Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 


p 84-1326

 

RED HEADED STEPCHILD -DEDICATION KELSEY,MAGUIRE,GEETTERS In late August 2000 I thought of the idea of a dedication for the Barrett family memoir RED HEADED STEPCHILD. It would have to be in keeping with my mother's wishes, as I consider her the senior author, who wrote most of the basic text and painstakingly copied down a great deal of correspondence, which would otherwise have been lost in 1993 thefts. I have had to make many judgments how she would wanted various materials handled and arranged, but I have tried to conform to what her intentions were. At the moment I am thinking of a four part dedication, honoring both the individuals and certain classes of people they symbolize. The four are: ALBERT KELSEY, who taught English, especially Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson, and assigned a biography project for each student to do an interview of a moderately prominent person in Boswell's style, with as much direct quotation as possible. Bert symbolizes many wonderful teachers- those Jack and Sophie had at Boston Latin, Revenue Cutter School, Naval War College, Fordham, Boston College, and Northeastern Law Schools, those Sophie had in Hartford and at Mount Holyoke College, and those I had - Mrs. Barbour, Miss Ponte, Mrs. Davidson at Thomas Jefferson School Waikiki, and my piano teacher Giuseppe deLellis and many more. We read many other biographies - classical Plutarch, Xenophon, Plato, Suetonius, Samuel Johnson's Lives of the English poets, Carl Sandburg's six volume life of Abraham Lincoln. Also Sophie and Jack were very close with Albert Kelsey through Roxbury Latin debating, which they followed closely for six years, and through Camp Kabeyun, Alton Bay New Hampshire. Also Lee Lockwood as 1949-1950 TRIPOD editor began a "Meet the Faculty" series on which I did much work. The Odyssey is a kind of biography we studied closely with Cary Potter 1950 - he strongly seconded Homer's words that the greatest blessing in life is a happy marriage - this is a central theme of RED HEADED STEPCHILD a love story in time of war and travel, like the Odyssey. With Frederick Weed we read the fictional Forsyte Saga by Galsworthy, which has had some influence on the family history research that will appear in Volume Three of 'STEPCHILD'.- SECOND: -- PACIFC FLEET CHAPLAIN WILLIAM A. MAGUIRE, who found Sophie accomodations at Chefoo during Asiatic Fleet exercises 1931 and was a hero in December 7, 1941 attack and wrote up Jack Barett's work in Pearl Harbor OVERSEAS TRANSPORTATION OFFICE 1941-1942 in chapter "BREAD ON THE WATERS" in "THE CAPTAIN WEARS A CROSS" 1943. It was Father Maguire who first said "there ought to be a book" about Jack Barrett and his work. Father Maguire symbolizes Jack's friends in Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard, including those that died, especially the two thousand four hundred victims at Pearl Harbor, where he tried to warn opinionated Admirals of the danger of air attack. In many ways Pearl Harbor is the climax of the forty-chapter memoir - Jack was well trained to try to save American lives but the RED HEADED STEPCHILD was frustrated by Roosevelt's "fair-haired boys". REBEKAH + ISADORE GEETTER The remaining dedication will probably be to my mother's baby sister Rebekah Geetter and her husband Dr. Isadore Geetter, who were an inestimable comfort to Sophie during seventeen and a half years of widowhood 1969-1987. They symbolize many wonderful relatives - and I do not desire to slight any of the others. Jack's relations are described extensively in the text, including chapters on his father, and his half-brother Bill and half-sister Mollie and relations like Loretto Buckley in Ireland, May and Ed Hartigan, and the Mehegans and Fahrbachs, who assisted gretly in fiding information. Sophie's other sisters Esther Meranski and Bertha Pollack and her brother Pete Meranski of Baltimore were of great importance to her, but in the years this memoir was written the friendship and frequent hospitality of the Geetter family were overwhelmingly important. So my present plan is to dedicate this memoir to Albert Kelsey, William Maguire and Rebekah and Isidore Geetter. --September 2, 2000 -John Barrett junior --TO NAVIGATE WEBSITE- Scroll down past first eight photos to bottom of first web page - then select desired WEB PAGE or enter YEAR or KEY WORD to find material "Red Headed Stepchild" & 500+ photos theses, letters, recent essays and news. Web Pages 1-50 contain mainly photos. P. 54 has FRANK DELAHANTY LETTERS. P 55 Has Part I Chapters 1-4 Sophie Meranski Barrett Early Years -Hartford CT, Mount Holyoke College, social work + Statistics, GREENWICH VILLAGE ROMANCE, letters. p. 56 has Ch. 5 Musical Interests of Sophie + Jack Barrett and Jack Barrett years at sea 1911-1920s Hydrographic Office WORLD WAR I SEATTLE 1919 WESTERNER 1920 TOUCEY 1921 WYOMING 1922 1911-1920s and GERSHOM BRADFORD CHAPTER. Web p 57 has PEARL HARBOR + WAIKIKI 1941-1947 p. 66 has JACK BARRETT "TACTICS" thesis 1924. p 67 MARBLEHEAD 1924-1927. William Joseph Barrett chapter on web p. 14 at photo #111. Revenue Cutter School 1909-11 web p. 78. INDEX top web p 75. .


 


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{5} CHAPTER Sophie Barrett (left) aboard Navy Transport HENDERSON autumn 1930 center is Junior Medical Officer, who invited Sophie to ship's dance third night of voyage. w986 p 44 #986 Sophie joined H-E-N-D-E-R-S-O-N at Portsmouth Virginia August 12. 1930 and reached Chingwantao, North China where Jack Barrett met her November 14, l930.Sophie is at left. Officer in center was Assistant Medical Officer of HENDERSON. Route went through Port-au-Prince Haiti' Cristobal and Balboa, Panama Canal Zone, Corinto, west coast of Nicaragua, San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco - Sophie visited Yosemite Valley and stayed at Ahwahnee Hotel while HENDERSON was overhauled at Mare Island north east side of San Francisco Bay -then Honolulu, Guam, Manila, Hong Kong - Sophie transferred to smaller transport - got to know Florence Hilldring Army wife - proceeded Shanghai to North China. H-E-N-D-E-R-S-O-N [John Barrett note This letter December 27, 1929 expresses Sophie's appreciation of Jack's Christmas message from the Philippines-"Dear lady of my fondest dreams - Come join me in the Philippines Where I will build a house for you Of SAWALI NIPA, and BAMBOO With Windows made of pearly SHELL - In SINAMY I'll dress you well, And you shall have your every wish - The while we dine on RICE and FISH.". Their June 1929 marriage was kept secret from most of Sophie's acqaintances in New York, including Macy's friends, where Sophie remained Director of Personnel Research until August 1930.. Emanuel Lyons much older than Jack and Sophie had been a friend since summer 1923 when Sophie worked at United Hebrew Charities. He published books "1001 Business Ideas" and "2222 Business Ideas." For years he invited the social workers to his western New Jersey farm, where Sophie appeared in three February 1926 photos with heavy snow. Joe Brill, a Fordham Law School classmate of Jack Barrett,. remained in New York City law practice up to the 1970s, and occasionally through Anne and Ivan McCormack the Barretts would hear news of him and other acquaintances, including Anne's family, the Taylors, the Nelson family from Charleston, South Carolina, various social workers,, and Jmmy Jemail, the "Inquiring Reporter" of the New York Daily News, later editor.]" DECEMBER 27, 1929 LETTER TEXT To. Lt. J.B. Barrett USS TRUXTUN US Asiatic Fleet c/o postmaster Seattle from SMB R.H.Macy + Co. 34th St. Broadway New York City December 27 1929 Barrett dear, My last letter to you was sent just a week ago today. Since that time there hasn't been a dull moment. Want to be bored with an account of the events? You will recall that I was planning to go to dinner with the dentist last Friday evening. Imagine my surprise when he told me his mother, father, and sister were waiting at home for us and that I was to be their guest for dinner. Gosh, but I was scared to be looked over by the family, but I pretended it was a every-day occurence with me. He lives up on Madison Avenue and Ninety-sixth Street. The dinner was delicious, we all got along famously, and I have an idea 'mamma' approved, because as I was leaving, she said,'Come to Christmas dinner, my dear.' I thanked her in my most charming manner and pleaded 'not guilty'. = The next day dawned like every other, but it was to be different. I was scheduled to go to a big party in Flushing- an annual party which I had turned down because you were you. To look all dressed up I decided to go home at noon, - and there I found a box from you with two adorable rings and some earrings. Promptly the rings were put on - they fit nicely - a wee bit large - and I love them. I can't wear them all the time because they are fragile, and the little decorative flowers fall off. You were nice to adorn me at this season of the year. I wear both rings on the fourth finger of my right hand. = The party was something or other - not very successful. Agnes Drummond and I stayed overnight. Sunday noon the family drove us into town, and we went to Agnes's apartment for tea. = Sunday evening after much persuasion on Martha's part I agreed to join her and Dottie on a date with three Spaniards. One of the men had a Auburn car. One of the men is an artist named Camilo Egas who has a studio on Charles Street. For some unknown reason his eyes rested on me, and he has been pursuing me ever since.Foreign men don't interest me, and when he phoned last night, I told him I was sick. He got my phone number through Martha. = Your Christmas card was received on Tuesday. It is without doubt the most beautiful card I have ever seen - and I say that in all sincerity. When Mrs. Smith rang the bell Christmas eve to deliver the card telling of the attractions of the Philippines in the form of fish, rice, and coarse clothes, my Christmas happiness was complete. The card is just too clever and too funny. I love it and may even frame it someday. = Santa Claus was more than generous: From Mr. Lyons there came a subscription to 'The Nation', a bottle of perfume, + a beautiful compact. From Mabel there came two pairs of silk stockings - from Edna Walton there came handkerchiefs - from Anne there came Yardley Old English Soap From Willie Kennedy there came 'SRM' stationery - from Martha there came genuine amethyst earrings. = Mr. Lyons and I started out five o'clock Christmas morning. We took the train to Landsdowne, [New Jersey] where we started our five mile hike to the farm house-- it was work and fun to go through all the ice and snow. After a fine Christmas dinner we hiked the five miles back. = Helen Miller called up just after I got home Christmas night. We plan to take dinner and a walk together this Sunday. = Joe Brill called me up last night. He told me he received a card from you and that he sent you one. After much conversation about nothing at all, he asked me to take lunch with him today. I turned him down on the basis of being 'busy.' I couldn't be rude to him because he may be sincere, but perhaps he may become discouraged with repeated refusals. Harold Nelson spends a lot of time at the apartment. - Sophie." HENDERSON "Slow Boat to China" In 1929 Jack wanted a third year at Fordham but didn't get it.In 1930 Jack was interested in commanding a Yangtze patrol boat.In 1930 on the TRUXTUN after skipper Carey left with tuberculosis and Jack had been in acting command, they went up the Yangtze river to Nanking after Carey's relief Lieutenant Commander Keliher arrived. Jack did not send for me there, as Americans were being evacuated rather than sent out. Since he was right on the spot, he applied for command of Jack a Yangtze patrol boat, which he would give him a opportunity to navigate thousands of miles up that great river and see many ancient and remarkable Chinese towns. But he didn't get that either.Instead he went from the TRUXTUN to the gunboat TULSA stationed in Tientsin, North China,as gunnery officer in May, 1930.He was acting Executive Officer for a time also. He transferred at Chingwantao when the TRUXTUN made a swing through north China, and Jack got to Peking and saw his old friend Bill Rupertus, who was stationed there. The TULSA spent most of the year at the dock on the Hai Ho river in Tientsin. Wives of three of the ship's officers and some of the wives of Army Fifteenth Infantry personnel were living there. Jack made inquiry and got permission to have me join him in Tientsin.An old Navy friend of Jack's - whom I had met in New York- Captain E.V. W. Keene -was in charge of Dependents' Transportation, and when I went to see him June 23, 1930, he was most kind and cooperative and told me he would look into transportation for me and would arrange my typhoid and cholera shots and for my smallpox vaccination.At first he considered the Army transport GRANT or the CHAUMONT going to Manila and advised Jack to investigate what transportation would be available from Manila to Chingwantao [North China].By July 25 Captain Keene and Jack had decided I should wait for the Navy transport HENDERSON leaving Hampton Roads, Virginia, on August 20, 1930, which would take me all the way, arriving at Chingwantao November 13, 1930. [A Yangtze River patrol boat which he could command would give him a opportunity to navigate thousands of miles up that great river and see many ancient and remarkable Chinese towns. But he didn't get that either.Instead he went from the TRUXTUN to the gunboat TULSA stationed in Tientsin, North China,as gunnery officer in May, 1930.He was acting Executive Officer for a time also. He transferred when the TRUXTUN made a swing through north China, and Jack got to Peking and saw his old friend Bill Rupertus, who was stationed there.Since the TULSA spent almost all of the time at the dock on the Hai Ho river in Tientsin, Jack was able to making inquiry and got permission to have me join him in Tientsin.An old Navy friend of Jack's - whom I had met in New York- Captain E.V. W. Keene -was in charge of Dependents' Transportation, and when I went to see him June 23, 1930, he was most kind and cooperative and told me he would look into transportation for me and would arrange my typhoid and cholera shots and for my smallpox vaccination.At first he considered the Army transport GRANT going to Manila and advised Jack to investigate what transportation would be available from Manila to Chingwantao [North China].By July 25 Captain Keene and Jack had settled on the Navy transport HENDERSON leaving Hampton Roads, Virginia, on August 20, 1930, and arriving at Chingwantao November 13, 1930. I saw Captain Keene on July 25 and August 6. Among other things he gave me my transportation on the HENDERSON from Hampton Roads to Chingwantao, China,-gave me rail transportation from New York to Hampton Roads via Pullman sleeper the night of August 18, 1930,- made sure I had my shots and vaccination,-and gave me a special passport for travel in China and Japan.[transfer??-] When I gave Macy's two weeks notice that I was leaving for China, they gave me one hundred dollars a wedding present,the usual procedure when an executive of the store married. I was still working but I used long lunch hours to buy a trunk, two matching suitcases, shoes, smart hats, day and evening dresses, a black coat trimmed with Persian lamb fur, gloves, underwear, and many pairs of stockings. Whenever possible I made my purchases at Macy's where I had a substantial D..A . account and where I received a ten per cent discount on all purchases as an employee. Mr. Lyons bought for me a lovely wedding band of small diamonds, at wholesale, so my wedding ring served as both an engagement and wedding ring, which I got at a very reasnable price. I made quick trips to see my family in Hartford and in Philadelphia July + attended Willie Kennedy's wedding August 6 to Marshall Verniaud. The young lady who trained the bundle girls at Macy's packed my trunk for me as a goodbye gesture and taught me how to pack a trunk and suitcases using tissue paper to avoid wrinkles in clothes.I receivied crystal earrings and beads from one of my assistants Miss Mildred Forman, turquoise and silver beads from Willie Kennedy, silver spoons from Anne and Ivan [McCormack] a steak knife and fork from Helen Miller,and a cake fork from Frances Manning. Eleanor and Anne Taylor took me to the train, and when they left me, I realized that ahead of me was a new life in which I knew no one until I saw Jack in about three months in North China. I was to go alone halfway across the world. DEPARTURE FROM HAMPTON ROADS VIRGINIA It was mid-morning August 19, 1930 when I arrived at the HENDERSON in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The HENDERSON was a very large Navy transport,-480 feet ten inches long, 60 feet ll l/2 inches wide,l9 feet l0 3/4 inch draft 101,000 tons, speed fourteen knots (p.207) First class passengers - women & children ll2 female servant six- officers & civilians as many as are given authority to travel except that no more than one hundred to be put in troop or crew spaces.Troop passengers l200.Built Navy Yard Philadelphia cost $ l,850,000.Commissioned May 20,l9l7.Eight five-inch fifty-caliber guns -two three-inch fifty-caliber guns,two masts, 27 officers, 24 chief petty officers & 373 enlisted sailors. When I boarded the big, white-painted HENDERSON at Hampton Roads, the Paymaster checked my papers, assigned me a nice cabin right on deck, and said the ship would said early next morning, and evening dinner would be served aboard, but I would have to get my lunch elsewhere. I left my bags in my cabin with three bunks on the upper deck& when I learned the first meal to be served would be dinner, I left by bus to see Norfolk,Virginia & have lunch in a drugstore. I walked all over Norfolk,not realizing that a few years later I would live there near the Naval Base & that my son John would be born there.By bus I got back to the ship for dinner.There were two messes in the passenger dining room,one early for women with children & the later one for adults only.I looked over the ship after dinner- the food was uniformly good on the HENDERSON. I got into my upper berth but was too excited to sleep. Somehow I had had the idea that I would not see a hairdresser for many months, so just before I left New York, I had asked my hairdresser to cut my hair very short. As he was used to my hair, I relaxed completely and failed to observe what he was doing. But I was shocked when I looked into the mirror after he had finished, as I was nearly bald, and I cried. I looked and felt ridiculous. My new clothes were all very feminine, but I looked too masculine with that hair-do "wind-blown". I would have to get my lunch elsewhere.Since I knew no one, I was lonesome and went to my bunk right after dinner as very few passengers were aboard at that time. I had just made myself comfortable in my bunk when a middle-aged woman entered the cabin, switched on the light, and screamed, "There is a man in my cabin!" Before I could re-assure her, he rushed out with her ten-year-old daughter, but returned shortly with the Paymaster. When he said, "That is Mrs. Barrett!' she calmed down,but she never spoke to me while we shared that cabin.Fortunately she left the ship at Panama, on the Atlantic side - so the unpleasantness was short-lived. Three enlisted men passengers played music at dinner & when the weather permitted they played for dancing in the lounge.___ SOCIAL LIFE on CRUISE About the third day out, the junior medical officer of the ship asked me why I did not attend the dance held every evening in the lounge. I explained that I hesitated to go alone, so he offered to escort me that evening after dinner. The sea was rough, and only a handful of passengers were in the lounge - all girls. After dancing with me, my escort danced with one of the young girls, and feeling conspicuous and self-conscious sitting there alone, I left. I was wearing a new light lavender chiffon dress with a black velvet sash and, except for my hair, I thought I looked well groomed. I went alone to the rail ouside my cabin, and as I stood there watching the moonlight on the water, a shp's officer joined me with the words, "I could never fall in love with you." He was immaculate in his white uniform with two and a half stripes on his shoulders and had a pleasant smile. Thinking that my slip was slowing or that he objected to my haircut, I asked him why, and he replied simply, "Because you are a brunette, and I like only blondes. My wife and five children are blondes." I was relieved. But we chatted for only a brief time as he was on duty, and my loneliness deepened. The ship seemed deserted as almost everyone -men and women alike- were seasick. Captain Mauldin's fourteen-year old son was making the trip with him as far as Los Angeles.The executive officer was Glenn Howell, & the senior doctor was Norman Roberts.One deck officer was Ben Shinn, who was later Jack's Executive officer on the CLAXTON & lived with his wife in the apartment house next to us when we were at 7l00 Hampton Boulevard. The paymaster was Lieutenant Cook. HAITI Immediately after sailing on the morning of August 20 going south at about Longitude seventy-four degrees West in the Atlantic Ocean en route to Haiti the sea was rough,& a woman from American Samoa, wife of a Navy Lieutenant,could not finish her breakfast because she was already seasick. Dr. Roberts, the senior medical officer, told me his wife & five children lived in Coronado near San Diego, California- that he once had duty in Guam- where even a Naval officer could save money -because there was nothing to spend it on there & that he had met his wife in Philadelphia & was looking forward to seeing them later in the voyage. I was uneasy about his intense interest in me, but my sense of humor came to my rescue.We approached Haiti on Saturday night when all the lights of Port au Prince were on. I believe the port of Haiti that evening from the ship was one of the most beautiful sights I had ever seen.On Sunday morning the passengers were going ashore, but I hesitated to go in a strange country & stood at the gangway until Dr. Roberts came along, said he was going to church & invited me to go with him.Haiti was my first time on foreign soil.After the service we walked through the native market- then Dr.Roberts called on a Marine family there & we were invited to stay to lunch in a white stucco house called "Sans Souci." PANAMA CANAL Our next stop was Colon on the Atlantic side of the canal where we stayed overnight, because the HENDERSON was scheduled to make an early morning transit through the Panama Canal.We saw a little of the night life in a few bars but spent very little & drank no liquor.While the ship was going through the canal the next morning from the Atlantic to the Pacific I was glued to the ship's rail, fascinated by the process of filling the locks & raising & lowering the ship.Dr. Roberts,who had transited the canal several times, was tireless in explaining the whole process to me.Strangely enough even though Jack had duty based in Balboa, Panama on the HANNIBAL in l934 & l935& although I made two round trips to the Pacific side of the Canal in those years I never again went through the Panama Canal as I used the train to cross the Isthmus of Panama to Balboa & Panama City.As in Colon we spent the evening seeing the night life of Panama City but returned to the ship early.The next morning we left for Nicaragua.-- After many passengers got off in Panama, I had the cabin to myself all the way from Colon to Chingwantao on the north China coast.Since the HENDERSON needed twenty feet depth of water, she could not go to Tientsin, where the Hai Ho river is very shallow. CORINTO NICARAGUA A few passengers, including me went ashore in Corinto, Nicaragua but stayed only a short time because of intense head & glare of the sun. CALIFORNIA Most of our remaining passengers left in California.Dr. Roberts arranged for the band to serenade me one evening as I entered the dining hall with the Al Jolson favorite, "California, Here I Come." We arrived in San Diego just after dinner.Mrs. Norman Roberts came to the ship to take her husband home.The next day Dr. Roberts said he had his car on the dock because his wife Dorothy had invited me to their Coronado home for dinner that evening.She wanted to see the young woman who dared travel alone from New York city to Chingwantao,halfway across the world.It was wonderful to be in a real home with five attractive children. I would myself live in Coronado l938-9.At San Pedro I rode into Los Angeles in Admiral Thomas Washington's gig & later returned to the ship in one of the HENDERSON's small boats.Admiral Washington was on duty at San Pedro, came to the HENDERSON in his gig,& when someone told him I was travelling alone half way across the world,he offered me a ride to Los Angeles- so I had a chance to see a city which I returned to several times in my Navy life. MARE ISLAND + YOSEMITE With very few first class passengers aboard we arrived at Mare Island,the shipyard of San Francisco, where the HENDERSON was scheduled to remain for two weeks for overhaul.I went to San Francisco from Mare Island, saw the city by bus & for the first time tried a seafod called abalone.Dr. Roberts & two Naval officers stationed at Mare Island were going to Yosemite Park for one night & two days. They had a drive-it-yourself hired car.We arrived toward evening of our first day-got accomodations for dinner rooms & breakfast at the Ahwahnee Hotel & I remember the wonderful show of stars that night. I thought El Capitan & Half Dome were impressive,but the men were disappointed because the waterfalls were dried up at that time of the year. I purchased a handcolored souvenir photo of Bridal Veil falls with a footpath and tree in the foreground. We saw the tremendous sequoia trees,& I was glad I had joined them for an inexpensive trip away from the noise of the workmen and the smell of the fresh paint. ACROSS THE PACIFIC I learned to play shuffleboard with the ship's officers, who also taught me Russian bank, a card game, and Acey Deucey, the Naval variation of backgammon. Finally the ship was ready. Some new passengers came aboard, and we sailed for Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii.As we left the Golden Gate, the Pacific was rough, and to my amazement I was seasick. Very suddenly as I stood at the rail, I lost my lunch into the Pacific Ocean. Only once more was I ever seasick - during a typhoon between Manila and Hong Kong.Like Jack, I was an excellent sailor. LETTER HOME 6 OCTOBER 1930 When we neared Honolulu, I wrote my family a letter, "10: A.M. Monday 6 October l930 Dearest Family,To-morrow at noon we are scheduled to arrive in Honolulu where Dr. Roberts and I intend to swim and to drive around taking in all the sights. He is a great old playmate, and I,m glad I found him.--On my birthday last Saturday, it was such fun way out at sea to open the birhday cards which Esther and Babe and Geetter so thoughtfully sent to me.They are nice cards - every now and then I read them over again, stopping to dream a bit about home and each one of you. I had Ben in mind on the first of October, and several times on that day -2- I read his grand letter and hoped that all was going well with him. November belongs to Sis, Babe, Abe and Isie - I'll not forget that no matter where I am or what I am doing.--Life on board is very peaceful- we have settled down again into a well ordered routine since leaving San Francisco last Tuesday, the 30th of September. Now at 10:15 in the morning most people are sitting out on deck in the large wicker chairs- some just gazing out to sea -some talking- some reading and others, like myself, writing letters.Breakfast is long since over.I had orange juice, hot cakes, and coffee.By 8:30 I was out on deck watching two men play shuffle -3- board - a game of good exercise played with sticks and round wooden pieces, which you drive onto a court marked with plus and minus numbers up to ten. The winning score is fifty, and you score whatever number is in the block into which you have shoved the round wooden piece.--As I was watching the game,some of my pals joined me. By 8:45 four of us were playing the game, laughing and carrying on until 9:l5 when we had "man overboard" drill getting out our life jackets and gathering on the lower deck.After that I still felt energetic, so I walked around the decks fourteen times (twelve times makes a mile- I did fourteen for good measure.)Then it was ten o'clock, and I decided -4-to put a bridge table up on deck in a quiet corner and write a letter home to my very dear family.--We lost a lot of older high ranking people at San Francisco where we took on passengers more nearly of my own age and rank.Now even I am pretty important, for we sit at table according to rank, and I am at Table Two.That's pretty good considering there are eight tables-I used to be at Table Four.--Funny thing - for a whole month, from Norfolk to San Francisco I had no sign of seasickness. However, the first day and a half out of San Francisco the sea was very -..." [remainder of letter apparently lost] PALI,MOONLIGHT IN KAILUA In Hawaii I went by a hired car around the Island of Oahu.The Kalanianaole Highway on the southeast coast was not yet completed, so we went by car across the Koolau Mountains over the Nuuanu Pali Road, had lunch at Kailua on the windward northeast coast, and returned to the ship for dinner.I thought of Jerome Kern's song, "When it's moonlight in Kailua, nights like these are divine."After dinner by trolley car we went to Waikiki,where we saw the new Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the Moana Hotel, and the famous Waikiki Beach by moonlight. At that time I didn't realize that I would live in Waikiki for six years during and after World War II, from l94l to l947.During the long uneventful trip to Guam we saw many flying fish- I stood in the bow of the ship watching them for hours. There were very few passengers now on the decks and in the dining room, and the orchestra had left us. MARINES Most of the passengers were Marine enlisted men under the command of a colonel. I heard they were en route to Shanghai. I have a vivid picture of the Colonel, who was in charge of hundreds of young Marines, bound for the Orient: - As I stood at the rail in Hawaii the night the ship was in port, I watched two young Marine officers in uniform help that man step onto the gangplank, as the Colonel had had too much to drink. But he was stiff and straight and soldierly as he made his way to the deck supported by his Marines. again the last night we were in Manila, I saw him approach the gangway, again supported by two Marines. Quietly, without fanfare, he was hurried to his cabin, and very few observed the tragedy of his weakness for liquor. GUAM It was difficult to read on deck with the glare of the sun, but hot and dark in the cabin. The HENDERSON could not go into the dock at Guam, but I went ashore in a small boat with a few sailors going to Guam for duty.From Guam I sent a postcard to my father David Meranski in Hartford. Dr. Roberts knew a lot of people in Guam, where he had had a tour of duty. One of his friends loaned him a car so that he could show me Agama, the capital of Guam. "SLOW BOAT TO CHINA Sophie text: "One morning I was standing on deck near the officers' quarters talking with the junior medical officer when my friend came up and asked to speak with me in private. He told me not to touch the sleeve of the junior medical officer. Surprised, I told him I hadn't realized I had touched his sleeve, and also said I saw no harm unconsiously touching the man's sleeve. Whereupon he explained, "I don't want you to touch any man because I am in love with you." Stunned, I tried to pass it off, but he assured me he was serious and wanted to marry me after he had made provision for his wife and chldren. I decided to keep quiet in the hope it was merely a passing fancy. ..." The ride to Manila was very smooth, and I occupied myself reading books about China that Jack had sent to me when I was in New York.There was a China Coasters Manual l927 and a text by Jesuit Father Leo Weiger and a French-Chinese dictionary. I studied Emily Post's Etiquette text carefully, preparing for the formal entertaining expected of Navy wives. MANILA At Manila I received a letter from Jack explaining that he would meet me aboard the HENDERSON at Chingwantao.He had asked a friend's wife Mrs. Eddie Smith, to meet me on the HENDERSON and show me Manila and entertain me for the day and evenng, and he would pay the bill.She boarded the ship as soon as it docked and was most gracious. But when I told my doctor friend that I would be going ashore with Mrs. Smith, he was hysterical and begged me to stay aboard with him that day and spend the evening in Manila. So when Mrs. Smith visited, I told her I had made previous plans for the day, and I sat around that hot ship all day. In the evening we went to the Army and Navy Club, but it was so crowded that we left and took a ride over the cobblestones of old Manila in a carametta, which is a carriage drawn by one horse. I did not see much of Manila that day but subsequently saw a lot of the town when en route around the world and home with Jack in 1932. I saw the Army and Navy Club that evening and saw something of old Manila from a carametta (horse and carriage).Florence Hilldring wife of Army Captain John Hilldring boarded the HENDERSON alone for the trip to Hong Kong, Shanghai,and Chingwantao.She planned to visit Army friends in Tientsin- to get away from the climate of Manila.She and the ship's engineer were friends of long standing.Florence "adopted" me, so I had a playmate for the rest of the trip. SHANGHAI (see INSERT on page 38)in Shanghai Florence Hilldring took me to a shop where she had previously bought a white rabbits'-fur evening jacket, and I bought one at a small price.Pity the poor men who escorted me in Shanghai and in Tientsin when the white rabbits' fur shed onto their black Tuxedos or their Navy Blues.I threw the coat away after a New Year's Eve Party at the Tientsin Country Club.I liked that coat very much, but I threw it away when I saw white fur on Jack's dark blue uniform overcoat as he checked it at the Country Club. After we walked around Shanghai during the day, two officers from the HENDERSON took us to the French Club in the evening. CHINGWANTAO + TIENTSIN The HENDERSON brought some new personnel for the TULSA - Ensign Brown and a few sailors and marines. Two weeks after my arrival at Tientsin I received a letter written by Dr. Roberts my naval officer friend on the HENDERSON. He had met Jack, but they failed to become friends. Eloquently he poured his heart out telling me that we would be married when he could make provison for his wife and children. Of course I realized thast he was influenced by my youth, by the romantic moon, stars, tropical countries visited, and that I must keep my head and steer clear of the rocks of disaster. So I reluctantly tore the letter to shreds and made no reply. Never did I hear from him again, but I sorrowfully read in the Army-Navy Register about 1939 or 1940 that he had passed away from tuberculosis leaving a wife and five children. His duties on long sea trips must have been a great strain on family life. JOHN BARRETT notes JOHN BARRETT from December, 1998 E mails to my classmate Peter Nathan now a dean at University of Iowa based on 1980s letters of Sophie to Mount Holyoke College friends: Sophie wrote down a number of experiences of a romantic-or-harassment nature, of which the most serious occurred in the later part of this trip aboard the big Navy transport HENDERSON, where the ship's doctor after they started out from Virginia told my mother "I could never fall in love with you. I only love blonds. My wife and my five children are all blonds." At first he was pleasant company, escorting my mother ashore at Port-au-Prince Haiti - very beautiful harbor by night, and I think they attended church - then several stops in Panama - Colon is on the Atlantic, and Balboa at Pacific end of Canal Zone - she visited some depressing bars which are mentioned in the letter to the Mount Holyoke College history librarian Mrs. Trehub-then Corinto, on Pacific Coast of Nicaragua was pleasant though hot. She had lunch or dinner with the doctors wife and some or most of the five children at San Diego, and at Los Angeles she was "piped" ashore in the admiral's "gig" (small boat). Many of the passengers left at these stops, and the HENDERSON stopped for overhaul at Mare Island on northeast edge of San Francisco Bay north of Berkeley-Oakland. While there a group including the doctor and my mother visited Yosemite Valley, staying at the famous Ahwahnee hotel. My mother purchased a handcolored souvenir photo of Bridal Veil Falls, with a footpath and tree in the foreground - this hung in my West Roxbury room many years until l993 thefts. Yosemite Falls was dry at that date September l930, as often happens - I think it was toward the end of September. My mother ordinarily is a good sailor, but one of the few times in her life she was seasick and threw up in unusually stormy weather just west of San Francisco. After Honolulu the doctor began to get romantic - the further west the ship got the more romantic he became, talking of divorcing his wife and marrying my mother - do you remember the 1940's song "I'd like to get you on a slow boat to China"-? that was the situation.Passengers sat by seniority, and on this part of the cruise my mother sat with relatively high-ranking officers. At Guam she mailed a cheerful postcard to her father David Meranski, who had disapproved of her marriage to a Gentile - said she was throwing away her education and career. By Manila she was hiding in her cabin. The doctor attempted to use X-rays to remove a large mole on Sophie's left wrist, but it was irritated by the treatment, and she subsequently had it removed surgically. She heard he died of tuberculosis in 1939.[John Barrett re-creation of 1980s letters to Ruth Peck Doyle, Clara Michal, Marion Lewis Smart, Becky Smaltz and 1923 classmates ]


 


84-1329 NEW YORK 1927-9 S-4 XANTHOS Letter, Fordham Law }F{

 

XANTHOS letter to New York Post published Tuesday,January 24, 1928 New York Evening Post Letter was written January 7, 1928 by LIEUTENANT JACK BARRETT under 'pen-name' "XANTHOS" Name of talking horse in Homer's ILIAD. Latin school pseudonym of John Berchmans Barrett who thought term meant 'red-head' or facetiously applied it to his own prognostications of danger like Homer's horse. The more usual translation is "blond" or "chestnut". TITLE: "SEES NEED OF STRONG NAVY" To the editor of the Evening Post: Sir It may seem 'smart' for Senators or others to deride what they do not understand.Just because the Navy spends its best energies "on the job" instead of sobbing about the difficulties imposed upon it by incompetence and indifference of alleged statesmen when laws and treaties are made, it seems the fashion to belittle the serious effects that must be faced by the Navy if and when any other nation or group of nations decides to attempt to take forcibly things they sorely need from our plenteous supply.= So I wonder then: What would be adequate then? Is the contest between Standard Oil and Dutch Shell a type of contest for control of products which might easily lead to international difficulties? Will nations fight to get their share of the necessaries of life? Will words feed the hungry or win battles? = Can our present high standards of living, comfort, and luxury be maintained if our foreign trade is curtailed or even held stationary at present volume? Is there any better use for life than to spend it in support and defense of home and country? = Give the Navy at least half a chance to save you from your own folly by providing it with at least a few items of modern equipment that the other have. [despite their poverty] instead of spending all in wasteful luxury, rum chasing, building post offices in deserts and giving idlers useless work at fancy salaries with which to support night clubs and other sybaritic parasitical growths.= Otherwise who knows even the Navy might get discouraged and join the wasters in the last made whirl before the final..." end of available text - end should be available in New York Post files January 1928. handwritten copy SMB's Black Notebook [last few words missing] # Two pages 277-8 Black Notebook Two Sophie comments on link to S-4 rescue effort previous month December 17, 1927. It also reflects l917 economics experience at Bureau of Foreign & Domestic Commerce and points toward effort to warn at Pearl Harbor in War Plans very reminiscent of "Xanthos" the horse. Sophie Barrett text;-p. 238- When Joe Hurley had dinner with us at the Victoria |Hotel, |April 15, [1932]his wife, Peggy Strickland Hurley, who before her marriage had been an editorial worker for the Boston Post, was in Ireland. Shortly after her return, she telephoned to me at the Victoria Hotel to introduce herself and to invite me to be her guest at a lecture she was scheduled to give at a suburban women's club that afternoon.She drove me to the club, where as a paid lecturer she gave an entertaining and instructive lecture on her experiences in Eire.She had tried to learn to speak Gaelic. Before she left me,she invited Jack and me to dinner at her home on Moss Hill Road in Jamaica Plain. The party was most enjoyable, because Peggy had -239- invited five Boston Post reporters to join us at dinner.The food was delicious, and the conversation flowed.After dinner, in the living room, Jack began a long tale about his [part in]efforts to rescue the Submarine S-4, which had gone down in Provincetown [Cape Cod] waters on December 17,1927. I had never heard the tale before and have never heard him talk about the S-4 since. But I remember him saying that he was on shore duty in New York City, living alone in an apartment, asleep one night when he was told by telephone to go to a tug immediately, as the tug was about to leave to go to the aid of the Submarine S-4. He related that the tug did not have the properequipment for the job, told in detail what they did,and how they finally had to give up.{John Barrett note- after Sophie wrote this late 1969 we found records of the New York harbor tug PENOBSCOT trying to make radio contact with CHEWINK, which was trying to recover pontoons lost at sea for use in effort to refloat S-4, which could not be rescued from great depth and pressure. We got additional information from Gershom Bradford later and Commodore Jack Baylis USCG retired. +I also found a January l928 letter my father wrote to New York Post under pen name "Xanthos." He had recently been to sea Dec. 1927 in very poorly equipped small harbor tug PENOBSCOT when every available vessel was rushed to try to help small submarine S-4, which sank in very deep water off Provincetown Cape Cod, when S-4 surfaced without warning in front of Coast Guard cutter PAULDING, which was not proved in any way at fault - captained by my father's schoolmate at Revenue Cutter School Jack Baylis, whom I visited in New Jersey 1970. There is material on website about S-4 by my father's friend from Naval Hydrographic Office DC Gershom Bradford - native of Kingston MA 1879-1978 - he helped lay out the test course off Provincetown about 1902. and knew one of the PAULDING officers who stood up for Baylis when he was critcized. The PENOBSCOT, the tug my father was on after being called out in middle of night about 18 Dec 27 had weak radio, lacked food and blankets for long trip and was otherwise lacking equipment for high seas. She was assigned to get in touch with another ship the CHEWINK, which was trying to recover some pontoons - someone hoped they could be used to refloat the S-4, which proved to be in water too deep for rescue, though survivors could be heard tapping for two weeks. When the modern sub THRESHER sank off Boston 1963, there was still no technology to rescue crew from great depth and pressure. My father's letter does not deal specifically with the S-4 but dealt with the general issue of presparedness and Navy budgets in the period when Hitler and Tojo were coming to power and gradually eluding the weak-minded democracies. The name Xanthos originally mean +fair+ or "blond" in Greek, but it was the name of the horse that warned the great hero Achilles who killed Trojan Hector to avenge his friend Patroclus that his turn was coming soon too -Achilles got the bad news in no uncertain terms "from the horse's mouth" as they say at the race track - then the gods intervened to hush the unnatural speech and warning. My father was considered at times a prophet of gloom and doom Pearl Harbor, etc --like the talking horse of the Iliad - and there seems to have been some fanciful allusion to his red hair - perhaps based on humor at Boston Latin in class of 1906 - though in good Greek "xanthos" means blond not red. Jack Barrett in the 1906 "Class Prophecy" was called Pyrrhus, in allusion to his sunburned freckled countenance as after mush time boating in South Boston during school years. It was natural to extend it from red face to red hair =Pyrrhus to Xanthos. The actual content of the letter has to do with Naval budgets in context of disarmament treaties, in which Britain and Japan scrapped plans to buiild ships while US gave up existing ships. German -Americans were influential through religious groups in neutralist anti-armament movements and isolationism, many people were entirely sincere - there was a Pacifist movement 1930's at Oxford, but the German government skillfully exploited the sentiments. Franklin Roosevelt had to overcome isolationism, and the support of German-Americans was vital in the war effort- In regard to the one-sidedness of 1920s naval disarmament see Admiral Knox's introduction to first volume of fifteen-volume "History of U.S. Navy in World War II." My father had several assignments in War Plans - he took junior Course at Naval War College Newport RI 1923-1924 - I am starting to type his TACTICS thesis for website - he participated in 1925 War Game Hawaii that demonstrated vulnerability of Oahu and Pearl Harbor - he was in War Plans and Reserve Training three tiimes New York 1927-9; Boston 1932-3, and Philadelphia 1936-8. He drilled a great many Naval Reservists out of Charlestown Navy Yard 1932-3 on EAGLE 19 built by Ford motors, and the Springfield Republican newspaper told of the last cruise in a front page story Sunday June 18, 1933 with photos of my father in uniform and the EAGLE 19 and members of the Springfield unit. Then President Roosevelt cut the budget attempting to keep his 1932 campaign promise to balance the budget. President Hoover built no new ships in four years. Then President Roosevelt heard about the fiscal ideas of British Lord Keynes and the Labor party that fiscal deficits are necessary to stimulate demand and employment in depression times, so he turned around and suported rebuilding the Navy, but Hitler and Tojo got an amazing headstart. (This may be happening today on FUSION ENERGY). My father saw the Atlantic war close up at Branch Naval Hydrographic Office New York, where he was in charge 1940-41 - then he was shocked at stupidity and complacency and refusal to plan when he was sent to Pearl Harbor as Assistant War Plans Officer Fourteenth Naval District July-October 1941. He was transferred to personnel Oct. and ran Overseas Transportation Office four years till October 1945. evacuating families after Dec. 7 attack -shipping very short till after Midway June 4 1942. In 1946 he was on courts martial - supported Capt. Paul Washburn who believed there was reasonable doubt when uncorroborated Reserve Officer with political connections accused career Naval officer of thefts from commissary - Nimitz and Navy Sec. Sullivan were angry - there was political pressure for conviction. Head of court Washburn found the witness evase - he was demoted by Nimitz but it was rescinded. The 1950 Uniform Code of Military Justice was suposed to reduced this type of "staff influence" pressure for conviction without fair procedure. Nimitz and staff did good job with intelligence for Battle of Midway 1942 - made good judgment permitting Orlin Livdahl gunnery officer on carrier ENTERPRISE to re-position new Swedish guns Sept 1941 to save four airplane spaces on carrier deck and increase firing angle of guns - Livdahl was friend of my father from destroyer CLAXTON 1936. --END REVISED CHAPTER--SMB's Black Notebook # Two pages 277-8 Sophie comments on link to S-4 rescue effort previous month Dec. 1927. It also reflects l917 experience at Bureau of foreign & Domestic Commerce. and points toward effort to warn at Pearl Harbor in War Plans very reminiscent of "Xanthos" the horse.-p. 238- When Joe Hurley had dinner with us at the Victoria |Hotel, |April 15, [1932]his wife, Peggy Strickland Hurley, who before her marriage had been an editorial worker for the Boston Post, was in Ireland. Shortly after her return, she telephoned to me at the Victoria Hotel to introduce herself and to invite me to be her guest at a lecture she was scheduled to give at a suburban women's club that afternoon.She drove me to the club, where as a paid lecturer she gave an entertaining and instructive lecture on her experiences in Eire.She had tried to learn to speak Gaelic. Before she left me,she invited Jack and me to dinner at her home on Moss Hill Road in Jamaica Plain. The party was most enjoyable, because Peggy had -239- invited five Boston Post reporters to join us at dinner.The food was delicious, and the conversation flowed.After dinner, in the living room, Jack began a long tale about his [part in]efforts to rescue the Submarine S-4, which had gone down in Provincetown [Cape Cod] waters on December 17,1927. I had never heard the tale before and have never heard him talk about the S-4 since. But I remember him saying that he was on shore duty in New York City, living alone in an apartment, asleep one night when he was told by telephone to go to a tug immediately, as the tug was about to leave to go to the aid of the Submarine S-4. He related that the tug did not have the properequipment for the job, told in detail what they did,and how they finally had to give up.{John Barrett note- after Sophie wrote this late 1969 we found records of the New York harbor tug PENOBSCOT trying to make radio contact with CHEWINK, which was trying to recover pontoons lost at sea for use in effort to refloat S-4, which could not be rescued from great depth and pressure. We got additional information from Gershom Bradford later and Commodore Jack Baylis USCG retired. Notebk 2 p 152 when Mrs. Haram was in cambridge in June 1954, we attended Brenda's class Baccalaureate Services at Harvard's Memorial Church and then were guests of Brena and mrs. Haram for dinner. = From Seattle Jack took the Great Northern train to Chiacago and New york. He collected a good many post cards of points such as salt Lake City Utash and Grand isalnd Nebraska, and we are uncertain whether he stopped of at Yellowstone park briefly. On the other hand he may have taken a more northerly route across Montana and Minnesota bbecause puzzlingly there are several postcards of Minneapolis, which is not on the Utah-Yoming nebraska route. On arrival at NewYork Jack reported for duty ay Stouth and Whitehall Streets June 27, 1927. He saw Marie Nelson that summer In Philadelph9a and new York often. He applied for judge advocate duty in Washington and corresponded with Alex Sharp which haexecutive officer of the MAARB during most of jacks tenure and who in the sum of 27 was starting several years duty in Wa at the Bur of Navigation, whiich handles personnel assignment. Jack sev times req j adv duty, but almost never in his career received any specific requested assignment. Dur Ag 27 Pa Barrett and Bill toured in Maine sending postcards from var cities inclu Bangor Augst 8. Pa Barrentt had given up hisn plumbing shop in 1926 and now worked onoly part time without employing sfull time help. Ab this time Mol and Katie were in the hab of spen part of the sum at Five Islands Main op by Fath Hasenfus.153 Jack's work involved considerable travel for training and inspection of Naval Reserve units in the Third Naval District. He also had responsibility for the maintenance of a considerable file of confidential records at Reserve Headquarters. He stayed at the McAlpin Hotel on his first arrival, then lived at 601 Madison Avenue for a time, and then lived from about October 1927 through 1928 and perhaps early 1929 [January] at the Knights of Columbus Hotel at Eighth Avenue between Fiftieth and Fifty-First Streets Then he rented an apartment at 48 Commerce Street in Greenwich Village until June 1929, when Miss Willie Kennedy of Macy's subleased his apartment. In September 1927 he enrolled at the Bronx Division night course of Fordham Law School. Considerable correspondence was necessary to determine whether his previous educational background satisfied all the New York State requirements for Law School admission. His Revenue Cutter training was more than equivalent to the two years of college required for law school admission. However, there were cumbersome additional requirements that he show he had studied American History and Biology or Hygiene.The New York authorities apparently thought he had attended the Naval Academy and kept asking for his grades there. The Coast Guard Academy certified that he had passed all the courses there in two years' attendance, but they did not have detailed records of his grades. Jack had to write twice to Mr. Patrick Campbell, Principal of the Boston Latin School, who sent a complete record of his grades during the four years 1902-1906. Jack told the New York Borad he had taken four years of history courses 154 at Boston Latin, and there was much history in the curriculum both there and at the Revenue Cutter School, renamed 1915 the Coast Guard Academy.Also the Boston Latin School, as the oldest school in the United States, had stressed the school's own history to a considerable extent.It was founded in 1635, and John Hancock, Benjamin Franklin,Samuel Adams,Robert Treat Paine,and William Hooper were five of its graduates who signed the Declaration of Independence. The New York Board accepted this. To meet the biology requirement Jack had to refer back to physiology classes at the Lincoln School in the ninth grade and below. His qualification here may have been a bit thin, but the authorities permitted him to enroll. Several of the Fordham facuulty were well known in New York state - Maurice Wormser, John T. Loren, Carmondy, and John F.X. Finn. Jack got good grades his first year, mostly A's and B's, and he enjoyed his studies and classmates. The second year, there were more distractions. He had to inspect Reserve units around New Tork and Connecticut and he very nearly was ordered away to the Orient before comleting his second year. Besides, he became acquainted with me, and I took up a good deal of his study time. Jack has kept most of his Fordham Law School textbooks. PLEADING {Common Law)SUBSTANTIVE LAW DEFINES RIGHTS AND DUTIES.Adjective Law outlines methods by which Substantive Law is enforced Adjective Law is Remedy for breaches of Substantive Law.Adjective Law includes PLEADING EVIDENCE PRACTICE [procedure]. Requisites for CAUSE OF ACTION first Right Second Violation of Right. Action = simple prosecution in a court of justice by one party versus another party for the redress or prevention of a wrong or publishment for a public offense. Rights may be divided into two groupings Original [natural]= rights require only proof of violation -SPECIAL [RELATIVE] Rights require both proof of right and proof of violation.Steps in Procedure PROCESS to bring defendant before court PLEADING Statement made to court in LEGAL form setting forth FACTS constituting the plaintiff's cause of action or the Defendant's defense-TRIAL proof or demonstration of Allegations in Pleadings VERDICT & JUDGMENT ..ENFORCEMENT Plaintiff may not PROVE anything not set forth in the PLEADING. COMMON LAW HAD SEVEN PLEADINGS 1.DECLARATION by plaintiff 2 PLEA by defendant 3 REPLICATION by plaintiff 4 REJOINDER by Defendant 5 SURREJOINDER by plaintiff 6 REBUTTER by defendant 7 SURREBUTTER by plaintiff New York now has three pleadings 1. COMPLAINT by plaintiff 2 ANSWER by defendant 3 rarely REPLY by plaintiff COMMONLAW PLEADING was used in new York until about 1848 or 1849 Then legislature adopted CIVIL CODE. COMMON LAW = That portion of the Law of England based not on legislation enacted but upon immemorial usage and general consent of the people. Three famous English courts were King's Bench, Court of Common Pleas, Court of the Exchequer.The term 'common law' is sometimes used in other meanings- to distinguish whole body of laws observed by English speaking nations from the Roman or civil law which prevails in continental Europe and Latin American states, and other variations. 1921- The Civil Practice Act - present Code of Pleading (Supplemented by "Rules of Civil Practice" Presiding Judges of Four Appellate Courts make necessary changes periodically. Burden of Proof He who has the affirmative of the issue has BURDEN OF PROOF. In civil cases the party having the burden of proof must prove by FAIR PREPONDERANCE OF THE EVIDENCE.In criminal cases proof must be beyond a REASONABLE DOUBT. A DEMURRER never raises a Question of FACT but only a Question of LAW. It says in effect " The plea does not show a sufficient cause of action." A DEMURRER ADMITS EVERY MATERIAL WELL-PLEADED FACT in PLEA.In effect, it says "Granted that all that plea alleges is so, still that is insufficient in law to make a cause of action." An ACTION is at LAW. A SUIT is in EQUITY. In New York MOTIONS replace DEMURRER, but grounds are SAME. FORMS OF ACTION-- There are TEN generally accepted FORMS [pigeonholes in clerk's desk] --EX CONTRACTU-- Arising fromn BREACH of CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS 1. DEBT 2. DETINUE 3.COVENANT 4 SPECIAL ASSUMPSIT 5 GENERAL ASSUMPSIT Allegation of a debt 2. Allegation of a promise General Assumpsit is divided into classes INDEBITATUS ASSUMPSIT money hadand received by defendant, loaned, interest, account stated ..QUANTUM MERUIT 'as much as he deserves' for work and labor plaintiff can recover what he reasonably deserves.. & QUANTUM VALEBAT 'as much as it is worth' for goods sold and delivered Founded on IMPLIED PROMISE TO PAY plaintiff as much as goods are reasonably worth. --EX DELICTO out of wrong, tort: [Arising from Breach of NATURAL RIGHTS] 6. TRESPASS 7. TROVER 8. REPLEVIN 9. CASE [Action on the case] 10. EJECTMENT ---TRESPASS is form of action to recover DAMAGES for any DIRECT PHYSICAL INTERFERENCE with the person or porperty of another.Trespass is subdivided into three classes TRESPASS VI ET ARMIS to recover for direct or physical interferecne with the PERSON of another TRSPASS DE BONIS ASPORTATIS to recover damages for Injury to PERSONAL PROPERTY chattels- removal or destruction and TRESPASS QUARE CLAUSUM FREGIT to recover damages for injury to REAL PROPERTY forcible intrusion. TROVER is form of action to recover VALUE of personal property uinlawfully taken. "CONVERTED" by the defendant Recovery of actual chattel NOT SOUGHT -this form of action is now commonly called "CONVERSION" -To be used cautiously because of various limitations in its scope.REPLEVIN-- form of action to RECOVER SPECIFIC CHATTELS with or without DAMAGES for unlawful taking and detention. This form of action has ben extended in its application and has been used largely instead of DETINUE.History of REPLEVIN dates back to about TWELFTH century when much used to regain specific chattels seized by landlord. Plaintiff must have general or special ownership and right to immediate possession. DEMAND advisable before action to fix date of detention.Plaintiff puts up BOND prior to action to cover in event of failure of the Action.CASE "TRESPASS ON THE CASE" Form of Action to Recover Damages -person or property- arising from WRONG by DEFENDANT done without DIRECT APPPLICATION of FORCE--wrongful act usually remote from resulting injury.This form of action is sort of a "catchall" for all not clearly under other forms of action.It covered violation of a legal right for which common law courts gave redress and for which no other common law remedy existed.EJECTMENT Form of Action to recover POSSESSION of REAL PROPERTY wrongfully held by Defendant together with damages for wrongful detention.--p 242-7819 Dungan Road, Phila 19111 graduated from Anderson College S.C.Anne met Marie in Newark, New Jersey about 1920 when they were taking a course in personnel work in industry at Waitt and Bond. M worked for years for Ph Housing As writing publicity. Then she was on the staff of Penns Tuberculosis Association until she retired. now lives in the country - Ph suburb. Harold Nelson was in the Army for a short time in World War II.Af the war he returned to N York. When thirty-eight or forty years old he married. Anne Taylor McCormack entertained the wedding party. Wife thoughtful, pleasant "just the person for Harold." He w for years at Texaco in a responsible job. Retired at sixty-five he went to live in Coral Gables, Florida.Wife died suddenly after twenty-five years of marriage. H gets a good pension. has lots of Texaco stock but is saddened by loss of his wife. He now lives in Charleston, South Carolina.Even in August Harold found East Greenwich New York chilly and he developed an allergy for weeds there. As a young man in New York he suffered from asthma. Lucile had a lovely singing voice, studied in France with Madame Calve' sang at Jansen's in New York and toured with Sigmund Romberg's company for "Blossom Time". Jack took her aboard a Japanese man-of-war in New York in 1929, and she made a great hit singing a song in Japanese. In later years she loyally remembered Jack with a Christmas card every year and after the war repaid some money he had lent her. Willie Kennedy was the first woman to receive a Ph.d from the University of Texas. She and Marshall Verniaud are retired. 243 I met Anne September 1925 on the eastern shore of Maryland while inspecting canneries for Children's Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor. I went to live with her for about three years summer 1927 to August 1930 at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village. Soon afterward she married James Ivan McCormack, and I sublet a room from them - room only, no board.Anne worked as executive secrtary of the Joint Vocational Service, New York. I met Jack Barrett at Anne's house. He had come to the apartment to see Marine Nelson, who was living in Philadelphia but was visiting New York one Saturday in August 1928. Marie had known Anne Taylor since 1920, and Jack met Marie and her family in Charleston, South Carolina when he served aboard the TOUCEY in Charleston in 1921.Anne next worked for Travelers Aid Society in New York, moved to Patchen Place after I left to join Jack in China.She gave me six silver spoons as a wedding present. Ivan's family were in farming in Michigan, and he was gassed in Waorld War I in France. He liked to discuss stocks and investments with Jack and later with John and me. At one period he was an investigator of fraud for the government. He wanted for many years to live on a farm, in the the 1960s he bought a pig farm in East Greenwich, New York, near the Vermont state line, but the ancient farmhouse was not in good condition, so he also bought a house in adjacent Salem. For several years Anne remained in New York City. Her two sisters retired - Betty was a nurse, Eleanor as a teacher, and they went back to live in their original home at State College Pennsylvnia near their brother Bob Tayler and his wife Kay.. In 1967 Anne had a stroke and went to live with Betty and Eleanor at State Farm. But Eleanor broke her hip, and Anne died soon after of cancer of the liver, so Ivan drove to State Farm to get Anne and bring her to the farm. With the help of an eighty-year-old employee Billy Martin, Ivan does the work of the farm and prepares all the meals. Since it would cost too much to modernize the very old farmhouse, built about 1760, Ivan has bought a two-family home about three miles from the farm. [Sophie text late 1969 or 1970] -- When I was living with Anne and Ivan McCormack at 27 Commerce Street, Greenwich Village 1927-1930, I knew Marie and Lucile Nelson and met their father and their younger brother Harold then twenty to twenty-two years of age.One time when the senior Mr. Nelson was up visiting from the south, Harold told him he was engaged to be married -probably a daydream. Mr. Nelson answered, "You made your bed, - now lie in it." Harold visited Anne and Ivan McCormack at their farm in Salem, New York in the nineteen seventies - we did not see Harold, but Ivan said Harold told a story that Jack Barrett sometimes put his watch on a shoestring when he did not have a regular watchchain.We knew Marie and Lucile better. Anne first knew Marie in social work, which gave the three of us a common interest. Marie corresponded from Dungan Road, Philadelphia, where she and Harman lived in the 1970s. A group of Lucile's letters in 1928 to Jack from Harrison, Maine turned up in Mollie Barrett's attic in South Boston in 1967. Lucile was hostess in the 1950s and 1960s at the famous Waldorf Towers hotel in Manhattan, where General Douglas MacArthur and Herbert Hoover resided many years. She retired to Carmel, California, and corresponded extensively with both Ivan and the Barretts in the 1970s after Anne Taylor passed away in November 1971.


 


p84-1330

 

MAGNETIC FIELD AS A TRACER OF SHEARED GAS FLOW IN BARRED GALAXIES 397NATURE:324-7 rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de There are two ideas of government. There are those who believe that, if you will only legislate to make the well-to-do prosperous, their prosperity will leak through on those below. The Democratic idea, however, has been that if you legislate to make the masses prosperous, their prosperity will find its way up through every class which rests upon them.+++Cancer magister Macrocheira kaempferi spider cranb Pac. waters near Japan -=50-300 m depth -King red Bristol Bay w of Alaska coat--choice, largwe. Blue large claw Pribilov St. Matthew Brown Aleutians,Dutch Harbor--Pacalithodes camtschatica -- Puget Lopholithodes mendtii - -green carcinus maenas - ble Callinectes sapidus Gulf -Uca pugilator fiddler - Emerita analaga Pac sand c xx Limulus polyphemus Heteropoda venatoria 'giuant cr' spider


 


p 84-#1331 Eva KIMBROUGH Dec 1973

 

p42 # 965 - nbk 8-174 Mrs. Eva M Kimbrough 1336 66th St Berkeley California December 18, 1973 Dear Mr Barrett, I had a letter from my cousin Joan today and she was telling me she didn't get to see you this year. She was telling me about the lovely parties you [actually Loretto] gave and the dancing and Irish singing. The people over there really enjoy the Americans as they think we are all quite wealthy over here. I never heard my mother speak of the Collins[es] you mentioned. I DON'T SEE MARY MATHEWS I don't see Mary Mathews, but I always have a Christmas card every year from her. I know she doesn't know much about her mother's people as her mother, Marie, married a German fellow and they were very close so I'm sure that's the reason she hasn't written to you. I haven't seen Marie Mathews in twnety-five years, and she hasn't ever come to see us. I don't think she cares to be among her relatives. Yes, she is the only grandchild of John Ring. The other boy Neil Ring married late in life. The other two Frances and John Ring never married. They have all been dead for quite some time. I never met Kate Kerrigan or the Coleman woman but my mother used to see her when she visited uncle John Ring. I TOO HAVEN'T MUCH NEWS ABOUT THE RELATIVES AS MY MOTHER NEVER TALKED MUCH ABOUT THEM. JOAN and Peggy I think would be the ones that knew the most of them. Have a nice X-mas and New Year Sincerely, Eva M. Kimbrough." Thanks for photos.


 


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: METHIONINE CYSTEINE VALINE,LYSINE LEUCINE+.zipper ISOLEUCINE PHENYLALANINE THREONINE HISTIDINE To: sunfuture@yahoo.com Some amino acid notes Jan 6 METHIONINE is an important amino acid that helps to initiate translation of messenger RNA by being the first amino acid incorporated into the N-terminal position of all proteins. This sulfur-containing amino acid is also the source of sulfur for cysteine in animals and man. In that regard, methionine is considered an essential amino acid whereas cysteine is not, so cysteine is nonessential only as long as the diet contains adaquate amounts of methionine. The terminal methyl group of the methionine side chain often participates in biochemical methyl transfer reactions making methionine a member of the "methyl donor" class of biochemicals. On a molar basis, methionine is incorporated into proteins and enzymes at the rate of 1.7 percent, but this is partially due to posttranslational protein-modifying events that often occur where methionine and several other N-terminal amino acids are removed from the protein. CYSTEINE is only incorporated into proteins at the rate of 2.8 percent relative to the other amino acids, but the unique thiol side chain of this amino acid is often heavily involved in the three-dimensional stability of proteins and enzymes. The side chain is also often involved in the chemistry occurring at the active sites of many enzymes. Cysteine is also critical to the metabolism of a number of essential biochemicals including coenzyme A, heparin, biotin, lipoic acid, and glutathione. VALINE is an aliphatic amino acid that is closely related to leucine and isoleucine both in structure and function. These amino acids are extremely hydrophobic and are almost always found in the interior of proteins. They are also seldom useful in routine biochemical reactions, but are relegated to the duty of determining the three-dimensional structure of proteins due to their hydrophobic nature. They are also essential amino acids and must be obtained in the diet. Important sources of valine include soy flour, cottage cheese, fish, meats, and vegetables. Valine is incorporated into proteins and enzymes at the molar rate of 6.9 percent when compared to the other amino acids.-- LYSINE is one of the essential amino acids that cannot be manufactured by the human body, but must be acquired from food sources. The best food sources for Lysine are lean meats, fish, potatoes and milk. [deficient in high-maize-corn diets] In the early 1980's lysine became well known for its ability to fight the Herpes Simplex-1 virus, mouth blisters and cold sores. Since then it has been shown to have broader immune enhancing effects. Some studies have shown it effective in relieving genital herpes.High doses of Lysine stop viral growth and reproduction, and aids in the production of antibodies, hormones and enzymes. In children lysine is needed for proper growth and bone development. It aids calcium absorption and maintains nitrogen balance in adults. It is also instrumental in the formation of collagen, which is the basic matrix of the connective tissues, skin, cartilage and bone. According to Linus Pauling, it may also help reduce angina pectoris, chest pain caused by insufficient oxygen in the heart muscle. Pauling recommends 5 grams divided throughout the day for this condition. Lysine aids in collagen formation, in the repair of tissue, and helps to build muscle protein, all of which are important for recovery from surgery and injuries. It also lowers high serum triglycerides Lysine supplements stimulate the liver to produce higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Lysine deficiencies can result in lowered immune function, loss of energy, bloodshot eyes, irritability, hair loss, retarded growth, and reproductive disorders, increases urinary excretion of calcium, and increases the risk of kidney stones in susceptible people. Lysine has no known toxicity. LEUCINE (līsn) (KEY), organic compound, one of the 20 amino acids commonly found in animal proteins. Only the L-stereooisomer appears in mammalian protein. It is one of several essential amino acids needed in the diet; the human body cannot synthesize it from simpler metabolites. Young adults need about 31 mg of this amino acid per day per kilogram (14 mg per lb) of body weight. Leucine can be degraded into simpler compounds by the enzymes of the body. Leucine contributes to the structure of proteins into which it has been incorporated by the tendency of its side chain to participate in hydrophobic interactions. Certain proteins that bind to DNA (see nucleic acid) and may help regulate its activities, posses regions in which leucines are arranged in configurations called leucine zippers. Leucine was isolated from cheese in an impure form in 1819 and from muscle and wool in the crystalline state in 1820. It was named after the Greek word leukos [white], evidently because at that time the purification of a subtance from nature to a white, crystalline state was considered noteworthy. The stucture of leucine was established by laboratory synthesis in 1891. See isoleucine. LEUCINE ZIPPER Matchmaking & Salt Bridges On the C90, Tidor simulated the leucine zipper of a gene-regulating protein called GCN4 bathed in about 200 water molecules. He used the CHARMM molecular dynamics software, which tracks the movement of individual atoms over time. His simulations followed protein movement over a nanosecond (a billionth of a second)with a million snapshots during this time span. Tidor substituted different amino acids in the water-avoiding core of the protein dimer, and the visualized results present a picture of how the substitutions affect the protein's stability. "It's really a short movie," says Tidor, "of how the molecule moves. Small changes were tolerated, but the zipper becomes less stable. The zipper still forms, but more weakly." The research is still at an early stage, notes Tidor, but the picture emerging so far -- from a combination of laboratory and computer research -- suggests that the hydrophobic interactions at the coil interface provide much of the driving force that zips two protein coils together. These water-avoiding interactions, however, play only a minor role in determining which coils pair up. More important to this matchmaking are the amino acids on the outer surface of the coils, through their ability to repel and attract other amino acids (depending on whether they have like or different electronic charges). Tidor's recent calculations have yielded an interesting insight into this picture. The bonds between opposite-charge amino acids on the surface of the zipper, called salt bridges, which help to dictate which coils pair, actually destabilize the dimer. In other words, these salt bridges add interactions that work against correct dimers. Nature, explains Tidor,has solved the problem of forming the right dimers at the right time by producing more than enough driving force -- through the hydrophobic effect -- to make both correct and incorrect dimers. At the same time, however, other interactions that work against the correct dimers -- but not enough to stop them forming -- produce strong repulsions that prevent incorrect dimers from forming at all. Experiments are underway in the laboratories of Peter Kim at the Whitehead Institute and Tom Alber at the University of California, Berkeley on some of the mutated structures Tidor has modeled, research that will complement his computational results. "This project provides a unique collaboration among three groups," says Tidor, "each devoting its expertise toward a common aim of understanding protein structure and stability. The ultimate goal is designing molecules to mediate coil interactions, which may be useful cancer therapies." The two helices of the leucine zipper, shown here in top (left) and front (right) views, are outlined as yellow-striped ribbons. The ribbons gently wrap around each other, apparent in the top view. The stick figure represents the molecular structure oxygen (red), nitrogen (blue), hydrogen (white) and carbon (green). The dotted surface shows the area of the molecule that can come into contact with surrounding water. As seen in the top view, the surface shields the interface between the helices so that water is not able to penetrate into this area, where leucine and other hydrophobic amino acids form the "teeth" of the zipper. ISOLEUCINE is a member of the aliphatic side-chain amino acid family that is composed of extremely hydrophobic biochemicals that are found principally in the interior of proteins and enzymes. Like several other members of this family (valine and leucine), isoleucine is an essential amino acid that is not synthesized by mammalian tissues. Another feature of this class of amino acids is that they appear to have no other significant biological role than incorporation into proteins and enzymes, where their main purpose is to help dictate the tertiary structure of the macromolecules. Isoleucine is incorporated into proteins at a molar rate of 4.6 percent when compared to the other amino acids. PHENYLALALINE is an essential amino acid but dangerous in excess. There is some suspicion of brain tumors from high intake. Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid formed from phenylalanine - they both have a six-carbon "phenyl" ring. Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important regulated step in mitotic cell cycles both in normal growth and accelerated in cancers. PHENYLALANINE - 50% OF ASPARTAME Phenylalanine is an amino acid normally found in the brain. Persons with the genetic disorder, phenylketonuria (PKU) cannot metabolize phenylalanine. This leads to dangerously high levels of phenylalanine in the brain (sometimes lethal). It has been shown that ingesting aspartame, especially along with carbohydrates can lead to excess levels of phenylalanine in the brain even in persons who do not have PKU. This is not just a theory, as many people who have eaten large amounts of aspartame over a long period of time and do not have PKU have been shown to have excessive levels of phenylalanine in the blood. Excessive levels of phenylalanine in the brain can cause the levels of seratonin in the brain to decrease, leading to emotional disorders such as depression. It was shown in human testing that phenylalanine levels of the blood were increased significantly in human subjects who chronically used aspartame.(6) Even a single use of aspartame raised the blood phenylalanine levels. In his testimony before the US Congress, Dr Louis J. Elsas showed that high blood phenylalanine can be concentrated in parts of the brain, and is especially dangerous for infants and fetuses. He also showed that phenylalanine is metabolised much more effeciently by rodents than by humans.(7) One account of a case of extremely high phenylalanine levels caused by aspartame was recently published the the "Wednesday Journal" in an article entitled "An Aspartame Nightmare." John Cook began drinking 6 to 8 diet drinks every day. His symptoms started out as memory loss and frequent headaches. He began to crave more aspartame-sweetened drinks. His condition deteriorated so much that he experienced wide mood swings and violent rages. Even though he did not suffer from PKU, a blood test revealed a phenylalanine level of 80 mg/dl. He also showed abnormal brain function and brain damage. After he kicked his aspartame habit, his symptoms improved dramatically. TRYPTOPHAN an essential amino acid that affects mood swings and brain chemistry. Only small amounts are needed. It is suspected contaminated supplements have caused harmful effects. Tryptophan crosses the blood-brain barrier with a binding protein that also carries glucose, whereas most of the other amino acids including the more basic ones chemically use a different binding protein. a 1982 Scientific American article suggests there is a kind of servomechanism like a thermostat because of this by which ingesterion of carbohydrate causes craving for protein +vice versa. ALANINE is a non-essential amino acid that is involved in the metabolism of tryptophan and the vitamin pyridoxine. The alpha-carbon in alanine is substituted with a levorotatory (l)-methyl group, making it one of the simplest amino acids with respect to molecular structure. This amino acid is one of the most widely used in protein construction, averaging about 9 percent of average protein composition on a per-mole basis when compared with the other amino acids. Alanine has little therapeutic role in humans, although it has been demonstrated to display a cholesterol-reducing effect in rats THREONINE is another alcohol-containing amino acid that can not be produced by metabolism and must be taken in the diet. This amino acid plays an important role along with glycine and serine in porphyrin metabolism. Threonine is incorporated into proteins and enzymes at a molar rate of 6 percent compared to the other amino acids. (thrīnn) (KEY), organic compound, one of the 22 -amino acids commonly found in animal proteins. Only the L-stereoisomer appears in mammalian protein. It is one of several essential amino acids needed in the diet; human beings cannot synthesize it from simpler metabolites. Young adults need about 14 mg of this amino acid per day per kilogram (6 mg per lb) of body weight. Although threonine participates in many reactions in bacteria, including the biosynthesis of vitamin B12 and isoleucine, its metabolic role in higher animals, including man, remains obscure. It is known only as a constituent of proteins, and even in that form it is relatively unreactive. In spite of the fact that its side chain has a hydroxyl group similar to that of serine, there is no indication that it participates in the catalytic functions of any enzyme. Threonine was isolated from the protein fibrin in 1935 and synthesized in the same year. L-HISTIDINE * This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you are pregnant, lactating, suffer from diabetes, neurological disorders, autoimmune problems, or any other serious illness, please consult your physician before using this product. Scientific References L-histidine* is an essential amino acid that cannot be formed by other nutrients, and must be in the diet to be available to the body. Most often recognized as a precursor to the allergy symptom producing hormone histamine, both histidine and histamine have essential roles in the body beyond tormenting allergy sufferers. Histamine is well known for its role in stimulating the inflammatory response of skin and mucous membranes such as those found in the nose - this action is essential in the protection of these barriers during infection.Histamine also stimulates the secretion of the digestive enzyme gastrin. Without adequate histamine production healthy digestion can become impaired. Without adequate L-histidine stores, the body cannot maintain adequate histamine levels. Less well known is that L-histidine is required by the body to regulate and utilize essential trace minerals such as copper, zinc, iron, manganese and molybdenum. L-histidine is essential in forming many metal bearing enzymes and compounds, examples being the antioxidant super oxide dismutase, the iron storage protein ferritin, the iron uptake regulation protein -FUR, the copper storage and iron metabolism cofactor cerulplasmin, red blood cell hemoglobin, the toxic metal storage protein metallothionein, and the cysteine regulating enzyme cysteine dioxygenase - to name but a few important enzymes dependent on L-histidine being available for formation and function. Metals such as zinc, copper and nickel are transported by binding with L-histidine, and such binding appears essential for rapid excretion of excess metal. Toxic metals such as mercury, lead, cadmium, and threatening excesses of essential minerals zinc and copper stimulate the rapid formation of metallothionein inside cells of the brain, liver, and kidneys.Metallothionein is a molecule designed to store metals in such a way as to prevent uncontrolled oxidation reactions - protecting the normal workings of the cell. Metallothionein requires both L-cysteine (usually derived from available glutathione stores) and L-histidine to be formed. Persons contaminated with heavy metals, suffering from chronic seasonal allergies, or following a low histidine diet are most susceptible to body depletion of adequate histidine stores - creating the possibility of mineral-enzyme deficiencies and dysregulation.Depletion of body stores of L-histidine might be best recognized by dysfunction of L-histidine dependent compounds, and low blood plasma concentrations of the amino acid.High blood serum levels of iron have been experimentally caused in humans by a diet low in L-Histidine. Intolerance of sulfur bearing foods like garlic and broccoli along with elevated blood plasma L-cysteine levels indicate inactivation of the L-Histidine and iron dependent enzyme cysteine dioxygenase. As with most free form amino acids, L-histidine absorption is best when taken between meals without food and without accompanying minerals. ARGININE is a complex amino acid that is often found at the active (or catalytic) site in proteins and enzymes due to its amine-containing side chain. Although arginine is considered an essential amino acid (it must be obtained through the diet), this is true only during the juvenile period in humans. Arginine is incorporated in proteins at about a 4.7 percent on a per-mole basis when compared to the other amino acids. Natural sources of arginine are brown rice, nuts, popcorn, raisins, and whole-wheat products. ASPARAGINE the beta-amido derivative of aspartic acid, is considered a non-essential amino acid. This amino acid plays an important role in the biosynthesis of glycoproteins and is also essential to the synthesis of a large number of other proteins. On a per-mole basis, asparagine is incorporated into proteins and enzymes at a rate of 4.4 percent with respect to the other amino acids. Aspartic acid is a non-essential amino acid, synthesized from glutamate or derived from protein food. It is involved in building DNA (genetic structures in cells), in carbohydrate metabolism & protein metabolism. It is a carrier molecule for the transport of magnesium & potassium in your cells. Aspartic acid is a major excitatory transmitter in your brain. Aspartic acid is frequently decreased in unipolar depression & patients with brain atrophy. It may be increased in those with seizures & strokes. ASPARTIC ACID Helps detoxify ammonia in your body. May help fatigue. May help depression. Has liver protective effects. Avoid with neuromuscular disorders. ASPARTIC ACID is a nonessential amino acid that the body can make from other sources in sufficient amounts to meet its needs. It is a critical part of the enzyme in the liver that transfers nitrogen-containing amino groups, either in building new proteins and amino acids, or in breaking down proteins and amino acids for energy and detoxifying the nitrogen in the form of urea. Recent studies have shown aspartate and arginine supplements either alone or in combination may help relieve chronic fatigue. Both amino acids are also helpful in treating decreased fertility in men caused by decreased sperm count or mobility. Aspartic acid and potassium aspartate were also helpful in treating heart attacks and preventing irregular rhythms. Its ability to increase endurance is thought to be a result of its role in clearing ammonia from the system. In one study, 85% of 145 patients with chronic fatigue who were given the potassium and magnesium salts of aspartic acid, felt significantly more energetic. Athletes also use it to promote stamina and endurance. It helps form the ribonucleotides that assist in the production of RNA and DNA, and assists in energy production from carbohydrate metabolism. Aspartic acid is one of two major excitatory amino acids within the brain (The other is glutamic acid). At small doses these amino acids stimulate nerve cells to higher levels of activity. At higher doses they may overexcite these nerve cells, causing cell damage or death. This is thought to happen in strokes, when large amounts of excitatory neurotransmitters are released by the damage and may contribute to further damage. Some research has shown that aspartic acid might be useful in opiate withdrawal. It was found more useful in this context than some major tranquilizing drugs. Depleted levels of aspartic acid may occur temporarily within certain tissues under stress, but, because the body is able to make its own aspartic acid to replace any depletion, deficiency states do not occur. Aspartic acid is abundant in plants, especially in sprouting seeds. In protein, it exists mainly in the form of its amide, asparagine. The popular sweetener Aspartame is a combination of aspartic acid and phenylalanine. Aspartic acid is considered nontoxic. PROLINE is one of the main amino acids of collagen and is also helpful to bone, skin, and cartilage formation. Proline can be formed from glutamine or the amino acid ornithine. In foods, it is found readily in dairy products and eggs, with some found in meats or wheat germ. Proline is helpful in maintaining joints and tendons, in tissue repair after injury, or for any type of wound healing. HYDROXYPROLINE is derived from the amino acid proline and is used almost exclusively in structural proteins including collagen, connective tissue in mammals, and in plant cell walls. An unusual feature of this amino acid is that it is not incorporated into collagen during biosynthesis at the ribosome, but is formed from proline by a posttranslational modification by an enzymatic hydroxylation reaction. Non-hydroxylated collagen is commonly termed pro-collagen.


 


p 84-1333

 

 


 


84-1334

 

BACKUP from p 44 CHAPTER Sophie Barrett (left) aboard Navy Transport HENDERSON autumn 1930 center is Junior Medical Officer, who invited Sophie to ship's dance third night of voyage. w986 p 44 #986 Sophie joined H-E-N-D-E-R-S-O-N at Portsmouth Virginia August 12. 1930 and reached Chingwantao, North China where Jack Barrett met her November 14, l930.Sophie is at left. Officer in center was Assistant Medical Officer of HENDERSON. Route went through Port-au-Prince Haiti' Cristobal and Balboa, Panama Canal Zone, Corinto, west coast of Nicaragua, San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco - Sophie visited Yosemite Valley and stayed at Ahwahnee Hotel while HENDERSON was overhauled at Mare Island north east side of San Francisco Bay -then Honolulu, Guam, Manila, Hong Kong - Sophie transferred to smaller transport - got to know Florence Hilldring Army wife - proceeded Shanghai to North China. H-E-N-D-E-R-S-O-N [John Barrett note This letter December 27, 1929 expresses Sophie's appreciation of Jack's Christmas message from the Philippines-"Dear lady of my fondest dreams - Come join me in the Philippines Where I will build a house for you Of SAWALI NIPA, and BAMBOO With Windows made of pearly SHELL - In SINAMY I'll dress you well, And you shall have your every wish - The while we dine on RICE and FISH.". Their June 1929 marriage was kept secret from most of Sophie's acqaintances in New York, including Macy's friends, where Sophie remained Director of Personnel Research until August 1930.. Emanuel Lyons much older than Jack and Sophie had been a friend since summer 1923 when Sophie worked at United Hebrew Charities. He published books "1001 Business Ideas" and "2222 Business Ideas." For years he invited the social workers to his western New Jersey farm, where Sophie appeared in three February 1926 photos with heavy snow. Joe Brill, a Fordham Law School classmate of Jack Barrett,. remained in New York City law practice up to the 1970s, and occasionally through Anne and Ivan McCormack the Barretts would hear news of him and other acquaintances, including Anne's family, the Taylors, the Nelson family from Charleston, South Carolina, various social workers,, and Jmmy Jemail, the "Inquiring Reporter" of the New York Daily News, later editor.]"IV-286 To. Lt. J.B. Barrett USS TRUXTUN US Asiatic Fleet c/o postmaster Seattle from SMB R.H.Macy + Co. 34th St. Broadway New York City December 27 1929 Barrett dear, My last letter to you was sent just a week ago today. Since that time there hasn't been a dull moment. Want to be bored with an account of the events? You will recall that I was planning to go to dinner with the dentist last Friday evening. Imagine my surprise when he told me his mother, father, and sister were waiting at home for us and that I was to be their guest for dinner. Gosh, but I was scared to be looked over by the family, but I pretended it was a every-day occurence with me. He lives up on Madison Avenue and Ninety-sixth Street. The dinner was delicious, we all got along famously, and I have an idea 'mamma' approved, because as I was leaving, she said,'Come to Christmas dinner, my dear.' I thanked her in my most charming manner and pleaded 'not guilty'. = The next day dawned like every other, but it was to be different. I was scheduled to go to a big party in Flushing- an annual party which I had turned down because you were you. To look all dressed up I decided to go home at noon, - and there I found a box from you with two adorable rings and some earrings. Promptly the rings were put on - they fit nicely - a wee bit large - and I love them. I can't wear them all the time because they are fragile, and the little decorative flowers fall off. You were nice to adorn me at this season of the year. I wear both rings on the fourth finger of my right hand. = The party was something or other - not very successful. Agnes Drummond and I stayed overnight. Sunday noon the family drove us into town, and we went to Agnes's apartment for tea. = Sunday evening after much persuasion on Martha's part I agreed to join her and Dottie on a date with three Spaniards. One of the men had a Auburn car. One of the men is an artist named Camilo Egas who has a studio on Charles Street. For some unknown reason his eyes rested on me, and he has been pursuing me ever since.Foreign men don't interest me, and when he phoned last night, I told him I was sick. He got my phone number through Martha. = Your Christmas card was received on Tuesday. It is without doubt the most beautiful card I have ever seen - and I say that in all sincerity. When Mrs. Smith rang the bell Christmas eve to deliver the card telling of the attractions of the Philippines in the form of fish, rice, and coarse clothes, my Christmas happiness was complete. The card is just too clever and too funny. I love it and may even frame it someday. = Santa Claus was more than generous: From Mr. Lyons there came a subscription to 'The Nation', a bottle of perfume, + a beautiful compact. From Mabel there came two pairs of silk stockings - from Edna Walton there came handkerchiefs - from Anne there came Yardley Old English Soap From Willie Kennedy there came 'SRM' stationery - from Martha there came genuine amethyst earrings. = Mr. Lyons and I started out five o'clock Christmas morning. We took the train to Landsdowne, [New Jersey] where we started our five mile hike to the farm house-- it was work and fun to go through all the ice and snow. After a fine Christmas dinner we hiked the five miles back. = Helen Miller called up just after I got home Christmas night. We plan to take dinner and a walk together this Sunday. = Joe Brill called me up last night. He told me he received a card from you and that he sent you one. After much conversation about nothing at all, he asked me to take lunch with him today. I turned him down on the basis of being 'busy.' I couldn't be rude to him because he may be sincere, but perhaps he may become discouraged with repeated refusals. Harold Nelson spends a lot of time at the apartment. - Sophie." HENDERSON #1095 p 56 "Slow Boat to China" [p 205]In 1929 Jack wanted a third year at Fordham but didn't get it.In 1930 Jack was interested in commanding a Yangtze patrol boat.In 1930 on the TRUXTUN after skipper Carey left with tuberculosis and Jack had been in acting command, they went up the Yangtze river to Nanking after Carey's relief Lieutenant Commander Keliher arrived. Jack did not send for me there, as Americans were being evacuated rather than sent out. Since he was right on the spot, he applied for command of Jack a Yangtze patrol boat, which he would give him a opportunity to navigate thousands of miles up that great river and see many ancient and remarkable Chinese towns. But he didn't get that either.Instead he went from the TRUXTUN to the gunboat TULSA stationed in Tientsin, North China,as gunnery officer in May, 1930.He was acting Executive Officer for a time also. He transferred at Chingwantao when the TRUXTUN made a swing through north China, and Jack got to Peking and saw his old friend Bill Rupertus, who was stationed there. The TULSA spent most of the year at the dock on the Hai Ho river in Tientsin. Wives of three of the ship's officers and some of the wives of Army Fifteenth Infantry personnel were living there. Jack made inquiry and got permission to have me join him in Tientsin.An old Navy friend of Jack's - whom I had met in New York- Captain E.V. W. Keene -was in charge of Dependents' Transportation, and when I went to see him June 23, 1930, he was most kind and cooperative and told me he would look into transportation for me and would arrange my typhoid and cholera shots and for my smallpox vaccination.At first he considered the Army transport GRANT or the CHAUMONT going to Manila and advised Jack to investigate what transportation would be available from Manila to Chingwantao [North China].By July 25 Captain Keene and Jack had decided I should wait for the Navy transport HENDERSON leaving Hampton Roads, Virginia, on August 20, 1930, which would take me all the way, arriving at Chingwantao November 13, 1930. [A Yangtze River patrol boat which he could command would give him a opportunity to navigate thousands of miles up that great river and see many ancient and remarkable Chinese towns. But he didn't get that either.Instead he went from the TRUXTUN to the gunboat TULSA stationed in Tientsin, North China,as gunnery officer in May, 1930.He was acting Executive Officer for a time also. He transferred when the TRUXTUN made a swing through north China, and Jack got to Peking and saw his old friend Bill Rupertus, who was stationed there.Since the TULSA spent almost all of the time at the dock on the Hai Ho river in Tientsin, Jack was able to making inquiry and got permission to have me join him in Tientsin.An old Navy friend of Jack's - whom I had met in New York- Captain E.V. W. Keene -was in charge of Dependents' Transportation, and when I went to see him June 23, 1930, he was most kind and cooperative and told me he would look into transportation for me and would arrange my typhoid and cholera shots and for my smallpox vaccination.At first he considered the Army transport GRANT going to Manila and advised Jack to investigate what transportation would be available from Manila to Chingwantao [North China].By July 25 Captain Keene and Jack had settled on the Navy transport HENDERSON leaving Hampton Roads, Virginia, on August 20, 1930, and arriving at Chingwantao November 13, 1930. I saw Captain Keene on July 25 and August 6. Among other things he gave me my transportation on the HENDERSON from Hampton Roads to Chingwantao, China,-gave me rail transportation from New York to Hampton Roads via Pullman sleeper the night of August 18, 1930,- made sure I had my shots and vaccination,-and gave me a special passport for travel in China and Japan.[transfer??-] When I gave Macy's two weeks notice that I was leaving for China, they gave me one hundred....[Black notebook One p 206] dollars a wedding present,the usual procedure when an executive of the store married. I was still working but I used long lunch hours to buy a trunk, two matching suitcases, shoes, smart hats, day and evening dresses, a black coat trimmed with Persian lamb fur, gloves, underwear, and many pairs of stockings. Whenever possible I made my purchases at Macy's where I had a substantial D..A . account and where I received a ten per cent discount on all purchases as an employee. Mr. Lyons bought for me a lovely wedding band of small diamonds, at wholesale, so my wedding ring served as both an engagement and wedding ring, which I got at a very reasnable price. I made quick trips to see my family in Hartford and in Philadelphia July + attended Willie Kennedy's wedding August 6 to Marshall Verniaud. The young lady who trained the bundle girls at Macy's packed my trunk for me as a goodbye gesture and taught me how to pack a trunk and suitcases using tissue paper to avoid wrinkles in clothes.I receivied crystal earrings and beads from one of my assistants Miss Mildred Forman, turquoise and silver beads from Willie Kennedy, silver spoons from Anne and Ivan [McCormack] a steak knife and fork from Helen Miller,and a cake fork from Frances Manning. Eleanor and Anne Taylor took me to the train, and when they left me, I realized that ahead of me was a new life in which I knew no one until I saw Jack in about three months in North China. I was to go alone halfway across the world. It was mid-morning August 19, 1930 when I arrived at the HENDERSON in Hampton Roads, Virginia. The HENDERSON was a very large Navy transport,-480 feet ten inches long, 60 feet ll l/2 inches wide,l9 feet l0 3/4 inch draft 101,000 tons, speed fourteen knots (p.207) First class passengers - women & children ll2 female servant six- officers & civilians as many as are given authority to travel except that no more than one hundred to be put in troop or crew spaces.Troop passengers l200.Built Navy Yard Philadelphia cost $ l,850,000.Commissioned May 20,l9l7.Eight five-inch fifty-caliber guns -two three-inch fifty-caliber guns,two masts, 27 officers, 24 chief petty officers & 373 enlisted sailors. When I boarded the big, white-painted HENDERSON at Hampton Roads, the Paymaster checked my papers, assigned me a nice cabin right on deck, and said the ship would said early next morning, and evening dinner would be served aboard, but I would have to get my lunch elsewhere. I left my bags in my cabin with three bunks on the upper deck& when I learned the first meal to be served would be dinner, I left by bus to see Norfolk,Virginia & have lunch in a drugstore. I walked all over Norfolk,not realizing that a few years later I would live there near the Naval Base & that my son John would be born there.By bus I got back to the ship for dinner.There were two messes in the passenger dining room,one early for women with children & the later one for adults only.I looked over the ship after dinner- the food was uniformly good on the HENDERSON. I got into my upper berth but was too excited to sleep. Somehow I had had the idea that I would not see a hairdresser for many months, so just before I left New York, I had asked my hairdresser to cut my hair very short. As he was used to my hair, I relaxed completely and failed to observe what he was doing. But I was shocked when I looked into the mirror after he had finished, as I was nearly bald, and I cried. I looked and felt ridiculous. My new clothes were all very feminine, but I looked too masculine with that hair-do "wind-blown". I would have to get my lunch elsewhere.Since I knew no one, I was lonesome and went to my bunk right after dinner as very few passengers were aboard at that time. I had just made myself comfortable in my bunk when a middle-aged woman entered the cabin, switched on the light, and screamed, "There is a man in my cabin!" Before I could re-assure her, he rushed out with her ten-year-old daughter, but returned shortly with the Paymaster. When he said, "That is Mrs. Barrett!' she calmed down,but she never spoke to me while we shared that cabin.Fortunately she left the ship at Panama, on the Atlantic side - so the unpleasantness was short-lived. Three enlisted men passengers played music at dinner & when the weather permitted they played for dancing in the lounge.___About the third day out, the junior medical officer of the ship asked me why I did not attend the dance held every evening in the lounge. I explained that I hesitated to go alone, so he offered to escort me that evening after dinner. The sea was rough, and only a handful of passengers were in the lounge - all girls. After dancing with me, my escort danced with one of the young girls, and feeling conspicuous and self-conscious sitting there alone, I left. I was wearing a new light lavender chiffon dress with a black velvet sash and, except for my hair, I thought I looked well groomed. I went alone to the rail ouside my cabin, and as I stood there watching the moonlight on the water, a shp's officer joined me with the words, "I could never fall in love with you." He was immaculate in his white uniform with two and a half stripes on his shoulders and had a pleasant smile. Thinking that my slip was slowing or that he objected to my haircut, I asked him why, and he replied simply, "Because you are a brunette, and I like only blondes. My wife and five children are blondes." I was relieved. But we chatted for only a brief time as he was on duty, and my loneliness deepened. The ship seemed deserted as almost everyone -men and women alike- were seasick. Captain Mauldin's fourteen-year old son was making the trip with him as far as Los Angeles.The executive officer was Glenn Howell, & the senior doctor was Norman Roberts.One deck officer was Ben Shinn, who was later Jack's Executive officer on the CLAXTON & lived with his wife in the apartment house next to us when we were at 7l00 Hampton Boulevard. The paymaster was Lieutenant Cook.Immediately after sailing on the morning of August 20 going south at about Longitude seventy-four degrees West in the Atlantic Ocean en route to Haiti the sea was rough,& a woman from American Samoa, wife of a Navy Lieutenant,could not finish her breakfast because she was already seasick. Dr. Roberts, the senior medical officer, told me his wife & five children lived in Coronado near San Diego, California- that he once had duty in Guam- where even a Naval officer could save money -because there was nothing to spend it on there & that he had met his wife in Philadelphia & was looking forward to seeing them later in the voyage. I was uneasy about his intense interest in me, but my sense of humor came to my rescue.We approached Haiti on Saturday night when all the lights of Port au Prince were on. I believe the port of Haiti that evening from the ship was one of the most beautiful sights I had ever seen.On Sunday morning the passengers were going ashore, but I hesitated to go in a strange country & stood at the gangway until Dr. Roberts came along, said he was going to church & invited me to go with him.Haiti was my first time on foreign soil.After the service we walked through the native market- then Dr.Roberts called on a Marine family there & we were invited to stay to lunch in a white stucco house called "Sans Souci."Our next stop was Colon on the Atlantic side of the canal where we stayed overnight, because the HENDERSON was scheduled to make an early morning transit through the Panama Canal.We saw a little of the night life in a few bars but spent very little & drank no liquor.While the ship was going through the canal the next morning from the Atlantic to the Pacific I was glued to the ship's rail, fascinated by the process of filling the locks & raising & lowering the ship.Dr. Roberts,who had transited the canal several times, was tireless in explaining the whole process to me.Strangely enough even though Jack had duty based in Balboa, Panama on the HANNIBAL in l934 & l935& although I made two round trips to the Pacific side of the Canal in those years I never again went through the Panama Canal as I used the train to cross the Isthmus of Panama to Balboa & Panama City.As in Colon we spent the evening seeing the night life of Panama City but returned to the ship early.The next morning we left for Nicaragua.-- After many passengers got off in Panama, I had the cabin to myself all the way from Colon to Chingwantao on the north China coast.Since the HENDERSON needed twenty feet depth of water, she could not go to Tientsin, where the Hai Ho river is very shallow. A few passengers, including me went ashore in Corinto, Nicaragua but stayed only a short time because of intense head & glare of the sun.Most of our remaining passengers left in California.Dr. Roberts arranged for the band to serenade me one evening as I entered the dining hall with the Al Jolson favorite, "California, Here I Come." We arrived in San Diego just after dinner.Mrs. Norman Roberts came to the ship to take her husband home.The next day Dr. Roberts said he had his car on the dock because his wife Dorothy had invited me to their Coronado home for dinner that evening.She wanted to see the young woman who dared travel alone from New York city to Chingwantao,halfway across the world.It was wonderful to be in a real home with five attractive children. I would myself live in Coronado l938-9.At San Pedro I rode into Los Angeles in Admiral Thomas Washington's gig & later returned to the ship in one of the HENDERSON's small boats.Admiral Washington was on duty at San Pedro, came to the HENDERSON in his gig,& when someone told him I was travelling alone half way across the world,he offered me a ride to Los Angeles- so I had a chance to see a city which I returned to several times in my Navy life.With very few first class passengers aboard we arrived at Mare Island,the shipyard of San Francisco, where the HENDERSON was scheduled to remain for two weeks for overhaul.I went to San Francisco from Mare Island, saw the city by bus & for the first time tried a seafod called abalone.Dr. Roberts & two Naval officers stationed at Mare Island were going to Yosemite Park for one night & two days. They had a drive-it-yourself hired car.We arrived toward evening of our first day-got accomodations for dinner rooms & breakfast at the Ahwahnee Hotel & I remember the wonderful show of stars that night. I thought El Capitan & Half Dome were impressive,but the men were disappointed because the waterfalls were dried up at that time of the year. I purchased a handcolored souvenir photo of Bridal Veil falls with a footpath and tree in the foreground. We saw the tremendous sequoia trees,& I was glad I had joined them [-(p 212) for an inexpensive trip away from the noise of the workmen and the smell of the fresh paint. I learned to play shuffleboard with the ship's officers, who also taught me Russian bank, a card game, and Acey Deucey, the Naval variation of backgammon. Finally the ship was ready. Some new passengers came aboard, and we sailed for Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii.As we left the Golden Gate, the Pacific was rough, and to my amazement I was seasick. Very suddenly as I stood at the rail, I lost my lunch into the Pacific Ocean. Only once more was I ever seasick - during a typhoon between Manila and Hong Kong.Like Jack, I was an excellent sailor. In Hawaii I went by a hired car around the Island of Oahu. The Kalanianaole Highway on the southeast coast was not yet completed, so we went by car across the Koolau Mountains over the Nuuanu Pali Road, had lunch at Kailua on the windward northeast coast, and returned to the ship for dinner.I thought of Jerome Kern's song, "When it's moonlight in Kailua, nights like these are divine."After dinner by trolley car we went to Waikiki,where we saw the new Royal Hawaiian Hotel, the Moana Hotel, and the famous Waikiki Beach by moonlight. At that time I didn't realize that I would live in Waikiki for six years during and after World War II, from l94l to l947.During the long uneventful trip to Guam we saw many flying fish- I stood in the bow of the ship watching them for hours. There were very few passengers now on the decks and in the dining room, and the orchestra had left us. Most of the passengers were Marine enlisted men under the command of a colonel. I heard they were en route to Shanghai. I have a vivid picture of the Colonel, who was in charge of hundreds of young Marines, bound for the Orient: - As I stood at the rail in Hawaii the night the ship was in port, I watched two young Marine officers in uniform help that man step onto the gangplank, as the Colonel had had too much to drink. But he was stiff and straight and soldierly as he made his way to the deck supported by his Marines. again the last night we were in Manila, I saw him approach the gangway, again supported by two Marines. Quietly, without fanfare, he was hurried to his cabin, and very few observed the tragedy of his weakness for liquor. It was difficult to read on deck with the glare of the sun, but hot and dark in the cabin. The HENDERSON could not go into the dock at Guam, but I went ashore in a small boat with a few sailors going to Guam for duty. I sent a postcard to my father David Meranski.Dr. Roberts knew a lot of people in Guam, where he had had a tour of duty. One of his friends loaned him a car so that he could show me Agama, the capital of Guam. I wrote my family a letter, apart from the postcard to my father:"10: A.M. Monday 6 October l930 Dearest Family,To-morrow at noon we are scheduled to arrive in Honolulu where Dr. Roberts and I intend to swim and to drive around taking in all the sights. He is a great old playmate, and I,m glad I found him.--On my birthday last Saturday, it was such fun way out at sea to open the birhday cards which Esther and Babe and Geetter so thoughtfully sent to me.They are nice cards - every now and then I read them over again, stopping to dream a bit about home and each one of you. I had Ben in mind on the first of October, and several times on that day -2- I read his grand letter and hoped that all was going well with him. November belongs to Sis, Babe, Abe and Isie - I'll not forget that no matter where I am or what I am doing.--Life on board is very peaceful- we have settled down again into a well ordered routine since leaving San Francisco last Tuesday, the 30th of September. Now at 10:15 in the morning most people are sitting out on deck in the large wicker chairs- some just gazing out to sea -some talking- some reading and others, like myself, writing letters.Breakfast is long since over.I had orange juice, hot cakes, and coffee.By 8:30 I was out on deck watching two men play shuffle -3- board - a game of good exercise played with sticks and round wooden pieces, which you drive onto a court marked with plus and minus numbers up to ten. The winning score is fifty, and you score whatever number is in the block into which you have shoved the round wooden piece.--As I was watching the game,some of my pals joined me. By 8:45 four of us were playing the game, laughing and carrying on until 9:l5 when we had "man overboard" drill getting out our life jackets and gathering on the lower deck.After that I still felt energetic, so I walked around the decks fourteen times (twelve times makes a mile- I did fourteen for good measure.)Then it was ten o'clock, and I decided -4-to put a bridge table up on deck in a quiet corner and write a letter home to my very dear family.--We lost a lot of older high ranking people at San Francisco where we took on passengers more nearly of my own age and rank.Now even I am pretty important, for we sit at table according to rank, and I am at Table Two.That's pretty good considering there are eight tables-I used to be at Table Four.--Funny thing - for a whole month, from Norfolk to San Francisco I had no sign of seasickness. However, the first day and a half out of San Francisco the sea was very -..." [end p. four remainder of 1930 letter may be lost.] Sophie text: "One morning I was standing on deck near the officers' quarters talking with the junior medical officer when my friend came up and asked to speak with me in private. He told me not to touch the sleeve of the junior medical officer. Surprised, I told him I hadn't realized I had touched his sleeve, and also said I saw no harm unconsiously touching the man's sleeve. Whereupon he explained, "I don't want you to touch any man because I am in love with you." Stunned, I tried to pass it off, but he assured me he was serious and wanted to marry me after he had made provision for his wife and chldren. I decided to keep quiet in the hope it was merely a passing fancy. ..." "The ride to Manila was very smooth, and I occupied myself reading books about China that Jack had sent to me when I was in New York.There was a China Coasters Manual l927 and a text by Jesuit Father Leo Weiger and a French-Chinese dictionary. I studied Emily Post's Etiquette text carefully, preparing for the formal entertaining expected of Navy wives. At Manila I received a letter from Jack explaining that he would meet me aboard the HENDERSON at Chingwantao.He had asked a friend's wife Mrs. Eddie Smith, to meet me on the HENDERSON and show me Manila and entertain me for the day and evenng, and he would pay the bill.She boarded the ship as soon as it docked and was most gracious. But when I told my doctor friend that I would be going ashore with Mrs. Smith, he was hysterical and begged me to stay aboard with him that day and spend the evening in Manila. So when Mrs. Smith visited, I told her I had made previous plans for the day, and I sat around that hot ship all day. In the evening we went to the Army and Navy Club, but it was so crowded that we left and took a ride over the cobblestones of old Manila in a carametta, which is a carriage drawn by one horse. I did not see much of Manila that day but subsequently saw a lot of the town when en route around the world and home with Jack in 1932. I saw the Army and Navy Club that evening and saw something of old Manila from a carametta (horse and carriage).Florence Hilldring wife of Army Captain John Hilldring boarded the HENDERSON alone for the trip to Hong Kong, Shanghai,and Chingwantao.She planned to visit Army friends in Tientsin- to get away from the climate of Manila.She and the ship's engineer were friends of long standing.Florence "adopted" me, so I had a playmate for the rest of the trip. (see INSERT on page 38)in Shanghai Florence Hilldring took me to a shop where she had previously bought a white rabbits'-fur evening jacket, and I bought one at a small price.Pity the poor men who escorted me in Shanghai and in Tientsin when the white rabbits' fur shed onto their black Tuxedos or their Navy Blues.I threw the coat away after a New Year's Eve Party at the Tientsin Country Club.I liked that coat very much, but I threw it away when I saw white fur on Jack's dark blue uniform overcoat as he checked it at the Country Club. After we walked around Shanghai during the day, two officers from the HENDERSON took us to the French Club in the evening. The HENDERSON brought some new personnel for the TULSA - Ensign Brown and a few sailors and marines. Two weeks after my arrival at Tientsin I received a letter written by Dr. Roberts my naval officer friend on the HENDERSON. He had met Jack, but they failed to become friends. Eloquently he poured his heart out telling me that we would be married when he could make provison for his wife and children. Of course I realized thast he was influenced by my youth, by the romantic moon, stars, tropical countries visited, and that I must keep my head and steer clear of the rocks of disaster. So I reluctantly tore the letter to shreds and made no reply. Never did I hear from him again, but I sorrowfully read in the Army-Navy Register about 1939 or 1940 that he had passed away from tuberculosis leaving a wife and five children. His duties on long sea trips must have been a great strain on family life.JOHN BARRETT notes JOHN BARRETT from December, 1998 E mails to my classmate Peter Nathan now a dean at University of Iowa based on 1980s letters of Sophie to Mount Holyoke College friends: Sophie wrote down a number of experiences of a romantic-or-harassment nature, of which the most serious occurred in the later part of this trip aboard the big Navy transport HENDERSON, where the ship's doctor after they started out from Virginia told my mother "I could never fall in love with you. I only love blonds. My wife and my five children are all blonds." At first he was pleasant company, escorting my mother ashore at Port-au-Prince Haiti - very beautiful harbor by night, and I think they attended church - then several stops in Panama - Colon is on the Atlantic, and Balboa at Pacific end of Canal Zone - she visited some depressing bars which are mentioned in the letter to the Mount Holyoke College history librarian Mrs. Trehub-then Corinto, on Pacific Coast of Nicaragua was pleasant though hot. She had lunch or dinner with the doctors wife and some or most of the five children at San Diego, and at Los Angeles she was "piped" ashore in the admiral's "gig" (small boat). Many of the passengers left at these stops, and the HENDERSON stopped for overhaul at Mare Island on northeast edge of San Francisco Bay north of Berkeley-Oakland. While there a group including the doctor and my mother visited Yosemite Valley, staying at the famous Ahwahnee hotel. My mother purchased a handcolored souvenir photo of Bridal Veil Falls, with a footpath and tree in the foreground - this hung in my West Roxbury room many years until l993 thefts. Yosemite Falls was dry at that date September l930, as often happens - I think it was toward the end of September. My mother ordinarily is a good sailor, but one of the few times in her life she was seasick and threw up in unusually stormy weather just west of San Francisco. After Honolulu the doctor began to get romantic - the further west the ship got the more romantic he became, talking of divorcing his wife and marrying my mother - do you remember the 1940's song "I'd like to get you on a slow boat to China"-? that was the situation.Passengers sat by seniority, and on this part of the cruise my mother sat with relatively high-ranking officers. At Guam she mailed a cheerful postcard to her father David Meranski, who had disapproved of her marriage to a Gentile - said she was throwing away her education and career. By Manila she was hiding in her cabin. The doctor attempted to use X-rays to remove a large mole on Sophie's left wrist, but it was irritated by the treatment, and she subsequently had it removed surgically. She heard he died of tuberculosis in 1939.[John Barrett re-creation of 1980s letters to Ruth Peck Doyle, Clara Michal, Marion Lewis Smart, Becky Smaltz and 1923 classmates ] [ CHECK if remainder is in GREEnWICH VILLAGE chapter] Insert from page 197 probably in chapter two] He told me about the vicissitudes of the service for the wife of a Navy line officer, saying he liked the life at sea, but that frequent separations were hard on many wives and that he had seen the marriages of some very fine Navy line couples on the rocks, principally because the wife had to make so many adjustments.If she had a profession or a job, she couldn't readily follow him from station to station, and if she gave up her job, she had too much leisure. Also if she refused invitations to social events when he was at sea,the Navy wife suffered intolerable loneliness. He warned too that Naval officers pay was very moderate and that his expenses for white uniforms and for blue uniforms were prohibitive.. Even more important than any of these causes was the uncertainty of the line officer's promotion and his ultimate retired pay.But he did say a Navy wife could have a lot of fun and adventure if she had the right attitude and zest for adventure.


 

 

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