club. He memorized a poem, "If you would ruin a man, Dagger & bomb are archaic- Teach him - Inoculate him with chess. It is fortunate perhaps that chess is seldom well taught -Or we should have (the world) going to rack & ruin while statesmen pondered (their chessboards) & taxicabs made knights' moves from Charing Cross to Picadilly- & Every now & then a suicide would turn up with this tragic message pinned to its breast - 'Alas- I checked with my queen too soon.'" Jack recounted one incident of a man who had & evening date & came in "for a quick game" & was glued to the chessboard five hours later, having forgotten all about the date. In December 1916 Jack transferred from Naval Hydrographic Office to Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Their function was to promote American trade interests. Jack's language skills came in handy,and he recollected translating materials from Rumanian, a conservative language that retained a strong resemblance to the Latin he had studied many years in Boston. One of his friends there was Chauncy Snow, a nephew of New York senator Chauncy Snow, well known at that time as a wit andpublic speaker. Because of the War, Jack remained only four months. In l9l5 Jack always interested in the sea, joined the District of Columbia Naval Militia.Among the l9l6 members we found the name of Miles Finley, now a retired Navy Commander. On October 23, l970 Commander Finley wrote: "Dear Mrs. Barrett,Your interesting letter of September 27th was forwarded to me by Bureau of Personnel, arriving just as we were leaving for San Francisco (his home is in San Diego, California).My connection with the D.C. Naval Militia was fairly brief.As I recall the chain of events was something like this: I had served in the War Department as a Quartermaster clerk at Fort Flagler, Washington, & at Fort Riley,Kansas August l908 to January l9ll.I was again in Federal Service, Office of Postmaster General,starting August l9l2.I marched up Pennsylvania Avenue,heading a squad of telephone girls & charwomen in the Preparednesss parade, passing in review before President Wilson. As the War Clouds began to roll up, I discussed personal war plans with my good friend, Lieutenant C.G.A.Johnson, P.A. Pay (clerk) D.C. Naval Militiua DCNM HEADED BY CAPTAIN MacGruder. I had thought of applying for a commission in the Quartermaster Corps, U.S. Army, but Carl asked me to go with hiim one Sunday morn to the DCNM Armory- Water and O Streets for an interview with Lieutenant Commander R.B. Bruninant (spelling?)DCNM, the commanding officer - he was chief clerk Bureau of Ordinance Navy Department. I think it was the next Monday that Carl telephoned me to go buy a uniform, that I had been commissioned Ensign, DCNM (Assistant Paymaster).- & this was followed promptly by orders to a session of Naval pay Officers' School Sept.l5-October l4, l9l6.I qualified for the National Naval Volunteers by attending this school & proving my ability.(Jack Barrett also became a member of the National Naval Volunteers by examination - Sophie Barrett note).I attended drill regularly & made one cruise in the USS SYLVIA Thanksgiving weekend l9l6 when we took Adjutant general J.C. Costner commanding D.C. Militia to the Colonial Beach area. He went duck hunting.Bunks in officer country were all filled, & & I spread a mattress in a passageway.(Jack Barrett made this cruise on the SYLVIA). Sorry these XEROX prints are so poor,but you will note 'Recruiting Campaign begun" in the 'Ready for Service' story.I was that recruiting officer, under orders of March 28, l9l7 for the purpose of making necessary preliminary arrangements for mobilization' an endorsement of April 6, l9l7 reads." You will discontinue duty under these orders received to mobilize Naval Militia."April 6, l9l7 other orders directed me to report at the Naval Militia Armory forthwith- turn over federal equipment & proceed to Naval Yard Norfolk. I then received orders to proceed to such port as the USS YANTRON may be (at) & report to the Commanding officer for duty as ordered.I rememberyou husband, but we met only at drills. I did not march in the March 4, l9l7 Inaugural Parade, I had not yet acquired `an overcoat. Carl G.A. Johnson did march. (Jack Barrett marched & kept postcards of the Inaugural March on March 4, l9l7.) I had a cozy seat to watch the event at a window in the old Post Office Building, Pennsylvania Avenue.I know the boys towed a field piece up the Avenue, & many sets of colors were riddled by the strong cold rain.-Miles Finley." From XEROX material D.C. Naval Militia Read for Service. Men could turn out fully equipped a few hours after call received.In a very few hours after a call for mobilization is received at the Naval Militia Armory at the foot of Water & O Streets Southwest, that organization could turn out, fully equipped one (hundred) sixty fighrting men= men who knew at least the rudiments of work aboard a man-of-war.A plan of the Navy Department to call out the Navla Militia to relieve officers and men of the regular Navy for service aboard the first-line ships of the Navy is awaiting the signature of the President.The one hundred sixty men now on the rolls are thoroughly interested- as all men who have not attended drills regularly have been dropped. These men participate in the Thursday night drills & participate in the practice cruises aboard the USS SYLVIA, the training ship loaned to the organization by the Navy.Four officers have taken the examination required by the Navy for the National Naval Volunteers. They are Lieutenant C.G.A. Johnson, asssistant paymaster, Lieutenant,P.D. Johnston commading the First Division, Ensign J. B. Barrett commanding the Second Division, & M.R. Finley assistant Paymaster. The other officers are expected to take their examinations in a short time, & the examinations of the men are now being held.A recruiting campaign has just been inaugurated in order to recruit the organization to its full strength of 445 men. Prizes have been offered by the staff officerss of the battalion for the men who bring in the most recruits.Every officer & man now in the organization is fully equipped for service afloat & the Supply Department of the local organization has on hand enough outfits to completely equip two hundred men immediately.The local organization is fully equipped to handle any large number of recruits that might come in as a result of a mobilizatiuon order. Jack Barrett's service: December l9l5 Served as A.S. 2M 3c & O.M. 2c in the Naval Militia of Washington DC till August l9l6. - August l9l6 commissioned Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February l9,l9l7 passed examination as Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February 24, l9l7 Ensign national naval Volunteers- accepted & executed oath of office.March 28, l9l7 Commissioned Ensign in the National Naval Volunteers dating from February 24, l9l7.==April 7,l9l7 Called into the service of the United States & to Navy Yard,Washington DC for duty aboard thne USS SYLVIA. --l9l7 November 8- Detached SYLVIA to duty USS MONTGOMERY as Navigator. Name changed to ANNISTON. The ship was camouflaged & did convoy duty in Carribean. l9l8 January l- became Lieutenant junior grade (jg) National Naval Volunteers for temporary service duty dating from January l, l9l8- May l7, l9l8 accept & executed oath of office. Granted two days leave from June l0 to June llth l9l8. June l3 detached USS ANNISTON to duty Naval Training Station Norfolk Virginia. - l9l8 July 1 Lieutenant in Naval Reserve Force, class two - transferred to Naval Reserve Force by act of Congresss approved July 1, l9l8 - July l0 admittted to Naval Hospital Hampton roads Va for treatment (sinus/?) Discharge July 23. Nov, 23, l9l8 given the provisional assignment with rank & grade of Lieutenant LDO in the Naval Reserve Class two to rank from July 1,l9l8. Assignment expires Feb. 23, l920- Dec. 2, l9l8 accepted & executed oath of office. From the Commandant of the First Naval District "There is forwarded herewith a Victory Medal conferred upon you in accordance with the provisions of an Act of Congresss approved May l3, l908 directing the preparation & distribution of badges to the officers & men of the Navy & Marine Corps of theunited States who participated in engagements & campaigns deemed worthy of such commemoration.The badge is issued to you by the Bureau of Navigation in recognition of your services in the World War." Some papers indicate in early 1918 Jack visited Bermuda while serving on the MONTGOMERY [ANNISTON] and had to pay customs duty on souvenirs brought back to USA.


 


#1270 p 77

 

rough endosplamic reticulum looks grainy with numerous ribosomes and synthesizes protein smooth further from nucleus processes carbohydrate of glycoproteins. Cyclins ubiquitin glycophorin annexin Cadherins bind similar molecules in other cells. Selectins with Ca 2+ active in endothelial, clotting. Intgeral proteins in membrane fusion; receptors. Fusion proteins. Nuclear pore. Snares, membrane fusion. Erythrocyte glucose transporter is type III integral protein. 12 hydrophobic aquaporing renal eye aqueous humor cerebrospinal fluid lung water. antiport Chloride-bicarbonate HCO3 exchanger cotransport 4 types transport ATPases tumor multidrug transporter. . K+ in cell Na+ outside plasma mem Ca 2+ pump . Ligand voltage gated ion channels K 1 .33 Ao radius Streptomyces lividans Na . 95 two K= repel at 7.5Ao. Acetylcholine superfamily - GABA -serotonin anion channels. Neuromuscular junctions . SMP ATP AMPP inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate. porins in E. Coli gram neg. pRb RETINOBLASTOMA protein mech arrests cell div in G1 if DNa damage detected. all cell types. Unphosphorylated pRb dinds transcription factor E2F so it cannot promte transcription needed for DNA synth DNA polymerase alpha + Ribonucleotide Reductase stop in G1 Cyclin E-CDK2 can unblock, phosphorylating pRb. CDK Cyclin Dependent protein Kinases reg. by phosp Phases s- synthesis DNA copied GAP = G2 new proteins cell size dobles M= mitosis nuc envel breaks down chrs move ANAPHASE to poles CYTOKINESIS pinches to two dau which form new envel. G0 withdraw from cycle - terminally diff cells are G0 - or G1 RNA + prot syn - no DNA syn. Late in G1 there is restriction point = a cell that passes is committed to pass into S phase. steroid retinoid thyroid hormones act in nucleus. DNA HREs are hormone response elements. 10-5th bp DNA to hemoglobin. Early embryo zeta and epsilon, Then alpha and gamma - at birth gamma stops beta starts. other gene families - histones prokaryotic chromosome 10^7-10^9 bp is supercoiled - also small plasmids. small RNAs can pass NUCLEAR PORES 9nm POLYTENE multiple copies side by side Drsophila 5 histones basic K lysine in H1 R arginine in 3,4 - H4 has a02 amino acids only two diff in pea 8 in yeast. also in chromatin non-histone polymerases, hormone receptors, regulatory proteins. NUCLEOSOMES beaded bands about 200 bp - 146 bp on histone OCTAMER DNA on surface makes 1.7 left hand superhelical turns. There is conserved HISTONE FOLD. 20-100 DNA bp BETWEEN NUCLEOSOMES - linker DNA has H1 lysine-rich + nonhistone proteins. A chromosome may have thousand loops of around ten thousand BP - size of Beta globin gene. Topoisomerases change supercoiling for condensation replication transcription. loop-=and-scaffold Relaxed euchromatin may be transcribed areas. Synthesis of histones incidates incipient DNa replication. 5 DNA polymerases. ligation of OKAZAKI fragments about 135 bp in eukaryotes. sev. thou ORIGINS of REPLICATION per chrom 5'ttttatatttt3' -ACS -- Origin biding factor. zinc finger TF III A-- helix-turn-helix - recognition helix lies in major groove of DNA -- TATA box 20-30 bp upstream start pyrimidine-rich "Inr" req. TBP + TF II D. DNA control element binds a TF. TRANS-ACTING ENHANCERS can be kilobases from PROMOTER by DNA LOOPING by nucleosomes may bring enhancer-bound prteins into close contact. CHROMATIN REMODELING FACTORS req, ATP hydrolysis may 'oen' nucleosomes TFS histone acetylases Pol II C terminal tail phosphorylated + helicase activity --- Pol Ii + TF II F move along DNA. General human TRNSCRIPTION INITIATION FACTORS TF II D - TBP core promoter rec. TATA + TF II B recruitment. -TAFS core promoter + non-TATA rec. + regul functions. - TF II A stabilization of TBP binding and TAF-DNA interaction; anti-repression function. TF II B -- RNA - Pol II TF II F recruitment - start-site selection by RNA Polymerase II. TF II F PROMOTER TARGETING of POLYMERASE II destabilization of non-specific RNA polymerase II-DNA interaqctions. RNA POLYMERASE II Catalytic functions in mRNA synthesis + recruitment of TF II E. --- TF II E recruits TF II H, modulates TF II H helicase, ATPase, + kinase activities = perhaps ? direct enhancement of promotoer melting. -- TF II H PROMOTER MELTING using HELICASE activity; Promoter clearance? by CTD kinase activity. General Promoters and Enhancers - TATA box TATAAAA CAAT box GGCCAATCT Gc box GGGCGG OCTAMER ATTTGCAT Special promoters and enhancer elements HSE CNNGAANNTCCNNG heat shock factor --- GRE TGGTACAAATGTTCT glucocorticoid receptor -- TRE CAGGGACGTGACCGCA Thyroid receptor binding protein


 


#1271 p 77w MARVIN STONE, GRIPSHOLM

 

BLACK NOTEBOOK FOUR p. 19 -- 5 July 1970 from Rear Admiral Marvin Stone USN Retired 1140 Keyes Avenue, Winter Park Florida 32789 Dear Mrs. Barrett, I am sorry to hear that your husband has passed on. Yes, I am the Martin Stone who served in the TULSA, but most of my time aboard was under Walter B. Decker as Captain and before your husband came aboard. I do remember him, but if my memory serves me right, he relieved me as First Lieutenant when he came on board, [May, 1930] and I don't remember him as Gunnery Officer, although as you say, and perhaps he WAS gunnery officer. [When SMB joined JBB in China, he WAS gunnery officer of TULSA, November 1930 - Sophie Barrett note]. I am glad to hear that some of the old shipmates are still alive, such as Supan and Paca. I have seen Gordon Hall a couple of times in the intervening years but don't know where he is now. I'm afraid there isn't much I can offer regarding my contacts with Jack except that I do remember he suffered pain in the facial area- probably sinusitis, - I suppose the weather in northern China had something to do with it. = The great majority of my service has been in the Pacific and Far East. The outbreak of World War II caught me in Tokyo as Assistant Naval Attache/, and I returned in the first exchange on the GRIPSHOLM. The rest of the war I was in the Southwest Pacific.Again I was in the Far East during the Korean War.I retired in 1955 and am living in Winter Park, Florida ever since. Nice place. It was nice to hear from you, and I wish you success in your project. Best regards, Marvin Stone." .


 


p 77- 1272 HANNIBAL chapter,second portion. Letters Harry Ferguson, Ezequiel Labiosa, Paul Nelson, Panama president Arias HANNIBAL day orders, Lafayette Jones, Dan Candler, Chester Peake. 1935 AUGUST pregnancy SEPTEMBER hurricane OCTOBER command CLAXTON

 

77-1272 HANNIBAL chapter, second portion.Letters of Harry Ferguson, Ezequiel Labiosa, Paul Nelson, president Arias of Panama, -HANNIBAL day orders,website PANAMA photo locations,+ Lafayette J.Jones, last Dan Candler and Chester Peake letters.Sophie's final portions of HANNIBAL chapter:- Great Dismal Swamp, Gleasons, Vaccaros-Trios, Rice family, McKims, Isabelle the parrot, HANNIBAL FINAL MONTHS 1935 AUGUST Sophie pregnant. SEPTEMBER Hurricane coming north. OCTOBER Transfer to command of CLAXTON. P-A-N-A-M-A second portion --HINCKLEY- -11 January l970 letter from Captain Robert M. Hinckley USN Retired 4200 Cathedral Ave. NW Washington DC-(salutations to Mrs. Barrett - main text addressed to John Barrett junior regarding HANNIBAL inquiries:"The survey area was the Gulf of Panama, & the Pacific Coasts of Panama & Costa Rica.We did work for the government of Costa Rica helping them find a deep sea port for shipping bananas out,She was an old ship purchased in l902 for the Asiatic Fleet.She was a collier -cast iron hull-built by Harland & Wolff shipyard in England.She was converted into a survey ship at least ten years before I took command.There was always a lot of work to do on a ship as old as she was,& we were always getting new Hydrographic equipment installed. The ship was being modernized to a certain extent.None of the officers were specialists in Hydrographic work- we had three Hydrographic officers from the Navy Hydrographic Office to plan & make charts of the work we were doing.The HANNIBAL operated directly under orders from the Chief of Naval Operations,& our plan of operations for the next survey season was made out by me in conference with the Chief Hydrographer & his aides.The ship sailed for the survey area shortly after the first of the year & would be in the survey area until late summer.We had two sub chasers & they did valuable work in going into (shallow) waters (where) the ship couldn't go to set up survey beacons & carry equipment.We left them down in Panama when the ship went north for an overhaul.Mr. Devine was in charge of the survey planning in the area,& he & I would always get together with your father to plan the next day's work.About our relations with the local government officials,the only occasion I had to call on foreign governments was when we surveyed around Costa Rica.I called on their President,& he was very appreciative of the work the ship was doing for his country.We arranged a trip from Punta Arenas where the ship was tied up to San Jose the capital for officers & wives & enlisted men to spend a weekend.We missed the regular train, so I called the President on the telephone-& he sent a "special" down from San Jose to pick us up.There was only one other ship during survey duty-the NOKOMIS-a converted yacht.We worked with her at one period sounding a large portion of the Gulf of Panama.We were the first survey ship to receive the deep sea sounding machine, which would bring back samples of the bottom & had a string of Nansen bottles,which tapped sea water every fifty fathoms.We had a scientist from Scripps Institute on board to analyze the water. The deepest sounding we got was over 900 fathoms (5400 feet).I took command of the HANNIBAL in January l933 & was detached May 3l, l934.One of the greatest thrills I had on the HANNIBAL was finding a rock pinnacle only six feet below the low tide surface about one half mile to seaward from an island near Cape Mala, Panama.The skipper of one of our sub-chasers,-Lieutenant Ascherfeld,I think-whom we left down in Panama when the ship went north-said he talked to the captain of a small coastal cargo vessel who told him there was a rock out there & he wouldn't go anywhere near that area.If you want to see the HANNIBAL survey areas & even the logs of the HANNIBAL, write Commander U.S.Navy Oceanographic Office, Suitland,Maryland 20390.Please give my & Mrs.Hinckley's kindest regards to your mother.Sincerely, Robert M. Hinckley, Captain, U.S.N. Retired (pl9l) Harry Ferguson letter Letter postmarked l6 April l970 from Jacksonville Florida written by Captain Harry Ferguson who was the engineer officer in l934-l935, "Dear Mrs. Barrett, Of course I remember you and Jack very well from my days on board the HANNIBAL from some time in October l934 until November l936. During that time I served as Engineering Officer, having relieved A.R. Boileau in October l934.Boileau was on board only a few days after my reporting for duty, so I never got to know him very well.However I do remember many of the others you mentioned in your recent letter-Candler, Halstead,Visser, Crosser,Ascherfeld, Nelson, Pittman,Peake, Aiken, Devine,Livingston, Lehman, and most of the others.When I reported on board, Gresham was the skipper, relieved later by Stevens,who was relieved by Richards not long before I left. If I remember correctly, Jack was relieved by Frank Fitch quite some time before I left.Our top speed with a good following breeze was nearer nine knots instead of six or seven (as some of the others said). I do remember, however, having Point Mala Lighthouse at the southern tip of Panama in sight for twenty-four hours as we were bucking a tide trying to round that point on our way to Balboa.Also, if I remember correctly,at that time the HANNIBAL was the oldest ship and only coal burner left in the Navy, with a three cylinder reciprocating engine and only one propellor. Several times we would leave Balboa or Cristobal with our bunkers full of coal and bags of coal piled up anywhere we could find room for them on deck in order that we could spend as much time as possible in the survey area. Pittman was a Warrant Boatswain who was drowned off the East Coast of Costa Rica- and his body returned via the HANNIBAL to Cristobal. I believe the Communications Officer was either Crosser or Aiken, (Crosser was First Lieutenant - Sophie Barrett note).I was certainly glad to get all the news about many of my shipmates with whm I HAD LOST CONTACT- I don't believe I had heard from or of any of them in years and years. I knew about Benny Crosser's death but did not know about the others you wrote about (Aiken, Boyd, Nelson,Ascherfeld, Boileau, Clarence Smith).Now for some information about me since leaving the HANNIBAL. I left her in Norfolk about November l936 and spent about seven months on the ARKANSAS as a turret officer. Then I went to the Naval Academy as an Instructor in Spanish. In June l939 I was detached from the Naval Academy and reported to the USS NASHVILLE a light cruiser which was then in Annapolis Roads.I went aboard as the seventh serior Lieutenant and left in April 1943 as the senior commander, except for the Executive offcier.If I had stayed aboard another couple of months, I would probably have been the "Exec" as not long after I left a classmate of mine who was junior to me became "Exec."I spent most of the war on the NASHVILLE- a good part of the time in the Aleutian Islands.Just after I joined her we went through the Canal to Long Beach (California), where we were based several months -and then sent out to Pearl Harbor.It appeared that we were going to be out there from then on, and since the Navy Department did not see fit to change our home base, I left my family in Long Beach.Finally I decided to send for them at my own expense, so my wife, Helen, had the boys taken out of school early, shipped the car out to Pearl Harbor, and all of them boarded a ship for there.About the time they arrived in Honolulu,the NASHVILLE was transiting the Canal again, under secret orders- so I could not wire her not to come.I could not get in touch with her for a month or more but finally was able to call her long distance from Boston and tell her to get back to Baltimore with her family as soon as she could. Of course that was all at my own expense.By the time she got back to Baltimore with the family,we were up in Iceland but came back before long, so she left the boys in Baltimore and joined me in New York for a few days. During the rest of l941 we operated out of Bermuda with the Neutrality Patrol and were there on Pearl Harbor day.That day we left again for Iceland and were gone for two or three weeks. When we got back, we were again sent to Pearl, and later to the Aleutians so I didn't get to see the family for a year or more. I finally got detached from the NASHVILLE in March or April l943 and got back to the States to find Helen living in Coronado with my mother and father. I went there and was stationed with the Operational Training Command Pacific until June l944.. I was then ordered to Balboa as Port Captain but wasn't allowed to take my family with me, so that was another year's separation- they finally joined me in Balboa in July, l945.Please remember me to any of our old shipmates that you might see or contact and my very,very best to you and yours, -sincerely, Harry Ferguson." I am also including a letter which Jack received on the HANNIBAL in Norfolk, Virginia sent from the Submarine base, Coco Solo, Caal Zone,dated September 27, l935 and written by Ezequiel Labiosa, Coxswain YP 41 Coco Solo, Canal Zone: "Lieutenant Commander J. B. Barrett, Executive Officer, USS HANNIBAL, Norfolk, Virginia, Dear sir,I can hardly find words to explain my gratitude and express you of my deep appreciation for your benevolent kindness in having granted me to remain here with the YP boats whereby I can provide my wife with a home in Colon. I will always remember your very hearty consideration, sir, and shall ever cooperate with you here in my duties and anywhere to the best of my knowledge and strength, gladly.In the event of any chance for me to go up for second class boatswain's mate, I wish you will kindly give one a thought down here, Mr. Barrett,and you can be sure that I will very highly appreciate your thought and will discharge my time in the Navy with such pride as only an officer of your caliber can provide in a man.If I could only serve my life in the Navy with suich officers as you- you can be sure sir that throughout my fifteen years in the Service, I never found anyone to whom I could be so grateful. I always hold high my pride in my good record. Only trust in God I will be under your command the years I have left to serve in the Navy." Another letter from a junior boat officer Paul Nelson was written to Jack from the Naval Observatory at Washington on 6 December l933 when the ship was in Portsmouth,Virginia: "Dear Commander, We have just about completed our course here at the Observatory. I expect to leave on or before thirteen December for Norfolk. There remains only a compilation of data. Commander Demott (Dewitt?) informed me that he is writing a letter to Mr. Devine in regard to the measuring sticks for the sounding machine tubes. He also informed me that the sticks will arrive on board before departure for Panama. Washington has been a very expensive city to live in, and both my wife and myself shall be glad to get back to Norfolk and our Hannibal friends. Please convey my regards to the members of the mess. Sincerely yours, Paul Nelson." (Note: Paul had the duty on the mine layer OGLALA the night of December 6-7 l941. Admiral Furlong was aboard that morning and as Senior Officer Present Afloat he gave the order for all ships in the Harbor to sortie right after the first bombs fell at Ford Island around 7:50 that Sunday morning.Paul had combatant duty in the War and was retired as a Captain.On October 8,l970 his wife Gene Nelson wrote:"Paul was Communications Officer on Admiral Furlong's staff and kept telling him the OGLALA was sinking and he'd better get off. OGLALA was his flagship, and he insisted the old thing be raised.It was alongside HELENA, which was tied up to 1010 dock. It has been pulled astern when it was toppled over on the dock. Paul could look into his (old) room whenever the water cleared.He had command of fourteen LSTs and convoyed the troopships which took Palawan (Western Philippines).He and his LSTs missed Leyte-Samar (October l944) as his (group's flagship the 775 broke down." The President of the Republic of Panama sent a radio to the USS HANNIBAL on May 23, l935 "To Captain James M. Stevens, USS HANNIBAL- My best thanks to you for the courtesy shown me during my visit to Coiba yesterday, Best wishes and regards, Harmodo Arias, president of the Republic of Panama." I am gioving here the MORNING ORDERS for the HANNIBAL at Bahia Honda, Panama , Wednesday 22 May l935 as a sample of the type of orders put out by Jack while Executive Officer of the HANNIBAL l933-l935: 0500 All Hands 0530 Turn to -Scrub down - Prepare to get under way- Breakfast for forty men (ML # 1,2,3,4 crews ,sounding and extra details 0615 ML#1,2,3,4, proceed as assigned 0620 under way 0730 breakfast 0800 Muster on stations. turn to- Sweep down - Clean up decks 0900 Quarters- White working uniform. Survey Operations 06l5 MR #1 Lt jg Jones ,full sounding crew plus two men Run lines as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one officer, ten men. ML#2 Lt jg Lockwood full sounding crew plus two men, Run lines as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one office, ten men.ML #3 Lt jg AKIN full sounding crew plus two men. Run lines as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one officer, ten men.Motor Launch #4 Chief Boatswain Pittman, full sounding crew plus two men. Run line as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one officer, ten men. Avoid unnecessary hazards. Ship will return to Bahia Honda prior to evening meal if practicable. Instructions for Official Visit at Coiba. Reference USNR Art. 234, 297, 322 All men on deck will be required to be in white working uniform prior to contact with planes.When planes have alighted on water, a Motor Whale Boat, flying color with an officer with AC boat and two men to man it, will be sent to transfer personnel (President of Panama, two other Government of Panama officials, Commander Gates, and Mr. Young) to shore at Coiba colony. The officer in the boat will invite party to return to ship for luncheon and will arrange for a definite time for return of boat for party and what time luncheon should be served. If party passes "close aboard" (USNR art 267, 400 yards) officers and crew will be called to "attention", facing outboard toward party. After landing has been effected,boat will transfer other personnel from planes to ship as necessary or desirable. When President comes aboard: All men on topside in white working uniform with neckerchiefs. Officers in full dress white - medals- gloves- swords- Full Dress Bilt. Have eight sideboys tending side rest of crew man Rail at equal intervals along ship's side. Officers assembled on quarterdeck, starboard side aft. Sound "Attention." Have the National Ensign of Panama "in sops" at the main. Tend the saide. When the president reaches the deck, officers and men shall salute. The National Emblem of Panama shall be displayed at the main the moment he reaches the deck and during the entire visit. After party goes below, removal of jumper and neckerchiefs may be authorized but with careful preparation ofor prompt resumption at President's departure. Personnel not in official party should be returned to plane well in advance of conclusion of official visit.On President;s departure some cermonies "Salute, manning rail, Attention" shall be rendered. National Ensign of Panama will be handed down at "Carry on" when President leaves ship. Motor Whale Boat, flying colors with officer will return President and party to planes. Officers and crew will shift into ordinary service uniform of the day - J.B. Barrett, Lieutenant Commander USN Executive Officer. be out there from then on. Devine, Livingston, Lehman, and most of the others." END HANNIBAL DAY ORDERS 22 May 1935. Website locations P-A-M-A-M-A chapter photos May 31, 1934 party for Captain and Mrs. Robert Hinckley Panama City - and detail of Jack and Sophie Barrett-#865 Sophie driver license 1934 Panama Sophie with Boyd's maid Netha #110 old Buick #156 p 20 #985 -p 44 Sophie in hammock com LJJ Lafayette Jackson Jones letter HANNIBAL Panama l935 On 15 February I received a letter from Fredericksburg Virginia, Mary Washington College from the junior boat officer on the HANNIBAL who is now Captain Lafayette Jackson Jones. "Dear Mrs. Barrett, I did indeed serve on the HANNIBAL at the time you speak of and remember Commander Barrett - then a Lieutenant Commander I believe- very well. To the best of my recollection Lieutenant jg Robert E. Lockwood joined the ship at sea in the early spring of l935 - I regret to say that Captain Lockwood Retired died in Delmar, California within the past year or two.I remember well most of the people mentioned by you. I believe Captain Gresham had the ship when I reported - later relieved by Captain Stevens and then by Captain Richards. Harry Ferguson was engineer, Dan "Shorty" Candler the navigator, Ben Crosser First Lieutenant, Peake the supply officer and Smith the doctor. Others on board were Akin, Visser, Halstead, and one or two others whom I can't recall- it was thirty-six years ago. Pittman was there and Lehman and Devine (hydrographers) - whom we called "Too-Too" with affection of course. I remember the day Pittman was killed. He, Mervin Halstead, and I were working the sounding boat crews along a stretch of beach, putting up shore signals and taking soundings.While landing with ourAtlantic City surf boats, I suspect that all of us turned over several times that day - I know WE did. The speculation was that Pittman may have been hit by the boat or by some of the materials carried for the construction of signals.It was not unusual for the landing boats to broach and turn end over end in the surf, but the waves did seem to be higher than usual on this particular day. As you probably know, the HANNIBAL - we called her the "White Swan" - she was painted white- was the last coal burning ship in the United States Navy. We would go to sea with full bumpers and sometimes with a deck load of coal in bags, and we stayed (at sea) as long as fuel supply allowed- usually about a month. We worked hard in the HANNIBAL, but we had a good time when we cme into port- usually for about ten days."Shorty" Candler and I used to go to the races at the old Panama Race Track. The horses weren't very fast, but that didn't bother us, and we played softball and tennis and drank beer of course.Dr. Smith and I had a lot of good fishing up and down the coast. The best as I remember was around the islands of Jicaron and Jicasita off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica.I remember one day we were out in the motor whale boat, and I had a good fish on the line.The fish was about to pull me on the rocks, and "Doc" wanted to cut him loose, but I wouldn't hear of it.Anyway we got the fish before he wrecked the boat, and he was a fifty-nine pound amberjack. "Doc" caught a one hundred fifty pound shark one day, and when he got him in the boat, I was ready to jump over the side.We caught all kinds of fish.You never knew what you would have on your line next, and that made it doubly fascinating. I talked many times with Commander Barrett. As I remember he had a mustache.Does my memory fail me in this regard?It seems to me that he assumed temporary command of the ship for a time - perhaps after Captain Gresham left and before Captain Stevens reported (spring l935).Anyway we all liked him very much and thought he was a fine officer.- Well, there are some of my memories of my service in the "white swan." I hope you wil find them interesting. Forgive me for waiting so long to answer your letter. Sincerely yours, L.J. (Jack) Jones, Captain USN Retired." Letter from Dan Candler 16 April l97l "We are planning on heading for Pennsylvania in about ten days for a stay of about six weeks, and while in Philadelphia I shall try to get in touch with Ethel Smith and get the story of the loss of the dog "Mack." I know that he was a Llewellen setter and was a well bred dog even though I never hunted with him.He was treated as one of the family.You might tell John that the only difference (i had) with his father was the one you mentioned - the late bridge game. Can't remember any others now.I told John that his father probably knew more about boats than anyone I've known.And he passed up many chances to take us to task when he probably should have.And a good "Exec" does not mention that an order comes from the Captain.John can well be proud of his father. Sincerely, Dan Candler."-- While Dan and Anne (Candler) were visiting in Pennsylvania in the early summer of l971, a heart attack -sudden- struck him, and he passed away. He had been looking forward to his fiftieth anniversary at Annapolis, as he was in the class of l922 and was very popular.His wife Anne wrote of his passing. BLACK NOTEBOOK FOUR p. 20 July 2, 1970 from Commander Chester Peake 2521 Milmar Drive Sarasota Florida 33577 My dear Mrs. Barrett, It was fine to have your letter. Tiny and I were glad to hear from you, also of all of our mutual shipmates of years ago. Just tell them I am still kicking and glad to be able to do so at my steadily advancing age. = But we must impart Tiny is still confined to the Rest Home. I am hoping and trusting the broken bone is knitting satisfactorily. An X-ray is scheduled for next week Naturally she is confined to the bed or a wheelchair practically the entire day. = Several days each week she goes to therapy- getting lonely here at home. When you write to Gene Nelson, kindly remember Tiny and me.She was a fine girl and a fine shipmate. Also Frank Delahanty. It has been years since I have seen him. I have your other letter here- filed under "P" for "pending" and for "personal". = We have some items of years ago in storage places here at the house - only - where are they? It's likely I would have to take out a few partitions to locate some of our memoirs. = But really I have kept your precious letter on my writing table - to jog up my failing memory- and - most important - to dig into the chests, boxes, etc. where our HANNIBAL notes are most likely to be filed away - at the first favorable opportunity. Tiny and I convey our kindest wishes. Sincerely, Chester P. Peake" [HANNIBAL Supply officer, who corresponded extensively with Sophie in 1970s]. Of HANNIBAL families, the Barretts lived near Clarence and Mary Boyd in Coronado, California 1938-9, saw Paul and Gene Nelson in Hawaii 1941, and Mary Ascherfeld 1946-7, and had Clarence and Mary Boyd visit at West Roxbury 1948. Correspondence with many HANNIBAL friends was extensive in 1970s, and Sophie remained in touch with Admiral Richard Visser and his wife Joan in Madrid Spain to 1986 and also with Mrs. Mary Ascherfeld in Pensacola, Florida, and Mrs. Halstead in Los Altos, California,and the Boyds' daughter Peggy - Mrs. Stafford Green in Charleston, Carolina. Friends of the Ascherfelds, Mr. and Mrs. Powers, whom Sophie met in Panama visited Sophie in West Roxbury about 1985. HANNIBAL chapter Sophie's final portions- Great Dismal Swamp, Gleasons, Vaccaros-Trios, Rice family, McKims, Isabelle the parrot, pregnancy, hurricane, transfer to CLAXTON command: Starting 7 December l934 Jack had four weeks leave during which we drove all over eastern Virginia, including Virginia Beach and Great Dismal Swamp and then into North Carolina. But most of the time we just stayed in Portsmouth,enjoying the yams and fresh spinach and taking short =166= drives into the country around Portsmouth. Early in January l935 I returned to Panama on the CRISTOBAL, and Helen Aiken wife of one of our junior officers was also aboard. I became acquainted with Mary and Margaret Gleason of Ardmore, Pennsylvania,who were going to Colon on the Atlantic side to visit their Army dentist cousin.We saw Mary frequently in Philadelphia when she worked for the Insurance Company of North America. Her sister worked in New York City for the Aluminum company.For the entire l935 season I lived at the McKim home in Ancon,where they rented me a good=sized porch, which served for living and dining, and a bedroom, a share of a bathroom, and kitchen privileges.The family next door, where the man Captain Schlomny was a Canal pilot, had a parrot that really talked.It called out, "Isabelle"- the name of their daughter, and it talked all the time.Mr.McKim worked in the Administration building on Ancon Hill.Their daughter Josephine McKim was a well-known swimmer who did the swimming parts for Hollywood movie stars.The younger daughter Musa Jane was studying at college on the mainland.Mr. McKim often visited the San Blas Indians on an island off the coast of Panama.They were a comparatively unknown group who avoided outside contacts, but they were friendly with Mr.McKim.He was writing a book about them and asked for my opinion and criticism. In Ancon in l935, John Vaccaro's sister Rose and her husband Hugo Trio called on Jack on the HANNIBAL.Since he wanted to show them as much of the Canal Zone and Panama as possible, he took them riding in the old Buick. When Jack got a flat tire, Hugo skillfully changed the tire for him.Commander and Mrs. Paul Rice, our old friends from the TULSA in 1930 and l931, were in Panama in 1935, when he was the Admiral's aide aboard the TRENTON. They lived in Panama City, where I visited them and I admired their spacious quarters- much nicer than the homes in the Canal Zone.But Gertrude got malaria there. Paul retired soon after her attack because of his arthritis in 1935,though he was recalled to active duty one year before World War II and worked at Pearl Harbor in industrial management. HANNIBAL FINAL MONTHS 1935 AUGUST Sophie pregnant. SEPTEMBER Hurricane coming north. OCTOBER Transfer to command of CLAXTON: When Jack told our medical officer on the HANNIBAL in early August l935 that I thought I was pregnant= and told him what my symptoms were, he told Jack I merely had phlegm.Going up north in September l935, I bought a few bottles of bay rum in Haiti- one for Bill Barrett, who met me in New York.The CRISOBAL had left a few days before the HANNIBAL, and we had a very rough trip because of a hurricane behind us. The HANNIBAL was closer to the center of the storm and made a dangerous passage. On the CRISTOBAL those of us on the upper deck were forbidden to leave our cabins. Bill Barrett met me in New York and took me by taxi to Grand Central Station, where I took a train via Berlin, Connecticut to New Britain where I saw my sister Babe and Dr. Geetter and their two young sons David and Albert, born l933 and l935.When I arrived in Portsmouth in September, l935 Jack had rented the second floor of Mr. Hanger's home, converted into two "apartments." It was much too small for us, without any dining space. The kitchen was merely a 'hole in the wall' a section of the living room with space only for a tiny stove and a tiny refrigerator. There were no wash tubs and only a very small sink, so the maid had todo the washing in the bathtub and had to go through the one bedroom to get to the bathroom.=l68- To eat one had to put up a bridge table in the living room. In the bedroom there was a genuine Duncan Phyphe table,but we didn't use Mr. Hanger's precious antique, as there was no pad for the table, which was too big for our cramped living room.The place was cold. At the most inappropriate times the elctric lights would go off.We would then have to search for Mr. Hanger,who lived in the cellar,which was always locked.Most of the time he was not there when the lights went out, and we endured cold and darkness.One Sunday evening when the lights went out at five o'clock (dark in Portsmouth at that season) Jack was so upset that he packed his suitcases and put them in the car preparatory to moving to the HANNIBAL as the place was unliveable.But since I was pregnant and did nothing about packing and getting out,he brought all his gear back and in disgust went to bed cold and hungry, and I did too.After living at the Hanger converted home a short time, Jack discovered that the first floor tenants were Commander and Mrs. Frank Delahanty of the Supply Corps.Frank and Jack were old friends.Sue Delahanty shopped with me for maternity clothes and helped me alter them.When we learned that my 1923 classmate Edna Delahanty at Mount Holyoke was Frank's first cousin, Sue and I became close friends.About Christmas time we found an apartment at 7100 Hampton Boulevard in Norfolk, Virginia not far from the Naval Operating Base, where Jack after November commanded the destroyer USS CLAXTON, after his HANNIBAL duty ended.


 


p 77w #1273

 

Officially the home port of the HANNIBAL was Portsmouth, Virginia, but in fact the ship was there only in the fall and very early winter. for repair work and transcription of the year's survey results and for leave and liberty. Most of the year the ship was in waters on the Pacific coast of Panama and Costa Rica surveying largely uncharted waters.which were becoming of interest to the national governments and American commercial interests.


 


Hydrographic Office DC + Navy Reserve World War I #1274 about p 77w 1-9-1-2--1-9-2-1

 

: -from page 273 of notebook "cargo convoys. from N l8, l9l7 to June l6, l9l8 as navigators, William Bell Wait., C.O. M.S. Richardson Lieut - USS PAMLICO training vessel used by JBB two days a week at Officers Material School )(Officer Training School) Hampton Roads VA July l9l8 to March l9l9.USS SEATTLE troopsship l9 March l9l9 to 15 July l9l9. Watch officer acting Navigator Admiral Gleaves, flagship, Captain J. Blakeley. West CORUM Oc 15 to Nov 15, l9l9. WESTERNER First Officer Nov 15, l9l9 to September 10, l920. USS STRINGHAM reported at Phila Dec. 30,l920 detached Charlleston SC Feb 7, l921 C.O. T.C. Slingluff USS TOUCEY Charleston SC CO Carroll and Abbott. Exec Navigator acting C.O. Feb 8, l921 to Jan 13, l922 USS COLUMBIA reported Jan 13, l922 Charles SC CO J.K. Taussig det Guacanayabo Bay Cuba 19 Jan l922 Battleship USS WYOMING 19 Jan ol922 g of G l9 Jan l922 H.B. Price CO Guantanamo Bay shore patrol F 25-26, March 1-6 incl. 14-15, 26-27, 30-31, 7-8 Ap June 25. CO G.W. Laws by June 26. Ship at Yorktown Va Jun 25. 24 July ship at Hampton Roads Va July 1 ship at Yorktown Va l8 August ship at Newport RI Aug 8 Newp RI 23 Sep sh at Yor Va 6 December Navy Yard NY JBB returns from fifteen days leave. 11 & 16 Nov ship of Yorkt Va. also ll Oc when JBB on board to select 28 men from ship for intensive instruction radio.21 Nov WYO at Ny w22 Oc ship at NY JBB on beach guard at 96th St. ;landing oc 23-24. 14 March l923 Balboa JBB appointed to hull board. fifteen days leave starting 28 May 1923 Navy Yard NY request was 21 May. Guantanamo 31 March l923 Aug 10, l922 Newpoort RI. NITRO Finney 27 June -26 July l929 POPE July 26 to Aug 5 ESDALL Aug 5 to 14 l929 TRUXTUN Aug 14, l929 to May 20, l930 Car3y ,l JBB acting, Keliher. aws by June 265 ____ 08 --l9l2-l9l9 Hydrographic Office & World War I #08 At this time Jack took many civil service examinations resulting in taking a job with the Naval Hydrographic Office in Washington in January l9l3. He found a home with a family of Christian Scientists on A Street southeast, who gave him a fine big private room where he was allowed to keep his window open constantly regardless of the weather.He also got three excellent meals a day there & was pleased that it was within easy distance of his office at the State, War & Navy Building (where he used to see President Wilson's Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan) but he was embarassed by the teen-age daughters who used to run their fingers through his wavy red hair. He was active & on one occasion walked forty-four miles between Baltimore & Washington.. He lived in the house for several years but finally had to move out reluctantly when lightning struck the house - the storm damaged the roof so badly a great deal of water came in.This was the period when the Barretts heard from immigrant Aunt Johanna Hession aged eighty-five years, who in April 1914 sent twenty-five dollar presents to his sisters Mollie & Kate (April l9l4) & Jack's father's sister Kate Barrett who lived with her aunts at 2043 Polk Street San Francisco wrote Jack a long letter about the San Francisco world's fair l9l5-her interest in women's suffrage & in President Woodrow Wilson's Irish-American press Secretary Joseph Tumulty - one of the first Irish to hold prominent national office- & her concern with the violent actvities of the International Workers of the World ("I hope they go to Kamchatka or Patagonia - I don't care which," she wrote.Postcards from Jack to South Boston were numerous - he followed his brother Bill's progress at Boston Latin School, where they had most of the same teachers.Jack came home to Boston most holidays.His work was largely mathematical revising the tables in Bowditch's American Practical Navigator.This was the period he got to know Gershom Bradford, C.C. Ennis & other Hydrographic staffers he kept in touch with for many years. The Hydrographic Office was begun by Matthew Fontaine Maury, who took the confederate side in the Civil War. George Littlehales was one of the better known hydrographers.Jack took a public speaking course at Gonzaga college & spent much time at the DC. Knights of Columbus.He saw chess champions Albert Lasker & Jose Capablanca at the Capital City Chess & Checker Club. He memorized a poem, "If you would ruin a man, Dagger & bomb are archaic- Teach him - Inoculate him with chess. It is fortunate perhaps that chess is seldom well taught -Or we should have (the world) going to rack & ruin while statesmen pondered (their chessboards) & taxicabs made knights' moves from Charing Cross to Picadilly- & Every now & then a suicide would turn up with this tragic message pinned to its breast - 'Alas- I checked with my queen too soon.'" Jack recounted one incident of a man who had & evening date & came in "for a quick game" & was glued to the chessboard five hours later, having forgotten all about the date. In December 1916 Jack transferred from Naval Hydrographic Office to Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Their function was to promote American trade interests. Jack's language skills came in handy,and he recollected translating materials from Rumanian, a conservative language that retained a strong resembled to the Latin he had studied many years. One of his friends there was Chauncy Snow, a nephew of New York senator Chauncy Snow, well known at that time as a wit andpublic speaker. Because of the War, Jack remained only four months. In l9l5 Jack always interested in the sea, joined the District of Columbia Naval Militia.Among the l9l6 members we found the name of Miles Finley, now a retired Navy Commander. On October 23, l970 Commander Finley wrote: "Dear Mrs. Barrett,Your interesting letter of September 27th was forwarded to me by Bureau of Personnel, arriving just as we were leaving for San Francisco (his home is in San Diego, California).My connection with the D.C. Naval Militia was fairly brief.As I recall the chain of events was something like this: I had served in the War Department as a Quartermaster clerk at Fort Flagler, Washington, & at Fort Riley,Kansas August l908 to January l9ll.I was again in Federal Service, Office of Postmaster General,starting August l9l2.I marched up Pennsylvania Avenue,heading a squad of telephone girls & charwomen in the Preparednesss parade, passing in review before President Wilson. As the War Clouds began to roll up, I discussed personal war plans with my good friend, Lieutenant C.G.A.Johnson, P.A. Pay (clerk) D.C. Naval Militia DCNM HEADED BY CAPTAIN MacGruder. I had thought of applying for a commission in the Quartermaster Corps, U.S. Army, but Carl asked me to go with hiim one Sunday morn to the DCNM Armory- Water and O Streets for an interview with Lieutenant Commander R.B. Bruninant (spelling?)DCNM, the commanding officer - he was chief clerk Bureau of Ordinance Navy Department. I think it was the next Monday that Carl telephoned me to go buy a uniform, that I had been commissioned Ensign, DCNM (Assistant Paymaster).- & this was followed promptly by orders to a session of Naval pay Officers' School Sept.l5-October l4, l9l6.I qualified for the National Naval Volunteers by attending this school & proving my ability.(Jack Barrett also became a member of the National Naval Volunteers by examination - Sophie Barrett note).I attended drill regularly & made one cruise in the USS SYLVIA Thanksgiving weekend l9l6 when we took Adjutant general J.C. Costner commanding D.C. Militia to the Colonial Beach area. He went duck hunting.Bunks in officer country were all filled, & & I spread a mattress in a passageway.(Jack Barrett made this cruise on the SYLVIA).Sorry these XEROX prints are so poor,but you will note 'Recruiting Campaign begun" in the 'Ready for Service' story.I was that recruiting officer, under orders of March 28, l9l7 for the purpose of making necessary preliminary arrangements for mobilization' an endorsement of April 6, l9l7 reads." You will discontinue duty under these orders received to mobilize Naval Militia."April 6, l9l7 other orders directed me to report at the Naval Militia Armory forthwith- turn over federal equipment & proceed to Naval Yard Norfolk. I then received orders to proceed to such port as the USS YANTRON may be (at) & report to the Commanding officer for duty as ordered.I remember your husband, but we met only at drills. I did not march in the March 4, l9l7 Inaugural Parade, I had not yet acquired `an overcoat. Carl G.A. Johnson did march. (Jack Barrett marched & kept postcards of the Inaugural March on March 4, l9l7.) I had a cozy seat to watch the event at a window in the old Post Office Building, Pennsylvania Avenue.I know the boys towed a field piece up the Avenue, & many sets of colors were riddled by the strong cold rain.-Miles Finley." From XEROX material D.C. Naval Militia Read for Service. Men could turn out fully equipped a few hours after call received.In a very few hours after a call for mobilization is received at the Naval Militia Armory at the foot of Water & O Streets Southwest, that organization could turn out, fully equipped one (hundred) sixty fighrting men= men who knew at least the rudiments of work aboard a man-of-war.A plan of the Navy Department to call out the Navla Militia to relieve officers and men of the regular Navy for service aboard the first-line ships of the Navy is awaiting the signature of the President.The one hundred sixty men now on the rolls are thoroughly interested- as all men who have not attended drills regularly have been dropped. These men participate in the Thursday night drills & participate in the practice cruises aboard the USS SYLVIA, the training ship loaned to the organization by the Navy.Four officers have taken the examination required by the Navy for the National Naval Volunteers. They are Lieutenant C.G.A. Johnson, asssistant paymaster, Lieutenant,P.D. Johnston commading the First Division, Ensign J. B. Barrett commanding the Second Division, & M.R. Finley assistant Paymaster. The other officers are expected to take their examinations in a short time, & the examinations of the men are now being held.A recruiting campaign has just been inaugurated in order to recruit the organization to its full strength of 445 men. Prizes have been offered by the staff officers of the battalion for the men who bring in the most recruits.Every officer & man now in the organization is fully equipped for service afloat & the Supply Department of the local organization has on hand enough outfits to completely equip two hundred men immediately.The local organization is fully equipped to handle any large number of recruits that might come in as a result of a mobilization order. Jack Barrett's service: December l9l5 Served as A.S. 2M 3c & O.M. 2c in the Naval Militia of Washington DC till August l9l6. - August l9l6 commissioned Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February l9,l9l7 passed examination as Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February 24, l9l7 Ensign national naval Volunteers- accepted & executed oath of office.March 28, l9l7 Commissioned Ensign in the National Naval Volunteers dating from February 24, l9l7.==April 7,l9l7 Called into the service of the United States & to Navy Yard,Washington DC for duty aboard thne USS SYLVIA. --l9l7 November 8- Detached SYLVIA to duty USS MONTGOMERY as Navigator. Name changed to ANNISTON. The ship was camouflaged & did convoy duty in Carribean. l9l8 January l- became Lieutenant junior grade (jg) National Naval Volunteers for temporary service duty dating from January l, l9l8- May l7, l9l8 accept & executed oath of office. Granted two days leave from June l0 to June llth l9l8. June l3 detached USS ANNISTON to duty Naval Training Station Norfolk Virginia. - l9l8 July 1 Lieutenant in Naval Reserve Force, class two - transferred to Naval Reserve Force by act of Congresss approved July 1, l9l8 - July l0 admittted to Naval Hospital Hampton Roads Va for treatment (sinus/?) Discharge July 23.Nov, 23, l9l8 given the provisional assignment with rank & grade of Lieutenant LDO in the Naval Reserve Class two to rank from July 1,l9l8. Assignment expires Feb. 23, l920- Dec. 2, l9l8 accepted & executed oath of office. From the Commandant of the First Naval District "There is forwarded herewith a Victory Medal conferred upon you in accordance with the provisions of an Act of Congresss approved May l3, l908 directing the preparation & distribution of badges to the officers & men of the Navy & Marine Corps of theunited States who participated in engagements & campaigns deemed worthy of such commemoration. The badge is issued to you by the Bureau of Navigation in recognition of your services in the World War."


 

 

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