Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 


REVENUE CUTTER SCHOOL p 78w ..1275

 

R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R SCHOOL materials will be gathered at website p 78-here is first part- be sure to see many photos- 1909-1910. Photos can be located with "key-word" search (9) --Sophie wrote the first manuscript in Black Notebook One begun 1969, and copied it in Notebook Two of the RED HEADED STEPHILD TEXT numberings preserve relation to both notebooks page numbers marked ** refer to the 'RED HEADED STEPCHILD' manuscript 1970-1971: TEXT: **342** From the time Jack was a very young boy he loved the sea.He was brought up in South Boston on East Seventh Street between L & M Streets at #634 till May,l902,then next door at #640-& as a young man he swam nearly every day & owned a dory,which he loved, & in which he & Joe Buckley at M & Eighth Street spent many hours rowing & fishing.He supplied his family & neighbors with fish & had enough left over for all the policemen in South Boston.Although he was accepted at Harvard college & planned to enroll & even took some meals that September at the freshman dining hall in the big Civil War Memorial Hall,he could not raise the necessary ($200) tuition funds to attend & turned his attention to the Naval Academy-a natural choice for a young man so at home on the sea.He was first alternate for a Naval Academy appointment (l907 or l908)-had passed all the physical & mental requirements & was told by the first choice candidate that he the latter did not intend to accept, but Jack was stunned when the other fellow took the appointment at the last moment.In l908 Jack turned his attention to the Revenue Cutter Service (merged in l9l5 with the Life Saving Service to form the modern Coast Guard) as the age limit for the Revenue Cutter School at Arundel Cove, South Baltimore Maryland was higher than for the Naval Academy. While waiting to take the entrance examination **343 he spent many hours in his attic & in the Boston Public Library studying history, & scored third in the country of of forty applicants on the l909 Revenue Cutter School examination.He passed the physical exam & entered the three year course in May l909 among a class of twenty-two cadets.During the winter they lived aboard the ORIOLE- his second cousin May Hartigan from D. & Third Streets South Boston remembered visiting in February l9l0 & observing clamshells in the pavements at Arundel Cove. Her father had been a stereotyper at Baltimore & Philadelphia before coming to the Boston Herald.Her eldest brothers "Miah" (Jeremiah) & James had died of spinal tuberculosis, although "Miah had played football at Boston College, as did Edward l889-l978, who graduated from Boston College l9ll & then repeated freshman year at West Point - a classmate of future World War II generals Dwight Eisenhower,Omar Bradley, & James Van Fleet l9l5, whom he saw in later years at reunions. James Hartigan was a newspaper reporter l907 in Bath Maine & wrote essays on philosophy. He was severely crippled for several years & passed away early in l9l2. Jack Barrett spent much time talking with him in his final months, & Edward came home & subsequently entered a seminary & was ordained l9l7.In addition to parish duties in North Weymouth & Everett, he started summer Camp Cedar Crest at Green Harbor,Marshfield for boys & girls,which operated l920's to l970's, & visited O Farrell cousins of the Hartigans & Jack Barrett in l929 at Kilbarry, Templemartin parish, six miles north of Bandon, county Cork,Ireland.It is possible to follow the Revenue Cutter summer cruises by the post cards Jack sent home from the [p.217]ITASCA, the cadet training ship,beginning May 24, l909 at Arundel Cove. The ship was next in drydock at Newport News,Virginia for about a week & headed for the Azores.Designed for the Naval Academy,the ITASCA could travel near ten knots speed with its engines,but sails were added for training purposes & added a couple of knots speed.ITASCA made its first Revenue Cutter School training cruise summer l907.The Revenue Cutter rank system-different from the Navy- was as follows: they had Third Lieutenants equivalent to Navy Ensigns-then second & first Lieutenants -& a Revenue Cutter Captain with 2 1/2 **344 stripes was equivalent to a Navy Lieutenant Commander. Regulations prescribed that the Superintendant of the Revenue Cutter School shall have the rank of Captain. A few senior officers had higher ranks,but they were not numerous.The highest rank was that of the Commandant in Washington.Mr. Paul Johnson l970's librarian of the Coast Guard Academy at New London has written in the US Coast Guard Aluumni Association Magazine a series of articles on the Arundel Cove years l900-l9l0 & earlier Revenue Cutter Service History, dating to the American Revolution.An important source of material has been Coast Guard Vice Admiral Wilfred N.Derby (Retired) originally of North Newark, New Jesey-a resident ofWeston Massachusetts on Viles Road since his l950 retirement.He was first in academic standing in Revenue Cutter School class of l9ll & was superintendant of the Coast Guard Academy at New London l947-l950.He met his wife in Hawaii where she grew up,& they were married there.Her father [p. 218] was connected with **345 the kona coffee business,& she was a Punahou School classmate of the songwriter Anderson who wrote "Cockeyed Mayor of Kaunakakai" & many other Hawaiian songs.Mrs. Derby's mother was born in New Zealand & an uncle in Melbourne, Victoria. The Derbys had duty in Boston in World War II & designed their own house in Weston upon retirement. The dining room has ricepaper wallpaper & a blue Shanghai rug. Admiral Derby was in White-Russian-held Vladivostok in l922 & served in Shanghai & Nome,Alaska.He made the ITASCA cruises of l908,l909 & l9l0.The l908 cruise was to England & Northern Europe.Jack made the cruises of l909,l9l0 & l9ll.=Admiral Derby remembers marching in President William Howard Taft's inaugual parade, March 4,l909.It was cold, stormy weather,& the Naval Academy contingent from Annapolis failed to show up for the Parade,but the Coast Guard, true to their motto of "Semper Paratus" -(Always Prepared) were present & in the parade. Spectators mistakenly said,"Here come the 'middies!" But for a long time the Revenue Cutter School teased the Navy about the inauguration, Admiral Derby said.The survival of the Coast Guard during this decade was a somewhat chancy matter. Many persons in the Navy felt the Navy should take over the functions of the Revenue Cutter Service, which was under the Department of the Treasury.In l906 a very embarassing scene occured when Theodore Roosevelt's Secretary of the Treasury Shaw, a smalltime Iowa banker, **346 was commencement speaker at the Revenue Cutter School exercises.He was the boss of the Revenue Cutter Service & stated he saw no reason for its existence.He implied the cadets were there only because they were too lazy to work for a living or get into the Navy.His speech was coldly received by the prospective Coast Guardsmen, who were deeply shocked- & for the next couple of years, Revenue Cutter Commencement exercises were [p.219]conducted without a graduation speaker because of this experience.Fortunately Congress had voted the funds for a Coast Guard School,which played an important part in the survival of the Revenue Cutter Service with an image independent of the Navy.__42- At one period the Coast Guard Academy had no land base.It moved about in the training ship CHASE. The l900 Arundel Cove site, the larger training ship ITASCA & the new location of the Academy in the fall of l9l0 at old Civil War Army Fort Trumbull on the Long Island sound south of New London Connecticut were important steps in the development of the modern Coast Guard.The size of the Academy fluctuated.There was comparative prosperity around l9l0-then a drop in funds in l9l4 lowered the enrollment-then there was steady expansion to **347 an enrollment around two hundred in l93l, the last year at Fort Trumbull.In l932 the Academy moved to its present site on the right bank of the Thames River, a short distance north of New London.New buildings have been steadily added on the attractive campus,which now offers a four year curriculum with an academic degree & now l970 houses nine hundred students.The course originally of two years was lengthened to three years in l903 & subsequently after Jack's time to four years.Many of the cadets are college graduates.Admiral Derby,one of the younger cadets,had already spent a year at the Webb school of Naval Architecture on Long Island.Jack's l9l2 classmate Floyd Sexton now a Rear Admiral, had nearly finished the Naval Academy when he failed the physical requirements on being found underweight.Undaunted he [p.220]attended the Revenue Cutter School & had a distinguished career & was in Hawaii l940's. The maximum age for entering the Coast Guard Academy is several years higher than for entering the Naval Academy. The Coast Guard Academy is still not as widely known as it deserves to be, and frequently it provides an excelllent alternative for prospects who are disappointed at the Naval Academy as Jack was.The class of l9l0 was the Senior Class when Jack entered in l909.Of this class Leo Mueller from Alabama did a great deal of photography, & many photos were duplicated & available for sale to cadets from the cruises.**348 Only five seniors made the l909 cruise- of these I met Jack's close friend William Keester at Norfolk,Virginia in l934.The Revenue Cutter catalogue of July l,l909 lists sixteen members of the class of l9ll, who were all photographed aboard the ITASCA on the l9l0 cruise.Their names are Trilck, Eberle, Derby,Starr, Bothwell,Scammel,Anstett,Klinger, Zeusler,Kniskern,Mueller,Stika,Hemingway, Yeandle,Lucas -& Clarence H. Dench made the cruise but apparently missed the picture.Fourteen of twenty-two cadets of the l9l2 class appear in the l9l0 ITASCA photo.Jack's classmate Joe Farley was later Commandant of the entire Coast Guard l947.Admiral Sexton was in charge of the Coast Guard in Hawaii in World War II.Fred Birkett of l9l2 wrote a Naval Institute article on conditions in Alaskan waters. The names of Jack's classmates Chester Kain & C.H. ("catch hell") Abel occasioned humorous comment.Kain later worked with Johnson & Higgins Company in general average adjustment & marine insurance in New York.I met Jack's classmate David Marvin in San Diego California in l938.He was attached to the Coast Guard Academy **349 at New London around l929 & wrote Jack a friendly letter about life at the Academy then. He sold Jack a large colored print of[221]"Famous Old Coast Guard Cutter Bear" copyright l929by U.S.CoastGuardAcademy Athletic Association.Visitors to our house in West Roxbury will remember seeing this picture over the living room fireplace.Jack remained very friendly with this close-knit group of shipmates,who always occupied considerable space on our Christmas card list. Clement J.Todd was another classmate who apparently was a frequent social companion of Jack's.He appears in a number of photos in Jack's album.including one at the David Farragut statue (l893) in South Boston near City Point. Apparently Todd met Jack's family, because he sent postcards from New London to Jack's young sisters Mollie & Kate after Jack left the Academy November l9ll. Two other classmates in many photographs are Peacock & "Gus" Stewart.After Stewart's death in l960's Jack corresponded with his widow at Stinson Lake New Hampshire & on one occasion tried to find her there when out on a drive.**350 Other members of the class who made the l9l0 cruise included E.M. Webster,Edward Earle,J.J.Talbott, Brown, & J.M.Earp- who was lost in World War I along with E. A Bothwell of the class of l9ll.They were both on the ship TAMPA lost in the English Channel as the result of a German submarine about l9l5 after their ship had completed crossing the Atlantic in a convoy.In addition to the regular cadets there were a few cadet engineers who attended the academy for shorter periods-usually one year at this date.They received higher pay- $900 annually versus $500 for the regular [222]cadets. In the class of l9l3 Jack had one close friend, William Rupertus- later a Marine General at Guadalcanal-Tulagi.Rupertus married the sister of his Coast Guard classmate Gorman-but she & their daughter died of an unusually virulent scarlet fever epidemic at Peking when Rupertus was there l929-l93l working on new gunnery methods.When Jack was sent to Peking for his physical examination for promotion to Lieutenant Commander,I met Rupertus when Jack and I called on him in his home in November l93l. General Rupertus is mentioned in Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison's books on World War II for his work in landing and capturing Tulagi in the Solomons summer 1942. Marine General Pedro del Valle wrote us in 1970 that Rupertus eventually remarried and then had a son in military service. Another famous member of **351 the class of l9l3 was Stone,who flew the Atlantic via the Azores from Newfoundland to Lisbon, Portugal as co-pilot of an airplane. This was the first heavier-than-air crossing of the Atlantic, although it did not capture the imagination of the public as much as the later non-stop flights of the British co-pilots Alcock and Brown and the highly publicized 1927 Lindbergh solo flight. These three appear in the 1910 ITASCA photo, and so does the well-known "Iceberg" Smith of the Ice Patrol. Yeandle 1911 and Von Paulsen 1913 were later distinguished aviators._[mid351**] - 48 Revenue Cutter service : Admiral Derby recalls him (Jack Barrett) as a pleasant outgoing personality with moderately reddish hair.Many of his friends called him"Redhead," though the consensus of his earlier acquaintances is that his hair was not a really bright(light) red (it photographs dark- a dark red as far as we have been able to determine).Admiral Sexton recollects that Jack had a special interest in history & would sometimes talk at length on ancient military campaigns. Apparently this was the influence of Pennypacker,Henderson, and Grace & Botsford & Selah Howell of the Latin School.Jack visited the Naval Academy at Annapolis in l9l0.He came home for Christmas l909. A plumbing acquaintance of Jack's father was in the Navy at this time & sent Mr. Barrett postcards from Malta & other ports.His name was Ben. He had worked for Jack's father & claimed to be aboard the fastest ship in the Navy (the .....?) Joe Buckley of South Boston often sent postcards to Jack as did Jack's family.His aunts in California had a highly favorable opinion of Jack & took great interest in his cruises.Jack's address books from this period indicate he had more or less "code" Greek names for several girl friends: (Greek letters " Helene" was Helen Cochrane of South Boston of Girls Public Latin School, who he dated l905-6 & perhaps thereafter- she was a neighbor on East.Fourth Street of Mollie & Anna Manning,, who later came to West Roxbury- Helen sent Jack a note when her mother died in l937) One of the others was "Athene." At the Overseas Transportation Office Pearl Harbor he often used Greek letters to keep confidential or secret information from being seen over his shoulder by unauthorized passers-by. From this period dates a friendship (probably not romantic) with Ora Whittlesey Sterry, who married Edward Waterman & lived at Camaguey,Cuba,where Jack visited several times in l920's when stationed at Guantanamo. They had two daughters Bonnie & Garda Waterman.Jack had a very good relationship with Academy Superintendant John E. Reinburg, who unfortunately for Jack left in February l9l0 because of tuberculosis.His successor W.V.E. Jacobs played an important role in Academy history, but Jack did not have as easy a relationship with him. When Captain Reinburg was in command of the ITASCA for the 1909 cruise, he gave his cabin to a cadet with tuberculosis in order to protect the other cadets in their crowded quarters, but Captain Reinburg contracted the tuberculosis and retired for several years for physical disability. His health improved, and he served in World War I. **mid 362.


 


1276 p 78 REVENUE CUTTER SCHOOL ITASCA CRUISES ZEUSLER diary Wilfred DERBY Joseph STIKA ii-iii

 

R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R SCHOOL 1276 p 78 1909 cruiseZEUSLERletter 1909- We have three sources of detailed information that Jack preserved from the ITASCA l909 cruise.He kept his thirty page student Seamanship Notebook, with drawings of the masts & sails= accounts of certain operations of especial interest that occured in European ports,& descriptions of man-overboard drill & other procedures,with facts about Jack's own precise assignments in these operations. Secondly, when Jack's sister Mollie died in October, l967, three or four postcard albums that Mollie & her mother & her sister Kate had accumulated contained hundreds of post cards from the Revenue Cutter cruises,& in l909 especially Jack's messages & the post marks are extremely informative.Third there was Jack's photo album,which shows the ITASCA at Ponta Delgada in the Azores,Genoa, & many Mediterranean ports.Admiral Derby has an album started by his classmate Anstett.with many of the same photos.They were produced in quantity & made available to the cadets.The Revenue Cutter School had a Yearbook "Tide Rips" begun about l905, buit it lapsed from l908 until the mid-l930's.Jack also appears in informal shots, rowing a boat,sitting in a classroom in Arundel Cove & sitting on the ITASCA deck in two photos studying his Seamanship Notebook There were two formal portraits (stolen l993) of Jack in a photographers studio in his cadet uniform- & a very fine snapshot of him scrubbing a floor.There are several shipboard groups & military formations -& in summer l9l0 landing force exercises at Gardiner's Bay, Long Island.Jack discussed many recollections & drew the course of the ITASCA in l909 on maps in Duruy's World History text (l898 revision by Professor Grosvenor of Amherst-from l848 French original)- a popular text used at Boston Latin as well as Revenue Cutter School. Profssor Grosvenor was the father of Gilbert Grosvenor, who edited National Geographic magazine 55 years l899-l954. New #46 - On the l909 cruise the cadets swam at Trieste with bathing suits borrowed from the Austrian officers who were stationed there at the leading Austrian port of that day.In Portugal & Greece the cadets were visiting countries whose kings were soon to be toppled in l9l0 revolutions.In Messina,Sicily they viewed the wreckage of the great earthquake of December l908,which had destroyed more than half the city only a few months before.Both Jack's album & the Anstett-Derby album have photos of a bullfight in a large Lisbon amphitheater.Portuguese bullfights are relatively humane. The bull is not killed,& I think the bull's horns are capped or blunted to protect the bull fighter. From Lisbon the ITASCA proceeded to Gibraltar about July 2 &then to Valencia,where both Jack & Admiral Derby were surprised by the numbers of blondes.The next stop was on the Riviera around Marseilles, Villefranche & Monte Carlo.A good postcard photograph was taken of the ITASCA AT GENOA - A DISTINCTIVE VIEW,WITH HIGH HILLS COMING down to the water in this great commercial port of northern ITALY.The next stop was Naples around July 21.Both albums have a view of Vesuvius from the bay with shipping in the foreground. The view is faded but has superb composition & could be retouched or used as the basis for a painting. There are also photos of Italian fishing boats with large quantities of spinnaker-like sails.Admiral Derby explains that two of these boats are dragging a very heavy fish net that trails behind them from one boat to the other in a U-shaped arc.The net meets heavy resistance in going through the water,& they proceed very slowly at two or three miles per hour & require an unusually p.226 large sail area to compensate for the drag of the net.In Jack's Seamanship notebook there are papers in which cadet Birkett requested leave to travel to Rome during the ITASCA's stay in Naples.The ITASCA was at Naples about July 21 to July 29,l909.About July 30 she sailed to Messina, where there are many postcards & some photos of the ruins from the great l908 earthquake.Two Boston families that we know have Messina backgrounds. The grandfather of Mollie's Pistorino friends in South Boston returned to Messina in his old age & lost much property in the December, 1908 disaster.The Pistorinos recall that many persons advocated the adoption of the Messinan dialect when the Italian language was standardized in the nineteenth century.In a committee of five the Florentine dialect defeated the Messinan by a three to two vote.The Pistorino family were among the Messinan nobility & not entirely happy about the reunification of Italy in the l860's because of the predominant political influence of northern Italy & the Piedmontese royal house.In West Roxbury our barber Frank D'Agostino was also from Messina,& Jack was very much interested to learn that he had a brother in the Italian Garda Costa in Messina.Frank visited his family over there several times in the l950's,& Jack enjoyed reminiscing with him.They were both enthusiastic gardeners, growing tender big Winsall & crystal white tomatoes,-& Frank brought back large Sicilian figs of a kind quite different from those usually seen in this country. Admiral Derby is another gardening enthusiast & twice in recent years grew some of Jack's crystal white tomatoes from seedlings which Jack took to Weston.From Messina the ITASCA passed through Scylla & Charybdis to Catania on the south toe=tip of Italy.Jack bought a stereo view card of an old church,in which the iron railing produces a very good three-dimensional effect.August 4 to 6 the ITASCA made an unplanned stop at Bari north of Brindisi when it appeared that she lacked sufficient coal to get to Venice.She was fueled by a British ship. Jack picked up posters of the hotel at Bari & several postcards.In October l962 on the night of the Cuban missle crisis, figuring that Krushchev & Kennedy were about to start atomic war,Jack & John decided to get out of Boston before the bombs dropped & drove to Albany,New York. They called on John's l957 Harvard classmate Bob Leet, who was then at Albany Medical School with a ten-month-old infant named Gregory.It developed that Bob's wife-the former Helena Pellegrini (Radcliffe l958) came from a family originally from Bari, & some interesting conversation then ensued. Bob was later a NASA space agency doctor at Houston at the time of the first manned moon shot.The discussion helped start the Barrett family on reconstructing history of family travels.From Bari the ITASCA proceeded to Venice, where Jack sent more postcards home.In his Notebook Jack describes the docking of the ITASCA there.This notebook was given l970 to Mr. Paul Johnson, librarian at Coast Guard Acadmy New London.From Venice the ITASCA proceeded to Trieste, now Italian but then a comparatively modern port serving as the only sea outlet of the Austrian empire.It was an impressive place.The ship was there about August l5.Jack sent several postcards home with both German & Italian captions,& Admiral Derby appears in a group of fiteen cadets swimming with two Austrian officers.Most of the cadets borrowed bathing suits. The route from here to Athens was via the Corinth Canal with spectacular scenery that Jack often spoke of.The canal is narrow, & the shores are high &rocky.A photograph shows Derby & Gus Stewart on board with a fine view of the canal in the background.This appears in both albums.At Athens the ITASCA docked at Phalerum rather that the famous "triplex port of Piraeus" which Jack had read about in ancient texts with Mr. Pennypacker at the Boston Latin School.Most foreign ships docked at Phalerum.Jack saw the Acropolis & Olympic stadium & museums & watched the Greek king review a large British fleet.He mentioned a Russian ship,which stayed at Athens at the time because the Turkish straits were not open to Russian vessels as of this date.Jack also wrote his family that they re-encountered the British ship from wich they obtained coal at Bari.Jack's Notebook describes "An Operation of Interest" in which the ITASCA,observing International Rules yielded right-of-way to a foreign vessel.They were not far from Salamis, where Athenians and allied Greeks led by Themistocles won a decisive naval victory in narrow waters against Persians under Xerxes. Themistocles had been an advocate of naval preparedness, and won funding for an expanded Navy in 483 B.C., over the opposition of the conservative Aristides, who was ostracized because of his opposition. Themistocles enticed the Persians to battle in narrow waters, where they hoped to prevent dispersal of the Greek fleet, just before the autumn equinox, which would have disrupted the Persian offensive. A huge Persian fleet was destroyed, and surviving units of the Persian army in danger of famine had to retreat by an extended northern route through Thessaly, Macedonia, and acrose the Hellespont waterway north of the Aegean sea. Jack Barrett often spoke of his admiration of the Athenian Themistocles, one of the greatest naval strategists and tacticians in all history.The ITASCA had planned to return through the Corinth Canal on the return voyage but finally set a course south of the Peloponnesus to Malta, where they arrived August 3l.Jack sent many cards home.One shows a view of the subsidiary harbor of Gozo.One card indicates a planned stop at Algiers,which did not materialize.Instead they proceeded to Gibraltar.The cadets took the ferry across to the International Zone at Tangier on the Moroccan (African) coast.The return voyage passed through Madeira, with its steep hills & carts & fishing industry.Jack invested heavily in postcards which I think will be of great interest to persons with local knowledge. On leaving Madeira & the Azores the ITASCA unfurled her homeward bound pennant- a long p. 230 long,thin streamer that was unfurled from the top of the nest & unfurled only at the start of the cruise home.This cheerful "goodbye" pennant appears in a photo in the album & is something of a curiosity. In mid-September the ITASCA participated in Hudson-Fulton week,celebrating the hundredth anniversary of Robert Fulton's invention of the steamboat& the three hundredth anniversary of Henry Hudson,usually credited with the discovery of the Hudson River.A large number of ships participated. Some of the photos in Jack's album have a caption "Tompkinsville Staten Island l909",but Admiral Derby believes most of the Hudson Fulton activity in l909 took place further up the river near Poughkeepsie. **359 Jack also sent his folks a postcard from Poughkeepsie, confirming Admiral Derby's recollection. **392 ADMIRAL ZEUSLER letter with 1909 diary On the twenty-first of February l970 Rear Admiral F.A. Zeusler wrote from Seattle Washington,"My dear Mr.Barrett, Reference is made to your letter of February 19. Yes, I remember your father well and I was sorry to hear of his death. I have a diary of 1909 at home that covers the whole cruise,but the pictures are at the (Coast Guard) Academy.I have taken out the most important comments of that cruise and am sending them to you.On the cruises Mueller,Eberly, Scannell and I usually usually bummed around.I have no material on l9ll,l9l2, and l9l3 cruises nor cadet life.I would suggest you get in touch with Commodore Webster,Commodore Baylis,Commodore Daniels, and vice Admiral Stika (Sophie Barrett note - we did).Mr. Paul Johnson's articles in the Coast Guard Academy Alumni Bulletin are very good; Captain J.E. Reinburg took sick- tuberculosis- detached from ITASCA and was sent to Fort Stanton for a period of time He retired 6/18/12, class of 1888. Academy Officers l908: Captain Reinburg, First Lieutenant Harry E. Hamlet, First Lieutenant W.J.Wheeler,Second Lieutenant C.G. Crapster,First Lieutenant of Engineers J.B. Turner,Second Lieutenant of Engineers L.C.Farwell, Asssistant Surgeon W.H.Frost,Professor Chester Dimick, Math, Professor Mason -French. -l909-Captain Reinburg, First Lieutenant H.D. Hinckly, Second Lieutenant T.G.Crapster, Second Lieutenant R.W.Dempwolf, Second Lieutenat S.V. Parker, First Lieutenant of Engineering H. N.Wood,Third Lieutenant of Engineering M. A. Doyle, Post Assistant Surgeon W. C.Billings, Professor Dimick, Professor Mason. - July 1910 Captain W.V.E.Jacobs,First Lieutenant H.H. Wolf, Second Lieutenant R.W.Dempwolf,, Second Lieutenant S.V. Parker,Second Lieutenant J.J.Hutson, Professor Dimick, First Lieutenant of engineering H.N.Wood,Third Lieutenant of engineering P:.B. Eaton, Assistant Surgeon H.J. Warner, Professor Mason. - l9ll- Captain W.V.E. Jacobs, First Lieutenant H.H. Wolf,Second Lieutenant R.W. Dempwolf,Second Lieutenant S.V.ParkerSecond Lieutenant J.J. Hutson, First Lieutenant of engineers C.M.Green Third Lieutenant of Engineers K.W. Krafft, Asssistant Surgeon H.J. Warner,Professor Dimick, Professor Mason. As I go through my papers, I will let you know if I find anything else of interest. Cruise Report -1909 diary of Admiral Zeusler- On Wednesday May 26 at 12:45 The ITASCA left the Cove in tow of GUTHRIE- anchored off Floods at 1:15 Thursday, left the anchorage at 10:15 and anchored off Kent Island at 12:25 maneuvering until 4:30 to break in the new cadets, After this anchored off Solomon's Island. Saturday under way at 10:00, anchored at 3:20 in Molijack. - May 31 Up anchor at 1:30 and anchored at Norfolk 5 PM.liberty- under way 3:00 entered the Atlantic Ocean, sloppy,chilly raining. June 11 saw our first sail. June 16 at two PM sighted Fayal(Azores). June 18 at 11 AM anchored in Ponta Delgada. Liberty granted. June 19 at 1:10 went to reception by consul. Visited beautiful gardens.Dinner at Brown's hotel. June 20 at 6'29 up anchor June 24 sighted land. 8:45 fired salute as we entered Lisbon. Lots of activity.-June 27 All hands went to a bull fight guests of the port.June 28 Minister and consul Hon. Charles Page Bryan invited us to a dance. many beautiful girls, wonderful food.Good music.Story written up New York Herald, Paris Edition. June 29 at 7:40 AM up anchor and headed for sea. (June 31??) at 8;30 Moored to Breakwater at Gibraltar. Much entertaining July 2 Trip to Tangier very interesting,but dirty in places.July 4 big celebration. Cadets invited to bullfight. 8:10 PM unmoored. July 5- 2 PM arrived at Valencia wonderful entertainment. Minister Mr. Herbert C. Williams sponsored a big dance.Pretty girls.Our band played accompanied by three local musicians.Fine report contained in New York Herald Paris Edition. Excerpt of article:'The peaceful invasion of this city by the American Revenue Cutter ITASCAwith the forty-seven clean=limbed and bright-eyed cadets, the pictiure of virile health, created a stir in the society circles during the past week, and the departure of the visitors after so short a sojourn is lamented by many an aristocratic girl who had begun to take improvised English conversation lesson from officers and cadets. No wonder Captain Reinburg hastened his cadets away from the siren shore. July 10- Up anchor at 3:45 headed for Villefranche where arrived July 11. July 14 Celebrating July 14 - French Fourth-of-July- went over to Monte Carlo, then to Monaco,Lost a few dollars.Went back to Villefranche that night. July 15 another trip to Monte Carlo.July 17 unmoored at 5:50 AM. Entered Genoa 3:30 PM. Pretty place but many beggars. -July 21 weighed anchor at 1:47. July 23 anchored at Naples at 7:47- July 24 visited Pompeii. July 29 unmoored ship 3:57 July 30 passed Capri, moored to buoy at (12:13?) in Messina, the town struck by an earthquake.Trouble with bumboats.Spent some time in the ruins.-August 1- Under way at 2:00 PM anchored off Catania at 7 PM. -August 2 Up anchor 6 PM- August 5 Entered Bari at 12:22 Up anchor to moor alongside of coal steamer NORTH BRITAIN.August 6 Under way at 5 PM after taking one hundred tons coal on board.August 8 Moored at Venice off Doge's Palace at 9:45. Liberty. Took in all the sights. August 12 Consul gave splendid reception.August 13 departed Venice arrived Trieste at 4:50 PM.August 14 Full dress reception ashore. Navy entertaining. August 18 wighed anchor at 7:30.August 21 anchored at 8:50 in Gulf of Patros- August 22 Up anchor at 0400- at 2 PM entered Corinth Canal - at 8:45 (PM) anchored off Piraeius in Sagunto Bay. Numerous Russian and British ships in harbor.August 24 English contingent of six cruisers and eight torpedo boats entered harbor. British sent us a challenge to water polo which we refused.We challenged them to diving and swimming and boat racing, which after a day of discussion, they refused.Visited Athens and all the old relics,-Parthenon, Jupiter temples,the stadium,-went to Phalerum August 20(?) All ships full dressed.The Greek king visited the British fleet and the ITASCA. August 28 up anchor 0455. August 30 anchor off Malta at 0740. Difficulty with bumboat men.Saw all the sights.September 1 received word we were to go to New York. Because of the illness of some coal bearers and some firemen cadets put on watch as coal bearers and firemen. Unmoored ship at 8:40.September 2 and 3 heavy gale. Sept. 6 arrived at Gibraltar breakwater - anchored at 10:00 PM. Sep 7 moored inside harbor at 6:30 AM, took on water supplies and coaled ship. Under way at 7 PM. Sept 12 anchored off Ponta Delgada at 6:25 then later moored to buoy. Sept 13 Unmoored at 7:55 PM Band played "Home Sweet Home" and up went our "Homeward Bound" pennant. Sept. 16 Band has been entertaining. We are scrubbing and painting and drilling. Sep 20 had much rain. Cadets relieved from active fireroom duty. At 0400 anchored off Tompkinsville Hudson river.Sept 25 prepared ship for port. Sept. 28 Up anchor and followed SEMINOLE to anchorage off 42nd Street - at noon changed anchorage to 142nd St. Held boat race with all boats in harbor.We came in fourth. At 6:30 PM up anchor to anchorage off Edgewood. - 0700 Sep 29 up anchor and up the Hudson River, anchored off River Dock at 6 PM.- 0900 up anchor to point twelve miles upriver where anchored. 30 Sept. up anchor at 0500. Passed West Point arrived at Newburgh at 11:00. Ashore for parade. Patrolled international races. Oct.l Headed upstream for Poughkeepsie Anchored there at 6:30 October 2 - October 4 ashore for parade Oct. 6 Under way for sea with many drill en route. Oct. 8 moored at base After securing leave granted eighth to seventeenth."(end Admiral Zeusler letter-1909diary) iiiRCS ARUNDEL COVE MD+ 1910,1911 ITASCA cruises ARUNDEL COVE SCHOOL YEAR 1909-10- ** top 359** That winter was the last that the Revenue Cutter School spent at South Baltimore.Jack was very fond of the head of the School Captain John E Reinburg, who had led the l909 cruise but developed tuberculosis & retired after the l9l0 spring term. He recovered and served in World War I. We had extensive correspondence in l970's. with his son-in-law Joseph E. Stika, then at Fort Worth Texas.The Revenue Cutter School had a football team that year though subsequently the service academies gave up the game in the aftermath of a fatality at the Naval Academy.The game was much rougher then,with restrictions on forward passing. Arundel & Curtis creeks were near the school grounds in South Baltimore.Cadet life was governed by very strict regulations,& a cadet had to have permission to go off the grounds,buy equipment or do anything out of the usual routine.Weekend privileges depended upon not incurring many demerits.Jack sent home Halloween,Thanksgiving,Christmas & Easter cards.At the insistence of Jack's devoted aunt Minnie Buckley,his second cousin May Hartigan visited the Academy while in Baltimore during the winter (February l9l0).She remembers the oyster shell sidewalk along the road to Arundel Cove. Coast Guard Academy librarian Paul Johnson's account of the Baltimore years suggests that the cadets had fairly ample opportunity to mix with the belles of Baltimore desite their strenuous course of study & discipline.The cadets lived aboard the old ship ORIOLE which floated (&sometimes sank) in eighteen inches of water.The cadets would sometimes be awakened at night by the sinking of their moored houseboat.Like many freighters in the old days,the ORIOLE was painted black for easier maintenance. Later the Navy switched to gray & the Coast Guard to white.In several photos in the album,the ITASCA,ORIOLE & CHASE appear side by side at Arundel Cove.At this date the ITASCA was the summer training ship.The ORIOLE was the houseboat,& the CHASE was kept as a reminder of the days when she had been a floating academy all year round before a land site was developed for the Academy. There was a ballroom aboard the ORIOLE where dances were held..It appears in the album with gala bunting.Chester Dimick was a well-known mathematician who taught Navigation at the school in Jack's day & remained until the l940s authoring several books. Mr. Mason taught history & English.Most of the other instructors were Revenue Cutter officers.These two were civilians.Jack continued his French studies & had opportunities to practice his speaking in French ports on all three summer cruises.A substantial part of the curriculum was in technical subjects like gunnery,navigation,seamanship engineering.Admiral Derby says occasionally a cadet would be dropped if he could not adapt to the environment aloft on the sails & riggings.Jack apparently enjoyed this type of experience & wrote later about his special assignment furling fore-topgallant sails on the ITASCA. He had better than 20/20 eyesight at this age,supposedly testing 20/l5 able to see at twenty feet what the average person sees at fifteen feet.He always had good distant vision though in later years requiring bi-focals for presbyteropia - farsightedness 232 SUMMER CRUISE 1910 -In the summer of l9l0 a shorter cruise was made from Arundel Cove Maryland to the Isle of Wight & Portsmouth on the south coast of England. On the Fourth of July a group of cadets in high spirits sent a note to the crew of an adjoining British training ship,"Can any of your men row?"This good-natured challenge to rowing competition was apparently not Jack's idea, 233 but he wound up writing the note,which was considered a breach of discipline & he was thought of as a ringleader.The cruise continued to Cherbourg, & they took leave to Paris on Bastille Day July l4. Returning via the Azores,the cadets in early August took part in landing force exercises at Gardiner's Bay Long Island & Sammy's Beach & other points in New York.This was the beginning of Jack's **363 enthusiasm for the Gardiner's Bay area, where he returned with junior class Naval Academy midshipmen the summer of l936 on the destroyer CLAXTON = with four accompanying destroyers. That summer they were guests of Miss Isabella Gardiner at Maidstone Country Club- she was a descendant of the original local Gardiner family.**363 While the cadets were on Long Island, Captain Jacobs was investigating the site at Fort Trumbull near New London, Connecticut, where the Revenue Cutter School would be relocated in the fall of 1910. Fort Trumbull was a Civil War Army fort large enough to hold several hundred cadets. Benedict Arnold held this region during the latter part of the Revolutionary War after his transfer of allegiance to the British side. The cadets' equipment was brought from Maryland, and Fort Trumbull became the site of the Academy at the start of the fall term in October 1910. New London was one of the earliest centers of population in Connecticut, and many American families trace ancestors back to early days in New London. The Harvard-Yale crew races are held on a four mile stretch of the Thames River near the present Academy in New London with Coast Guard boats officiating and keeping spectators off the race course. Admiral Derby recalled performing this function between 1947 and 1950. He had to tell some millionare tycoon to move his yacht away from the finish line. The millionaire claimed he was having trouble lifting his anchor and moving the boat off the race course, but Admiral Derby told him if he did not move his boat within thirty seconds, it would be moved for him by the Coast Guard. This was abut half an hour before starting time. The millionaire somehow managed to get the anchor up and move the boat. Jack and John Barrett attended the spring 1968 Harvard-Yale crew race and visited the Coast Guard Academy at that time. = Jack sent home post cards of New London 1910-1911 with views of **364 the Academy, parade grounds,and military formation. There was also a view of the old ship HARTFORD docked there. The Revenue Cutter Service experienced a shortage of officers in December, 1910, and so Admiral Derby's class scheduled to graduate in l9ll was accelerated because of a shortage of Revenue Cutter officers, & they left the school and were commissioned December l9l0. That year Jack corresponded with someone who signed her named HELENE in Greek letters. He never would furnish any information as to her identity. It may have been Helene Cochrane of East Fourth Street, South Boston, who attended Boston Girls Latin and dated Jack around 1905. She was a neighbor of Mollie and Anna Manning, who moved to West Roxbury and were neighbors of the Barretts from 1947 on. Jack also had Greek-letter designations for several other female friends, of whom "Athene" was probably Ora Whittlesley Sterry, who married Edgard Waterman and saw Jack in Camaguey Cuba in 1926 and sent many photos of her family. **364 The summer of l9ll the ITASCA cruised to Marseilles,France,but there was a cholera quarantine at Gibraltar, & the cruise was curtailed.Jack gave a postcard to someone aboard a commercial ship bound for Providence Rhode Island, & the card was mailed to South Boston from there indicating a delay at Fayal in the Azores, & an expected August l9ll return.Authorities in the Azores were concerned the ITASCA might bring cholera from Gibraltar.A subsequent postcard was postmarked August 19, 1911 New London: "Arrived here at New London Thursday, August 17. Leave for Gardiners Bay Tuesday." This was the summer that in September Jack's second cousin Robert Mehegan junior visited the San Francisco Barrett relatives - Jack's aunt Sister Mary Joseph at Berkeley, where for some years she was Mother Superior of a Presentation Convent for high school age girls- and her sister Kate (they both went west l87l from Boston on the transcontinental railroad opened with the Golden Spike l869)- and their immigrant aunts Margaret Barrett & Mrs. Johanna Hession who emigrated Cork to Boston l84l & then reached San Francisco l854 crossing Panama by muleback. Jack met his Mehegan cousin during this autumn but Mehegan died l933 of spinal tuberculosis, & his widow Elvira returned to her home Evanston Wyoming teaching school for thirty years to support her four young children. We located them in Denver August l970 by writing their church in Evanston.


 


REVENUE CUTTER SCHOOL WEBSTER DENCH DANIELS MUELLER ROSE p 78-1277

 

iv R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R School letters WEBSTER DENCH DANIELS MUELLER ROSE p78-1278 On April 17, l970 Jack's l9l2 Revenue Cutter School classmate E. M. Webster of Bethesda, Maryland sent John a copy of his biography:A native of Washington DC Commodore Webster graduated from McKinley Manual Training High School (Tech High) in l908 and from the Revenue Cutter School in l912 and performed sea duty throughout World War I. He was retired for physical disability in 1923 but was immediately recalled to active duty as Chief Communications Officers at headquarters in Washington DC until l934. On being relieved from active duty he joined the Federal Communications Commission as Assistant Chief Engineer.In 1942 he again returned to active duty at Coast Guard Headquarters and resumed his former assignment as chief Communications Officer. Returning to retired status in l946 he served as Telecommunications director of the National Federation of American Shipping until April 1947. At that time President Truman appointed him as a Commissioner on the Federal Communications Commission.For more than forty years Commodore Webster has figured prominently in activities involving safety of life at sea. Beginning in 1925 he has attended twenty-seven International conferences involving the application of radio to safety, including those under the auspices of the International Telecommunications Union and the 1929, 1948, and l960 International Safety of Life at Sea Conferences.On April l6, l970 Captain Clarence H. Dench of the class of l9ll wrote;"The l909 School of Instruction cruise was the best I know of. We went to the following places: Ponta Delgada, Azores-Lisbon, -Gibraltar-Valencia- Villefranche-Genoa- Messina-Bari Italy I think we thought we were running short of coal- Venice, Trieste then in Austria-Hungary- Athens. At Athens we sped to New York under forced draft to be at the Hudson Fulton celebration in memory of Hudson's discovery of the Hudson [p375] River l609 and Fulton's invention of the steam boat around l809 then back to Arundel Cove Maryland. Captain Commandant Worth E. Ross who had been the first cadet in the Revenue Cutter School about l877 inspected us and the school about this time. In about December l909 Captain John E. Reinburg who had been Superintendant of the School and C.O. of ITASCA since before May l908 when I entered came down with tuberculosis and was ordered to the United States Public Health hospital.Fort Stanton New Mexico. He got over it- I talked with him in l9l7 or l9l8 when he had returned to active duty in World War I. The year l909 proved to be a hard one- they told us in the 1911 class that we would be graduated six months ahead of time. They "threw the book" at us. Captain Reinburg was succeeded by Captain William V.E. Jacobs.My class graduated 15 December 1910 although technically the 1911 class. The l9l0 cadet cruise was by comparison short.We went to the Azores, I think - Portland England, some port in France-the Azores again, then home. I agree with Milton Daniels that in the fall of l9l0 we did not know that the Academy was going to be moved to New London Connecticut. But that's where my class graduated after a very short first class year at Fort Trumbull, New London. I remember Portland England as a great British Naval Port.Milton Daniels and I visited an ancient church in Dorchester I think near Portland.Also a Roman amphitheatre the Romans had built on a HILLSIDE with the steps and the seats long ago grassed over. We had had a fleeting trip on the excellent British railroads.I aslo saw Bournemouth, which is quite near and was astounded to see an impressive statue of George III with highly laudatory and long comments on his reign- very opposite of what I had learned of the United States of his tyranny.Later I read that George III had often spent summers at Bournemouth and that the town owed much to him as his mere presence made it a summer resort.Your father's classmate Samuel Peacock resigned and went into the Civil Service Washington DC. Birkett resigned but later came back into the Coast Guard. (Clement?)Todd resigned, but I later met him. He had become a Captain US Navy Reserve in World War II. Poor Earp went down on the TAMPA torpedoed by a German submarine on which my class lost Bothwell and the l9l3 class lost Jimmy Frost in Bristol channel September 26, l9l8.Talcott didn't get through or resigned.I was shipmates with Gus Stewart in l923 on the International Ice Patrol- have lost track of him.He may be Coast Guard Retired.I ran into Earle on an International Yacht race when Earle was one of the reporters covering the race.I don't know how he left the Coast Guard. Dave Marvin's father whom I met was a literary man and had written on the American merchant marine.I remember his book.Marvin later developed heart trouble, was retired, later died.I remember entertaining Mrs. Marvin and the children in California when we brought the TAHOE from the West Coast to the East Coast in 1938. I don't know of a C.C.Plummer. Floyd Sexton was a close neighbor of mine in l927 and was godfather to my son Rodney born that year. C.H Abel is retired in Coast Guard, lives in Florida.I think H.G. Rose in l9l3 was Commanding Officer in another first line ship whe I was commanding Officer of TAHOE, and I was also in command of the ICE PATROL. (I had beside a 125 footer - all three ships based in Halifax. I really enjoyed the ICE PATROL- considered a "lemon" by some. I meant to add that at Messina Sicily the awful debris of the earthquake of December l908 still lay in the street nearly up to the second story windows, and ships still rode bow and stern moored with forefront and keel partly on stone dock. We went through the famous Scylla and Charybdis channel to get to Messina from Naples. I hope this letter will be of some help." On 23 April l970 Captain Dench wrote "In my long letter I forgot to say that pursuant to your suggestion, I wrote to Commodore Webster, and in his reply he says that both he and Mrs. Webster are in nursing homes. Her mind is about gone, and he has Parkinson's disease.Webster has had a distinguished career in Commmunications.The Coast Guard gets a lot of things from the Navy, but their Supply Departments are not allied." -Daniels,Mueller,Dench- p. **382 On March l5, l970 Commander Milton Daniels USCG wrote: This is in answer to your letter of March sixth asking about my experience at the Revnue Cutter School of Instruction- that is my recollection of its title. I believe it became the Coast Guard Academy at a later date. I was appointed an engineer cadet on June 6, l9l0 and have been lucky enough to stay in the service ever since. Engineer cadets were trained to become commissioned engineer officers and were limited in the duty and authority to the ship's power plant.They were required by law to serve at least six months as cadets during which tme they made a practice cruise on the Practice cutter as the ITASCA was called.When under way we stood watch in the engine room. In port we worked on deck learning what we could of ship lifeboat drills, signal drills, and going aloft to learn the names of the sails and running rigging. The engineers of 1910 were Francis Allen, Ben Thorn, and Milton.R. Daniels in that order. An engineer could only be appointed to a cadetship when there was a vacancy, and mine did not occur until June sixth. The ITASCA left Baltimore about June first and I went down to Norfolk and joined her there, the last addition to the ship before she sailed.I remember your father very well. He was pink cheeked, freckled, and usually laughing. He was more fortunate that most of us- he didn't get seasick. I believe he went to Boston Latin School and knew 283 some Latin and Greek, which amazed me. As I recall it, he and Sam Peacock usually went on liberty together and both resigned from the Revenue Cutter Service and served in the Navy in the First World War. Peacock did not stay in the Navy- he went into Civil Service in Washington and I lost track of him. There isn't much I can tell you about the school at Arundel Cove. I didn't serve there.The ITASCA sailed from Hampton Roads early in June l9l0 and I imagine you have a good description of that from the other officers.You have met a good cross section of the cadets in the ship. Derby was a first classman, Sexton and Marvin and Barrett were second classmen, and Rose a third classman. On my cruise we called at Ponta Delgada Azores to coal ship and then went to Portland England where we were given a 48 hour liberty to go to London. At Portland we were surrounded by the British Home Fleet, and as I remember it the original battleship DREADNOUGHT with Admiral Fisher in command was the flagship. Late on the night of July 4th the flagship called the ITASCA by Morse code to tell us ,"You may be interested to know that Mister Johnson knocked Mr. Jeffries and is now world (boxing) champion."The miracle is that we could receive it. The Royal Navy could outsignal any other - fast and accurate.We went to Cherboug with liberty to go to Paris, then back to Ponta Delgada and then to New London. When we arrived at New London, we were told that the school had been transferred there, so we tied up to the wharf at Fort Trumbull. I believe everyone except the cadets knew about the moving of the school.- the idea of training in those days was to tell them as little as possible.After a few days in New London we went out to Gardiners Bay (Long Island) and had boat drills under sail and landing on the beach with rifles and a small gun in the sailing launch.We went into Greenport on Sunday for liberty and compulsory Church. At the end of the summer we went back to New London and moved ashore to Fort Trumbull and after about a month's leave came back and attended classes and drills.The engneers finished up some time in January l9ll. This is about all I can say about the cadet experience. I am in the 1910 photograph you mention but only a little of my face shows- we were crowded together too much." On the 23rd of March l970 Commodore Milton Daniels wrote again: "I find I have made a mistake in my letter to you. Lord Fisher was not in command of the Channel Home Fleet when we were at Portland England. By l9l0 he had been promoted to be one of the Lords of the Admiralty., It may have bewen Beresford who was in command. Beresford and Fisher did not get along well when they reached flag rank. I knew something about the DREADNOUGHT even as a cadet, and Fisher's part in planning it. I guess that threw me off. The British excellence in signalling I believe is just due to constant practice. It seemed to me that everybody on a British ship, merchant or Royal Navy and everybody in a dockyard, civil service or military was a capable signal man with either flashing light or semaphore flags." On March l9, l970 Captain Leo C. Mueller wrote from Mobile Alabama, "Dear Mr. Barrett junior, Your long letter of March ll, l970 gave me much pleasure and reminded me of my cadet days and fine classmates. But my memory is not as good as it ought to be and I am sorry that I do not have pictures or recollections of my association with your father.I am sure that some of the diaries of my classmates can give you more information than I can of the old school of Instruction at Arundel Cove and at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut, You are correct in crediting me with taking many Kodak piuctures on cadet cruises. But I don't believe I took the picture of Derby and Stewart in the Corinth Canal or of your father and Derby. Since photography was my hobby, I spent my cadet pay mostly on taking pictures- the money spent was not much in view of my living under the modest pay of those times without too many other attractions or distractions. Derby was always a fine athlete and together we held down the pitching duties on our cadet baseball team with only a maximum of sixty cadets to draw upon. During world War II I urged all hands to take out government Life Insurance, and in l946 after I retired I became an agent for Shenandoah Life Insurance Company and continued to urge veterans to reinstate their National Life Insurance. Derby and I occupied a room on the old practice cutter CHASE which was moored alongside of the wooden ship ORIOLE at Arundel Cove. The ORIOLE was the former Navy ship DALE l6 guns,built in 1838. I still go to my office every day and am glad I have work to engage me. My wife died in l96l but I always have children visit me. Please give my regards to Derby and my other classmates if you see them. I might mention that I had a store in Baltimore print many of my pictures and maybe those are the ones you have seen. I sold them to my friends for what they cost me to have printed but I made many prints myself at the School. I am sorry to see that many of my classmates have passed on.I wish that I could be of more assistance to you and wish you success in writing about the Revenue Cutter Service. On March 24 l970 John went to see retired Captain Dench at Chelsea Naval Hospital where he was awaiting a minor ear operation. The visit lasted from four in the afternoon until l0:15 pm as Captain Dench enjoyed his company. He was to be operated on for removal of cancer of ear on March 25, l970 Captain Dench said it was a minor skin operation.He was in the class of l9ll and two of his letters appear earlier in this chapter *(386) p.380 On March 11,l970 Rear Admiral Earl Rose of Alexandria, Virginia wrote:"I can add little to my previous comment. I kept a diary of ther l9l0 cruise to the English channel via the Azores.We got up to London, Cherbough,, and Paris for two short visits.I kept no diaries for 1911 and l9l2. The l9l0 diary is one hundred twenty pages in length. I have just re-read it for the first time in many many years.The ITASCA left Arundel cove near Baltimore on May 26, l9l0,- AND JUNE 7, l9l0 from Hampton Roads for sea.She arrived at New London, Connecticut on August 6, l9l0 from cruise. You mention the late Major General William Rupertus. He was on all three cruises - l9l0, l911, l9l2. My diary shows he was ill much of the l9l0 cruise with kidney ailment and fever.He took the l908 and l909 cadet examinations but failed to be appointed in both years because of albumin in the urine as we knew it in those days.He passed the l9l0 exam, was appointed and completed the three years course and was graduated with the rest of us but was not commissioned because of his failure to pass a final physical exam. He was a very ambitious,hard-working cadet and stood high in the class.His physical condition did not prevent his entry into the United Staters Marine Corps, in which he was appointed a Second Lieutenant on November 14, l9l3.I saw him about a year later in Portsmouth, Virginia, where the Marines maintained a small school for probationary Second Lieutenants. I later saw him as a Colonel in command of the Marine Barrack Washington,D.C., in l939 or l940.He called my attention to the fact that the famous Marine Band was under his command.He had married Frank Gorman's sister and had two children.All three perished in China in the nineteen thirties (1929?) of diphtheria (It was scarlet fever according to Jack who saw Rupertus in Peking very soon after the tragic event-Sophie Barrett note). Gorman was in my class and became a Rear Admiral.Rupertus became a Brigadier General and commanded the landing at Tulagi in the Guadalcanal affair. Later as a Major General he landed his division on Gloucester Point.He died of a heart attack in the Washington DC Navy Yard in 1945,I think.This occurred in the home of Brigadier General Robert Kilmartin, USMC.I knew General Kilmartin well in subsequent years, and he told me of the passing of Rupertus in his home.Rupertus was married a second time (had a son in the service)." Many photos of ITASCA Revenue Cutter School and cadets appear on website, with additional information in captions. An index will be added at website p 78. In 1970 John Barrett junior visited Commodore John S. Baylis, class of 1909 at his New Jersey home and discussed the 1909 cruise, the Revenue Cutter School and Coast Guard, in which he served many years, and his experience on the cutter PAULDING, which could not avoid the submarine S-4 when it surfaced close in front of the PAULDING off Cape Cod December 17, 1927. References to Commodore Baylis appear in material on Gershom Bradford and on the S-4.


 


REVENUE CUTTER SCHOOL Librarian PAUL JOHNSON Adm.JOSEPH FARLEY Adm.STIKA MARVIN DEMPWOLF w1278 p 78

 

R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R School p78-1278 RED HEADED STEPCHILD NOTEBOOK TWO [**] pages 387-392 Sophie Barrett wrote On 26 March 1970 we received a copy of the Coast Guard Alumni Bulletin of March-April 1970 with an article "The Academy at Fort Trumbull 1910-1920" by Paul H. Johnson,curator and librarian of the Coast Guard Acdemy at New London, Connecticut. Jack was a cadet in the years 1909, 1910, and 1911." p 365 Jack resigned from the Revenue Cutter School October 22, 1911. He had completed two and a half years - three summer cruises and two winters - and had received a very fine education, which started him on a career of thirty-seven or thirty-eight years in nautical fields. It was undoubtedly a great disappointment to him to leave the Academy at that time. A 1921 family letter says it was because of a relatively minor prank, but we do not know any further details. he had many good friends at the school, who remained close as long as Jack lived and gave a splendid response to our historical inquiries. Apparently we stimulated Admiral Earl Rose to continue study of Coast Guard history, and he made valuable contributions. John Barrett junior visited Curator Paul Johnson at the Academy in 1970, and Mr. Johnson wrote in appreciation of our efforts. The Revenue Cutter School education stood Jack in very good stead at the Hydrograhpic Office and in the Navy and merchant service, and the friendships always had a very special quality. The Coast Guard is dedicated to Marine Safety and preparedness and preservation of life at sea.This viewpoint influenced Jack in his work with small boats on the survey ship HANNIBAL 1934-5 in Panama and Costa Rica, and he always recalled the Coast Guard motto "Semper Paratus" along with the Marine "Semper Fidelis". Some highlights of careers of his friends: Admiral Joseph Farley Coast Guard Commandant 1947. Vice Admiral Wilfred Derby Superintendant Coast Guard Academy 1947-1950. Vice Admiral Zeusler commander at Sitka, Alaska World War II. Vice Admiral Joseph Stika son-in-law of Captain John Reinburg the 1909 ITASCA commander. Commodore E M Webster in charge of Coast Guard Communications developing LORAN and FCC Commissioner. Commodore John Baylis in command at Puerto Rico World War II. Floyd Sexton in Command Hawaii in World War II. Captain Dempwolf in command Cleveland, Ohio 1930s and New York Port Director 1940. Captain Clarence Dench. General William Rupertus US Marine Corps leader of Tulagi landing summer 1942. Of the Civilian faculty of Revenue Cutter School Chester Dimick remained many years at Coast Guard Academy and published textbooks on Navigation and Celestial Trigonometry. Caption 1910 Landing Force photo RCS from p 70 no. 1211 ==w1281 p 80 R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R School + Admiral Farley letter Edit 1211 p 70 Landing Force Exercise Gardiners Bay Long Island New York August 1910 Revenue Cutter Service. The 1910 cruise was in British waters at the time of the Johnson Jeffries heavyweight boxing championship match, which interested many cadets as news came. An unauthorized rowing match book place between Revenue Cutter School cadets and British counterparts -although it was not Jack Barrett's idea, he wound up writing a note, "Can any of your men row?" which was sent across. At this period the British Navy was polarized between adherents of Admirals Fisher and Bereford, as Revenue Cutter School engineering cadet Milton Daniels recalled in 1970 letters. The Revenue Cutter School cadets were in Paris on Bastille Day, July 14, 1910, and returned to US for landing force exercises at Gardiners Bay August 1910 shown in this photo.Then they received the surprsing news that their school was moving from Arundel Cove, South Baltimore to an old Civil War Army post, Fort Trumbull on Connecticut coast south of NEW LONDON. The school was renamed the Coast Guard Academy 1915, enlarged, and moved 1932 to present site north of New London, where Jack and John Barrett visited the Academy June 1968 while attending Harvard-Yale crew races there. In letter Admiral Wilfred N. Derby tells of clearing yachts out of the way of the race while he was Superintendant of Coast guard Academy l947-1950. He used to grow Jack Barrett's tomato seedlings at his home on Viles St. Weston. His wife's family had roots in Hawaii and New Zealand. + Black Notebook Number One p 32 letter from Admiral Joseph Farley USCG He was Commandant of the Coast Guard 1947 [1912 Revenue Cutter School classmate of Jack] PO Box 311 Blowing Rock, N.C. June 3, 1962 Dear Jack, Thanks for your letter of May 24. I am sorry the post office wa so slow in forwarding it, but it doesn't change anything. I am just too old and seeing too poorly to be able to attend the functions. [fiftieth reunion of the Class of 1912 at the Coast Guard Academy, New London, Connecticut] = Ruth, though having some leg trouble, is walking her head off. She owns a cottage and ten-plus acres on the side of a mountain here. Between her flowers and a small vegetable garden there is no rest for the weary. I get in about two hours a day in the vegatable garden, grass cutting and clearing overgrowth. = the last I saw of Peacock he was still working for the Maritime Commission.He was a member of the Merchant Marine association, which made me an honorary member when I retired. I have seen no mention of his death so assume he is still alive.Kain was doing quite welll in New York, -Merchant Marine insurance. Webster is still in Washington. He sent me his change of address last month- the Kennedy Warren, 3133 Connecticut Ave. NW Washington 8, DC. Phone 232-1523. I saw Abel at a couple of parties two or three years ago. We did not see him last year when we were down there. He and his son were in real estate business. = We expect to be up here until the end of October if it does not freeze too soon. Our water pipes are exposed, so we have to move out and have the water drained from the pipes before a hard freeze comes = Sorry we can't get together for the fiftieth but wishing you the best of luck. Sincerely,Joe." end FARLEY letter. Vice Admiral Joseph STIKA August 17, 1970 letter from notebook 4 p 129:"Dear John-Number 26 may be Daniels but I can't be sure. I did not know Ora Sterry at the Mohican.There is no Edgar Waterman in the Fort Worth phone book. I did not know - or had forgotten than the first Mrs. Rupertus was 'peewee" Gorman's sister.I used to hear from Dave Marvin but have lost track of his daughter Jean since his death.Likewise I do not know the whereabouts of Kain, Peacock and others.Admiral Farley's younger brother John was with Crown Zellerbach before he retired. He lives in Oakland California.We hear from them at times, confirming Joe's arthritis. I can recall no specific details of the Admiral's career, although it was most outstanding certainly. I was in rum war destroyers when Commodore Baylis's PAULDING hit the S-4. I believe my wife's brother,Rear Admiral L.R. Reinburg,now dead,helped Baylis during the investigation. I was recalled from leave to replace Iceberg Smith on the SENECA one year so he could come ashore and write up his ice patrol report. I met FDR {President Franklin Roosevelt] and his wife once when he visited Puerto Rico during a southern cruise on the HOUSTON and another time at a White House reception during my assignment as chief Ordnance officer at Coast Guard headquarters.-Also again met Mrs. FDR in the Virgin Islands when she visited there - Drew Pearson's father was the governor. I knew that Mrs. Derby came from Hawaii. Lost track of "Nat" Earle after the school days. I did not make the l908 cruise.Our class came in two sections- mine entered in October, 1908. -After the first section, which included {Admiral] Derby, had made the cruise...Best wishes, sincerely, J.E. Stika."


 


REVENUE CUTTER SCHOOL w1279 p 78

 

R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R SCHOOL 1276 p 78 One of the Revenue Cutter School officers who appears in the 1910 ITASCA cruise photo Captain R.W Dempwolf was later New York Port Director in 1940, when Jack was in charge of the Branch Hydrographic Office, and they cooperated in keeping the office in a convenient location for sea captains just before departure: Sophie Barrett notebook Four pages 226-8: "DISPUTE REMOVAL OF NAVY BUREAU:-- SENTIMENT FAVORS CUSTOM HOUSE LOCATION OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL HYDOGRAPHIC OFFICE. Reports that the New York Branch of the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, to which deep sea pilots always resort for navigation aids before sailing, will be moved from its present location in the Custon House to another site has stirred considerable comment in steamship circles. While no formal protest of the impending removal of the Bureau to a less convenient location has been launched as yet,numerous ship line officers and several maritime and trade organizations were understood to be considering such a step. DECENTRALIZATION OPPOSED. Moving of the Hydrographic Office to another building would mark the removal of a third Bureau closely allied with ship operations and navigation from the confines of the Custom House -- a decentralization of the shipping facilities that has found little favor with steamship operators. The Steamboat Inspectors' Office is now located at 45 Broadway,while the Coast and Geodetic Survey Office has been moved to 90 Church Street.Since ship masters, particularly those of vessels operating in foreign trade, always consult the Hydrographic Office on navigation conditions in their routes as soon as they have secured clearance papers,- moving of the Office from the Custom House is seen as especially inconveniencing regular services of the Office such as giving of information on ice conditions in the North Atlantic and sailing obstacles in foreign waters. These have been increased by the considerable special information on mine fields and other war-created hazards since the outbreak of the conflict.SPECIAL WARNINGS VALUABLE: As a consequence its service to pilots has become even [p.227] more valuable than in ordinary times.Masters of vessels plying into the war zone never fail to secure special warnings released by the Hydrographic Office regarduing such war hazards.Steamship companies apprised of the possible moving of the Office out of the Customs Building- in which they now obtain clearance papers and Coast Guard harbor regulations for leaving the harbor indicated their disapproval of the change. Although none of them was willing to comment officially,more than a dozen intimated they would direct a communication to W. E. Reynolds, the Administrator of Public Buildings of the Federal Works agency in Washington.Several maritime organization expressed the same view,with two of the leading ones suggesting they would not permit the removal of the Hydrographic Office to go through without directing their opinion to the proper governmental source.Commander John B. Barrett USN is the officer in charge of the New York Branch of the United States Navy Hydrographic Office.[end of news story]. DEMPWOLF letters: [Captain DEMPWOLF was an officer of Revenue Cutter School and appears along with cadet Jack Barrett in 1910 photo aboard training ship ITASCA, which appears on this website] "Dear Commander Barrett, The enclosed copy of a letter received from Captain G.S. Bryan, U.S. Navy., Washington D.C., dated 12 November 1940, is forwarded for your information. Sincerely, R. W. Dempwolf, Captain, United States Coast Guard,- Commander, New York district." [p.228] "New York, N.Y. 7 November 1940 [To] Captain C.C. Todd, U.S. Navy--Acting Hydrographer, Hydrographic Office, Washington D.C. -- Dear Captain Todd: It has come to my attention that efforts are being made by other government agencies to obtain the space now occupied by the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Custom House, New York. If such agencies succeed in obtaining this space, it would cause considerable inconvenience and hardship upon the masters of merchant vessels in obtaining necessary information prior to clearing the Port of New York.The clearances of vessels from the Port of New York are handled through the Marine Division at the Custom House and through the Commander, New York District of the Coast Guard.All of such clearances are approved by the Ship Control Board, Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. Whenever the clearance of a vessel is approved, the master is given a special number by the Coast Guard through the Marine Division at the Custom House.As you know, the average master desires the very latest information, and it is only fitting and proper that he should get this information just prior to his sailing from the Port of New York. Therefore, in my capacity as Commander New York District, United States Coast Guard and Captain of the Port of New York, I urgently recommend that the Branch Hydrographic Office in the Port of New York remain in its present location in the United States Custom Office. Very truly yours, R.W. Dempwolf, Captain United States Coast Guard, Commander New York District."


 


R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R School w1280 p 78 PAUL JOHNSON JOSEPH FARLEY

 

RED HEADED STEPCHILD NOTEBOOK TWO [**] pages 387-392 Sophie Barrett wrote On 26 March 1970 we received a copy of the Coast Guard Alumni Bulletin of March-April 1970 with an article "The Academy at Fort Trumbull 1910-1920" by Paul H. Johnson,curator and librarian of the Coast Guard Academy at New London, Connecticut. Jack was a cadet in the years 1909, 1910, and 1911." p 365 Jack resigned from the Revenue Cutter School October 22, 1911. He had completed two and a half years - three summer cruises and two winters - and had received a very fine education, which started him on a career of thirty-seven or thirty-eight years in nautical fields. It was undoubtedly a great disappointment to him to leave the Academy at that time. A 1921 family letter says it was because of a relatively minor prank, but we do not know any further details. He had many good friends at the school, who remained close as long as Jack lived and gave a splendid response to our historical inquiries. Apparently we stimulated Admiral Earl Rose to continue study of Coast Guard history, and he made valuable contributions. John Barrett junior visited Curator Paul Johnson at the Academy in 1970, and Mr. Johnson wrote in appreciation of our efforts. The Revenue Cutter School education stood Jack in very good stead at the Hydrograhpic Office and in the Navy and merchant service, and the friendships always had a very special quality. The Coast Guard is dedicated to Marine Safety and preparedness and preservation of life at sea.This viewpoint influenced Jack in his work with small boats on the survey ship HANNIBAL 1934-5 in Panama and Costa Rica, and he always recalled the Coast Guard motto "Semper Paratus" along with the Marine "Semper Fidelis". Some highlights of careers of his friends: Admiral Joseph Farley Coast Guard Commandant 1947. Vice Admiral Wilfred Derby Superintendant Coast Guard Academy 1947-1950. Vice Admiral Zeusler commander at Sitka, Alaska World War II. Vice Admiral Joseph Stika son-in-law of Captain John Reinburg the 1909 ITASCA commander. Commodore E M Webster in charge of Coast Guard Communications developing LORAN and FCC Commissioner. Commodore John Baylis in command at Puerto Rico World War II. Floyd Sexton in Command Hawaii in World War II. Captain Dempwolf in command Cleveland, Ohio 1930s and New York Port Director 1940. Captain Clarence Dench. General William Rupertus US Marine Corps leader of Tulagi landing summer 1942. Of the Civilian faculty of Revenue Cutter School Chester Dimick remained many years at Coast Guard Academy and published textbooks on Navigation and Celestial Trigonometry. Caption 1910 Landing Force photo RCS from p 70 no. 1211 ==w1281 p 80 R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R School + Admiral Farley letter 1211 p 70 Landing Force Exercise Gardiners Bay Long Island New York August 1910 Revenue Cutter Service. The 1910 cruise was in British waters at the time of the Johnson Jeffries heavyweight boxing championship match, which interested many cadets as news came. An unauthorized rowing match book place between Revenue Cutter School cadets and British counterparts -although it was not Jack Barrett's idea, he wound up writing a note, "Can any of your men row?" which was sent across. At this period the British Navy was polarized between adherents of Admirals Fisher and Beresford, as Revenue Cutter School engineering cadet Milton Daniels recalled in 1970 letters. The Revenue Cutter School cadets were in Paris on Bastille Day, July 14, 1910, and returned to US for landing force exercises at Gardiners Bay August 1910 shown in this photo.Then they received the surprsing news that their school was moving from Arundel Cove, South Baltimore to an old Civil War Army post, Fort Trumbull on Connecticut coast south of NEW LONDON. The school was renamed the Coast Guard Academy 1915; enlarged and moved 1932 to present site north of New London, where Jack and John Barrett visited the Academy June 1968 while attending Harvard-Yale crew races there. In letter Admiral Wilfred N. Derby tells of clearing yachts out of the way of the race while he was Superintendant of Coast Guard Academy l947-1950. He used to grow Jack Barrett's tomato seedlings at his home on Viles St. Weston. His wife's family had roots in Hawaii and New Zealand. Black Notebook Number One p 32 letter from Admiral Joseph Farley USCG He was Commandant of the Coast Guard 1947 [1912 Revenue Cutter School classmate of Jack] "PO Box 311 Blowing Rock, N.C. June 3, 1962 Dear Jack, Thanks for your letter of May 24. I am sorry the post office wa so slow in forwarding it, but it doesn't change anything. I am just too old and seeing too poorly to be able to attend the functions. [fiftieth reunion of the Class of 1912 at the Coast Guard Academy, New London, Connecticut] = Ruth, though having some leg trouble, is walking her head off. She owns a cottage and ten-plus acres on the side of a mountain here. Between her flowers and a small vegetable garden there is no rest for the weary. I get in about two hours a day in the vegatable garden, grass cutting and clearing overgrowth. = the last I saw of Peacock he was still working for the Maritime Commission.He was a member of the Merchant Marine association, which made me an honorary member when I retired. I have seen no mention of his death, so assume he is still alive.Kain was doing quite well in New York, -Merchant Marine insurance. Webster is still in Washington. He sent me his change of address last month- the Kennedy Warren, 3133 Connecticut Ave. NW Washngton 8, DC. Phone 232-1523. I saw Abel at a couple of parties two or three years ago. We did not see him last year when we were down there. He and his son were in real estate business. = We expect to be up here until the end of October if it does not freeze too soon. Our water pipes are exposed, so we have to move out and have the water drained from the pipes before a hard freeze comes = Sorry we can't get together for the fiftieth but wishing you the best of luck. Sincerely,Joe."


 


Caption 1910 Landing Force photo RCS from p 70 no. 1211 ==w1281 p 80 R-E-V-E-N-U-E C-U-T-T-E-R School + Admiral Farley letter

 

1211 p 70 symbol (9) brings up Revenue Cutter School chapter collected on web page 78 and related 1909-1910 photos.9-982. 12-91 spinnaker,94 Corinth canal. 19-151,152 Gibraltar. 20-153. 23-181,182. 25-789 ITASCA crew + cadets. 33-895 sewing,896,897. 34-903 dance hall. 35-911 Bari,-912 Madeira, -913 Bari. 47-370,1011. 69-1198,1202 Jack,1203,1204,1205. 70-1206 landing exercise Sammy's Beach or Gardiners Bay,1209,1211


 


78-1282 Caption of Gershom Bradford photo p.10 see 39w,56w

 

Born Kingston, Massachusetts May 10, l879, Gershom Bradford studied at a schoolshhip that was forerunner of massachusetts Maritime Academy. in l900 he helped lay out a deepwater navigational test course off Provincetown Cape Cod, where in l927 the submarine S-4 surfaced without warning in front of the Coast Guard cutter PAULDING. The Submarine sank as a result of the collision, in which Jack Barrett and many others were sent to sea in rescue efforts. Gershom Bradford went to Naval Hydrographic office Washington D.C. 1908 and was a valued friend of Jack Barrett there l9l3-l9l6 and kept in touch with Jack and family thereafter.Gershom's wife Mary Lightfoot's family owned property at4701 Reservoir Road NW Washington D>C where the German embassy was their next door neighbor l970. She lived to age 103, and her niece Mrs. Laroe of Toledo,Ohio gave the Barretts this photo. Gershom wrote several editions of "A Dictionary of Sea Terms" and many articles for American Neptune Magazine, published by his friend Walter Whitehill at maritime Peabody Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.More than twenty of these articles were colllected in two books published by Barre press "Yonder is the Sea" and "In with the Sea Wind."Gershom's father Gamaliel had been in whaling in California and Pacific l850's. Then he was active innfighting in Union Navy in Civil War.Gershom's uncle-by-marriage Frederick Knapp was assistant to Frederick Law Olmstead on Sanitary Commission, which cared for sick and wounded Union soldiers in Civil War - comparable to later American Red Cross. Sophie Barrett's l923 ount Holyoke classmate Rebecca G.Smaltz of Phiadelphia got to know Gershom because her cousin Laura Wood Roper publioshed some information from Gershom in "F.L. O." - her biography of Frederick Law Olmstead remembered primarily for his conservation work at Yosemite and niagara Falls and landscape architecture at 500 parks and Arboreta.Both Gershom's parents were descendants ofcolonial Pymouth colony governor Robert Bradford, and he did a great deal of colonial history, also wrote about Admrial Horatio Nelson compelling a Cape Cod fisherman to pilot him through shallow waters l782 during the american Revolution - much about whaling, Cape Horn, seamanship, and the l782 disappearance of the crew of Mary Celeste New Bedford fishing boat near the Azores, which he attributed to a waterspout frightening the crew.Bradford in the l970's did research on his uncle General Edward Wild, who lost a leg at Antietam 1862 but commanded Negro troops with remarkable success in l864. He also remembered seeing Mosby, of the l864 Confederate "Mosby's Raiders" of Virginia,, who later was appointed to positions in the federal government and was stilol active when Bradford went to Washington l908.He accepted honorary membership in Sons of UnionVeteran l978. His secvond cousin Dr. Charles Bradford also writes history on Merimac-Monitor ironclads l862 -Lexington= concord in Revoilution. Dr. Bradfrod's father was dean of Harvard Medical near World War I and develpoped the Bradford orthopedic frame. Gershom wrote many articles for weekly Duxbury Clipper and the home of his great-grandfather in Kingston has becvome a historic site. -


 

 

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