Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 


GENE NELSON letter Dec.1941 family evacuation PEARL HARBOR

 

Admiral Bloch that ALL Navy dependents were to be evacuated as quickly as ships could be made available.When Gertrude Rice learned that Jack would be working on the dock all Christmas Day loading the evacuees aboard several ships, to be convoyed by three destroyers & a cruiser,she invited John & me to share Christmas dinner with her & Paul -risky as she lived near the Army's Fort Derussy in Waikiki, but it was within walking distance of our house.Carrying our gas masks,John & I walked to Gertrude's apartment, where she gave us a most delicious turkey dinner.When John asked for more peaches with his turkey,Gertrude hesitated, as they were brandied peaches.We had just finished eating when Jack apeared-tired & unfed at three o'clock in the afternoon.Gertrude gave him a good dinner,but he had to leave immediately because he was evacuating thousands of frightened wounded & dependent women with unruly children-with lines miles long waiting to get on the ships.Many women & children had given up their homes & were unfed. Jack saw our friend Mrs. Jean Nelson (from Panama days) standing in line with her two sons-ages about five & seven-at least a mile from the ship trying to control the two boys & watch her luggage at the same time.Jack called a couple of sailors to help her with her bags,& then he went aboard with her & gave her a lovely big room on the Matson Line's LURLINE.She was very pleased when he had an extra cot put in for Eric,the younger boy,so the family could be together in one cabin.Jack ordered her trunk taken to her cabin-a great privilege as most passengers could get nothing from their trunks during the voyage,because the trunks were in the hold.Later Gene Nelson wrote me that many of the children had no warm clothes for the cold weather of San Francisco about New Year's Day,& many had no shoes or stockings, which children generally do not use in Hawaii.One evening when the order came to "Darken Ship," some women thought they heard,"Abandon Ship," & there was temporary panic-but that soon subsided.The destroyers of the convoy occasionally dropped depth charges for suspected submarines,but the voyage was not too harrowing.GENE NELSON letter June 24,l970 "widow of Captain Paul Nelson,who had been a young boat officer on the survey ship HANNIBAL when Jack was "exec" & who was aboard the mine layer OGLALA on December 7,l94lwhen she was sunk & who died some time ago- a letter about her evacuation by Jack onthe LURLINE Christmas Day l94l.Her son Paul junior was graduated from the Naval Academy & became a submariner- & her sonEric became a Naval aviator,but Eric was killed in a mountain accident recently.Gene herself passed away from a heart condition in March l97l. There were our good Navy friends,who visited at our house in West Roxbury in the l950's for Sunday dinner. In her letter Gene wrote,'"Dear Sophie: Paul had (p.ll9f)the duty December 6-7 l94l aboard the OGLALA usually referred to as THAT old minelayer.I did not know he was alive until 2;30 pm The wife of the skipper 'Colonel' Speight located me at Kay Tompkins' where I had gone after I picked upthe children at Saint Andrews Episcopal Church. Kalaimaku Street was an evacuation area,so that it was senseless totry to go home. I went on home with the boys-Paul junior & Eric after spending the day getting up & down a rickety ladder with them & hiding under a reinforced concrete culvert.Later Paul & the paymaster came home-Paul trying to whistle & in khaki as the uniform was changed from whites to try to catch any possible saboteurs.I forget how I got the word,but I went downtown to have the boys evacuated wight away.Later I was informed I had to go along.A might telephone call told me to report for evacuation at a downtown pier.Somehow I had trunks,suitcases & even a toy or two with us.All our Christmas presents had sunk on the OGLALA December 7, l94l.(Paul jr was about eight & Eric about five) A cot was put in a lovely room on the LURLINE now renamed the MATSONIA.It was made up about sundown for Eric.The sheets felt odd,& next morning we found they were pure linen from the lanai suites! We had nothing to bathe in for 4 l/2 days but cold salt water. We had sailed on December 26,l94l accompaniedby two cruisers- one of them the St. LOUIS,& five destroyers.The destroyers ran around like mad that afternoon tossing over "ash cans" (depth charges).They were kept very busy tossing over depth charges p ll9g as we had all four of the Matson liners in convoy. We had aboard I believe thirty-eight of the burn cases.The boys went belting down a main staircase & almost ran into one, one day.I threatened them with everything I knew if theyt did it again. The gallant suffering burned boy (sailor) kept telling me he kknew they meant no harm. have keen hearing.One night over the loudspeaker came "Prepare to darken ship."Over a hundred people paniced,as they [thought they]heard,"Prepare to abandon ship." My table mates bolted,but I grabbed an arm of each boy & told them to stay seated.Took quite a while to restore order.One evening some others were in our assigned places.We were put at a small table against the wall-I had some words,believe me with the steward- & we went back to our table for breakfast & kept on there.The stewards were quite surly. I heard later that at disembarkation at San Francisco they were marched off & sent to a recruiting office - or else...I cannot vouch for the story.They should have been,because the children were given a patented cooked cereal every day & diarrhea was rampant,you may imagine. One morning I was talking to a lovely older lady & mentioned I was worried about all the children I saw barefooted & in cotton only.Our boys had their little but too small coats & caps & were warm enough to land in San Francisco within two days. I bet it was twenty minutes later when over the loud speaker came a request that anyone who could spare clothes report to deck room- I had been talking with a General's wife.She got things done that I a Lieutenant's wife coould only worry about.We docked on a beautiful day at Pier 32 San Francisco.I managed to reach a phone & called Paul's sister-at work of course.I could hear her call over her shoulder,"My brother's wife & boys are here from Pearl Harbor-'bye,bosss."When she came to pick us up, I told ner "Open the front & back doors. We've had only cold salt water in which to wash for 4 l/2 days." On the dock were plenty of warm donations which should have been sent to Honolulu.Plenty of time for it. The Red Cross was there selling orange juice, coffee, milk for anickel apiece. A good friend of mine had on the same slacksuit for three days & I asked if she had any other clothes.Everything of hers had been put in the hold & no person could go look.She came down to our room & I outfitted her with a brand new suit from Sears Roebuck & even had thread & needle for her to shorten the pants- all thanks to your Jack having given orders for all our baggage to go in our lovely big room. This is July 5 now- I get sidetracked by this lousy heart & my sixty-first birthday on July 3. As ever,Gene Nelson." THE OGLALA haD PREVIOUSLY BEEN A FALL RIVER liner But she was almost always tied up at Pearl Harbor. On December 7,l94l she lay next to the cruiser HELENA at 1010 dock & capsized.She was tied up so slong that a family of birds built a nest in her funnel.


 


HANNIBAL w1292 p 80

 

HANNIBAL Sunderland, England $147,941 pur price commissioned June 7, 1898 + January 1921. Vertical 3 EXP engines. 2 S.E. boilers 11,000 horsepower, generators A M blower ECKDYN Westinghouse Sturtevant 274 feet one inch. 39 feet 3 inches - 17 feet four inches draft. Four thousand tons displacement. nine knots. gross tonnage 1953 tons. No armament. 17 officers, 11 petty officers, 135 other enlisted. SYLVIA old steam yacht. p. 326 sold October 20, 1921. ANNISTON cruiser. was formerly the MONTGOMERY Authorized 1888 Built Columbia[n?] Iron Works Baltimore - was cruiser # 9. Name changed to ANNISTON March 14, 1918 while Jack was aboard. stricken August 25, 1919. Sold November 14, 1919. STRINGHAM DD 83 Rear Admiral Stringham 1862 - he was in War of 1812. HENDERSON API 483 feet 10 inches. 60 feet 11.5 inches 19 feet 10.75 inches draft. ten thousand tons. fourteen knots. 7,493 tons registered. Vertical 3 EXP engines, 4000 horsepower. First class passengers, women and children 112, female servants six, officers and civilians as many as are given authority to travel except that no more than one hundred to be put in troop or crew spaces. Troop passengers for indefinite period twelve hundred - additional for short period eight hundred. Built Navy Yard, Phila,$1,850,000.Commissioned May 24, 1917. Eight five-inch 50 caliber two - three inch 50 caliber. Two masts 27 officers, 24 chief petty officers, 373 enlisted.


 


p 80-1293 BOSTON LATIN

 

BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL chapter RedHeadedStepchild by Sophie + John Barrett Masters William Foster Rice, Joseph Webber Chadwick, William Pride Henderson and Henry Pennypacker appear in second row from back .Jack Barrett is fifth from right in third row from front. Next to him is Truman advisor David Niles, and third from right end is Navy ophthalmologist Dr. Irving W. Jacobs. Other identifications: Front row second from left - Samuel Finkel- once youngest Massachusetts State Senator- corresponded with Sophie and John from California l970-1972,. Front Row extreme right Henry Thomas - author of numerous biographies and books on scholarship and philosophy. His son Dana Lee Thomas was an editor of Barron's Financial Weekly in l970s - active in Harvard alumni - wrote Barretts in l970s. - Third from right George Carl Adams - another active correspondent l970s. Fifth from right is attorney Dan Lyne, who walked to school with Jack Barrett and Edward Illingworth from South Boston - his son Dan Lyne was a classmate of Jack Barrett at Boston College Law School 1949-1951. Second row fifth from left William Angus Corley Annapolis graduate and career Naval officer- second from Right Dr. Austin Cheever, who settled in Hawaii.Third row sixth from right David Niles [originally Neyhus] who achieved diplomatic recognition for Israel 1947 fifth from right "Red Headed Stepchild" John Berchmans Barrett 1888-1969. Back row fifth from right John Carroll Poland junior who grew up in West Roxbury, found West Roxbury Historical Society l931 and Braintree Historical Society - he was l906 Boston Latin Class Secretary - left extensive notes -his wife Lucile was a cousin of West Roxbury Branch Librarian Pauline Walker. The Polands moved l954 from Temple St. West Roxbury to l9 Trim Street, Camden Maine, wheere the Barretts visited them l963 and l968. Mrs. Poland donated the original of this photo to the Barretts after her hubsand died March 28, l969. She lived to age ninety four or more, returning to her native Ossippee, New Hampshire. In Chapter below, there is identification numbering keyed to this photo- ------ B-O-S-T-O-N __L-A-T-I-N Jack Boston Latin story- Ancient History exam question:"Tell all you know about the Emperor Caligula" {a highly depraved character}.Student received passing grade for reply, "The less said about Caligula the better." E_D_W_A_R_D _E_V_E_R_E_T_T _H_A_L_E When Jack was a student at Boston Latin, he heard Edward Everett Hale,(1822-l909) 1835 alumnus who frequently spoke to the students and was active in alumni.Hale is principally remembered today for his short story "The Man Without a Country", which reflects patriotic feelings of the era just before the Civil War, comparable to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's stirring "Sail on O ship of State - Sail on O nation strong and great" or Walter Scott's "Breathes there a man with soul so dead Who never to himself has said, 'This is my own, native land?'" Edward Everett Hale was a grandnephew of Revolution hero Nathan Hale.In later years he was appointed Chaplain of the United States Senate in a period of corruption and muck-racking. He comically remarked,"I looked at the Senators, and I prayed for the country."Jack quoted this a number of times. In 1635 Reverend John Cotton wanted to establish in the new world a school like the Free Grammar School of Boston, England, in which Latin and Greek were taught.The first school was in the home of the master.Boston assigned the rents of Deer, Long, and Spectacle Islands in the Harbor to suport of the school. Jack had the tercentennary history 1935 by Pauline Holmes published by Harvard School of Education. Dr. Moses Merrill, who was principal retiring 1901, reorganized the curriculum on a modern basis, after which there were few changes. When Jack entered in 1902, Arthur Irving Fiske became principal. He taught Latin- was courteous, scholarly, gentlemanly, but developed health problems, retired and died in 1910 while Jack's brother Bill was enrolled. His successor was Henry Pennypacker, who was an excellent athlete, taught Greek, and later was Harvard Dean of Admissions.He was succeeded by Patrick Thomas Campbell in 1920. Jack took Greek with Pennypacker, Latin with Fiske, French with William Pride Henderson, History - his best subject gradewise with Selah Howell,[who lived on Kirk Street, West Roxbury]and English with Byron Groce.He took math with Pat Campbell and later consulted principal Campbell in connection with transcripts of his grades for Navy and job applications.Campbell was elected Superintendant of Boston Public Schools in 1931. Of the fifty-six signers of the Declaration of Independence five were Boston Latin School boys - John Hancock,Samuel Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Treat Paine, William Hooper.Originally the school was on the north side of School Street, until 1784,when a new schoolhouse was built on Bedford Street. In 1881 the School moved to Warren Avenue,where Jack attended for four years from 1902 to 1906.Boston English High School and Girls Latin were nearby. In 1922 the Latin School moved to a new building on Avenue Louis Pasteur in the Fenway.Admission requires an examination in mathematics and English.Courses ofered are English, Latin, Greek, French, German, History, Mathematics,Physics, Chemistry, Biology, General Music, Art, Physical Education,Health Education, Declamation. Declamation has been offered since the foundation of the Latin School. Jack kept many copies of the student-written Boston Latin School magazine "Register." Jack was especially fond of Caesar's "Gallic Wars" and Duruy's World History - originally 1848 French translated and updated 1898 by Professor Grosvenor of Amherst College.Jack was admitted to Harvard College 1906 based on the special Harvard exam used at that date. He attended a few classes but found he could not afford the two hundred dollars tuition.He would have been a classmate of T.S. Eliot, John Reed,Dan Lyne, Edward Illingworth. Latin prose composition was stressed- Jack remembered and quoted an example "Quos dii ruant, infurant" - based on the Greek of Sophocles' play "Antigone"- "Those whom the gods would destroy, they first drive mad." T_H_O_M_A_S__ C_R_A_V_E_N_ On March 30, l97l Mr. Thomas D. Craven, Secretary of the Boston Latin School Association supplied us with the names and addresses of the surviving members of Jack's class of l906.He listed George C.Adams,Dr. Augustus Cheever,Samuel B. Finkel, Dr. Emilio Goggio, Dr.Irving W. Jacobs, and Gardner Murphy, junior, among the ten surviving members of the class.Although he gave ten names and addresses of l906 members, we found only the named six alive. We wrote letters to the ten Mr. Craven named and had replies indicating that only six survived. F_R_E_D_E_R_I_C_K__ B. _W_I_L_L_I_A_M_S Mr. Frederick B. Williams of Roslindale and Needham had suggested we contact Mr. Craven.G_E_O_R_G_E __A_D_A_M_S George Carl Adams replied on March 10, l97l, "Dear Mrs. Barrett,So pleased to hear from you this morning.I am not sure if I can be of much help.Of course I knew John but not very well and I don't recall even having Bill Corley called "Stubby". I know Gardner Murphy very well indeed but the other boys not so well.You were very kind to send me so much information.It was very interesting. I hope you can get in touch with some of the boys who knew Jack very well and can give you the information you want.Write again and tell me how you get on.-George Carl Adams.(Milford, Connecticut)" Our letter to Joseph Merrill was answered from New York City on March 7, l97l by his son Arthur Merrill telling us his father had died on May 7, l970 at age eighty-one.He promised to get in touch with us if he came across anything of interest about the Boston Latin School experiences of his father, but we heard no more from him.We wrote several times to Dr.Austin Cheever of Honolulu and did not get a reply although friends told us he was alive but not in good health.He was a skin specialist. Dr. Emilio Goggio of California wrote twice but contributed no detailed information about his school years. He was a linguist graduated from Harvard in l909.A second letter from George Adams March 17, l97l "Henry Pennypacker was my favorite teacher.He taught Greek. He was later made headmaster. A wonderful man.We all got honors in Greek on entrance Exams at Dartmouth and Harvard." State Senator S_A_M_U_E_L __F_I_N_K_E_L On March 20, l97l the Honorable Samuel B. Finkel wrote from North Hollywood, California,"I feel badly that I am unable to furnish you with the information you would like concerning certain members of the Class of l906.About the only ones I remember strictly from my Latin School days are Fred Wilmot and John Poland- my closest friend following our Latin School days.The following I remember from later contacts in one way or another- Dan Lyne, Austin Cheever,Dave Niles, Henry Schnittkind and a few others whom I would meet casually.To my regret none of the others "rang a bell"- Goode, Goggio,.Jacobs, McCarthy.There is a deeply rooted Latin School tradition in my family.My two brothers went to Latin School-both of them distinguished themselves scholastically and in other ways.My only son was a member of the class of l934 or perhaps l933. There was a specially close relationship between him and William Pride Henderson. If without too much trouble a Xerox copy of the 1906 class dinner picture could be sent to me, I would appreciate it very much and would be glad to pay for whatever expense is involved. Do you have any idea of how many of the class are still living?Are Gardner Murphy and I the only ones? Don't hesitate to write again." (Note-William Pride Henderson lived in West Roxbury in later years, and Jack saw him when we moved there in l947.) D_A_N & G_E_N_E __L_Y_N_E On March 26,l97l Gene Lyne, son of Jack's close friend Dan Lyne sent a note enclosing the photostat copy of a few pages his father had written about the Latin School. Jack and Dan Lyne and Ed Illingworth of South Boston walked to the Latin School on Warren Avenue across the Fourth Street bridge, passing a Lithuanian church on West Fifth near B Street on the way. E_D_W_A_R_D__ I_L_L_I_N_G_W_O_R_T_H Illingworth studied in Europe with composer Ferruchio Busoni, moved to West Roxbury n Woirld War I era, and taught music in Boston Public Schools and played a church organ near the West Roxbury Parkway on Sundays.Dan Lyne's paper is entitled, "Preparatory School." "Boston Latin School was my preparatory school. I was a student there from l902 to l906.It is the oldest public school in the United States.The Boston Transcript described it as 'the school that dandled Harvard College on its knee.'I believe Harvard College was founded so that graduates of Boston Latin might have an institution near at hand in which to continue their studies.Ten per cent of the signers of the Declaration of Independence had been students at Boston Latin School.It was a long distance from my house to the school, but I rode it on the street car only twice- all other days I walked it over Dover Street bridge regardless of the weather, for the fare of five cents was worth saving, and I was never absent or late during the four years.I received more real education at the Boston Latin School than in any other place including Harvard and Harvard Law School.I was president of the Boston Latin School Association from 1941 to 1944.This year I have been asked to serve as judge at the school's annual prize declamation,for I am a member of the class which is fifty years out this year. I had graduated from grammar school before entering so I did not take the regular six year course.Boys so entering were known as 'out of course' students and were expected to get back into course at the end of their first or second year.I have never forgotten my first home lesson at Boston Latin School, memorizing declination of 'mensa'.I walked around and around a table at home and very seriously considered transferring to some other school.Each class had a 'home room teacher'.In the third class my home room teacher was Mr. Norton, in the second Mr. Rulandon, and in the First Mr. Chadwick ('Chad').I regret to have to record that in each of my four years I received more 'misdemeanor'marks than did any other boy in my class.Under the rules of the school this disqualified me from receiving any prizes or holding any commission in the school regiment.In my last year Mr. Fiske('Pa") the headmaster called me out from my room to the corridor and said to me,'Lyne, at the teachers' meeting last night it appeared you had enough misdemeanor marks to warrant a censure.You are color sergeant of the regiment, and I want you to carry the flag at the exercises next week,so I vetoed the censure. I did this because I feel you have an unusually well-rounded mind- most good students are excellent in language but only mediocre in mathematics,but you have been outstanding in both languages and mathematics,although your past censures have prevented your getting any prizes.'he next day Mr.Henderson our French teacher,called at me,'Lyne,one misdemeanor mark! -and I'm tempted to take you down to the gym and give you a lesson!' I replied, 'I'm ready and willing to go to the gym with you at any time.' Henderson:'Two misdemeanor marks!' Lyne 'Go to hell! 'Henderson,'You're censored.'So I did not carry the flag at the exercises the next week, but I have always loved 'Pa" Fiske for his kindness in trying to make it possible for me to do so. 'Pat Campbell succeeded Mr. Pennypacker- who had succeeded 'Pa' Fiske as head master at Boston Latin School-told me this story, 'Dan, I'm having a hard time keeping the boys up to the school's old standards of education. I was upbraiding one of them recently, and he said to me, "Mr. Campbell, I don't see why I should study any harder. It took Joe Kennedy seven years to get through Latin School,and look how well he has done."'"Dan Lyne's father was blind and peddled brooms in South Boston, where they lived at D and Third Streets across from Jack's cousins the Hartigans and Donovans.Dan became a district attorney in the early l920's, then went into law practice, and handled Jack's inheritance in l926 of three thousand dollars from his aunt Kate in San Francisco. Dan married Sue O'Brien of Dorchester and had five children and many granchildren. Their sons Eugene and Kerry Lyne became lawyers.Dan recommended John for Roxbury Latin School l947 and Jack for Boston College Law School l949. G_A_R_D_N_E_R __M_U_R_P_H_Y_On April 11,l971 Mr. Gardner Murphy junior of Cambridge Massachusetts wrote"THANK YOU FOR THE NEWS OF SOME OF THE 1906 MEN WHO HAVE MOVED AWAY AND IN SOME CASES PICKED OUT CALIFORNIA to settle. I have learned more about the class in the last few months than in all the years since graduation."He identified forty-six classmates in the official l906 photo for us. He was in investments and resided many years in Buffalo, New York, then retiring in Cambridge, Massachusetts where we located him and John visited his apartment. Captain USN I_R_V_I_N_G__ J_A_C_O_B_S On April 13, l97l we received a letter from Dr. Irving W. Jacobs of Tustin California "This will acknowledge your letters of March 8 and April 7, l97l. As my eyes have not been good for the past several months,this letter will be a short one.It was nice to hear of events and friends of your husband.He was a good friend in the Boston Latin Class of l906. He visited me aboard the Hospital ship RELIEF while in Guantanamo Bay. As we both did not speak Spanish,we had a difficult time communicating with the Cuban people. We had studied too much Latin and Greek while in Boston Latin School.Lieutenant Commander Corley a Naval Academy graduate was treated [CHECK MANUSCRIPT] by me about that time. We spoke of Boston Latin graduates- your husband was mentioned at that time. I do remember other Boston Latin l906 classmates such as Dan Lyne - later a lawyer in Boston - Sheehan - Captain of the baseball team and the Poland boys, Buckley, Ney, Neyhus (Niles) Finkel, Schnittkind (Henry Thomas), who wrote the words of the class song"The boys of 'six' do all kinds of tricks"- it was my pleasure to have written the music.Some professors at Boston Latin at that time were Dr. Irving Fiske, principal, Pennypacker professor of Greek, Henderson professor of French and Greek. -Stuffy Groce - professsor of English - a true sadist.He said to Ney,"Your mark in English this month is 15 - last month it was 20."Sorry but I cannot remember much more and must close" -Dr. Irving W. Jacobs, career opthalmologist, U.S. Navy. F_I_N_K_E_L (2) On April 23, l97l the Honorable Samuel Finkel wrote again from North Hollywood,California "You will be glad to know that I called Dr. Jacobs on the phone and had a pleasant talk with him during which we reminisced about our Boston Latin School teachers and classmates. Both of us agree you deserve a gold medal for trying to bring the surviving members of the class to the attention of each other.I explained to Jacobs that I have allowed my driver's license to lapse and so could not make the trip to Tustin,which is about fifty miles from here.Fortunately, Jacobs's wife can drive.I invited both of them to visit us in Los Angeles.I look forward to their visit. Schnittkind -He was an author-his pen name was HENRY THOMAS- he had a son who collaborated with him and later succeeded him either under the same name or a different one. Their publisher was Doubleday New York city. A letter to them will get you the information you want.If and when you get it,I would appreciate your letting me know what you have learned about him. D_A_V_I_D__ N_I_L_E_S- Niles You can get full information about him through Ford Hall Forum attention Judge Reuben Lurie Superior Court and -or Louis P.Smith.In my opinion Niles became the outstanding member of our class.His office was in the White House during the administrations of Truman and Franklin Roosevelt. He wielded tremendous power both in the White House and Congress. (Note Niles was an advisor expecially on labor matters and played a crucial role in President Truman's prompt diplomatic recognition of Israel. Presidential speech-writer Clark Clifford supported the efforts of Niles, and President Truman overruled Secretary of State George Marshall, who threatened to resign but withdrew the threat after Truman's decision). Wilmot-He does not appear in the class picture [actually he does] but he certainly was a member of our class.He won the first prize in Declamation while still in the Second Class.He later became a professional actor then an advanced Universalist Minister and later religious editor of a well known newspaper in Providence Rhode Island.Groce the English teacher:[gap?] In a later letter which I hope my failing eyesight will not prevent me from writing, I shall use some of your comments and those of John as cues for some observations of my own."-Samuel Finkel.On May 24, l97l the Honorable Sam Finkel wrote again from North Hollywood,"In accordance with an exchange of letters and telephone calls between Dr. Irving Jacobs and myself Saturday May 22nd was fixed as the date for our reunion in his home.In every way the visit came off very well.It was not only a memorable occasion- but a pleasant one as well. The highlight of the visit was the class picture.Jacobs had never seen it before nor did he remember the occasion (a class dinner in l908). Mrs. Jacobs was not able to identify her husband nor me.I am writing Jacobs that his class song collaboarator [Henry Thomas]passed away.Incidentally he played the song, and we both sang it together.I know David Niles was never married. Sam Finkel."= J_O_H_N & L_U_C_I_L_E__ P_O_L_A_N_D For a number of years Jack had received attractive photo Christmas cards from his classmate John Poland, who had moved from West Roxbury to Camden, Maine in 1954. These cards motivated us to resume our habit of annual Christmas photos, as in Jack's active Navy years.On August l6, l963 Jack John and I visited Mr. and Mrs. John Carroll Poland junior at their home at 10 Trim Street in Camden Maine. We were reurning from a week's holiday touring Montpelier, Vermont,Lake Champlain, Roux's Point New York, Montreal Three Rivers, Quebec City, the Beauce Valley, Jackman. Maine.John Poland had attended Harvard college class of 1911 and divinity school and was very active as l906 Boston Latin class secretary, organizing reunions, round robin letters,and an extensive newsletter and questionnaire for the l935 school tercentennary.He also was founder of the West Roxbury Historical Society in l93l, having grown up on Temple Street.His father and uncle had developed a brand of washing machines.He moved to Maine in l954. His wife Lucile was a first cousin of West Roxbury Branch Public Librarian Pauline Walker, who helped Jack a great deal in 1950s and 1960s. Jack and John visited the Polands in Camden again in May l968 and shortly thereafter joined the West Roxbury Historical Society, in which we were active many years. John Poland died the same day as President Dwight Eisenhower, March 28, l969. Lucile lived to age 94, corresponded with the Barretts and West Roxbury Historical Society to 1988 or later, and went to a retirement home in Ossippee, New Hampshire, where she grew up.] Sophie Barrett notes: In June,l97l John Barrett went to Camden by bus to visit Mrs Poland, who gave him the l906 Boston Latin class photo and a big box of Boston Latin materials and items for the West Roxbury Historical Society, including John Poland's notes on early settlers in the Baker Street area near Brook Farm, beginning around l690, originally in Newton but annexed to Roxbury and Boston.On this trip John Barrett also saw Captain and Mrs. Haskell Todd in Belfast, Maine, where they discussed discussed the 1938-1939 voyages of the tanker TRINITY. Mrs. Poland drove John to Mount Megunticook where Edna St. Vincent Millay had the idea for her best-known poem. On May 23, 1971 Lucile Poland, wife of Jack's Boston Latin School classmate wrote to John from Camden, Maine: "Dear John, Thank you very much for the photograph of the Boston Latin School class including my John when he was a youth. I appreciate your thoughtfulness in having the picture copied for me, and I hope you will overlook my negligence in not thanking you sooner. I do not know any of John's Latin School classmates. I met Dan Lyne once and your father when you three called on us here in our home. [When John was a guest at Mrs. Poland's home in Camden one month after receiving this letter - June, 1971- Mrs. Poland told him that she had gone to Hawaii to visit Doctor and Mrs. Austin Cheever. He was a 1906 classmate of John Poland at Boston Latin School. Maybe she didn't realize he was a BLS classmate - thought of him only as an old Boston friend.] I have heard John speak of several of the others, so their names are familiar to me. You may be interested in having this late class reunion picture. I wonder if your father is in this picture. John is seated directly back of #10. I do not wish to have the picture returned.What a pity that John and I have no sons and daughters to cherish some of our intimate belongings. We found each other too late. When we were maried in 1944, I was forty-nine, and John was fifty-eight. At that time I suggested we adopt a litte boy or a girl or both, but John said, "No, we are too old, - it wouldn't be fair to the children", and we have done many things to help other people's children. In so doing, we have derived much pleasure and satisfaction. = I do have many friends here in Camden. My roots are firmly planted here, and I should hesitate to leave the house where John and I spent the happiest years of our life. The house is big, but I love it. I was glad to hear of the activities of thr West Roxbury Historical Society. [Jack Barrett was a member of this Society]. [Sophie later joined]. = One reason for my delay in thanking you was that I wished to go to the attic to look among John's things for Latin School memorabilia. I found a box marked "Boston Latin School" containing papers and photographs.One large class picture mounted on cardboard. Your father's class picture is in the group, and I think there are three or four of the teachers. [John brought this picture home and had reproductions made for the six surviving classmates as John Poland had named everyboy in the photograph]. = "Now then you offered your help, and I am going to accept your offer. My thought is this: Maybe you could ask some friend to take a drive with you some pleasant day this early summer, = drive to Camden, and pick up these things. I have a guest room with a big double bed if you wiah to stay overnight." = [John went to visit Mrs. Poland and returned with a big box of Boston Latin memorabilia.] = From the Boston Globe Librarian I learned on June 9, 1971 that David K. Niles [Neyhus] died on September 28,1952. The Globe carred the obituary on September 29, 1952 in the A.M. edition. It was on the front page. John made a copy at the Boston Public Library, where the paper, going back to 1872 is on microfilm. = John Barrett had a very enjoyable June, 1971 visit in Camden and also in Belfast, Maine saw Captain and Mrs. Haskell C. Todd , who reminisced about the voyages of the tanker TRINITY to the Philippines, Dutch Indies, Dutch Harbor, and Japan. Mrs. Poland showed him the mountain where Edna St. Vincent Millay wrote one of her best known poems, and gave much material both on Boston Latin School and West Roxbury. The founding of the West Roxbury Historical Society was his idea in 1931, though Harold Arnold, minister of Theodore Parker Church became the first president. John Poland had a great interest in a 1767 School House on Centre St., the old post road traveled by George Washington and his troops in 1775. He also made extensive notes on early families of 1690-1800 near John Eliot Pulpit Rock the later site of Brook Farm. A tradition came down through these families and their descendants to the farmer who sold the Brook Farm site to George Ripley and took back a mortgage autumn 1841. .. Samuel Finkel wrote that he got into Massachusetts politics at an early age and was the youngest elected member of the State Senate in history. 1906 PHOTO IDENTIFICATIONS: l906 photo [left to right in each row, beginning at back] BACK ROW 1.Arthur Timothy Good 2 Winthrop Snow Ney 3. Pierpont MCloskey Cowan 4 George Francis McCarthy 5 John Carroll Poland junior 6 Francis J. Fallon 7 Emilio Goggio 8 Earnest Rudolph Wonemuth,junior? 9 Michael Sisonsky TEACHERS SECOND FROM BACK 10 William Foster Rice, teacher Joseph Webber Chadwick teacher, William Pride Henderson French teacher Henry Pennypacker,Greek teacher. THIRD ROW FROM BACK 14 John Patrick Buckley l5 John Edward Mahoney l6 Samuel Krensky (dentist) 17 Charles Jacales Gale l8 Royal Norton Hallowell l9 Joseph Daniel Donovan 20 David Kahn Neyhus 21 John Berchmans Barrett 22 Albert Hussey 23 Irving W. Jacobs 24 James Humphrey 25 Joseph R. Sheehan FOURTH ROW FROM BACK [second front Front]26 Louis Walter Hickey 27 James Joseph Goode 28 Averille Daily Carlisle 29 Joseph John Mahoney 30 William Angus Corley 31 Cornelius Francis Regan 32 Percy Anthony Broderick 33 John Timothy Reardon 34 Edward Victor Hickey (son a banker?) 35 Richard Dobbyn 36 Austin Walter Cheever 37 Bernard Wolf FRONT ROW 38 Stanley W. Moulton 39 Samuel Benjamin Finkel 40 Francis Stephen Killilea 41 John Michael Spillane 42 Charles Edward Vincent Mansfield 43 Joseph Leo Merrill 44 Joseph Warren Doherty 45 Daniel Joseph Lyne 46 Gardner Murphy second 47 George Carl Adams 48 Henry Joseph Conroy 49 Henry Thomas Schnittkind. Not in picture Edward P. Illingworth,Chrles Nathan Woyzenski. In a letter from Samuel Finkel dated July 4, l97l he says, "In the picture you sent I was glad to be reminded of Sisonsky (#9) He was the essence of gentility humility and dignity of demeanor.He graduated from the Harvard medical School and became a successful doctor in Boston.Unhappily he died much too young.He worked his way through school as an usher at the Colonial Theater.Reverently I bow my head in his memory.Thanks a million for sending me the class pucture.It both gladdened me and saddened me. May your trip to Ireland be both pleasurable and fruitful. Regards to your mother-Sam Finkel" Mr. Finkel refers to a l908 photo at a l906 class reunion dinner which about eigheen attended including Jack Barrett.[This photo was stolen l993, but a photocopy survives.] Boston Latin later turned to one big reunion of all classes, but in the early l900's classes had individual dinners. We still have a copy of the official l906 senior class picture, from the Poland collection. A_N_N J_A_C_O_B_S -On September 14, l971 Mrs. Ann Jacobs wife of Irving W. Jacobs wrote from Tustin, California,"Dr. Jacobs and I would like to thank you for bringing two old Boston Latin School classmates together after sixty-five years. Mr. Finkel and his wife paid us a visit along with his son in June. We found them to be a lovely couple.(go to p. 445A)and enjoyed their vist very much. Dr. Jacobs and Mr. Finkel had a wonderful time talking over old times, and it was amazing how well they could remember events after such a long time. Mr. Finkel's wife Dora is a delightful person and we all love her. Last Saturday we paid a return visit at their son Larry's home. They too are lovely people and we had a very enjoyable visit. We are looking forward to a pleasant and lasting friendship, thanks to you. We also wish to thank you for the pictures you sent.Dr Jacobs could remember quite a few of them and little incidents connected with them. He regrets not being able to give you more help in your search for more acquaintances of your late husband. Mr. Finkel told us there are six living of the classmates.We have been married for eleven years. Thank you again for bringing the Finkels and the Jacobs' together " - Mrs. Irving Jacobs D_A_N_A Lee T_H_O_M_A_S & H_E_N_R_Y T_H_O_M_A_S Niles,Dana Thomas-Boston Latin-1906- Dana Thomas,David Niles- On June 9, l97l Dana L. Thomas, son of Henry Thomas originally named Schnittkind, wrote from New York City: My father was indeed a member of the Class of l906 at Boston Latin School, knew Senator Finkel,and possibly some of the others you have mentioned in your letter.He always spoke to me with great affection about those years in school and to the end re-lived the happy memories of those days. I was born and brought up in Boston and while I have not been living there for thirty years, I have warm, fond feelings for it.Recently my son Peter was graduated from Harvard, the third of his family to go there.He graduated magna cum laude and Phil Beta Kappa and in visiting him during his student years I had occasion to return to Boston and Cambridge and retrace some of my own years while visiting him. My father's family name was originally Levon.The Levons came from Russia.My father's oldest brother was the first to emigate to the United States at the turn of the century, and he adopted the name Schnittkind- I don't know why.My father began writing in the early l920's using his first two names given at birth- Henry Thomas- and after having written over twenty books he made Thomas the legal family name.Born in poverty my father made a brilliant record at Latin School,graduating with one of the highest academic records awarded a student.He became the protege as a student of one of his Boston Latin teachers, Mr. Charles Capen, a gentleman in his eighties who wanted to adopt my father as a son so that he could give him the opportunities that my father's parents were unable to provide.But his parents were unwilling to give my father up.My father went to Harvard on scholarships, walking from Boston to Cambridge to save the fare- he graduated in three years after winning numerous honors.He graduated in the famous class of l9l0 which included Walter Lippman, T.S Eliot, Heyward Broun and many others.My father received his Ph.d in the Classics in, I believe, l9l4.This is merely a thumbnail sketch, I realize, but I will be happy to fill you in with anything else you might want to know that I can recall personally or have been told about.In the methew best of luck in your biography and I hope it will come to a happy fruition. Best regards, Dana L. Thomas." Information about Henry Schnittkind, who wrote as Henry Thomas AB, MA and Ph.D was educated at Boston Latin School l906 and Harvard l9l0. Although he has been editor of the Stratford magazine, President of the Stratford Book Company,a teacher at Boston University and Headmaster at Fairfax Preparatory School most of his life has been devoted to writing.Dr. Thomas hasbeen author or co-author of more than forty books including "The Living World of Philosophy" "The Complete Book of English" and "Living Biographies of Great Philosophers." Doubleday sent us his book,"Understanding the Great Philosophers."- He also wrote "Mathematics Made Easy" "Science Subjects made Easy" "Stories of the Great Dramas and Their Authors"- "The Story of the United States" "The Story of Knowledge" "The Story of the Human Race" "The Wonder Book" "The Poets of the Future" and co-authored with Dana Lee Thomas (his son) "Living Biographies of Religious Leaders" "Great Scientists" "Famous Rulers" "American Statesmen" "Famous Men" "Great Composers" "Great Poets" "Great Painters" "Famous Americans" "Famous Novelists" "Famous Women". David Niles of Class of l906 (originally surname was Neyhus). See copy of New York times obituary which John reproduced at the Library. In l936 James Roosevelt and Harry Hopkins invited David Niles to Washington from Boston.In l94l or l942 he became a resident assistant to the President at the White House.He retired in 1951 after serving Presidents Roosevelt and Truman. He was bitterly attacked by anti-Israel factions as reported in New York Times story May 5, l948. Active member of Ford Hall Forum in Boston, Never attended college. President Sachar of Brandeis was an authority on Niles, and Brandeis University has an archive on him." Sam Krensky of the 1906 class became a dentist, and Jack Barrett often talked with him and his wife in South Brookline. Boston Latin graduates 1909 Coleman Silbert attorney 1910 Jame Bowe MOLONEY of South Boston Lincoln School HARVARD 1914 HARVARD MEDICAL 1917 career Naval officer 1917-1950 Captain USN was at Battle of Midway on NORTHAMPTON, where he frequently saw the great Admiral Raymond Spruance. BOSTON LATIN 1912 William Joseph Barrett, Secretary of Metropolitan Life Insurance Company after 39 year career in Policyholders Service Bureau and developing group health plans MIT 1916, U.S. Army officer World War I. John Vaccaro Harvard college 1916 & law school 1919 attorney & conveyancer. Archibald Dresser appraiser. F_R_E_D_E_R_I_C_K__GILLIS & family: Frederick Gillis teacher, especially business and economics, Boston College and Boston Superintendant of Schools. Fred Gillis and his grandson participated in March,1985 West Roxbury Historical Society program saluting 350 anniversary of school, along with head master Contompasis, Sophie and John Barrett, who organized the program, Frank Molloy, Miss Gretch, and many Boston Latin alumni and their families. Representatives of Boston Latin and Latin Academy now both coeducational participated. Fred Gillis wrote books for his granddaughter while her father was in Vietnam in miitary service. Many West Roxbury residents have had Boston Latin ties, and information on them will be appreciated. They include former Vice-Principal Albert van Steenbergen, James F. Sullivan, senior, George McLaughlin, Frank Crosson, Richard Whiting Bonney, Edward Mulvanity, James Gibbons, Thomas Hegarty and Girls Latin alumnae Beatrice Dunham, Dorothy Sullivan. Boston Latin principal Wilfred O'Leary and his wife, though Jamaica Plain residents, were members of the West Roxbury Historical Society many years, and he was president in 1982. He was also principal of Roslindale High School. Jack Barrett while at Boston Latin 1905 dated Helen Cochrane of East Fourth Street, South Boston. She was a friend and neighbor of Mollie Manning Curtaz and Anna Manning, who became longtime residents on Linnet Street West Roxbury.. [from Notebook 4 p 61] "To Lieutenant Commander John B. Barrett c/o Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania -[from] 378 Columbia Road, Dorchester Massachusetts April 8, 1937 Dear Jack, I am sure you will be very much surprised to hear from me, and I hope not angry at me for writing. My mother has just passed away, and so I have been trying to straighten things out here. = While going through some boxes today, I found all the many pleasant letters you had written as far back as 1910 (my - I'm old). Mother had them all neatly tied and marked, and after reading some of them, I thought I would just drop you a line. = Trust you have been well and happy all these years. Sometime would like so much to say "Hello" if you ever happen to be in this locality. = With kindest regards and pleasant memories of a past friendship, I am - Sincerely, Helen P. Cochrane." . Harvard -Arnold Arboretum botanist Bernice Schubert long editor of Arnold Arboretum Journal specialist on legumes and Dioscoraceae and distinguished photographer who worked with botanist Fernald at Harvard herbaria attended Girls Public Latin and recalls that one of her classmates Sylvia Rehder Wetherell of Jamaica Plain was the daughter of dendrologist Alfred Rehder. There were only forty-seven students in the class of 1906 with Jack Barrett, but demand for quality education led to rapid growth before the time when Bill Barrett was in class of 1912, and in the early 1950s, average Harvard College freshman classes had more than eighty Boston Latin graduates. Readers of Pauline Holmes's 1935 history published by the Harvard School of Education should note the remarkable satiric poem "The Grammarian's Funeral" by Benjamin Thompson the Boston Latin schoolmaster about 1703.


 


p 80w no.1294

 

Locations of RED HEADED STEPCHILD text chapters by WEB PAGE SEQUENCE--- p ONE at photo #7 Philadelphia 1937 -=- p 13 THIRTEEN at photos #100,101,102 HANNIBAL Panama-Costa Rica 1933-4-5 - -=- p. FOURTEEN # 111 WILLIAM JOSEPH BARRETT -=- p. TWENTY-NINE 29 #867 OVER THE MOUNTAIN" WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS summer 1947. -=- p. THIRTY-ONE at photo #877 Boston Latin School 1902-1906. Related photos p 41 #960,#961.-=-p FIFTY FOUR Frank DELAHANTY letters relate to battleship WYOMING, Naval War College, Virginia 1935 destroyer CLAXTON 1936 Hawaii 1946 and to 1970s.-=- page 55 FIFTY-FIVE Web page FIFTY-FIVE contains First four chapters of Part One of RED HEADED STEPCHILD Sophie Ruth Meranski Barrett family, Hartford Connecticut and Mount Holyoke College, social work, and marriage to 1930. Chapter 1 is Hartford and Mount Holyoke.Chapter 2 discusses social work mainly in Philadelphia and New York and marriage June 1929 to Lieutenant Jack Barrett USN. The final portion Sophie subtitled "GREENWICH VILLAGE ROMANCE" 1928-1930. Chapter 3 contains text of Sophie's 1925 Economics + Sociology master's thesis "The Young Offender and the Criminal Law in Massachusetts". Chapter Four presents Meranski family letters.-=- Web page FIFTY-SIX 56 begins with Part I chapter Five Musical Interests of Jack and Sophie Barrett Web page Fifty-Six then contains chapters of Jack Barrett's years at Hydrographic Office and in U.S. Navy from 1912 through about 1927. The first item focuses on Jack's mentor at Naval Hydrogaphic Office 1913-1916 Gershom Bradford, and his maritime writings, including material on S-4 submarine sinking and rescue effort December 1927. The next chapter begins when Jack returned to South Boston after Revenue Cutter School November 1911, has material on his Lighthouse Service experience in Maine 1912, four years in Washington 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office, Naval Reserve Officer duty World War I and commercial experience. Then there is material on destroyer TOUCEY 1921, battleship WYOMING 1922-2. -=- Web page FIFTY-SEVEN 57 gathers materials on Barrett family years in Hawaii 1941-1947, including Jack's frustrating attempt as Assistant War Plans Officer to warn superior officers of grave danger at Pearl Harbor, and then his work four years 1941-5 as Assistant Personnel Officer in charge of Overseas Transportation Office, handling all surface transportation of Navy Personnel and families.Other materials are being placed in more convenient sequence, and over 550 photos relate to materials. -=- Lower half Web p. SIXTY-FIVE second copy of Sophie Barrett 1925 Master Thesis Mount Holyoke -=- p SIXTY-SIX In 1923-4 Jack took Junior Course at Neval War College, Newport, Rhode Island,and his TACTICS thesis spring 1924 appears on web page SIXTY-SIX 66. -=- Material on MARBLEHEAD 1924-1927 is being gathered on web page SIXTY-SEVEN and includes subsequent experiences of Phil Dahlquist, Micky and Maimie Ashley of Shanghai, Harold Fultz, Eddie Arroyo, George Phillips, Forrest Close, Alexander Sharp, the Craig family of Melbourne, Australia, and the Anderson and Rainey families of New Zealand. -=- p. SEVENTY-EIGHT Material on Revenue Cutter School 1909-11 includes many photos of Mediterranean cruises and text now on web page SEVENTY-EIGHT 78. --p.EIGHTY-ONE tanker TRINITY 1938-9 and Coronado-Pardees p EIGHTY_TWO COMMAND of DESTROYER CLAXTON 1935-6 p EIGHTY-TWO #1312. -=- p NINETY-ONE Jack Barrett 1953 Northeastern Law School master's thesis in Taxation, - portion of chapter "HOME IS THE SAILOR 1947-1969"... PLANNED FINAL ORDER OF TEXT: At web page 55 [Fifty-Five] Web page 55 contains First four chapters of Part One of RED HEADED STEPCHILD Sophie Ruth Meranski Barrett family, Hartford Connecticut and Mount Holyoke Colege, social work, and marriage to 1930. Chapter 1 is Hartford and Mount Holyoke.Chapter 2 discusses social work mainly in Philadelphia and New York and marriage June 1929 to Lieutenant Jack Barrett USN. The final portion Sophie subtitled "GREENWICH VILLAGE ROMANCE" 1928-1930. Chapter 3 contains text of Sophie's 1925 Economics + Sociology master's thesis "The Young Offender and the Criminal Law in Massachusetts". Chapter Four presents Meranski family letters. Web page 56 begins with Part I chapter Five Musical Interests of Jack and Sophie Barrett. Part II follows Jack Barrett's life after he entered the Revenue Cutter School May 1909. The Revenue Cutter School chapter is in segments on Web p. SEVENTY-EIGHT, with many 1909-1910 photos from ITASCA cruises. Web page Fifty-Six then contains chapters of Jack Barrett's years at Hydrographic Office and in U.S. Navy from 1912 through about 1927. The first item focuses on Jack's mentor at Naval Hydrogaphic Office 1913-1916 Gershom Bradford, and his maritime writings, including material on S-4 submarine sinking and rescue effort December 1927. The next chapter begins when Jack returned to South Boston after Revenue Cutter School November 1911, has material on his Lighthouse Service experience in Maine 1912, four years in Washington 1913-1916 at Naval Hydrographic Office, Naval Reserve Officer duty World War I and commercial experience. Then there is material on destroyer TOUCEY 1921, battleship WYOMING 1922-2, NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport, Rhode Island 1923-4 and TACTICS thesis spring 1924 web page SIXTY-SIX and web P67 light cruiser MARBLEHEAD 1924-7 Hawaii-Australia-Nicaragua-China. In preparation are chapters on New York 1927-9,[trip home from China, sub S-4 sinking,December 1927, XANTHOS letter to New York Post on naval Preparedness, January 1928, and two years night law school at Fordham 1927-9], destroyer TRUXTUN 1929-30 Philippines-Yangtze Sophie's Voyage to the Orient of transport HENDERSON 1930, gunboat TULSA Tientsin and North China 1930-31, Honeymoon around world on Dollar Lines 1932, EAGLE 19 in Boaton 1932-3. Next are chapters on SURVEY ship HANNIBAL 1933-4-5 Panana, Costa Rica Virginia at web p.THIRTEEN 13 photos #100,101,102., -=- command of destroyer CLAXTON 1936 - web p. EIGHTY-TWO 82 #1312. -=-PHILADELPHIA chapter 1937 is on web P. ONE at photo #7, -=-TRINITY tanker to Orient 1938-9 at p. EIGHTY-ONE #1301 -=- and NEW YORK Branch Hydrographic Office 1939-1941 directory at P EIGHTEEN # 142 -- in chronology and text sequence. Web page 57 gathers materials on Barrett family years in Hawaii 1941-1947, including Jack's frustrating attempt as Assistant War Plans Officer to warn superior officers of grave danger at Pearl Harbor, and then his work four years 1941-5 as Assistant Personnel Officer in charge of Overseas Transportation Office, handling all surface transportation of Navy Personnel and families.Other materials are being placed in more convenient sequence, and over 550 photos relate to materials. "Then Over the Mountain" tells of visits to Western National Parks 1947, p TWENTY-NINE #867, and "Home is the Sailor" highlights of Jack's return to Boston and West Roxbury 1947 to 1969. [Northeastern Tax thesis at p. NINETY-ONE]. Part Three will cover Early Barrett family history, Jack's childhood and schools, BOSTON LATIN School, p THIRTY-ONE #877 -=- his half brother William Joseph Barrett, p FOURTEEN at #141 -=- his father John Robert Barrett, letters, and and account of Sophie and John Barrett after 1969. --------. 1999 text: Corrected and expanded versions of "RED HEADED STEPCHILD" begin below on website pages 75 and 76 with Chapter One "Sophie, the Meranski family Hartford and Mount Holyoke 1901-1923" and Chapter Two:Social Work and Marriage New York-Philadelphia 1923-1930." Chapter three on website p 65 is Sophie's 1925 Master's Thesis "The YOUNG OFFENDER AND THE CRIMINAL LAW in Massachusetts" directed by Professor Amy Hewes Economics and Sociology. ENJOY+STUDY"RedHeadedStepchild"by Email or WEBSITE Sophie Meranski Barrett 1901-1987 wrote the main text of Navy family memoir "Red Headed Stepchild" beginning 1969 at 52 Emmonsdale Road, West Roxbury, her home 1947-1987. Most of the text can now be seen on website http://www.ccilink.com/barrett with more than 500 photos. Her son John B. Barrett Jr. collaborated and is typing and editing material from handwritten notebooks and recollections. Interested persons may request specific portions by E mail as they are edited, including 1924 and 1925 theses of Jack at the Naval War College Newport Rhode Island and Sophie in Economics and Sociology at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts. There are also numerous letters from Navy, Coast Guard, Marine and other friends and many relatives. A website Index and Directory begins at top of website page 75 seventy-five, and below is a more complete outline of the present organization of materials, which can be E-mailed.Reasonable copying of these materials for personal and scholarly use is very welcome and encouraged. If anyone should be interested in adapting portions of these materials for large scale publication, a financial contribution to assist further work might be appropriate -contact John B. Barrett at 113 West Third Street, Port Angeles Washington WA98362-2824 current 2000 E mail addresses include sunfuture@yahoo.com, jbbarrettjr@mailcity.com, Meranski@yahoo.com--- meranski@hotmail.com--- Sophie's original writing began with a series of eight "black notebooks" mainly 1969-1974. A little later she conceived the idea of a book primarily about her husband Commander John Berchmans Barrett 1888-1969, with a chapter on his brother Bill and much material on Barrett family history. Material on Sophie's own family the Meranskis and her early years before 1928 was mainly in the black notebooks. Some of the Chapter Titles in the "Red Headed Stepchild" narrative included: I.-Barrett Family History II-Childhood and Schools IIa [web p 82 # 1313] Boston Latin School 1902-6 -3-.Revenue Cutter Service 1909-11 [web p 78]4.William Joseph Barrett 1895-1967 [chapters 5-7 ] 5-Interval between Revenue Cutter Service and Regular Navy 1912-21 Naval Hydrographic Office DC and Reserve Officer World War I -6- Regular Navy,Destroyer TOUCEY 1921 Charleston SC -7- Battleship WYOMING 1922-3 -8-NAVAL WAR COLLEGE Newport 1923-4 with TACTICS thesis [web P66] and related Delahanty letters [web P54] -[Ch9 at web P67]-"Newest Ship in the Navy" Light Cruiser MARBLEHEAD 1924-1927 War Games Hawaii visit Australia-New Zealand 1925 action Nicaragua-Shanghai China 1927 many letters Phil Dahlquist, Harold Fultz, George Phillips, "Boney" Close, Jack Fradd, Edward Arroyo -TEN-[web P 97-#1439] Shore Duty New York 1927-9 During this time December 17, 1927 Jack was sent to sea in inadequately equipped New York Harbor tug in the desperate effort to rescue crew of submarine S-4 who were trapped alive in hopelessly deep water off Provincetown Cape Cod. This was on his mind when he wrote a January 1928 letter to New York Post under pen-name "XANTHOS" about Naval preparedness and irresponsible attitudes in United States Congress. "XANTHOS" was the name of Achilles's horse in the Iliad, which warned him of his impending doom. "XANTHOS" originally meant blond, but some of Jack's Boston Latin friends humorously applied it to his reddish hair and tendency to make grim predictions in military and naval affairs. He deplored lack of action by Hoover when Japanese attacked Mudken Manchuria 1931 and again when Franklin Roosevelt curtailed Naval Reserve program June 1933. He warned of danger at Pearl Harbor for a long time, especially the weekends, and lack of effective liaison with Army. He lost his mother in 1889 but had a happy relation with his stepmother and her children and family. But he would occasionally refer to himself as the "Red Headed Stepchild." Sophie originally considered writing a memoir 1950s of the Pearl Harbor attack under the title "I was There," but Fleet Admiral Leahy had used this title for his memoir as President Roosevelt's chief of staff, so Sophie settled on "Red Headed Stepchild" for Jack's biography,. which expanded to cover family and friends. _ELEVEN-[web P55] "GREENWICH VILLAGE ROMANCE" Sophie met Jack August 1928 at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village, New York, where she sublet from social worker Anne Taylor. She describes their romance and marriage in the Red Headed Stepchild text. This material may be combined with the more extended account in the notebooks of her social work and life New York 1923-1930. -TWELVE-[ web p 81 #1305] Destroyer TRUXTUN summer 1929-May 1930 Philippines-Yangtze Rive-Nanking. Jack Barrett wrote some recollections of the TRUXTUN in 1967 for the Commanding Officer of a new TRUXTUN then being commissioned. He also was begnning work on family history and school days.In many ways this was the beginning of the family memoir, and Jack identified many photos and recorded information on Barretts, Buckleys, Mehegans, Revenue Cutter School, Boston Latin, and Naval Hydrographic Office. --THIRTEEN-[web P 83 # 1322 + # 1326] VOYAGE to the ORIENT ["SLOW BOAT TO CHINA} Sophie's long trip on Navy Transport HENDERSON from New York to Tientsin China via Oanama, California, Hawaii, Guam. -FOURTEEN-[web P 99] Life in the Orient November 1930-Januiary 1932 centered at Tientsin with visits to Peking, Chefoo, Wai-Hai-Wai, Shanghai- war in Manchuria -FIFTEEN- Return via Egypt and Europe- honeymoon via Dollar Line PRESIDENT PIERCE and VAN BUREN January -March 1932. -SIXTEEN - EAGLE 19 Boston drilling Navy Reservists based at Charlestown NAVY YARD MUCH CONTACT WITH BARRETT family April 1932-summer 1933 -SEVENTEEN- Survey Ship HANNIBAL Web p 80 -1933-1935 west coast PANAMA and Portsmouth, Virginia important letters Robert Hinckley, Richard Visser, Mervin Halstead, Dan Candler, Paul Lehman, Ferguson,Ted Agnew,Ascherfelds, Boyds,Lafayette Jones, -EIGHTEEN- Command of DESTROYER CLAXTON [web p 82 #1312] 1935-6 landing force exercises Culebra, Puerto Rico, lunch with Sec. Ickes- drilling of Annapolis midshipmen at Gardiners Bay Long Island - letters of Admiral Orlin Livdahl,Captain Warren McClain, future CBS newsman Richard C. Hottelet, grandfather Barrett -NINETEEN Shore Duty Philadelphia 1937 -TWENTY -TANKER TRINITY to Dutch East Indies and Cavite Philippines -humorous letter of Captain Haskell C. Todd of Belfast Maine- account of Captain Fred S. Holmes and young engineer Hyman Rickover-family saw Boyds, Delahantys, Pardees in Southern California 1938-9 -TWENTY-ONE Brooklyn 1939-1941 Command of Naval Hydrographic Office NY 1940-41 - promotion to Commander -World's Fair, Jones Beach, Atlantic City letters about MARY CELESTE mystery from Charles Edey Fay and Gershom Bradford 1879-1978 -TWENTY-TWO [web P 57]- PEARL HARBOR, WAIKIKI, Thomas Jefferson School- This is a very long chapter. In many ways the climax of Jack Barrett's career was his effort to warn of Pearl Harbor danger while briefly assigned to War Plans July-October 1941 and then his four years service in charge of OVERSEAS TRANSPORTATION OFFICE PEARL HARBOR until after the final victory in 1945. Sophie's first treatment was in Black Notebook One recently edited May 1999- then her treatment in "Red Headed Stepchild" in 1970 and a special -November-December 1981 newspaper article prepared for fortieth anniversary of attack on the request of West Roxbury Transcript Editor Jason Korell. Sophie describes -Dedication of Aiea Naval Hospital 1943- and her surgery there May 1947- visits with Honolulu Star Bullletin editor Riley Allen and his wife 1942 and with Captain and Mrs. Samuel Wilder King 1946 - Thomas Jefferson School and Punahou- our landlod Walter Glockner and his habeas corpus situation with the military governor- Jack's court martial duty 1946- our nieghbors the Distellis, James and Edythe Needles, the Samoan tenants upstairs, wartime barbed wire, gas masks, centipedes and bomb shelters. Important letters - Wilfred Pang long active in Honolulu Chinese community describes wartime work of the Overseas Transportation office- Chaplain Maguire's book "The Captain Wears a Cross" 1943 treats the same subject=- Gene [Mrs. Paul] Nelson tells of taking her two young boys to San Francisco in big convoy December 26, 1941- hero Henry Brantingham tells of arriving in Honolulu without proper uniform after being evacuated from Philippines April 1942 AND SENT TO WASHINGTON D.C. TO RECEIVE CITATION FROM PRESIDENT Rooosevelt for his unit, whose PT boats evacuated Gen. MarArthur- -TWENTY-THREE web P 57-#1108] - "Over the Mountain" After planning for more than three years, the Barrett family summer 1947 toured Yosemite, redwoods, Crater Lake, Columbia River Highway, Mount Rainier, Glacier Park Montana, Yellowstone Grand Teton (with long night drive 'Over the mountain" from GrAND CANYON OF the YELLOWSTONE RIVER TO MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS-then home by northern route to Hartford and Boston. TWENTY-FOUR - "Home is the Sailor" - Barrett's stay with Jack Barrett's sister Mollie - move to West Roxbury 1947- John attended Roxbury Latin and Harvard- Jack completes law school at Boston College Law School 1951 under G.I. Bill -Hartigan cousins help find Irish relatives. Much West Roxbury material still being prepared. Recently PART ONE has been organized from "Black Notebooks, letters, and recollections: This material is nearing final form, though gaps are being filled from Sophie's handwritten texts: As currently planned Part One will have at least five parts:--- {i} Sophie and the Meranski Family,- Hartford Connecticut and Mount Holyoke College 1901-1923 {ii} Social Work and Marriage New York-Philadelphia 1923-1930 {iii} "THE YOUNG OFFENDER AND THE CRIMINAL LAW IN MASSACHUSETTS" Sophie's 1925 Masters Thesis in Economics and Sociology at Mount Holyoke College directed by department head Amy Hewes with extensive bibliography of early historical sources. {iv} MERANSKI-GEETTER_POLLACK-Hartford-Mount Holyoke -related letters and materials Arthur Meranski, Rebekah Geetter, Jason Pollack Mollie Aronson, Ivan McCormack. John Barrett plans to reconstruct 1970s materials on Mount Holyoke alumni - much destroyed in 1993 thefts. [v] John Barrett essay "Musical Interests of Sophie and Jack Barrett" These five chapters focus on Sophie's l;ife up to 1928, when she met Jack Barrett. The Red=Headed Stepchild material will probably be reorganized, WITH PART TWO continuing the narrative of Jack and Sophie together over forty years after 1928. Then probably the early years of the Barrett family will be placed in a re-organized Part Three at the end, with much new information on relations located in the 1970s and more recently.- Most of this material will be available on the website, but can be E mailed to those who are interested in a particular topic or segment. Many recent photos and material from storage added to May 2000.- John Barrett


 


Ferguson,Labiosa,Day Orders

 

P-A-N-A-M-A from no 1155 bot p 63w - Labiosa Ferguson Day Orders President of Panama Visit (Gene Nelson letter probably will be transferred) #43 HANNIBAL (pl9l) Ferguson letter Letter postmarked l6 April l970 from Jacksonville Florida written by Captain Harry Ferguson who was the engineer officer in l934-l935, "Dear Mrs. Barrett, Of course I remember you and Jack very well from my days on board the HANNIBAL from some time in October l934 until November l936. During that time I served as Engineering Officer, having relieved A R Boileau in October l934.Boileau was on board only a few days after my reporting for duty, so I never got to know him very well.However I do remember many of the others you mentioned in your recent letter-Candler, Halstead,Visser, Crosser,Ascherfeld, Nelson, Pittman,Peake,, Aiken, Devine,Livingston, Lehman, and most of the others.When I reported on board, Gresham was the skipper, relieved later by Stevens,who was relieved by Richards not long before I left. If I remember correctly, Jack was relieved by Frank Fitch quite some time before I left.Our top speed with a good following breeze was nearer nine knots instead of six or seven (as some of the others said). I do remember, however, having Point Mala Lighthouse at the southern tip of Panama in sight for twenty-four hours as we were bucking a tide trying to round that point on our way to Balboa.Also, if I remember correctly,at that time the HANNIBAL was the oldest ship and only coal burner left in the Navy, with a three cylinder reciprocating engine and only one propellor. Several times we would leave Balboa or Cristobal with our bunkers full of coal and bags of coal piled up anywhere we could find room for them on deck in order that we could spend as much time as possible in the survey area. Pittman was a Warrant Boatswain who was drowned off the East Coast of Costa Rica- and his body returned via the HANNIBAL to Cristobal. I believe the Communications Officer was either Crosser or Aiken, (Crosser was First Lieutenant - Sophie Barrett note).I was certainly glad to get all the news about many of my shipmates with whm I HAD LOST CONTACT- I don't believe I had heard from or of any of them in years and years. I knew about Benny Crosser's death but did not know about the others you wrote about (Aiken, Boyd, Nelson,Ascherfeld, Boileau, Clarence Smith).Now for some information about me since leaving the HANNIBAL. I left her in Norfolk about November l936 and spent about seven months on the ARKANSAS as a turret officer. Then I went to the Naval Academy as an Instructor in Spanish. In June l939 I was detached from the Naval Academy and reported to the USS NASHVILLE a light cruiser which was then in Annapolis Roads.I went aboard as the seventh serior Lieutenant and left in April 1943 as the senior commander, except for the Executive offcier.If I had stayed aboard another couple of months, I would probably have been the "Exec" as not long after I left a classmate of mine who was junior to me became "Exec."I spent most of the war on the NASHVILLE- a good part of the time in the Aleutian Islands.Just after I joined her we went through the Canal to Long Beach (California), where we were based several months -and then sent out to Pearl Harbor.It appeared that we were going to be out there from then on, and since the Navy Department did not see fit to change our home base, I left my family in Long Beach.Finally I decided to send for them at my own expense, so my wife, Helen, had the boys taken out of school early, shipped the car out to Pearl Harbor, and all of them boarded a ship for there.About the time they arrived in Honolulu,the NASHVILLE was transiting the Canal again, under secret orders- so I could not wire her not to come.I could not get in touch with her for a month or more but finally was able to call her long distance from Boston and tell her to get back to Baltimore with her family as soon as she could. Of course that was all at my own expense.By the time she got back to Baltimore with the family,we were up in Iceland but came back before long, so she left the boys in Baltimore and joined me in New York for a few days. During the rest of l941 we operated out of Bermuda with the Neutrality Patrol and were there on Pearl Harbor day.That day we left again for Iceland and were gone for two or three weeks. When we got back, we were again sent to Pearl, and later to the Aleutians so I didn't get to see the family for a year or more. I finally got detached from the NASHVILLE in March or April l943 and got back to the States to find Helen living in Coronado with my mother and father. I went there and was stationed with the Operational Training Command Pacific until June l944.. I was then ordered to Balboa as Port Captain but wasn't allowed to take my family with me, so that was another year's separation- they finally joined me in Balboa in July, l945.Please remember me to any of our old shipmates that you might see or contact and my very,very best to you and yours, -sincerely, Harry Ferguson." I am also including a letter which Jack received on the HANNIBAL in Norfolk, Virginia sent from the Submarine base, Coco Solo, Caal Zone,dated September 27, l935 and written by Ezequiel Labiosa, Coxswain YP 41 Coco Solo, Canal Zone: "Lieutenant Commander J B Barrett, Executive Officer, USS HANNIBAL, Norfolk, virginia, Dear sir,I can hardly find words to explain my gratitude and express you of my deep appreciation for your benevolent kindness in having granted me to remain here with the YP boats whereby I can provide my wife with a home in Colon. I will always remember your very hearty consideration, sir, and shall ever cooperate with you here in my duties and anywhere to the best of my knowledge and strength, gladly.In the event of any chance for me to go up for second class boatswain's mate, I wish you will kindly give one a thought down here, Mr. Barrett,and you can be sure that I will very highly appreciate your thought and will discharge my time in the Navy with such pride as only an officer of your caliber can provide in a man.If I could only serve my life in the Navy with suich officers as you- you can be sure sir that throughout my fifteen years in the Service, I never found anyone to whom I could be so grateful. I always hold high my pride in my good record. Only trust in God I will be under your command the years I have left to serve in the Navy." Another letter from a junior boat officer Paul Nelson was written to Jack from the Naval Observatory at Washington on 6 December l933 when the ship was in Portsmouth,Virginia: "Dear Commander, We have just about completed our course here at the Observatory. I expect to leave on or before thirteen December for Norfolk. There remains only a compilation of data. Commander Demott (Dewitt?) informed me that he is writing a letter to Mr. Devine in regard to the measuring sticks for the sounding machine tubes. He also informed me that the sticks will arrive on board before departure for Panama. Washington has been a very expensive city to live in, and both my wife and myself shall be glad to get back to Norfolk and our Hannibal friends. Please convey my regards to the members of the mess. Sincerely yours, Paul Nelson." (Note: Paul had the duty on the mine layer OGLALA the night of December 6-7 l941. Admiral Furlong was aboard that morning and as Senior Officer Present Afloat he gave the order for all ships in the Harbor to sortie right after the first bombs fell at Fod Island around 7:50 that Sunday morning.Paul had combatant duty in the War and was retired as a Captain.On October 8,l970 his wife Gene Nelson wrote:"Paul was Communications Officer on Admiral Furlong's staff and kept telling him the OGLALA was sinking and he'd better get off. OGLALA was his flagship, and he insisted the old thing be raised.It was alongside HELENA, which was tied up to 1010 dock. It has been pulled astern when it was toppled over on the dock. Paul could look into his (old) room whenever the water cleared.He had command of fourteen LSTs and convoyed the troopships which took Palawan (Western Philippines).He and his LSTs missed Leyte-Samar (October l944) as his (group's flagship the 775 broke down." The President of the Republic of Panama sent a radio to the USS HANNIBAL on May 23, l935 "To Captain James M. Stevens, USS HANNIBAL- My best thanks to you for the courtesy shown me during my visit to Coiba yesterday, Best wishes and regards, Harmodo Arias, president of the Republic of Panama." I am gioving here the MORNING ORDERS for the HANNIBAL at Bahia Honda, Panama , Wednesday 22 May l935 as a sample of the type of orders put out by Jack while Executive Officer of the HANNIBAL l933-l935: 0500 All Hands 0530 Turn to -Scrub down - Prepare to get under way- Breakfast for forty men (ML # 1,2,3,4 crews ,sounding and extra details 0615 ML#1,2,3,4, proceed as assigned 0620 under way 0730 breakfast 0800 Muster on stations. turn to- Sweep down - Clean up decks 0900 Quarters- White wroking uniform. Survey Operations 06l5 MR #1 Lt jg Jones ,full sounding crew plus two men Run lines as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one officer, ten men. ML#2 Lt jg Lockwood full sounding crew plus two men, Run lines as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one office, ten men.ML #3 Lt jg AKIN full sounding crew plus two men. Run lines as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one officer, ten men.Motor Launch #4 Chief Boatswain Pittman, full sounding crew plus two men. Run line as per boat sheet. Lunch and supper for one officer, ten men. Avoid unnecessary hazards. Ship will return to Bahia Honda prior to evening meal if practicable. Instructions for Official Visit at Coiba. Reference USNR Art. 234, 297, 322 All men on deck will be required to be in white working uniform prior to contact with planes.When planes have alighted on water, a Motor Whale Boat, flying color with an officer with AC boat and twqo men to man it, will be sent to transfer personnel (President of Panama, two other Government of Panama officials, Commander Gates, and Mr. Young) to shore at Coiba colony. The officer in the boat will invite party to return to ship for luncheon and will arrange for a definite time for return of boat for party and what time luncheon should be served. If party passes "close aboard" (USNR art 267, 400 yards) officers and crew will be called to "attention", facing outboard toward party. After landing has been effffected,boat will transfer other personnel from planes to ship as necessary or desirable. When President comes aboard: All men on toipside in white working uniform with neckerchiefs. Officers in full dress white - medals- gloves- swords- Full Dress Bilt. Have eight sideboys tending side rest of crew man Rail at equal intervals along ship's side. Officers assembled on quarterdeck, starboard side aft. Sound "Attention." Have the National Ensign of POanama "in sops" at the main. Tend the saide. When the president reachges the deck, officers and men shall salute. The National Emblem of Panama shall be displayed at the main the moment he reaches the deck and during the entire visit. After party goes below, removal of jumper and neckerchiefs may be authorized but with careful preparation ofor prompt resumption at President's departure. Personnel not in official partyt should be returned to plane well in advance of conclusion of official visit.On President;s departure some cermonies "Salute, manning rail, Attention" shall be rendered. National Ensign of Panama will be handed down at "Carry on" wqhen President leaves ship. Motor Whale Boat, flying colors with officer will return President and party to planes. Officers and crew will shift into ordinary service uniform of the day - J.B. Barrett, Lieutenant Commander USN Executive Officer. be out there from then on. Devine, Livingston, Lehman, and most of the others. (HANNIBAL material)


 


P-A-N-A-M-A LJJones and last Candler from no.1148p 62w

 

P-A-M-A-M-A chapter photos May 31, 1934 party for Captain and Mrs. Robert Hinckley Panama City - and detail of Jack and Sophie Barrett-#865 Sophie driver license 1934 Panama Sophie with Boyd's maid Netha #110 old Buick #156 p 20 #985 -p 44 Sophie in hammock com LJJ Lafayette Jackson Jones letter HANNIBAL Panama l935 On 15 February I received a letter from Fredericksburg Virginia, Mary Washington College from the junior boat officer on the HANNIBAL who is now Captain Lafayette Jackson Jones. "Dear Mrs. Barrett, I did indeed serve on the HANNIBAL at the time you speak of and remember Commander Barrett - then a Lieutenant Commander I believe- very well. To the best of my recollection Lieutenant jg Robert E. Lockwood joined the ship at sea in the early spring of l935 - I regret to say that Captain Lockwood Retired died in Delmar, California within the past year or two.I remember well most of the people mentioned by you. I believe Captain Gresham had the ship when I reported - later relieved by Captain Stevens and then by Captain Richards. Harry Ferguson was engineer, Dan "Shorty" Candler the navigator, Ben Crosser First Lieutenant, Peake the supply officer and Smith the doctor. Others on board were Akin, Visser, Halstead, and one or two others whom I can't recall- it was thirty-six years ago. Pittman was there and Lehman and Devine (hydrographers) - whom we called "Too-Too" with affection of course. I remember the day Pittman was killed. He, Mervin Halstead, and I were working the sounding boat crews along a stretch of beach, putting up shore signals and taking soundings.While landing with ourAtlantic City surf boats, I suspect that all of us turned over several times that day - I know WE did. The speculation was that Pittman may have been hit by the boat or by some of the materials carried for the construction of signals.It was not unusual for the landing boats to broach and turn end over end in the surf, but the waves did seem to be higher than usual on this particular day. As you probably know, the HANNIBAL - we called her the "White Swan" - she was painted white- was the last coal burning ship in the United States Navy. We would go to sea with full bumpers and sometimes with a deck load of coal in bags, and we stayed (at sea) as long as fuel supply allowed- usually about a month. We worked hard in the HANNIBAL, but we had a good time when we cme into port- usually for about ten days."Shorty" Candler and I used to go to the races at the old Panama Race Track. The horses weren't very fast, but that didn't bother us, and we played softball and tennis and drank beer of course.Dr. Smith and I had a lot of good fishing up and down the coast. The best as I remember was around the isaldns of Jicaron and Jicasita off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica.I remember one day we were out in the motor whale boat, and I Ihad a good fish on the line.The fish was about to pull me on the rocks, and "Doc" wanted to cut him loose, but I wouldn't hear of it.Anyway we got the fish before he wrecked the boat, and he was a fifty-nine pound amberjack. "Doc" caught a one hundred fifty pound shark one day, and when he got him in the boat, I was ready to jump over the side.We caught all kinds of fish.You never knew what you would have on your line next, and that made it doubly fascinating. I talked many times with Commander Barrett. As I remember he had a mustache.Does my memory fail me in this regard?It seems to me that he assumed temporary command of the ship for a time - perhaps after Captain Gresham left and before Captain Stevens reported (spring l935).Anyway we all liked him very much and thought he was a fine officer.- Well, there are some of my memories of my service in the "white swan." I hope you wil find them interesting. Forgive me for waiting so long to answer your letter. Sincerely yours, L.J. (Jack) Jones, Captain USN Retired." Letter from Dan Candler 16 April l97l "We are planning on heading for Pennsylvania in about ten days for a stay of about six weeks, and while in Philadelphia I shall try to get in touch with Ethel Smith and get the story of the loss of the dog "Mack." I know that he was a Llewellen setter and was a well bred dog even though I never hunted with him.He was treated as one of the family.You might tell John that the only difference (i had) with his father was the one you mentioned - the late bridge game. Can't remember any others now.I told John that his father probably knew more about boats than anyone I've known.And he passed up many chances to take us to task when he probably should have.And a good "Exec" does not mention that an order comes from the Captain.John can well be proud of his father. Sincerely, Dan Candler."-- While Dan and Anne (Candler) were visiting in Pennsylvania in the early summer of l971, a heart attack -sudden- struck him, and he passed away. He had been looking forward to his fiftieth anniversary at Annapolis, as he was in the class of l922 and was very popular.His wife Anne wrote of his passing.


 


Hawaii main account edited July'99

 

On Sunday morning December 7,l94l I got up early hoping to go for a swim before breakfast.My next door neighbor Mr. James Needles (a Mormon with a wife Edythe a Christian Scientist from Wales) knocked on the window & told me Jack should proceed at once to Pearl Harbor as the Japanese had bombed the ships,& all service personnel were required to report to duty stations.Mr. Needles told me the bombing was at its height.An Army wife at #24ll Ala Wai Mrs. Means had a miscarriage that morning.A little later Gertrude Rice drove up in a private car.She lived near the Army Fort DeRussy.She said she was going to "the hills"&asked John & me to go with her.I refused, telling her Jack had gone to Pearl Harbor & wouldn't know where to find me if he came home safely.Then an Army jeep appeared,& the driver told me to stay in the house,not use the telephone, boil all water,& observe a six o'clock curfew & complete blackout as soon as darkness fell.Around dark Jack appeared in full white uniform with sword,gun & gunbelt with ammunition.Tears filled his eyes as he told me that professionally,as he had feared, the Japanese had done a superb job,crippling our battleships,killing our men,& destroying planes at Ford Island, & Army planes at Hickam Field & other installations.Jack repeated the fact that he had been "shut up" by the brass when he harped on the likelihood of just such an attack & the need for better Army-Navy cooperation.Driving to Pearl Harbor that morning Jack had to pass hot ashes where someone had been killed shortly before (possibly by antiaircraft "friendly" fire from American ships.)While I served his supper in complete darkness, he told me the ARIZONA was sunk with great loss of life- the OKLAHOMA was capsized- the WEST VIRGINIA & CALIFORNIA were hit & damaged-the NEVADA got under way but later met difficulties- the PENNSYLVANIA was hit in dry dock & badly damaged.. He became silent when neighbors came in, but they soon had to observe the curfew & go home.At curfew we put two cots together in our back bedroom & had John sleep with us there in the "Crack" between the cots.Jack went to bed when John did saying he would have the emergency duty at Pearl Harbor the next few nights & might get little sleep.About midnight I was startled when the telephone rang.I heard Captain Rice anxiously ask me if I knew where Gertrude was. I answered ,"Yes, she went to the hills."Of course he asked me what hill & to whose house she went,but I had no more information.He gallantly told me I had helped him & he would telephone everyone he knew who lived on a hill - Oahu was full of them-Round Top, Saint Louis Heights,Wilhelmina Rise, Pacific Heights.At dawn December 8 Captain Rice appeared, grey & unshaven,with Gertrude safely in tow.Since he would have duty for some nights to come,we arranged to have Gertrude occupy John's usual cot in the front bedroom = she would arrive just before blackout & leave before breakfast every morning.Jack left after breakfast Monday December 8 & I picked up a broom to sweep the living room while John was reading one of the Christmas books we bought the previous Saturday at Liberty House.There was a ring at the door & two men entered in civilian clothes.When one flashed an FBI badge,I almost passed out.He asked,"Does Walter Glockner live here?"Walter Glockner was my landlord who lived upstairs & had just returned with a large load of groceries.They went upstairs & took him off in their car,& I never saw him again until after the war.He was interned on Sand Island in Honolulu Harbor - the Hawaiian territory civilian courts held military governor Richardson in contempt of court for disregarding a writ of habeas corpus-the fine of five thousand dollars was never paid as President Roosevelt pardoned the governor- but Mr. Glockner agreed to spend the rest of the war years in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he wrote us frequently. He worked there as a brewer, returned in l945, swam every day at Waikiki Beach, & offered to give blood when I had surgery in May l947 before leaving Hawaii.We soon were outfitted with gas masks & required to carry them at all times.We also were finger printed,had our blood typed (mine was probably done wrong-my metal dogtag said "type O",but years later I found out I was type B.) We were vaccinated & given tetanus toxoid & typhoid shots.We had to turn in our money & receive bills marked,"Hawaii."Even five-year old John was fitted to a special smaller gas mask made at Pearl Harbor & had to carry it everywhere.We were no longer allowed our daily swim at Waikiki as the Army strung miles of thick barbed wire fence all along the beach with no entrance gates.Jack worked seven days a week & some nights without any holidays off-neither Christmas,New Year's Thanksgiving or any other day from the first day of the war through the last.We could no longer walk along the banks of the Ala Wai Canal for exercise,as the Army strung barbed wire the entire length.Barbed wire was strung in downtown Honolulu near the Academy of Arts on Beretania Street,where one rainy day my irreplaceable big black umbrella was caught by the wind,& a large hole ripped in it.I really believe that my umbrella was the only thing the Army caught in all those miles of barbed wire.I thenceforth got properly soaked in Honolulu's "liquid sunshine" as I walked a great deal.Jack became friendly with Riley Allen,editor of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin-Riley invited Jack to meet his friends & reporters one Sunday afternoon at their home on a steep hill.Several Sundays later Mr.& Mrs. Allen invited the three of us to have dinner with them at the Honolulu Country Club.Since Jack had to work,we met at 5:30 in the lounge,& Riley hurried us to the dinner table as the waiters & waitresses were all "enemy aliens" according to martial law.& had to be in their own homes by six PM.Young John refused to eat,on the grounds that he had not washed his hands.I tried to persuade him he could just use the knife & fork,but without being cross the childless editor calmly took the boy to the washroom, & they returned happily to eat their meal in lovely surroundings.They were neighbors of our friend Dr.Paul Withington and his ward Rose, whom he later married- Irish,Chinese, & Hawaiian. (In l990 she took John junior to visit the Administration Building where Jack worked & the site of their former home near Round Top & to lunch at the Honolulu Yacht club in which Paul was long active). After December 7 Jack's office was a very busy thoroughfare where requests poured in from the hospitals for evacuation of those wounded who could be moved,for the evacuation of outside non-residents caught in Hawaii on the day of the attack,evacuation of Navy & Army dependents & evacuation of some local civilians whose idea was to get out of there to the mainland. Jack's office had the tremendous job of sending Navy & Army personnel with orders to the forward areas of the war or to the mainland for reassignment.The lines of applicants were never ending.He had several very able assistants. Matson p.86 Navigation Company or from Castle & Cooke & worked as a Lieutenant as assistant to Jack.His knowledge of ships and of Hawaii was invaluable.From l943-5 Jack also had a young Lieutenant Martin Williams from Kentucky.In charge of the clerical force was a Chinese-American Wilfred Pang-Jack's right-hand man who relieved him of a great deal of the routine work.Secretaries Violet Ho & Blossom .. were under Pang's direction. Also there was a Marine officer present to take care of transportation requirements for the Marines.In addition to his office in the Pearl Harbor Administration Building,Jack had a downtown office for the convenience of women & children,as the rationing of gasoline & the crowded buses made it difficult for them to go to the Pearl Harbor office.The downtown office reduced the crush at the Pearl Harbor office PANG letter from Sophie Barrett l=notebook #4:"WILFRED S. PANG Executive Secretary State of Hawaii (John A.Burns governor)Department of Social Services -Criminal Injuries Compensation Commission-l390 MillerStreet-PO Box 339 Honolulu Hawaii 96809 August l4,l970 Dear Mrs.Barrett,This will acknowledge receipt of your nice letter of June 28th,which was forwarded to me recently. I am no longer with Matson Navigation Company-I left Matson in l966 & am now employed by the State of Hawaii.I saw an item in the local newspaper when Commander Barrett passed away.I am very glad you & John are preparing a family memoir of your experience.I went to work for the United States Navy in December l94l.However,I was not assigned to Overseas Transportation Office until April or May l942.Actually I was loaned to the Navy by my employer at the time,Castle & Cooke Inc.(General Shipping Agent).The Overseas Transportation Office handled surface transportation for the Fourteenth Naval District (Pearl Harbor).It was our responsibility to get personnel to their ship or station (command).In addition,we arranged transportation for dependents of naval personnel.Much of the work was of highly confidential nature.I was sort of an administrative assistant or right hand man to Commander Barrett.I coordinated activities & supervised the work of several persons-Robert Choy,who is employed by Castle & Cooke Inc, Violet Ho,& Blossom Anyong.Besides my office in Pearl Harbor, I also maintained an office in the Castle & Cooke building in downtown Honolulu. Lieutenant James Murray l94l-2 & Lieutenant Martin Williams l943-5 were assigned to the office also. I reported directly to Commander Barrett.The Commander demanded the best in a person.Because of my background & experience he entrusted me with most of the detailed work.We worked very closely & got along extremely well.I enjoyed working with him & had the deepest respect & admiration for the man.He talked to me about John often.I left Pearl Harbor shortly after thee end of World War II September l0,l945 to return to my civilian job at Castle & Cooke,Inc.My responsibility was to help reorganize the Passenger Department.In l947 I was transferred to Matson lines. I worked in the Booking or Reservations Division until l960,when I was promoted to Sales Representative.In this capacity I worked closely with airlines & travel agencies.In September l966 I joined the Mid-Pacific Insurance Agency,Limited, as an account executive.I resigned in May l968 when I was offered a job with the State Government.I am the Executive-Secretary-Administrator for the Criminal Injuries Compensation Commission,State of Hawaii.I manage the statewide program which aids victims of a criminal act.There are only six states with this type of legislation.The other states are California,New York,Maryland,Massachusetts & Nevada.I have an Investigator & a Secretary working for me,& I enjoy my work very much.Also the pay & benefits are good.Ever since l960 I have become deeply involved in community service activities.In l964 I was appointed by the Governor of Hawaii to serve as a Commissioner on the Commission on Children & Youth.The Commission is advisory to the Governor & the State Legislature with respect to any & all problems affecting children & youth in the state of Hawaii.I worked as Chairman of the Commission from l965-l969.I am now serving my seventh year as a commissioner.Under the statute the statutory maximum is eight years.Because of my interest & concern for children I have been asked to serve on many boards of private & public agencies.Among them are: Member,commission on Children & Youth,state of Hawaii=-Member of Board of Trustees,Palsina Settlement-Past President Honolulu Theatre for Youth -Past President Hawaii Eye Bank -Vice President & Director Waikiki Lions Club Vice President & director Big Brothers of Hawaii, Inc. Member of Task Force on Juvenile Delinquency- Law Enforcement Planning Agency, state of Hawaii -Director Hale Kipa Inc. (runaway shelter for girls- chairman of board Services to Girls) Blind Advisory Board. In addition I am an active big brother & spend weekends with two fifteen year old boys (twins).They are fatherless & live in low housing area.I also devote considerable time to the Lions organization. As past president of the Hawaii Lions Eye Foundation & the Hawaii Eye Bank I am deeply involved with programs for the visually handicapped.Some of my activities are glaucoma clinics,used eyeglass project,pre school vision screening program,eye bank, diabetes treatment center. I was awarded the LIBERTY BELL Award for the State of Hawaii in Conference on citizenship held in Washington DC in September.As a member of the YMCA I see Robert Choy occasionally.I have not seen Violet Ho or Blossom Anyong since I left Pearl Harbor in l945.Kindest personal regards to you & John.WILFRED S. PANG" Letter from Captain Harold F. FULTZ USN Retired July 29,l970:"8 Ridley Court,Glen Ridge,New Jersey 07028 Dear Sophie,Any people of any color who really mean business I am willing to help.I tutor black kids (age l4 to 40)-& it requires real study at age eighty-one.I am free for a week or two now & want to answer your two letters,which were quite nostalgic.I remember MARBLEHEAD Captain Miller well- I was later his Executive Officer at the U.S. Navy Ammunition Depot, Hingham, Massachusetts- and Alex Sharp (MARBLEHEAD "exec") was well known & greatly looked up to. The MARBLEHEAD was a relatively new ship,& a fine one.I was assistant engineer officer & later went to the cruiser OMAHA as Engineer Officer,where I remained over the usual tour of duty to repair her after her serious grounding on Castle Island in July l938.We eventually put her through a highly successful full power test & restored her in time for her to serve valiantly in the war.The MARBLEHEAD had a good baseball team largely because of an officer named"Shorty" Milner,who was almost major league stuff.Bumphrey was a supervisor at the Standard Oil Compound, Shanghai,& a good friend to us all.He introduced us to the Ashleys.If you look up Jack's civil war uncle in Somerville, New Jersey,come insured. It's notorious for auto deaths.I was Executive Officer of Republic-the big transport.We evacuated civilians from Honolulu.Some of the kids we evacuated had never worn shoes or even wanted to.One of my duties aboard was to play the piano in the large theatre space to quiet passenger nerves.Our warning to mothers that in event any child got overboard we would not stop was not exactly a happy prospect.Your husband,who was always able to see the real root of things,would have been amazed at the navigational problems of a hospital ship in wartime.Except in rare places all navigational coastal lights were extinguished,& we had to "grasp at a straw" to get around,because we were on the move day & night. Without forest fires, the moon &lightning we would often have been in difficulty.Off New Guinea is a passage known as the Tufi Leads (Leads means Range).A dozen times I ran it at night following very excellent range lights,which were never extinguished during the war.Finally I ran it in daylight & saw the angry,jutting rocks-& I've had a slight shake in my knees ever since,thinking of the disaster had I not followed exactly those lights.A range is a line to keep you on course by lining up two lights.-like two trees in the woods so you won't go in a circle.I've dreamed a sailing (small sailboat) back to Tufi with my wife to show her those rocks.It's only ten thousand miles as the crow flies,& a sailboat does not follow a crow.In the October 20 typhoon the COMFORT (hospital ship) came through by the grace of God. Forty nurses that night were scared to death,but not one even let their helpless patient(s) know it.Seventy craft were lost that night,I am told. My quartermaster shouted,"The barometer has reached bottom & has risen a bit. Best to you... Harold Fultz." _Another friend from TULSA days Commander Myron Thomas,was on Admiral Calhoun's staff, & through Jack he made arrangements for his wife & son to be evacuated on Christmas Day.He appreciated all Jack did to help & wrote to me recently that except for confusion on the dock his wife & son had a good trip on the Lurline. "I well remember he booked my wife & son for the LURLINE on Christmas Day l94l & I didn't see them again until Christmas Day l943.He enjoyed the reputation of being a good shipmate & always willing to help a fellow officer or enlisted man-Myron Thomas." Commander Thomas wrote that when he was on Admiral Calhoun's staff (Commander Service Force) he knew what a difficult time Jack was having trying to provide transportation with so little available space. "He performed his task in a most creditable manner & then with his tact,careful planning,foresight & diplomacy in dealing with many anxious wives & husbands at this critical time was able to satisfy the majority of naval personnel who had to remain in the (war) zone & were anxious to get their dependents to the mainland." #78-#78B Thomas Jefferson School Waikiki l942-1946 #78B Thomas Jefferson School Hawaii I entered John in the public English Standard primary Thomas Jefferson School, Waikiki near the head of the Ala Wai Canal, where Ala Wai Boulevard intersects Kapahulu Street about five blocks east of our home near Kapiolani Park with its remarkable zoo & bird collection & Sunday band concerts.At that time in Hawaii there were two school systems. For those children who passed an exam in proficiency in English a very fine education was offered. We estimated a large majority of the pupils were of Asian backgrounds, with Japanese the largest group many exceptionally gifted & hard-working.Another gifted pupil was Robert Ho of a Shanghai background. His mother lived in Waikiki & was proficient at block printing.At least one student Sam was part Hawaiian, and the students knew and used common native Hawaiian words like the greeting "Aloha" kapu keep out - Pau finished-Mauka toward the mountains - Makai toward the water, & opu - stomach.The teachers were well qualified & in many cases had experience on the United States mainland.Three of John's teachers, were of Portuguese backgrounds, Mrs Celestine Silva Barbour in the first grade, who was our neighbor on Ohua Street, Celia Ponte of Kaimuki in the third grade,& Mrs. Silva in the fourth grade. In the fifth grade John's teacher Mrs. Agnes Davidson came from an old New England family - her names was Agnes Dee Mason before her marriage, & her ancestor Mason in l630 received the original royal charter as founder of the New Hampshire colony. One of her daughters was on the staff of Honolulu radio station KHON, and her son Douglas Davidson was a professional photographer who photographed her class in l946 at Valentine's Day & also did nature photography including Hawaii's major waterfalls.Mrs. Barbour the first grade teacher had an exceptionally warm & friendly personality.Her parents had come from Portugal & Madeira in l883 to work on sugar plantations at Kohala on the northwest coast of the "big" Island - Hawaii.She remembered seeing Queen Liliuokalani around l9l5 at the girls school she attended in Kaimuki.She remembered the musicologist Sigmund Spaeth "the tone sleuth" & other interesting visitors in Hawaii over many years.She had previously taught on the Islands of Hawaii & was later a high school principal - probably at Kamehameha school Honolulu.Her first grade classroom was a small cottage at the south tip of the long covered corridor with the first, second &third grade classrooms. An art classroom was next door.A large vegetable garden run by Mr. Chong was on the west side of the building & shared by the neighboring non-English standard Waikiki school. Crown flower plants hosting monarch butterflies grew between the classrooms & the garden & furnished material for science projects.John had been reading & writing for more than two years, but he was in the habit of printing all-capitals & had to learn to use the small letters also. There were hot lunches in the centrally located school cafeteria, where pupils took turns working under head cook Mrs. Billie. A small pomegranate grew at a little fishpond near the lunch room.In the dining & assembly area a Christmas show produced eight Christmas carols, including "Silent Night, Away in a Manger" &" Joy to the World" & relatively little-known "Love Came Down at Christmas Love our lovely love divine Love came down at Christmas Stars & angels Gave the Sign." Pupils acting as angels had to stand very still while the others sang the songs.Naps were required in rest period. In January l943 John was transferred to Mrs. Elsie Mattoon's second grade classroom, where the children were six months to a year older than John. Again the teaching was excellent..One day a week Mrs. Mattoon & the other second grade teacher Mrs. Fisher sent their pupils to the other teacher's room, & Mrs. Fisher read an interesting story titled,"Billy the Goat." John was sick a couple of sessions & never found out how the story turns. out. The children used to play on swings & seesaws & jungle-jims & play games like "Go in & out the window -as we have done before-Go skipping round the village- Go kneel before your partner..." Nancy Kawamura was frequently a leader in these games & songs.Rose Lee lived on the golf course across the Ala Wai Canal in front of our home, where her father was a caretaker.Her mother was deaf. Joseph Kinoshita, who became a Honolulu lawyer (& Air Force Reserve Judge Advocate) would often walk home with John along Ala Wai Boulevard after school. Sometimes he would stop at our house & practice wrestling on the front lawn (despite the crabgrass). Miss Celia Ponte was a conscientious & understanding third grade teacher with a large number of students in her classroom.She later became a school principal.During this time John was becoming more nearsighted & got glasses after testing at school & with Dr. Withington's encouragement.Janet Ikeda was an outstanding student in spelling bees & in races to answer arithmetic flash cards quickly.The other third grade teacher Mrs. Evans always wore a flower in her hair fresh every day & like to recite a poem about the Hawaii cup-of-gold flower "made for fairies to hide in."Mary Lou Gilares & other girls acted as Junior Police Officers "JPO's" holding STOP signs after school so that pupils could cross Kapahulu Street on the east ("Diamond Head") side.Students learned to sing a melodic rendition of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, "Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; of restricting the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people to petition the government for a redress of grievances. All of the fourth grade class voluntarily took religion classes once a week- our Ala Wai neighbor Mrs. McCarthy covered the Good Samaritan & other parables & the Golden Rule & Sermon on the Mount & managed to convey the joyous, charitable side of religion without getting hung up over doctrinal controversies. The librarian Miss Becker was friendly & popular & one book John discovered there was Richard Halliburton two travel books - the Wonder Books of Marvels. Sometimes pupils would be assigned to assist in the school office, answering telephones "Thomas Jefferson School- office monitor speaking"- ringing the bells at proper times & taking messages to teachers.It was an opportunity for the principal Mrs. Vance to get to know the students.She was actively involved in all phases of school life.North of the school buildings were softball fields & exercise bars for chinning & arms exercises.A very active Cub Scout pack met on the bleachers near the softball field under the leadership of scout master Mr. Paul Ishimoto, who later became a top official of the Honolulu Boy Scouts.At that time the official age for entering Cub Scouts was nine years, but John did a lot of the Cub achievement tests in early l945 before his ninth birthday in his fourth grade year, looking up family history & learning scout pledges & lessons. The group climbed Red Hill & went on other hikes.After the war ended l945-l946 some of the other pupils would ride with Jack & John to the waterfall on the Pali road & other sites.In the fourth grade Mrs. Martin was friendly & sometimes rode home with us in Waikiki, but she had health problems & left Honolulu around January l945. For one week Mrs. Jepson was a substitute - one day she explained a method of thinking in terms of "aliquot parts of the dollar." The spring of l945 Mrs. Silva was an effective, hard-working teacher who stressed arithmetic achievement. One day April l2, l945 in rest period news came President Roosevelt had died & students were sent home.In the fifth grade Agnes Davidson had students memorize many poems- "True worth is about being not seeming, Of doing each day that goes by Some little good - not in dreaming of great things to do by & bye. Oh better than the riches of a gold crowned king Is the heart-felt memory Of a lovely thing." Mrs. Davidson knew a great deal of American history. She had lived in Arizona & subscribed to the photo magazine "Arizona Highways".She lived west of us on Lewers Road, where we visited after she retired.She once saw John & me after school sitting at the north edge of the school grounds under monkeypods trees near Ala Wai Boulevard & sang, "Don't sit under the monkeypod tree with anybody else but me" - a Hawaiian adaptation of the current American hit, "Don't sit under the apple tree."(*Monkeypods are members of the Bean or Legume family in the mimosoid subfamily - also known as "rain trees" because leaves fold up when it rains.We used to see sixth grade teacher Mrs. Hazleton near her home on Kuhio Street not far from the school, where she sometimes gave us ripe mangoes from a tree in her yard. In l942 there was an art teacher, who passed away not long afterward at a young age, but usually the home classroom teachers supervised periods in the art room. Mrs. Harrison,Mrs. Barbour's first grade teacher was often friendly though John was not in her class - she worked with Mrs. Barbour on the l942 Christmas Pageant, which was very well done & a welcome contrast to the war tensions of Christmas l94l when schools were closed. Air raid drills were held in bomb shelters at school,& effectiveness of gas masks was tested in a room full of tear gas.-#76-#76 Sam King from notebook p.107"The first native Hawaiian to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy was Samuel Wilder King class of l909.He resigned his seat as elected Hawaiian territorial delegate to the United States Congress to return to active Naval duty during the war.He served as Military Governor of American Samoa during the war.During his absence his wife Pauline went to see Jack about a lost trunk belonging to her son in the Navy.She was pleased by the personal interest she felt Jack took.She used to say she was "Part-Hawaiian & proud of it."Jack knew her husband either in person or by reputation from his several visits to Hawaii in the l920's.Her husband also had New England ancestral roots & was a distant relative of the poet Oliver Wendell Holmes.One day Pauline paid an afternoon call on me in Waikiki.When I told Mrs. King I could not find a small lahalla straw mate for John's daily nap at school in rest period,she said that she would ask Sam to try to get one in Samoa.A few weeks later she returned,carrying a Samoan straw mat.- a little too large & pretty for school naps where the mats were stuffed into a wooden chest for storage, but since Sam had taken the trouble to ship it via a Navy ship going to Pearl Harbor, & Mrs. King had picked it up there & delivered it herself to us in her car,we used the mat for naps at Thomas Jefferson School.Frequently after that I would find wonderful bananas, pineapple, papayas & lettuces on the bench on my front porch & once I found some macadamia nuts there- a nut I had never seen before- hard & most delicious.These delicacies were left for us by Mrs. King after her occasional visits to her family on the other side of Oahu.During the war mr. & Mrs. King & their children lived in a rented home in Kahala because of the gasoline rationing & blackout. When the war ended,Sam returned to Oahu, & Mrs. King telephoned inviting the three of us to a supper party in honor of Sam's return home.Jack was no longer working on Sundays.As we were preparing to leave the house about 5:30 Sunday evening to go to Kahala, Colonel William Winchester Paca,commander of the Marines at Camp Catlin came to call. He was an old friend from our TULSA days in North China in l93l, & his family were descendants of the William W.Paca of Annapolis Maryland who signed the Declaration of Independence in l776. Paca's home in Annapolis became Carvel Hall at th Naval Academy.Paca was one of the few Marine officers who was a graduate of West Point military academy.He was known to some of his friends as "Soldier" because of this background- he visited us several times during his Hawaii duty l944=l946.That Sunday afternoon he was cold & tired& soon after he arrived he asked me for a cup of coffee, which I tried to make it my large Silex. i am afraid I gave him a rather poor cup of coffee because my mind was on the King party, where we were to eat at six o'clock - still I didn't like to desert Paca. Without consulting him I telephoned Pauline King to ask her if she could have the commanding officer of Camp Catlin as her guest for supper, and she agreed.At the supper we met Captain Edward D. Washburn, junior, who like Jack, had formerly been in charge of a Branch Hydrographic office. Washburn had the one in San Francisco at the same time Jack had the one in New York City l939-l94l.At the party were Captain Sam King, Captain & Mrs. Lewis- Jack's boss as Personnel Officer during the war,& the woman who headed the Women's Marine Corps.There were also a number of young people, including the King & Lewis families. When Mrs. King asked me to fill glasses of milk in her kitchen,I was amazed that she was handling all the cooking herself with no maid to cook or serve.The senior guests were served at numerous card tables in the living room, while the young people were served outdoors.Mrs. King had prepared an enormous pot of spaghetti & meatballs-just right for that rather chilly evening.We were seated at Captain Washburn's small table for four- he,Jack, John & I comprising that group.At first I did not sit with them as Mrs. King asked me to serve the dishes of spaghetti as she ladled them out & told me exactly whom to serve & to whom to give milk.So I rushed back & forth serving Captain Washburn,Jack, Colonel Paca, the woman Marine,Captain & Mrs. Lewis exactly as she told me to-& when I asked about the people outdoors, she said they understood that the kitchen would be theirs after the guests were served.Then she filled a plate for me,& when I realized it was the last of the spaghetti,I asked her about her own spaghetti, & she told me to forget it.So reluctantly I went to my seat, feeling I had done a good job.Suddenly I heard the guest of honor Sam King inquiring loudly, "Don't I get anything to eat?" We had forgotten to serve Sam.After dinner the young folks came into the living room, played dance records, & danced. Colonel Paca enjoyed himself very much dancing with the young people, & when we finally left, he continued at the party.While waiting for his supper, Sam King said," This informality is just Pauline. It reminds me of an incident that happened shortly before I resigned as Delegate to Congress.We usually came home (to the windward side of the Island) when Congress closed each year to relax.I had often said to friends in Congress 'if you come to the Islands, let us show you some Hawaiian hospitality'. One afternoon when I was not home,three Congressmen did call- & a maid told them, 'Just go out back'- because that's where Pauline was. ."- so they went out back to see the perfect Washington hostess they had known impeccable in dress when in Washington-& they were amazed when she hailed them from high up in a tree.She nonchalantly climbed down & offered the Congressmen some of the mangoes she had collected. Pauline verified that the story was true.There was a parent-teacher association at the Thomas Jefferson School through which I met some of the other parents.We met Peter Perser & his mother from nearby Tuisitala Street in the first grade on the day school opened in September l942- & later the families of Robert Ho, Nicholas Vaksvik, Rose Lee on the golf course, & the Cook family who lived half a block east of us at 2465 Ala Wai. Edric Cook worked with a shipping company,& his wife Anne was from Seattle. Her father born in Europe came for an extended visit about l945. Ether Trease was an officer of the Honolulu Parent Teachers Association.We attended the tenth birthday of her daughter Diane at their large house on a hill in Kaimuki.Mrs. Trease commented that nobody ever bothered to celebrate her own birthdays because they fell two days after Christmas on December 27.Dr. Paul Withington was a Navy Reserve doctor who advised Jack on ship facilities & priorities for the sick & wounded.His mother was the first woman principal in a Massachusetts school (in Brookline) The Withington family developed a sugar plantation on windward Oahu before l900,and five sons attended Harvard. Paul Withington played football & rowed on the crew in the class of l909.After medical school l9l3 he coached football at University of Wisconsin & became an Army doctor in World War I. In Hawaii he was interested in yachting & worked with swimmer Duke Kahanamoku improving the breathing & timing of the Australian crawl stroke. In the l930's he knew General Patton, who was stationed in Hawaii several years.One time we had dinner at Dr. Withington's home high up in a valley near Mount Round Top & saw several rabbits in cages there & met his ward Rose, whom he later married.There was a tidal wave tsunami in l946 - the most serious damage was at Hilo.In March l945 the Navy sponsored a swimming met at which we saw the famous champion Duke Kahanamoku.Jack arranged transportation for a number of prominent athletes & entertainers mostly in the Navy who entertained troops in forward areas. He had an autographed catchers mitt from Yankee Bill Dickey a baseball from Johnny Mize then with the New York Giants, & a photo of Gene Tunney, all of whom visited the Transportation Office, as did Bing Crosby's sons.We also saw exhibitions of prominent tennis players.-#28ee- the dog, except I had seen her several times with her owner. I dared not go to his apartment to look for dog food,as the large dog might have attacked me.I had stocked nothing.& the military governor had ordered all stores closed to halt the hoarding that started the day after the attack.The dog went back & forth between my front & side doors & the entrance to Mr. Glockner's upstairs apartment at the back of the house.She would not let the milkman, laundry man or newspaper boy approach.When Gertrude Rice came to spend the night,she would rush in when the dog was going to his own door, & in the morning she would rush out. I called the police to remove the dog,but they refused, saying they had more to do than be concerned about than the dog.Jack was on duty at Pearl Harbor day & night December 8-11.Finally I called the police to come at once for an emergency.The dog would not let them ring the doorbell - I called out that I had a small boy in the house & was out of food.Finally they did send the dog catcher. Later that month I had a postcard from Mr. Glockner asking me about his property & asking me to put mothballs in his clothes.Then it happened.When Navy women learned Jack had a wife in Waikiki,they began calling me on the telephone & came in droves to the little house,thinking I might plead their cases with Jack.Eventually Jack established priorities-the wounded-surviving widows & their children -pregnant women-women with very young children-& women with medical problems.Naval Reservist Dr. Paul Withington-who had grown up on a Windward Oahu sugar plantation & played football & rowed at Harvard l909 -& who was in charge of the Navy Dependents' Dispensary- advised Jack on medical cases needing to leave for the mainland.Mrs.Clorinda Low Lucas,one of the first native Hawaiian social workers advised about civilians who needed immediate transportation because of health or social need,& Pacific Fleet Chaplain Captain William Maguire haunted the Transportation Office,as he was familiar with the hardships of Navy women & children.Jack found it hard to refuse Chaplain Maguire's requests. because he was the Navy chaplain who in l93l found a room for me in Chefoo in l93l when the whole Asiatic fleet was in town & there was no place for me in the hotels.All sailings of ships in & out of Pearl Harbor were top secret..So when Jack got word from the Port Director, Lieutenant Commander Martin Derx, of the exact number of spaces he could have in the ships to evacuate personnel & dependents on Christmas Day l94l,his staff immediately started telephoning the hospitals to prepare the wounded for the trip to the mainland. They telephoned Navy & Marine personnel to be ready to sail,& then secretly notified the Navy dependents as all Navy women with young children were required to leave the Islands whether or not they wanted to.The order came from Admiral Bloch that ALL Navy dependents were to be evacuated as quickly as ships could be made available.When Gertrude Rice learned that Jack would be working on the dock all Christmas Day loading the evacuees aboard several ships, to be convoyed by three destroyers & a cruiser,she invited John & me to share Christmas dinner with her & Paul -risky as she lived near the Army's Fort Derussy in Waikiki, but it was within walking distance of our house.Carrying our gas masks,John & I walked to Gertrude's apartment, where she gave us a most delicious turkey dinner.When John asked for more peaches with his turkey,Gertrude hesitated, as they were brandied peaches.We had just finished eating when Jack appeared-tired & unfed at three o'clock in the afternoon.Gertrude gave him a good dinner,but he had to leave immediately because he was evacuating thousands of frightened wounded & dependent women with unruly children-with lines miles long waiting to get on the ships.Many women & children had given up their homes & were unfed. Jack saw our friend Mrs. Gene Nelson (from Panama days) standing in line with her two sons-ages about five & seven-at least a mile from the ship trying to control the two boys & watch her luggage at the same time.Jack called a couple of sailors to help her with her bags,& then he went aboard with her & gave her a lovely big room on the Matson Line's LURLINE.She was very pleased when he had an extra cot put in for Eric,the younger boy,so the family could be together in one cabin.Jack ordered her trunk taken to her cabin-a great privilege as most passengers could get nothing from their trunks during the voyage,because the trunks were in the hold.Later Gene Nelson wrote me that many of the children had no warm clothes for the cold weather of San Francisco about New Year's Day,& many had no shoes or stockings, which children generally do not use in Hawaii.One evening when the order came to "Darken Ship," some women thought they heard,"Abandon Ship," & there was temporary panic-but that soon subsided.The destroyers of the convoy occasionally dropped depth charges for suspected submarines,but the voyage was not too harrowing.GENE NELSON letter June 24,l970 "widow of Captain Paul Nelson,who had been a young boat officer on the survey ship HANNIBAL when Jack was "exec" & who was aboard the mine layer OGLALA on December 7,l94l, when she was sunk & who died some time ago- a letter about her evacuation by Jack on the LURLINE Christmas Day l94l.Her son Paul junior was graduated from the Naval Academy & became a submariner- & her son Eric became a Naval aviator,but Eric was killed in a mountain accident recently.Gene herself passed away from a heart condition in March l97l. There were our good Navy friends,who visited at our house in West Roxbury in the l950's for Sunday dinner. In her letter Gene wrote,'Dear Sophie: Paul had (p.ll9f)the duty December 6-7 l94l aboard the OGLALA usually referred to as THAT old minelayer.I did not know he was alive until 2;30 pm The wife of the skipper 'Colonel' Speight located me at Kay Tompkins' where I had gone after I picked up the children at Saint Andrews Episcopal Church.Kalaimaku Street was an evacuation area,so that it was senseless to try to go home. I went on home with the boys-Paul junior & Eric after spending the day getting up & down a rickety ladder with them & hiding under a reinforced concrete culvert.Later Paul & the paymaster came home-Paul trying to whistle & in khaki as the uniform was changed from whites to try to catch any possible saboteurs.I forget how I got the word,but I went downtown to have the boys evacuated right away.Later I was informed I had to go along.A might telephone call told me to report for evacuation at a downtown pier.Somehow I had trunks,suitcases & even a toy or two with us.All our Christmas presents had sunk on the OGLALA December 7, l94l.(Paul jr was about eight & Eric about five) A cot was put in a lovely room on the LURLINE now renamed the MATSONIA.It was made up about sundown for Eric.The sheets felt odd,& next morning we found they were pure linen from the lanai suites! We had nothing to bathe in for 4 l/2 days but cold salt water. We had sailed on December 26,l94l accompanied by two cruisers- one of them the St. LOUIS,& five destroyers.The destroyers ran around like mad that afternoon tossing over "ash cans" (depth charges).They were kept very busy tossing over depth charges p ll9g as we had all four of the Matson liners in convoy.We had aboard I believe thirty-eight of the burn cases.The boys went belting down a main staircase & almost ran into one, one day.I threatened them with everything I knew if they did it again. The gallant suffering burned boy (sailor) kept telling me he knew they meant no harm. have keen hearing.One night over the loudspeaker came "Prepare to darken ship."Over a hundred people paniced,as they [thought they]heard,"Prepare to abandon ship." My table mates bolted,but I grabbed an arm of each boy & told them to stay seated.Took quite a while to restore order.One evening some others were in our assigned places.We were put at a small table against the wall-I had some words,believe me with the steward- & we went back to our table for breakfast & kept on there.The stewards were quite surly. I heard later that at disembarkation at San Francisco they were marched off & sent to a recruiting office - or else...I cannot vouch for the story.They should have been,because the children were given a patented cooked cereal every day & diarrhea was rampant,you may imagine. One morning I was talking to a lovely older lady & mentioned I was worried about all the children I saw barefooted & in cotton only.Our boys had their little but too small coats & caps & were warm enough to land in San Francisco within two days. I bet it was twenty minutes later when over the loud speaker came a request that anyone who could spare clothes report to deck room- I had been talking with a General's wife.She got things done that I a Lieutenant's wife could only worry about.We docked on a beautiful day at Pier 32 San Francisco.I managed to reach a phone & called Paul's sister-at work of course.I could hear her call over her shoulder,"My brother's wife & boys are here from Pearl Harbor-'bye,boss."When she came to pick us up, I told her "Open the front & back doors. We've had only cold salt water in which to wash for 4 l/2 days." On the dock were plenty of warm donations which should have been sent to Honolulu.Plenty of time for it. The Red Cross was there selling orange juice, coffee, milk for a nickel apiece. A good friend of mine had on the same slacksuit for three days & I asked if she had any other clothes.Everything of hers had been put in the hold & no person could go look.She came down to our room & I outfitted her with a brand new suit from Sears Roebuck & even had thread & needle for her to shorten the pants- all thanks to your Jack having given orders for all our baggage to go in our lovely big room. This is July 5 now- I get sidetracked by this lousy heart & my sixty-first birthday on July 3. As ever,Gene Nelson." THE OGLALA haD PREVIOUSLY BEEN A FALL RIVER liner But she was almost always tied up at Pearl Harbor. On December 7,l94l she lay next to the cruiser HELENA at 1010 dock & capsized. She was tied up so long that a family of birds built a nest in her funnel. End addition rest from #28:Another friend- from TULSA days in China-Commander Myron Thomas-was on Admiral Calhoun's staff,& through Jack he made arrangements for his wife & son to be evacuated on Christmas Day.He appreciated all Jack did to help & wrote to me recently that except for confusion on the dock before departure his wife & son had a good trip home on the LURLINE.Since I refused to accept my Navy quarters at Makalapa in July l941 chiefly because it was located so near the oil storage tanks,I was interested to read later in Samuel Eliot Morison's official history of the Navy in World War II that the greatest mistake the Japanese made on December 7 was their failure to bomb the huge reserve supply of oil at Pearl Harbor-& their failure to destroy the repair yards & docks & command & information facilities at the Administration Building. Commander Myron Thomas on Admiral Calhoun's Service Force staff wrote l970 about Jack: "He performed his task in a most creditable manner,& then his tact,careful planning,foresight & diplomacy with many people at this critical time satisfied the majority of naval personnel who had to remain in the (war) zone & were anxious to get their dependents to the mainland. I well remember that he booked my wife &^ son for sailing on the SS.LURLINE on Christmas Day '4l- & I didn't see them again until Christmas'43." Soon after the attack I learned a lot about it from Jack & from Captain Paul Rice,who worked for Admiral Furlong in the Navy Yard in charge of civilian workers in the repair shops.When Jack was Operations & War Plans assistant at Pearl Harbor in August l94l, he tried hard to get his superiors to work with the Army & alert the navy to the real threat of an attack by the Japanese, but he was ignored-& transferred by Bloch to the Overseas Transportation Office,where his warnings could not disturb their golf.Paul Rice told me the civilian workmen voluntarily returned to work at the repair shops even while the attack was in progress-they worked well to prepare the ships for the trip to the mainland for permanent repairs.Early in the New Year l942 Jack was notified that several ships were en route to Honolulu to evacuate a large number of Navy dependents.Accordingly they secretly notified many women to give up their homes & be prepared to sail at a specified secret time.Not until the day of planned departure did Jack learn that all the ships had been sent elsewhere-the Navy women & children were stranded without places to live & without much ready cash.Jack was hounded day & night by displaced women & children=he was the victim of a situation which he had done nothing to create. For months no ships for dependents were made available to him, as they were all occupied in transporting troops & supplies for the crucial battle of Midway,which occurred June 4.Late in May l942 my friend Lillian Arroyo visited me in Waikiki as she had learned that her husband was scheduled to leave the Islands shortly.She used her precious gasoline to drive me to a Japanese store in Honolulu where they put new covers on my chair cushions & sold me their last three Philippine teakwood bookcases & the only two unpainted pine rocking chairs in the place, which was practically empty.Lillian told me the awful secret of the preparations for Midway,& I promised to say nothing to anyone-not even to Jack.But the secret worried me,& I understood why Jack had no ships for the wounded & Navy dependents.But we won the Battle of Midway- & after that Jack could transport all the people who wanted to leave. Since Admiral Bloch put pressure on him to send us away,& since we had no home to go to on the mainland, we declared Hawaii our legal residence & remained throughout the war until June 4,l947.In the spring of l942,the Army cut some of the barbed wire at our entrance to the beach at Waikiki,& we joyfully resumed our daily swim just before dinner each evening.One late afternoon May l942 I lit the oven to bake a few very old potatoes & the last four old yellow onions.When Jack finally came home,he had with him a young man in civilian clothes-a soiled white shirt & really dirty white civilian trousers.Jack took me aside & whispered that his guest was a Lieutenant junior grade just in from a forward area of the war exhausted & afraid of the Shore Patrol because he was out of uniform-he had no time or funds to get a uniform before he left for the states to receive a Presidential citation from Franklin Roosevelt on behalf of his unit that had been in the Philippines.We took Henry Brantingham for a walk to the beach & loaned him a swim suit.The four of us walked hurriedly to the beach, swam-& in the walk home Henry was relaxed enough to laugh & talk like a normal young person.I raced into the kitchen-where my potatoes were overcooked -& my few little onions almost burned. I cut some stale cold roast beef cooked the previous Sunday.By the time they had showered & dressed it was dark,but we sat down to our simple meal.But we had a pleasant time & when I asked Henry if he would like to join us for a swim & supper the next night,he merely replied,"That is up to the Commander."Jack walked to the Moana hotel with Henry so he wouldn't get lost & picked up by the Shore Patrol. Jack told him not to leave the hotel until he had heard from the Transportation Office. Brantingham had been skipper of a PT boat evacuating MacArthur & his family- then in mountains of Cebu-a Filipino loaned him a civilian shirt & trousers so he could have his dirty uniform .washed. Before the uniform came back from the laundry, Brantingham flew out on one of the two last planes to leave the Philippines.So that is why Brantingham reached Australia in soiled civilian clothes.Later in the Solomons he commanded one of the four PT boats that were with Lt. John F. Kennedy & was involved in picking up Kennedy, as described in Donovan's book "PT l09."Brantingham remembers us well in l970 & expressed appreciation in his l970 letter from La Jolla,California.


 

1298.
#1298 p 80 John Barrett hidden word square 1995-6 "IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE?"

 

Top line is motto of Hippocrates, "Life is short but art is long" Words may run down, up, right-to-left as well as left to right. Several hundred hidden words are present including terms from medicine, anatomy, biology, biochemistry and names of researchers.This may be reprinted and is believed educationally useful.Other words squares will be added to website - Washington state geography- Mathematics- Geology-Earth Science- -Harvard names- -Victory in the Pacific- Botanical Latin- "From Fairest Creatures We Desire Increase" [Line from Shakespeare's first sonnet introducing Evolution wordsquare]- Victory in the Pacific 1945- Hawaii- Franz Schubert 200th anniversary- presto.possible.musical terms- legal terms- classical Greek- there is a rather esoteric one on cryptogams - bryophtes, fungi,etc. Does anyone have a copy of a lost 1995 word square on Ireland, counties and geography that had some features of a map? There may be a copy in storage in Jamaica Plain. If anyone has a copy, I would like to put it on the website.These wordsquares were suggested by ones used while substitute teaching in Boston, and they are intended to be amusing and educational. Please try making printouts.Ideas of orders for future ones are welcome.---+--Hydrographic Office DC + Navy Reserve World War I #1274 about p 77w 1-9-1-2--1-9-2-1 Edit : -from page 273 of notebook "cargo convoys. from November l8, l9l7 to June l6, l9l8 as navigators, William Bell Wait., C.O. M.S. Richardson Lieut - USS PAMLICO training vessel used by JBB two days a week at Officers Material School )(Officer Training School) Hampton Roads VA July l9l8 to March l9l9.USS SEATTLE troopsship l9 March l9l9 to 15 July l9l9. Watch officer acting Navigator Admiral Gleaves, flagship, Captain J. Blakeley. West CORUM Oc 15 to Nov 15, l9l9. WESTERNER First Officer Nov 15, l9l9 to September 10, l920. USS STRINGHAM reported at Phila Dec. 30,l920 detached Charlleston SC Feb 7, l921 C.O. T.C. Slingluff USS TOUCEY Charleston SC CO Carroll and Abbott. Exec Navigator acting C.O. Feb 8, l921 to Jan 13, l922 USS COLUMBIA reported Jan 13, l922 Charles SC CO J.K. Taussig det Guacanayabo Bay Cuba 19 Jan l922 Battleship USS WYOMING 19 Jan ol922 g of G l9 Jan l922 H.B. Price CO Guantanamo Bay shore patrol F 25-26, March 1-6 incl. 14-15, 26-27, 30-31, 7-8 Ap June 25. CO G.W. Laws by June 26. Ship at Yorktown Va Jun 25. 24 July ship at Hampton Roads Va July 1 ship at Yorktown Va l8 August ship at Newport RI Aug 8 Newp RI 23 Sep sh at Yor Va 6 December Navy Yard NY JBB returns from fifteen days leave. 11 & 16 Nov ship of Yorkt Va. also ll Oc when JBB on board to select 28 men from ship for intensive instruction radio.21 Nov WYO at Ny w22 Oc ship at NY JBB on beach guard at 96th St. ;landing oc 23-24. 14 March l923 Balboa JBB appointed to hull board. fifteen days leave starting 28 May 1923 Navy Yard NY request was 21 May. Guantanamo 31 March l923 Aug 10, l922 Newpoort RI. NITRO Finney 27 June -26 July l929 POPE July 26 to Aug 5 ESDALL Aug 5 to 14 l929 TRUXTUN Aug 14, l929 to May 20, l930 Car3y ,l JBB acting, Keliher. aws by June 265 ____ 08 --l9l2-l9l9 Hydrographic Office & World War I #08 At this time Jack took many civil service examinations resulting in taking a job with the Naval Hydrographic Office in Washington in January l9l3. He found a home with a family of Christian Scientists on A Street southeast, who gave him a fine big private room where he was allowed to keep his window open constantly regardless of the weather.He also got three excellent meals a day there & was pleased that it was within easy distance of his office at the State, War & Navy Building (where he used to see President Wilson's Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan) but he was embarassed by the teen-age daughters who used to run their fingers through his wavy red hair. He was active & on one occasion -Easter 1913- walked forty-four miles between Baltimore & Washington. On a postcard to his South Bosto family he recorded starting near Library of Congress 8:30 AM and arriving Baltimore six PM. He lived in the house for several years but finally had to move out reluctantly when lightning struck the house - the storm damaged the roof so badly a great deal of water came in.This was the period when the Barretts heard from immigrant Aunt Johanna Hession aged eighty-five years, who in April 1914 sent twenty-five dollar presents to his sisters Mollie & Kate (April l9l4) & Jack's father's sister Kate Barrett who lived with her aunts at 2043 Polk Street San Francisco wrote Jack a long letter about the San Francisco world's fair l9l5-her interest in women's suffrage & in President Woodrow Wilson's Irish-American press Secretary Joseph Tumulty - one of the first Irish to hold prominent national office- & her concern with the violent actvities of the International Workers of the World ("I hope they go to Kamchatka or Patagonia - I don't care which," she wrote.Postcards from Jack to South Boston were numerous - he followed his brother Bill's progress at Boston Latin School, where they had most of the same teachers.Jack came home to Boston most holidays.His work was largely mathematical revising the tables in Bowditch's American Practical Navigator.This was the period he got to know Gershom Bradford, C.C. Ennis & other Hydrographic staffers he kept in touch with for many years. The Hydrographic Office was begun by Matthew Fontaine Maury, who took the confederate side in the Civil War. George Littlehales was one of the better known hydrographers.Jack took a public speaking course at Gonzaga college & spent much time at the DC. Knights of Columbus.He saw chess champions Albert Lasker & Jose Capablanca at the Capital City Chess & Checker Club. He memorized a poem, "If you would ruin a man, Dagger & bomb are archaic- Teach him - Inoculate him with chess. It is fortunate perhaps that chess is seldom well taught -Or we should have (the world) going to rack & ruin while statesmen pondered (their chessboards) & taxicabs made knights' moves from Charing Cross to Picadilly- & Every now & then a suicide would turn up with this tragic message pinned to its breast - 'Alas- I checked with my queen too soon.'" Jack recounted one incident of a man who had & evening date & came in "for a quick game" & was glued to the chessboard five hours later, having forgotten all about the date. In December 1916 Jack transferred from Naval Hydrographic Office to Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Their function was to promote American trade interests. Jack's language skills came in handy,and he recollected translating materials from Rumanian, a conservative language that retained a strong resemblance to the Latin he had studied many years. One of his friends there was Chauncy Snow, a nephew of New York senator Chauncy Snow, well known at that time as a wit and public speaker. Because of the War, Jack remained only four months. In l9l5 Jack always interested in the sea, joined the District of Columbia Naval Militia.Among the l9l6 members we found the name of Miles Finley, now a retired Navy Commander. On October 23, l970 Commander Finley wrote: "Dear Mrs. Barrett,Your interesting letter of September 27th was forwarded to me by Bureau of Personnel, arriving just as we were leaving for San Francisco (his home is in San Diego, California).My connection with the D.C. Naval Militia was fairly brief.As I recall the chain of events was something like this: I had served in the War Department as a Quartermaster clerk at Fort Flagler, Washington, & at Fort Riley,Kansas August l908 to January l9ll.I was again in Federal Service, Office of Postmaster General,starting August l9l2.I marched up Pennsylvania Avenue,heading a squad of telephone girls & charwomen in the Preparednesss parade, passing in review before President Wilson. As the War Clouds began to roll up, I discussed personal war plans with my good friend, Lieutenant C.G.A.Johnson, P.A. Pay (clerk) D.C. Naval Militia DCNM HEADED BY CAPTAIN MacGruder. I had thought of applying for a commission in the Quartermaster Corps, U.S. Army, but Carl asked me to go with hiim one Sunday morn to the DCNM Armory- Water and O Streets for an interview with Lieutenant Commander R.B. Bruninant (spelling?)DCNM, the commanding officer - he was chief clerk Bureau of Ordinance Navy Department. I think it was the next Monday that Carl telephoned me to go buy a uniform, that I had been commissioned Ensign, DCNM (Assistant Paymaster).- & this was followed promptly by orders to a session of Naval pay Officers' School Sept.l5-October l4, l9l6.I qualified for the National Naval Volunteers by attending this school & proving my ability.(Jack Barrett also became a member of the National Naval Volunteers by examination - Sophie Barrett note).I attended drill regularly & made one cruise in the USS SYLVIA Thanksgiving weekend l9l6 when we took Adjutant general J.C. Costner commanding D.C. Militia to the Colonial Beach area. He went duck hunting.Bunks in officer country were all filled, & & I spread a mattress in a passageway.(Jack Barrett made this cruise on the SYLVIA).Sorry these XEROX prints are so poor,but you will note 'Recruiting Campaign begun" in the 'Ready for Service' story.I was that recruiting officer, under orders of March 28, l9l7 for the purpose of making necessary preliminary arrangements for mobilization' an endorsement of April 6, l9l7 reads." You will discontinue duty under these orders received to mobilize Naval Militia."April 6, l9l7 other orders directed me to report at the Naval Militia Armory forthwith- turn over federal equipment & proceed to Naval Yard Norfolk. I then received orders to proceed to such port as the USS YANTRON may be (at) & report to the Commanding officer for duty as ordered.I remember your husband, but we met only at drills. I did not march in the March 4, l9l7 Inaugural Parade, I had not yet acquired `an overcoat. Carl G.A. Johnson did march. (Jack Barrett marched & kept postcards of the Inaugural March on March 4, l9l7.) I had a cozy seat to watch the event at a window in the old Post Office Building, Pennsylvania Avenue.I know the boys towed a field piece up the Avenue, & many sets of colors were riddled by the strong cold rain.-Miles Finley." From XEROX material D.C. Naval Militia Read for Service. Men could turn out fully equipped a few hours after call received.In a very few hours after a call for mobilization is received at the Naval Militia Armory at the foot of Water & O Streets Southwest, that organization could turn out, fully equipped one (hundred) sixty fighrting men= men who knew at least the rudiments of work aboard a man-of-war.A plan of the Navy Department to call out the Navla Militia to relieve officers and men of the regular Navy for service aboard the first-line ships of the Navy is awaiting the signature of the President.The one hundred sixty men now on the rolls are thoroughly interested- as all men who have not attended drills regularly have been dropped. These men participate in the Thursday night drills & participate in the practice cruises aboard the USS SYLVIA, the training ship loaned to the organization by the Navy.Four officers have taken the examination required by the Navy for the National Naval Volunteers. They are Lieutenant C.G.A. Johnson, asssistant paymaster, Lieutenant,P.D. Johnston commading the First Division, Ensign J. B. Barrett commanding the Second Division, & M.R. Finley assistant Paymaster. The other officers are expected to take their examinations in a short time, & the examinations of the men are now being held.A recruiting campaign has just been inaugurated in order to recruit the organization to its full strength of 445 men. Prizes have been offered by the staff officers of the battalion for the men who bring in the most recruits.Every officer & man now in the organization is fully equipped for service afloat & the Supply Department of the local organization has on hand enough outfits to completely equip two hundred men immediately.The local organization is fully equipped to handle any large number of recruits that might come in as a result of a mobilization order. Jack Barrett's service: December l9l5 Served as A.S. 2M 3c & O.M. 2c in the Naval Militia of Washington DC till August l9l6. - August l9l6 commissioned Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February l9,l9l7 passed examination as Ensign in Naval Militia of Washington DC. February 24, l9l7 Ensign national naval Volunteers- accepted & executed oath of office.March 28, l9l7 Commissioned Ensign in the National Naval Volunteers dating from February 24, l9l7.=April 7,l9l7 Called into the service of the United States & to Navy Yard,Washington DC for duty aboard thne USS SYLVIA. --l9l7 November 8- Detached SYLVIA to duty USS MONTGOMERY as Navigator. Name changed to ANNISTON. The ship was camouflaged & did convoy duty in Carribean. l9l8 January l- became Lieutenant junior grade (jg) National Naval Volunteers for temporary service duty dating from January l, l9l8- May l7, l9l8 accept & executed oath of office. Granted two days leave from June l0 to June llth l9l8. June l3 detached USS ANNISTON to duty Naval Training Station Norfolk Virginia. - l9l8 July 1 Lieutenant in Naval Reserve Force, class two - transferred to Naval Reserve Force by act of Congresss approved July 1, l9l8 - July l0 admittted to Naval Hospital Hampton Roads Va for treatment (sinus/?) Discharge July 23.Nov, 23, l9l8 given the provisional assignment with rank & grade of Lieutenant LDO in the Naval Reserve Class two to rank from July 1,l9l8. Assignment expires Feb. 23, l920- Dec. 2, l9l8 accepted & executed oath of office. From the Commandant of the First Naval District "There is forwarded herewith a Victory Medal conferred upon you in accordance with the provisions of an Act of Congresss approved May l3, l908 directing the preparation & distribution of badges to the officers & men of the Navy & Marine Corps of the United States who participated in engagements & campaigns deemed worthy of such commemoration. The badge is issued to you by the Bureau of Navigation in recognition of your services in the World War." ." #04- #04 World War I era-April l0, l9l7 to October 22, l9l7 executive officer, navigator & watch officer on USS SYLVIA Fifth Naval District.Oct. 22 to Oct. 25 temporary duty Kazeruna (spelling?) October 25 to November l5, back to SYLVIA. November l5, l9l7 to June 16, l9l8 navigator USS MONTGOMERY later named ANNISTON along Atlantic seaboard between Newport Rhode Island, Charleston, South Carolina, & Bermuda. The Anniston was camouflaged & did convoy duty in the Carribean ( not clear if Lieutenant Barrett was aboard at that time).From June l7, l9l8 to March 2l, l9l9 he was an Instructor in Seamanship & Regulations at the Officer Material School, Norfolk (Hampton Roads,?) Virginia under Captain Quimby.One of the naval overseas vessels that were sailing had to return to port Saturday night because of the condition of the compasses.It was rather difficult under the circumstances to get an expert to compensate the compasses without considerable delay to the ship.Lieutenant (jg) Barrett was communicated with & the circimstances explained to him.He very gladly offered to go out to the ship & compensate the compasses. I want to express my appreciation for the work that he did, as it was a saving to the government & it prevented a delay of at least one day'd sailing of the vessel. Signed W.S. Whitted, Commander United States Navy, Retired." Captain Quimby sent a letter to the Bureau of Navigation:"It gives me pleasure to forward the enclosed letter of commendation in regard to the compasss work of Lieutenant J.B.Barrett & suggest that such matters should be placed in the record of Lietenant Barrett, & letter of commendation should be returned to Lieutenant J.B. Barrett from the Navy Department."On February l7, l9l9 Jack received orders to proceed to Washington DC for a three day course of instruction at the Naval Observatory.On November l4, l9l8 Lieutenant H. L. Crawford USN Retired, wrote to the Steamboat Inspectors at Tampa Florida:"This is to certify that J. B. Barrett served as Quartermaster first class in the USS ILLINOIS from July l5, l9l6 to July 26, l9l6, also as Executive & Navigating Officer on the USS SYLVIA from April 10, l9l7 to November 15, l9l7, performing all duties assigned to him in an efficient manner. he was found to be a sober, capable, & industrious office, & I take great pleasure in recommending him as such. We have the graduation programs of the classes of the Officer Material School in which Jack was an instructor l9l8, & they list the names of the graduates.After prolonged search we located one member of those classes Commander Arthur Edwin Uber, born in l897 now retired & living in Butlet, Pennsylvania: On May 4, l97l he wrote,"Mrs. Barrett: Yes! I am trhe same A.E. Uber who was graduated from the officer Material School at the Naval Operating Base in Norfolk, Virginia on 12 March l9l9. Our school was the old Pennsylvania Buiulding constructed for the Jamestown Exposition held in l907.Captain "Jack" Quimby as you mention was in charge of the school.Strange as it may seem, your late husband's name was the only other name I can remember among all the instructors & students in the school.You must remember this is all about a period fifty- two years ago.Tiny fragments of the time, if any at all,come back to me now. I am quite sure any of my recollections would be of little value to you.He was not tall - rather thin- But the name sticks. A group of us were standing out in front of the building, across from the sea wall on the other side of the street.Someone said, "Here comes 'Salty' Barrett. We saluted.He returned it!!!- Put on a big grin & waved back. He evidentrly had on his number three work uniform, since the braid was well tarnished with a greenish line.Among us in those days an officer who showed evidence of practical experience & sea duty was muchg admired & respected.See what I mean? Just a little bit of the past= 52 years ago- of no particular value.I still have my "Knight's Seamanship", which is falling apart & also my little "Bluejacket's Manual.I remember going up to Yorktown one weekend on the PAMLICO ((training ship for students in Officer material School). Quarters were crowded or non-existent.Many swung their hammocks outside on deck. It was cold - but turned warm during the night & rained.That precipiated a rush to get under cover- you can imagine..-A.E. Uber." _March l9, l9l9 Detached Fifth Naval district where served as Instructor of Seamanship & Regulations at Officer Material School Norfolk. Went to Commander, Cruiser & Transport Force, New York for assignment to USS SEATTLE - l9l9 March 31: To duty as Navigator on board the USS Seattle. Made three (four?) round trips Brest (Brittany, France)to to Hoboken New Jersey with returning troops. Smedley Butler US Marine Corps was in charge of a large base at Brest with Marines & other troops awaiting transportation. Jack was interested in Butler's career & may have seen him at this time & at Shanghai l927. It is possible Jack's acquaintance with Pacific Fleet Chapplaim William Maguire (Captain USN in l940's) may date from this time also. Some notes in Jack's handwriting stolen l993 gave chronology of an incident April l9l9 at Brest, where local civilians stole eggs from the battleship about three o'clock in the morning, leadeing to an investigation.There were severe food shortages in France 7&other parts of Europe at this period in aftermath of the Great War.--l9l9: June l9 Detached USS SEATTLE & relieved of all active duty. This was the period of the popular song, "How're ya going to keep 'em down on the Farm after they've seen Paris? How're ya going to keep them away from Broadway, painting the town? - That's a mystery." Jack was first officer of the commercial ship WESTERNER (previously a troopship) from November l5, l9l9 to September l0, l920.The Commander Richardson from Virginia was one of Jack's closer & more congenial friends & correspondents for nearly fifty years, & he & his siter-in-law Mrs. Kane kept in touch with the Barrett family until l972, when he passed away. Jack made his first trip through the Panama Canal, opened l9l4. They visited Hawaii, & Japan, where Jack took photographs of the Inland Sea & sent them to the Navy Department, which was interested in precise information on foreign ports & waterways.He wrote his father a long letter from Shanghai - his first visit to China. They took on timber & cordage materials as cargo in Manila. Until l993 we had a notebook with Jack's detailed navigational calculations of stars, latitudes & longitudes passing through the eight-degree-north channel in islands south of India. Before the advent of radio, it was important to be able to recognize many navigational stars, as only a few might be visible in cloudy weather.With somewhat less cargo than hoped they proceded through Suez & arrived Liverpool May l920. Jack could see the Irish shore, from which his grandparents had emigrated, but there was political tension in the time of the "troubles" as Ireland sought independence from Britain, & this was the closest Jack ever came to the homeland of his ancestors.The ship was bothered by thefts on the dock,& Jack as first mate complained to the police. One policeman said to him, "You'll stand by me, mate?"Jack believed he was asking for a bribe but offered him nothing.One of the officers Jack remembered pleasantly was a Norwegian named Torkelson.In London Jack saw Pavlova danced her favorite ballet role as the Swan in Camille Saint-Saens's "Le Cygne". It was probably on this trip (or in Washington) that Jack saw Sarah Bernhardt play Shakespeare's "Shylock" in her older years after having a leg amputated.He mentioned this a number of times in conversation. In December l920 Jack was commissioned as a Regular Navy Officer &^ remained on active duty until January l, l947retiring with the rank oif Commander & more than thirty-three years combined U.S Government service including Revenue Cutter School cadet May l909- November, l9ll.; Lighthouse Service in Maine l9l2 on Lighthouse Tender Zizania'; US Naval Hydrographic Office Washington DC January l9l3-December l9l6 revising Bowditch Navigational Tables & answering "Inquiries from Mariners" (as a civilian) employment in Bureau of Foreign & Domestic Commerce (December l9l6- April l9l7 until activated in Naval Reserve April l9l7) - here he used his Boston Latin background translating many languages including Rumanian , which resembled Latin- DC Naval Militia- Commissioned December l9l5 - summer cruise July l9l6 - activated in Naval Reserve April l9l7 through July l9l9 - then regular Navy l920 to l947


 

 

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