Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 


M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D main account p 85-1335

 

Jack hiked over the Nuuanu Pali with Lieutenant Edward Arroyo, a recent Annapolis Naval Academy graduate from Louisiana who was at Pearl Harbor again l941-l942 with his wife Lillian and daughter Mary. He was involved in the intense secret preparations for the Battle of Midway June 4-5, l942. his wife went shopping with Sophie Barrett when very little was available in Honolulu after the Pearl Harbor attack, but Sophie found two rocking chairs suitable for use outdoors and three Phillippine teakwood bookcases the Barretts used for fifty years.The Arroyos left Hawaii in l942, but the Barretts located Eddie Arroyo in l969 and he sent several letters with recollection of MARBLEHEAD days l924-l927 and Hawaii l941-l942.His wife had passed away and his daughter Mary was in religious life in Louisiana.He knew Phil Dahlquist and many of our friends. At this time the Nuuanu Pali was the only short route to Kailua and windward Oahu, as the coastal Prince Kalanianaole Highway and Kalihi tunnel were not developed. Eddie Arroyo wrote " 7608 St. Charles Avenue, Apartment 'E', New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 -23 April 1970, Dear John- Mrs. Arroyo: she passed away years ago in May of 1951. My daughter Mary, 35, is working at a local hospital after doing a strech in the Cenacle order of nuns while my son, Edward B. Arroyo, junior,is in the Jesuit order completing studies for his doctorate at Duke University in North Carolina.I have read your letters with much interest, especially information about your father.Another shipmate of ours on the MARBLEHEAD was Paul Coloney USN retired, who resides in Bradenton, Florida.Should you have a Navy Register of Retired Officers, you may find his address therein.He was a good friend of mine, but I being a poor correspondent,- I've lost track of him. Glad you heard from Admiral Sharp, for whom I had great admiration and respect.You mentioned the CLAXTON in your letter. I served as her engineer 1931-1932 and as her 'Exec'from 1932 to 1934. I recall her being turned over to the British in 1939 [1940? in exchange] for our use of some of the British bases in the Atlantic. I did not know captain Fred Holmes. In your of 29 March you mention Ralph Earle and Dan Candler, both classmates of mine whom I know quite well.Earle is living in Durham, North Carolina, while Candler was residing in Dallas, Texas.Since retiring in 1946 I have been teaching at high school and college level, except for a couple of years I was in engineering work in New Orleans. Last years I was retired for good because of my age - sixty-nine, so I've been living a very easy life, playing golf - bridge occasionally and meeting with friends here in New Orleans.Last summer I made a delightful cruise on a Holland American liner to North Africa, the Mediterranean, and western Europe and incidentally revisited some of the ports the MARBLEHEAD had visited on her shakedown cruise in 1924-1925.I hope you will continue your writing projects, and I should think you could write a very interesting book about your father.My regards to your mother, and should you pass this way, - give me a ring- I would be glad to see you. Sincerely, Edward B. Arroyo --P.S. An interesting note about Captain Coloney. He put the MARBLEHEAD in commission in 1924 and he was her last commanding officer when she was sent to the graveyard after World War II." Front yard 2415 ala Wai Boulevard. Variegated panax hedge visible in background, border of Needles property on east (Diamond Head direction) photo by John Barrett, Jr. Sophie is sitting in a rocking chair purchased very early 1942 before goods from mainland became unavailable.She went shopping with Lillian Arroyo, who left Hawaii mid-1942.Her husband Lt. Commander Edward Arroyo wrote two letters in 1970: " 7608 St. Charles Avenue, Apartment E New Orleans Lousiana 27 July 1970 Dear John Thank you for the pictures, which arrived in the mail today. As I recall, it was taken on Kailua Beach on the north coast of Oahu, the isle on which Honolulu is located. I don't recall your father going to the Charlestown Hospital while we were in Boston,nor do I remember hearing about Samuel Wilder King, Duke Kahanamoku, or Riley Allen.The King family were prominent in Hawaiian history years ago. I recall our doctor on the MARBLEHEAD flying over to visit the Leper colony on Molokai, and possibly your father may have accompanied him.As for Lahaina, it was a large anchorage off the southwest coast of Maui where the fleet anchored frequently after exercises. There wasn't much there at the time [May 1925] except large [sugar] cane fields.I remember Captain J.R. Van Nagel and Captain Fultz slightly.As I may have told you, I left the MARBLEHEAD about June 1926 to go to the Submarine School, New London, Connecticut.In October 1926 having been disqualified physically for Sub duty, I joined the CINCINNATI in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and served on her until June 1929 when I was ordered to the Naval Academy for duty as an Instructor.However, I did see the MARBLEHEAD during 1926-1929 as we operated with her in Hawaiian waters and then to China in the summer of 1927, returning to the States in company with her in July, 1929. I didn't know Miss Ashley mentioned in your last letter.The Litton Industries Destroyer contract is reviving the shipping industry on the Gulf coast.New Orleans has a very good shipbuilding facility -Avondale- which has a large contract for ship construction, both Naval and commercial. I didn't know anybody living in Cuba,but I do recall reading some of Thomason's stories about the services. Re-our visit to the Galapagos Islands we stopped there on our return from the Australian cruise to make a survey of the islands, as the charts available at the time were antiquated and out of date. I don't recall anyone going ashore there. As I recall, we, along with the RICHMOND, remained near the islands about a week taking soundings with our Sonic Depth Finders. The islands are peaks of high mountains, with great depths of water close inshore. Your father must have had a lot of friends according to your letter. I do recall his having a very friendly and interesting manner and he was a good conversationalist. Re: -problems on the MARBLEHEAD when the ship was new there were a few that I recall. I was Torpedo Officer, and our torpedo tubes were in semicircular areas just aft of the ship's beam, fairly close to the water line, so that in heavy weather and when the ship turned sharply- as in maneuvers-Green Sea would wash through the torpedo areas, salting up everything. Shortly thereafter,the tubes were removed from the ship, and the areas closed in.Your father had a difficult duty on the ship, and in my opinion he performed his job in an outstanding manner.I do recall in Papeetee [Tahiti] having had Shore Patrol duty there.It was a difficult assignment as liquor and women were cheap and the men ashore quite disorderly after a long cruise. Thank you again- Eddie Arroyo- In 1941 some Naval officers were disgusted by what seemed inertia and incompetence of the vast Pearl Harbor machinery." excerpts MARBLEHEAD years 1924-7 April 1925 war games Hawaii demonstrating vulnerability of Pearl Harbor to air attack and Oahu to invasion by surprise Barrett Family memoir "Red Headed Stepchild" WAR GAMES HAWAII 1925 #1099 #38MARBLEHEAD Lahaina l925 After Panama & the West Coast, where Jack saw his second cousin Robert Fahrbach & Fahrbach's father Emil Fahrbach,they arrived under radio silence in Hawaii April l5,l925, when the MARBLEHEAD took part in the very important war games in which the attacking "Blue" Forces defeated the defending "Black" Forces & captured the Hawaiian Islands.Admiral MacDonald in collaboration with the Army,had the defense of the Hawaiian Islands.The story is well told in the New York Times article headed "MARBLEHEAD at Hawaii War Maneuvers",Sunday,May l0,l925.Story of the swift triumph of Blue Forces on Hawaiian Defenses forced to anchor because the capital ships could enter Pearl Harbor only with difficulty because of the lack of anchorage space inside.After the War Games many departed with General Hines including Major General Neville, who commanded the Blue Mai??col Forces (some material illegible will be checked against original article when available)the senior Black umpire,a general & Lieutenant Colonel Kruger,who was the chief Army assistant to Admiral Coontz & General Hines.Several thousand persons went to the pier decorating the officers & other passengers with leis.The ship was tied to the pier with paper streamers that cracked when the ship pulled away to the strains of "Aloha Oe" & other Hawaiian tunes.252Major General Lewis,the Hawaiian Department Commander,declined to comment on the statement attributed to Chairman Butler of the House Naval (Appropriations) Committee(Philadelphia Congressman & father of the great Marine general Smedley Butler) to the effect that appropriations would be asked to make Hawaii the strongest military outpost in the world.The General admitted that there are serious deficiencies in the defenses as they exist.General Lewis said,"I am naturally very much interested in any proposal for developing the defenses of Hawaii as they have constituted my most earnest study since my arrival in the Territory.I can assure you that it has been for some time the conservative opinion of our trained officers that these defenses are insufficient even for a reasonable security against unfortunate eventualities.And I concur in that opinion." General Lewis was asked to comment on the prevalent belief that Army garrison here should be from five to ten thousand men stronger than at present,that the air forces should be greatly increased & provided with modern equipment to enable the Army to resist successfully such landing as that simulated in the recent maneuvers- that there should be additional modern eighteen inch guns in the Coast Defenses-that the Construction program has been seriously neglected & that the local naval protection in the form of submarines & mines is seriously deficient. Some officers wanted one hundred thousand men.The General replied that there were serious shortages in all of these respects.The details from the flagship Pennsylvania to the New York Times,April 27,l925:Now that the struggle is ended between the Blues & the Blacks for the control of the Island of Oahu-keystone in the Hawaiian Arch of the American Structure of National Defence,the story of the campaign plan of the pictors & vanquished may be told (Jack Barrett was on the MARBLEHEAD of the victors,the Blue Forces-SMB note)- it is clearly evident 253 it is evident from the progress of this major peacetime conflict that the Naval & Marines forces comprising the Blues would now be camping in Pearl Harbor after having taken the Island by direct assault in today's operation.The mission of the Blues was to recover from the Blacks possession of Honolulu & Pearl Harbor as Naval Operating Bases.That mission was certain of achievement when the umpires called a halt on the contest.The action of the umpires was founded in the conviction that the Blue forces had been able to land & advance on the north shore of Oahu,- a superior military force of Marine Sl...? troops & maneuver them in a position where the Blacks were unable to halt or defeat the advance of the khaki-clad invaders.The defeat of the Blacks does not mean that the Hawaiian Islands are not strongly defended.Both Nature & Washington with liberal hands have contributed toward the defense of the Islands against attack by enemy forces.The mountain ranges along the east & most of the west coast of Oahu are absolutely impossible for armed forces landing along these particular stretches of the shoreland.After a twelve day voyage of 2600 miles from San Francisco to the Hawaiian group, the Blue Fleet arrived off the northern & southwestern coasts of Oahu at midnight of April 26.The armada traveled in special screening formation en route to protect the sixteen vessels of the Fleet train (constructively representing transports) against enemy submarine attack. This formation consisted of a series of concentric circles of warships.The battleships were in the center,with the train of transports.Around the battleships steamed the smart & speeding destroyers.Beyond the -254-steamed the light cruisers (JBB in MARBLEHEAD-SMB note)& beyond that were the submarines-the furthermost outpost of the Fleet formation,which was 42 miles in diameter.Not a mishap ?marred the voyage.All ships that left San Francisco Harbor on April l5 in an aggregation of one hundred twenty-seven of all types of warships arrived at their appointed positions at the Islands of Oahu & Molokai in safety & good condition.The battleship MARYLAND,which left Puget Sound at a later date joined the main body of the battle fleet several hundred miles north of Oahu.Somewhere out in the Pacific the Blue Scouting Fleet headed by the battleship WYOMING was detached from the main formation & sent ahead so as to be able to carry out the operation of establishing an air base on the island of Molokai April 25, two days before the scheduled of Admiral Robinson for the main expedition attack on Oahu.The rest of the fleet continued on a direct route to Kaena Point at the northwestern corner of Oahu,maneuvering from day to day in th execution of Battle Problems. Radio silence was established on the second day out from San Francisco & was not lifted until arrival of the vessels within sight of Diamond Head late this afternoon after the execution of the mission involved in the War Games.At twelve o'clock last night when the bulk of the main battle fleet moved into position off the northern coast of Oahu,mighty searchlights from the interior & along the northern coast flashed seaward.Under cover of darkness the vessels were in position for the attack,six miles out when several minutes after midnight a bombardment of the beach was inaugurated preliminary to the landing 255--#39-#39 MARBLEHEAD P.255 preliminary to the landing of the first wave of Marines at twelve o'clock this morning,exactly twelve hours after the bombardment began. During these twelve hours the main force made the landing on the north coast.Some of the battleships-with destroyers -were detached & sent around to the southwestern coast to carry to carry out a similar landing of Marines- this was only a secondary operation.The attack on the north was the primary one.Meanwhile the Scouting Fleet under the command of Vice ADMIRAL MCKEAN WHICH HAD GONE WITH THE AIRCRAFT carrier LANGLEY to establish a temporary air base at Molokai Island slipped westward to the southern coast of Oahu & endeavored to delude the Blacks into the belief that a landing force was about to be put into east of Diamond Head.It was a successful manoeuvre & in combination with the secondary landing of the Marines on the southwest coast caused the Blacks to think that the main landing was being made on the south coast.In this assumption the blacks made a fatal mistake & were not in a position to meet the shock of the primary landing of the expeditionary force when it was shoved forward on the north coast.Ideal weather conditions favored the Blues when it (the Blue Force) emerged from the long spell of radio silence & lowered the boats in which the Marines were sent through the surf to the beach.While the heavens sparkled with thousands of starts,the region between shore & coast was blanketed with that particular form of tropical semi=mist & near rain which Americans in Hawaii have come to regard as 'liquid sunshine'.It was difficult for the powerful searchlights of the Blacks to distinguish the faint shadows of the hulls (hulks?)in the darkness that enveleoped the arrival of the Fleet.The Fleet had been darkened & traveled with 256 no lights showing above decks long before reaching Oahu.When morning broke magnificiently over the island,the main section of the expeditionary force began landing on the northern & southwestern coasts,& feinting operations were progressing east of Diamond Head.On the north coast especially where no ships had stood the night before,morning disclosed the presence of a strong naval force.The big guns of seven dreadnaughts were trained on the shore.Beyond them were the transports between boats filled with Marines,& destroyers were protecting the formation against submarine attack while seaplanes were being catapulted from the decks of battleships & spinning off into the air for reconnaisance of the enemy positions ashore.The sea was as smooth as glass & the breakers not as heavy as usual over the coral reefs.The first wave of Marines sent ashore were met with heavy machinegun attack & suffered heavy casualties,but the defense cordon of Blacks on the north coast was weak & the second wave were pushed through so far that the succeeding waves had soon charged the beachhead & soon had driven six miles from the beach.The operation was accompanied by a spectacular aircraft operation in which there were thrilling battles between enemy bombing & fighting planes & the fighting planes & scouters of the Fleet.Had not the Blues completely outgunned the Blacks in the north of the principal landing shore,it would have been difficult for the invader to have made such easy headway in pushing their Marines forward in the northern coast.Part of the time the Fleet steamed with darkened lights.& for nearly ten days it steamed the Pacific with all wireless switches pulled so as to ensure complete radio silence.Not a single letter was flashed by radio from any of the ships.The radio silence was a complete success-a real simulation of actual war conditions as near as it could be achieved in time of peace.Should the United States as a nation ever be faced with the problem of defending Oahu in time of war,it would be infinitely better GAP?[257 On ther return trip In the Galapagos Islands they were surprised to see a large number of seals-hundreds of them.A rather cold current runs through them,& it seems strange to see the seals where only tropical animals would be expected.But the seals were there.] p260 MARBLEHEAD itinerary departed Philadelphia l5 September l924 - arr.Sep l6 Newport RI dep.l7 Sept. -arr.l8 Sep.Navy Yard,New York dep.5 November-Arr.. 7 November Bermuda Islands dep Nov 2l arr.23 Nov.Navy yard Norfolk Virginia dep. 28 Nov.-arr.6 December Southampton England dep 12 Dec. -arr. l7 DecMarseilles France dep 24 Dec.-arr.24 Dec Villefranche France dep 25 Dec - arr. 27 Dec. Algiers,Algeria dep.31 Decem-1924-arr. 1 January l925 Gibraltar dep. 5 Jan- arr. 7 Jan. Funchal, Madeira dep.9 January -arr. l7 Jan. Navy Yard Boston dep l0 February -arr. l0 Feb. Boston Light dep.l3 Feb.-arriv l8 Feb. Hampton Roads Virginia dep. l9 Feb.- 23 Feb.arr.Colon,CaNAL ZONE DEP 23 FEB.- arr. 23 Feb Panama Bay dep 25 Feb.arr. 12 March San Diego California dep l6 March arrive l7 March San Pedro Cal.depart 3 April - arr. 5 April San Francisco California dep. 15 April [RADIOSILENCE] -#40 MARBLEHEAD itinerary 25 Apr.l925 arr. Molokai Territoy of Hawaii dep. 25 Apr. -arr .27 Apr.Honolulu dep 30 Apr.-arr. 30 Apr. Pearl Harbor dep l May - arr. 1May Honolulu dep.7 May - arr.9 May Lahaina,Maui dep.28 May-arr. 29 May Hilo,island of Hawaii dep.29 May - arr. 1 June Honolulu dep. lJun-arr. 1 June Pearl Harbor dep 2 Jun -arr. 2 Jun Lahaina dep 6 June-arr. 6 June Honolulyu dep.l5 June -& l July - crossed equator 6 July l925 - arr.l0 July Pago Pago Samoa dep.11 Jul -arr. 23 Jul Melbourne,Victoria, Australiadep 4 August - arr. 5 August Hobart Tasmania dep 7Augu -arr. 11 Aug Wellington New Zealand dep.24 Aug- arr 30Aug..Pago Pago Samoa dep 3 September -arr. 8 September Papeetee Tahiti dep.ll Sep -arr. 22 Sep Galapagos Islands, Ecuador dep 24 Sep-arr.25 Sep Balboa Canal Zone dep 2 October -arr. October 4 Guantanamo Bay, Cuba dep -dep 12 Oct-arr. 12 Oct Gonaives Gulf Haiti dep. l6 Oct.-arr.l6 Oct. Guantanamo Bay Cuba dep.26 Oct.- arr.26 Oct. Gonaives Haiti dep.30 Oct. -arr.30 Oct. Gonaives Gulf Haitidep 2 Nov- arr. 2 Nov Guantanamo Bay Cuba dep.20 November arr. 23 Nov Hampton Roads Virginia dep ? - arr30 Nov.North river New York dep30 Nov.- arr. 1 December Navy Yard Boston dep 8 January l926-arr. 9 Jan Hampton Roads Virginia dep. 10 Ja. page 262- ... arrived Bluefields Nicaragua ll January l927- Puerto Caebas on l3 January. Jack Barrett received ribbons in l927 for being in combat areas in Nicaragua in January & Shanghai China April-June during the civil war there. He was scheduled to lead a landing force at Bluefields, but the MARBLEHEAD was shifted to the Pacific. He encountered marine writer John Thomason this time in Nicaragua & later l943 arranged his transportation to the mainland.In February in Honolulu he receieved a letter from "Chesty" Puller - who later commanded Maines in the Inchon Korea landing September, l950 -the letter stolen l993 concerned an informal evening party.-continuing chronology: M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D arrived Puerto Cabezas Jan. l3, l927 left Nicaragua29 January = spent some tiome in honolullu February-March departed 24March to make record eight & a half day cruise to Shanghai with hundreds of Marines, who came under command of Gen. Smedley Butler,survivor of the Boxer rebellion in Peking l900. Jack admired Butler,who was very sucessful in China l927-9 & was slated to become Marinecommandant but for the personal animosity of Herbert Hoover, who had worked in the Kailin mining operaztions inNorth China & objected to remarks Butler had made condemning thedictatorial actions of Benito Mussolini.Butler in l930's retirement condemned over-use of Marines to serve commercial interests in foreigncountries where national security was not threatened. Chaing-kai shektook the offensive against the communists at Shanghai speing l927, &both sides were strongly anti=foreigner & business interested werethreated. Jack had a number of friends from l927 at Standard Oil co.Shanghai.He was detached June 4 at Shanghia & traveled Tokyo toSeattle onthe same ship as General Leonard Wood, retired l920's USgovernor of the Philippines.Jack traveled by rail from Seattle to his home in Boston & next duty in New York June l927-l929. -#56-# 56 Fradd letter Marblehead l927 Shanghai page M 259 responded magnificently to our letters of inquiry: John F.Fradd wrote from Florida: Your two very nice letters awakened nostalgic memories of the first cruise I ever had in my thirty-five years in the Navy.Whenever MARBLEHEAD sailors get together,all we talk about is our cruise to China & back,which covered nineteen months.The MARBLEHEAD was my first ship.I joined her in June of l926 & served four years in her.I can't vouch for the correctness of dates,& l927 was a long time ago. You mentioned that Jack Barrett was mess treasurer, & so was I shortly afterward.I had the job for about three months during our cruise up the Yangtze River & after. I recall the mess bill at that time was thirty dollars a month. It was near Christmas time in l926 when we returned to Boston, her home port, from Guantanamo,Cuba.In January l927 we were ordered to proceed to Norfolk,& load our torpedoes & two scout planes & continue on to Nicaragua,where trouble was brewing.We put a company of our landing force ashore to join our Marines, who were protecting the holdings of United Fruit company from some bandit who was trying to start an uprising. The name of the place was Puerto Cabezas on the east coast.Our flagship was the USS RICHMOND, another six inch gun cruiser. We were ordered to Pearl Harbor.At the time very few of us knew about what was going on in China.We spent a month or so in the Hawaii area practicing gunnery, torpedoes,& operations,-when suddenly we were ordered to Shanghai,China.I can recall returning from liberty with Lieutenant Close to find the navigator & chief engineer figuring out how fast we could make the trip without running out of fuel. M260. We got under way in the morning & completed the (Shanghai) run in the shortest time ever up to that time (eight & a half days).Our sister ship the CINCINNATI had some propellor trouble & arrived twenty-four hours later.At this point we were getting reports of civil war in China, & the names of Chiang kai-shek & Chaing Tso-lin & (Michael) Borodin were in the news.We also received a report of the Communist attack on the "foreign" embassies in Nanking,in which the USS NOAH was involved.When we arrived at Shanghai,the Whangpoa river near town was loaded with ships, so we went downstream to the juncture of the Whangpoa & Yangtze & anchored for a week or so.While there we witnessed the first naval battle many of us had ever seen. The Wonson fort at the juncture of the two rivers was held by South Chinese forces & was to be attacked by the North Chinese fleet.The commander of the fort came aboard to ask if we would move off to an anchorage to the west,as he was expecting an attack by the northern forces & did not want us in the way. So we moved.Sure enough,at 11:30 Saturday morning four gunboats appeared,standing upriver right after our Saturday inspection.They opened fire on the fort,which returned the fire.The accuracy of both left much to be desired,but we had to admire the tactics of the commander of the ships afloat.It happened an English warship was anchored in the stream-& the Northern commander took full advantage of this fact.His ship would steam within range of the fort,fire & then swing around in columns behind the English warship while they reloaded their guns. this continued for a hour, until a burst from the fort M 261 appeared to hit the bridge of the leading gunboat.This signalled the end of the battle.Shortly after this we steamed up river to just south of Shanghai & moved to the Standard Oil docks.In the city the Southern forces had taken Shanghai & moved north,although barbed wire entanglements & bunkers were still in place on the streets.The city quickly returned to normal,but brigands were active. While on liberty,most of our officers were robbed at one time or another.I relieved "Shorty" Milner as head of the baseball team,& MARBLEHEAD not only won the Shanghai league championship but had the opportunity of playing with five other teams including the Japanese. One of these was the team representing Japan in the eastern Olympics.We also played later for the championship of the Phillippines.The next episode concerned our trip up the Yangtze River to Nanking. The CINCINNATI went up first for a stay of a month,& we followed later.She was fired on by small arms from the banks & an officer was wounded,so we placed boiler plate around the bridge & other exposed positions for protection- nobody fired at us, but all guns were at the ready.The navigator measured the fall of the river every morning so we would know when we had to return down river in order to cross over some sand bars safely.Otherwise we would have had to remain upstream for months before the river rose again.The ship visited Tsingtao & Chingwantao later. In July a number of us took a trip to Peking.We got there aboard a Chinese troop train.Upon arrival we saw an armored train furnished by the Japanese & tried to take snapshots of it,-but guards with fixed bayonets prevented that. I did ask one of the M262 guards if I could take his picture-& he was quite pleased- we got good pictures of him -& the train! (notes on photos).- John E Fradd, Rear Admiral USN Retired."-#58 -#58 Dahlquist MARBLEHEAD l927 Commander Phil Dahlquist in commentary on Admiral Fradd's letter wrote from Eugene Oregon: "The MARBLEHEAD did not stop at Nanking, as he intimated but went on up the Yangtze River for another couple of hundred miles to Hankow.I'm sure he would recall this if he remembered all the golf he played on the course there,which was surrounded by a ten foot high (or higher) stone wall. It wasn't unusual to hear shots on the other side of the wall as we played.I think one of the sad days of that era was when "Eva" Brant was lost overboard.He was an excellent young oficer & probably one of the most popular on board.Brant went back to the after part of the ship-which was very low.The seas were coming up from astern & breaking over the deck very heavily.Brant went out to help an enlisted man & held the man with a scissors hold in his legs until others could pull him back-but a following sea washed Brant overboard.It was a very heroic act on Brant's part & typical of what one would have expected of such a man.On our trip to Australia we stopped off at Samoa going & coming.I was swimming in at the dock & missed the last boat back to the MARBLEHEAD.I waited,& the Captain's gig came in fromthe MARBLEHEAD to pick up a guest for dinner with the Captain.He was a Samoan gentleman of about fifty years.He seemed very dignified & wore a black dinner jacket,black tie, & studs in his shirt. Instead of trousers he wore a sort of wrap-around garment of excellent quality material-very neatly pressed.coming down to his kneecaps.Riding out to the ship I said I had been at a nautical school at Norfolk about three years before, & we had a Samoan classmate who acquitted himself very well- he had graduated well up in his class & had been well thought of.The man was Chief of Police in American Samoa, & we was very pleased by my story,as the boy was his son.It was the l927 Nanking incident that took the MARBLEHEAD to China in the first place.Trouble had been anticipated apparently-& we were already out as far as Honolulu on a standby basis.Then the Nanking thing happened,& we went out the rest of the way.I think the NOAH was in on it. The american destroyer NOAH had been sent up to Nanking on a plea from some missionares who were in danger from bandits overrunning the area.The American destroyer skipper went over to call on his counterpart on an English destroyer -they agreed & laid down a barrage above the mission-then the missionaries could come out & down to the dock under cover of the barrage.This was successful,& the destroyer took them to safety.In April l97l Rear Admiral James McNally wrote,"I cannot add too much to your wonderful job of research work.Jack loved papers & kept all kinds of papers & notes.That in fact is one of the strongest memories I have of him.I remember sitting in his stateroom & he pouring through a wicker hamper full of notes to locate a paper that would settle a wardroom argument. Jack was very thoughtful & kind to us junior officers.Phillips,Brant,Van Nagell,Florence, & McNally all reported to the MARBLEHEAD at Pearl Harbor after Naval Academy graduation l925. I notice you have not mentioned John E.Florence.He lives in Charleston,South Carolina. You will have to excuse this new automatic typewriter.It writes faster than I can think, & it cannot spell.We all made the Australian cruise together.Then after leave & recreation in New York after we got back we went to the West Indies- Guantanamo & Haiti. I served on the MARBLEHEAD 23 June l925 to 25 June l926. I was first division junior officer. In that job I had lots of contact with John(Jack).John read a lot & had a good grasp of what was going on in the world.Some of his statements were prophetic.(Executive officer)Commander Alex Sharp would ask,"What has the saber-rattler to say today?" The next contact I had with John was at Pearl.Marjorie & I called on you- young John was only a baby.I was stationed at the Navy Yard & was machinery-electrical planning officer.After the attack I became the Salvage Planning officer & was in charge of preparing the plans for raising & repairing the sunken ships.John helped me get the family off to Long Beach,California.Later he assigned me transportation so I could go to Newport News Virginia to fit out & be chief engineer of --p.266M-- YORKTOWN. The "Fighting Lady" was another wonderful ship just like the MARBLEHEAD.I feel that I had a lot to do with it as I wrote the organization as Outfitting Officer and put a lot of MARBLEHEAD ideas into the ship.After the raid on Marcus and Wake [Islands] I was transferred to the MASSACHUSETTS. I was on her for twenty-three months. I ended up with eleven stars on my South Pacific ribbon. It was John again [at Pearl Harbor Overseas Transportation Office] who wrote my orders for transportation on a destroyer to Efate to join the MASSACHUSETTS. Even John did not know where the MASSACHUSETTS was and could only write me as far as Espiritu Santo..I actually had to locate the MASSACHUSETTS by 'grape vine telegraph'. I had heard the MASSACHUSETTS was at Efate, and to join her a made a war patrol on a PBY going there after its patrol.That was the last time I saw John. I have always felts my life was richer for having known him", [end Amd. McNally-Adm Evenson follows].#57-#57 Phillips letter MARBLEHEAD l925Lactoris #57 Rear Admiral George L.Phillips of Maine wrote: Dear Mrs. Barrett,I well remember your husband Jack (sometimes known as "Red") from the MARBLEHEAD,which I joined in June,l925 & served in until July l926. I used to stand watches with him in station for several months until I qualified as a top watch stander.I remember the trip he arranged with a New Zealand friend of his (Haskell Anderson of Wellington & Napier) for a party (of which I was one) to spend a few days in Napier.NZ.I believe that Jack & the New Zealander had met in Newport News Virginia at the end of World War I when the latter was on his way home was on his way home from service in Europe(wounded at Gallipoli).We had a splendid cruise to Australia & New Zealand & a wonderful voyage through the south Pacific islands.I remember seeing Jack at Pearl Harbor in late l944 when I was on my way out to Ulithi for the attack on Iwo Jima & Okinawa.I called on him at his office & well remember being at your house for dinner some time in November or December,l944. I brought out a jug of maple syrup to give you.My wife came from Australia where I met her on the cruise in l925.We were married in Montreal,Canada in l928, & Jack was one of two sponsors for her entry permit into the United States.The other was Frank Maeihle (spell?) who was also on the MARBLEHEAD with Jack.I was in occasional touch with Captain Shackford before his death in Jamestown a few years ago." M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D from R2 and Arroyo letters from B4


 


M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D opening, fultz,close

 

M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D from Lactoris aug 31 ..NZ M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D 114-108-111 -272- July 3, l924 JBB reported to Naval Inspector of Machinery,William Cramp and Sons Co Philadelphia in connection with fitting out MARBLEHEAD Arrived Navy Yard 8 AM July 16 few days - return to Cramp.Later short run down Delaware (River) First week in August go to Rockland for full trials for ten days.Returned to Cramp yard to 30 August. 5 Sept at Navy Yard Philadelphia. Also 11 September. September letter C.C Plummer (ex Hydrographic Office, friend of Gershom Bradford) Sept 8 . To visit Newport Rhode Island about 16 September.Then about one month New York. Ready about 29 Sep at Navy Yard New York. MARBLEHEAD Commissioned October 10. Nov 5 leave New York. Nov 20 shore patrol Murray Bay Bermuda heading toward Newport News Va Nov 21.- Dec.2 galley hot - 6 Dec. Southampton England Leave request 8 Dec. to noon Dec 9 JBB address c/o Archer 35 Vartrey Road, Stamford Hill,London. To sea Dec 12 - Marseilles dec 24 -Villefranche Dec. 25- Algiers Dec. 31 - Jan 6 l925 JBB writes report on shakedown cruise -Jan 7 Funchal Madeira - Boston - Board of Inspection and survey at Final trials in February and necessity for completion of annual inventory of Construction and Repair equipage by 31 March. - March 23,l925 San Diego - m- Feb. 18 - had already left Boston - April 6-l0 San Francisco leave plus weekend April 11 and 12 Reported back to ship 0035 MONDAY APRIL 13. April 24 Landing force exercise Molokai 27 April shore patrol Merchant and Bethel Streets Honolulu for duration of stay of fleet Reported 10 M April 28 Latter part of May JBB got ships service funds. MARBLEHEAD to fire ShortRange Director Practice off Lahaina (Maui) during week commencing 15 June until Thur 18 June. 1 July depart Honolulu. 6 July cross equator 165 degrees 40 minutes west.- July 25 Melbourne - July 31 Tasmania -,Hobart-Launceston-August 5 and 6 New Zealand through Monday August 17th.August 30mShore patrol TAHITI - Galapagos - Panama =- Guantanamo 8 to 10 Nov - Dec. l925 Boston - 11 Feb. l926 Balboa Schedule of provision issues at Balboa CZ MARB 18 f Refrigerated supplies 0600, fresh vegetables are dry stores. 1300 from store ship "BRIDGE" Vessels of light cruiser division two will use all motor launches for transporting provisions.These boats will be be posted as required. JBB officer in charge of the boats. 0545. June 20, MARblehead (town)Masachusetts Hotel Rock-Mere one night Six dollars . See Boston Post story on naming dedication of ship. - 8 June NY Boston JBB requested duty on European station for balance of present seacruise. If not granted,continue present assignment. - 6 & 14 Jul M at Boston - 30 S Aid to Executive Officer Alex Sharp Construction and repair, ships service. - Oc 19 Gonaives Bay Haiti O 25 Guantanamo Bay N 6 to 16 Guan Nov 25 to 29 leave Dec.Boston New York weekend D 4-5, 11-12 - Phila D 27 JAN 6, 1927 SAILING FOR NICARAGUA - FEBV 27 HAW TILL MARCH 18-MAR 8 LAHAINA -[JACK]Sailed frt Pearl h 24 Marc 4 PM to Shanghai April 2 - at Shanghai 21 April. June 4 Sh detached June 6 PRESIDENT. Madison Kobe (acqu. Harams.June 20, Seattle June 27, New York.S-4 23l feet (21'10 l/4") 13 feet one inch draft 876 tons surface,1092 submerged max fuel oil supply 36,950 gallons normal l9,271 gal four inch 50 caliber guns. Four torpedo tubes, 12 tor 4 officers 4 petty o 30 others Nelseco Co, NY NY Westinghouse motors contractor- US Government bureaun of Design Commissioned Nov. l9, l9l9 114' New Zealand l925 Rainey.He took me to the Wellesley Club afterwards remained there to nearly seven when the Marine Superintendant for Commonwealth and Dominion Captain West invited Captain Rainey and me to go out home to dinner with him and take pot luck. Did so. General Beers drove us out.Captain West showed us medals he got for saving lives in North Atlantic winter gales while in the WhiteStar line.Also a pice of China salvaged from wreck old oild USS TRENTON wrecked at Apia Samoa l888? Then went to BarclaySmith's and played roulette till one AM. Returned to ship in TRENTON boat.Captain Rainey and I were partners in the roulette, so I didn"t have much to bother about. Next evening I had dinner with folks I had met at the Rotary Club reception Monday Mr. and Mrs. Launcelot Moore and Miss Leslie Taverner. Had a very pleasant quiet evening. Next day I went ashore early, went to races at Trentham,saw many people that I knew. Captain West,Captain Rainey had a very interesting day picked three or four winners actually netted a slight loss finally and returned to Wellington about five pm went out to ship slipped into uniform evening dress and went to Navy League Ball. Fared poorly on program as boat was late leaving ship,as dinner for guests dragged slowly. The next day while going ashore in ten am boat it backfired and took fire - serious.Assistance came from ship's boats,nearby ships, and harbor tow boat. I shifted to another boat and had lunch with the Raineys - young Rainey and his fiancee Miss Flux, Mr. and 249 Mrs. Ritchie At 3:30 we went out to the ship.AAt 4:30 we went ashore again to the CLUB then back to the ship. Instead of taking the duty I was ordered to join Commander and party to represent the wardroom at a dinner at the Wellesley Club that was being given by Mr. Martin Leicky,Mr. Fowler, Mr. Ardlow, and some others.There were six of us.Elaborate dinner, wines, good luck Tiki for each of us then adjourned for services stories to upstairs compartment to about ten PM Refought Jutland, talked politics -Then we separated, drove to dock missed Commander so returned to Club to look for him s when young McNally came into club looking for Naval personnel for a dance at Mr. and Mrs. Tansley's we went&danced. missed the auto going to dock,got into car with local crowd,so missed one am boat and slept on the SEATTLE till 7 am then out to the ship on MEMPHIS boat. Busy till 2:30 then ashore to pay bills for ship's activities- laundry etc- had Mr.and Mrs. Launcelot Moore and Miss Taverner off to ship for dinner there by boat with John Higgins to farewell ball on PENNSYLVANIA. This was a very well managed affair enormous expanse of deck was used with three and sometimes four orchestras in use in different parts of the ship.Supper below decks in cabin and wardroom.Tremendous crowd but by reason of large deck space everybody had room enough although I believe there were at least three thousand people present. Next day Sunday I expected Captain Rainey, West DeGrunchy,and wives out to lunch on ship, but windy weather set in, OMAHA dragged anchor, and fouled our bow about 1000 AM, damaged stern and adjacent plating somewhat, and when I finally succeeded in getting a boat ashore, I was late, and because of the heavy wind and rainstorm the party was "off." Had lunch at Midland- another Naval officer and a man from Dunedin at my table. The latter ordered Burgundy Sparkling and insisted on my having some of it with him instead of the stout. I had previously called Captain Rainey,and he and his son took me out to their home, Bloomfield Terrace, Lower Hutt,for the afternoon and evening tea. Ended by winning fifteen shillings at card game I do not even know the name of. John Rainey and (his fiancee) Miss. Flux drove me in to the dock. I caught the midnight boat back to the ship.Another boat hit us on way out and dented side about twelve inches abaft where I was sitting on port side. Then after trying to find boat that hit us, I went aboard and slept. Next day Monday we were under way at 9:30 AM for Samoa. On the 28 of N l924 the M left Norfolk v for her European shakedown cruise.On the 6th of December th we were in Southhampton Eng. The young pay clerk Philip Dahlquist took a boat to take a walk on shore but the fog came up after the boat left the ship and was so thick that they got lost and landed some distance from Southampton. They had to remain there for two days before they could find their way back to the ship. Jack was taken for an Englishman at his hotel on Leave in London and when he bought a suit, the clerk offered to "sent it around to your rooms."Even in the subway he was asked directions. Christmas even they were in Marseilles and Christmas Day in Villefranche, France. They spend four days at Algiers and four days (bottom M 250)In quite a number of different ships p 271 Jack had responsibility for supervising the mess and kitchen either as commanding officer,executive officer or mess treasurer. Before accepting the mess treasurer's job on the MARBLEHEAD elected periodically he insisted the members agree to allow him to serve two fresh vegetables in addition to potato for dinner every evening. When the mess members objected that the extra vegetable would cost more and raise the mess bill, Jack proved that the extra vegetable actually reduced the mess bill by reducing meat consumption. On the HANNIBAL he bought a hand operated coffee grinder to ensure fresh coffee. On another ship he told the mess steward to put away the frying pans and use them only for breakfast.He also insisted that sixty per cent of meat purchases be beef. Jack claimed that the excellent food was one of the advantages of enlisting in the Navy.Another matter that Jack considered of great importance for morale was prompt promotion of deserving subordinates and to see that they received the benefit of all available educational and training programs. As communications officer on the WYOMING he had the responsibility of picking personnel from time to time to attend radio school. He later took particular pleasure in recommending Miles Edward Saunders of the Branch Hydrographic Office New York for a Naval Reserve commission and likewise Philip Dolan of the Overseas Transportation Office at Pearl Harbor for a reserve Commission in l945. 129 MARBLEHEAD M'260 In July 1924 after completing the Junior Course at the Naval War College in Newport Rhode Island, Jack reported for duty in Philadelphia putting in commission the new .light cruiser MARBLEHEAD at the William Cramp Company and the Naval Shipyard.Chauncy Shackford was Captain of the ship and Alex Sharp the Executive Officer, while Jack was the Construction and Repair Officer with additional shore patrol duties,ship's service and later mess treasurer in addition to watch, patrol,and court and hull board duties.The MARBLEHEAD was commissioned on 8 September l924, and Jack remained on board until June l927, when he was detached and left her in Shanghai, China. The ship had covered in excess of eighty thousand miles. I am giving here the entire Itinerary of the MARBLEHEAD to clarify just where Jack was on specific dates:After detachment June l927 he traveled to his next assignment in New York via Tokyo and Seattle. Former Philippines Governor General Leonard Wood was aboard the same ship with Jack, as was Mrs. Weesner, who corresponded with the Barrett family up until the l950's.She invited the Barrett to attend her daughter Brenda Haram's graduation Baccalaureate from Radcliffe in Cambridge June l955.=p299= Captain Shackford usually ordered his cabin or the gangway painted when he knew his wife was coming aboard. One day only two hours before noon he told Jack, the Construction and Repair officer to have the railing and gangway painted before his wife came aboard for lunch.Jack tried to dissuade him,as it was a wet day, and the paint could not possibly be dry by 12:30 noon. But Shackford was adamant, and the gangway and railing were painted.Mrs. Shackford came to the ship in white shoes and a flowing summer dress. She was distressed when paint got on her dress, gloves, and shoes.-247= of Napier. This leading car was an old Hudson touring car, the driver of which claimed he had driven it more than three hundred thousand miles.Snapped a few pictures of it later at Palmerston north.Had a very interesting trip- fortunately the Manawatu Gorge was open till five pm so we got through it, saving time by avoiding detour and also giving view of gorge.Second car only went as far as Danvenirk? where some of the passengers left us.Driving through the gorge was very nasty in some places, but we had no mishaps.We arrived at North Palmerston at 12:45, had lunch there - some changes of passengers were made.We changed cars for Wellington.My companion in the front seat for this stage of the trip was Captain John.B. Rainey,General Manager of Cunard Shipping Lines in Wellington, New Zealand.He had spent some time in the United States when a young man and had served in the Texas Rangers,the expert riding and shooting Texas group that enforced law and order in early days. We talked and were fairly well acquiainted by the time we reached Wellington.I went to the Midland Hotel and had dinner - happened to be seated at table with a Captain Lochner, Thirty-First Lancers Retired, now in business in Auckland, and we spent an interesting evening till 10:30 discussing strategy, economics and our past experiences straight from the shoulder like old friends.Then parted- I returned to ship and at last got a real night's sleep.Routine work next day.I was detached to Rotary reception in Kirkaldie at 8:00 pm Monday.Met some people that had been in Nice last Christmas (l924) WHEN TH4E SHIP WAS AT VILLEFRANCHE a nearby port, and after a pleasant evening was invited to dinner with them for Wednesday.The next afternoon Tuesday I drove about town considerably to arrange =268- from Dahlquist log-Executive Officer Commander Alexander Sharp, Gunnery Officer Lieutenant Commander George Hull, Engineer Officer Harry Badt (remained Jack's good friend for many years)Supply Officer Walter A. Beu?le? Pay clerk Philip C.Dahlquist. Nov 7, l924 arrived Bermuda from New York Navy Yard Anchored in Gra?issey Bay and almost got caught in there by a hurricane. Managed to get out, and the Captain wanted to see what his ship could do in rough weather.So we rolled as much as fifty-five degrees at times. Most unconfortable.Nov 23 Arrived Norfolk Navy Yard for repaires to storm damage. It was mostly broken insulators in the rigging of the masts. (John Barrett note: Jack Barrett used to quote an old saying about hurricanes "June too soon - July Stand by -August Look out you must - September Remember - October, All OVER-" but contrary to the verse he also recollected this November l924 hurricane mentioned by Phil Dahlquist.)..6 Dec. l924 Very heavy fog when they landed in Southampton, England. ..16 April l925 En route to Hawaiian Islands MARBLEHEAD in Scouting Fleet in advance of Battle Fleet. -24 April Scouting Fleet assembled for attack. 25 April Sent landing force from Scouting Fleet- MARBLEHEAD to island of Molokai- Captured airplane landing field and radio station-Established base for air force.Left to join attack on Oahu. Apr 26, l925 Attacked and broke up railroad communications in three different places. Proceeded to attack Honolulu at night. First attack unsuccessful. Second attack proved very disastrous for enemy. Earlier in the day enemy bombing planes were destroyed by sixty of our planes operating from Molokai.Apr. 27, l925 At daylight attacked beach to cover landing of our forces. Attack successful and went on in to Honolulu. Anchored in the afternoon. & May l923 Underway this morning. Maneuvers. Whole fleet is out. 9 may arrived Lahaina, Maui. - 17 May Played baseball Lost 13 to 10. - 18 May At Sea for tactical exercises.=2 June at Honolulu.Ball game. Scouting Fleet 10, Battle Fleet 7. - 4 June very nice dance at Alexander Hotel Roof, Honolulu. 6 June MARBLEHEAD took Admiral Koontz, Senator Hale,and Governor of Hawaii Farrington to -269-Lahaina. Back again to Honolulu. Speed 32 knots. June 12 To sea for SRDP rehearsals. Back again.June 18 Went to Pearl Harbor for drydocking.June l9 Dinner party on board MARBLEHEAD. June 23 Left dry dock. July 5 En route to Pago Pago (Samoa). July 6 Held Neptune party. big time. July 10 arrived Pago Paho Samoa. Fueled from SAPELO. -July 28 Star Spangled Ball at Maison Deluxe in St.Kilda, Melbourne.August 4, l925 Underway for Hobart, Tasmania Speed 25 knots. Quite rough. Aug 5, l925 Arrived Hobart Tasmania. The ship at dock. Went to Launceston twenty officefs and one hundred enlisted men made trip in private train (Jack Barrett was one of the officers, and Walter Buck and enlisted Phil Dahlquist of the MARBLEHEAD) Big official dinner given officers that evening.- 6Aug l925 Returned from Launceston. 7 August Left Hobart Tasmania for Wellington New Zealand.Received kangaroo mascots. As the flagship Richmond was pulling away from the dock, there was a huge crowd to watch the departure of the ships.The crowd made a passageway for an officer in his frock coat uniform. He caught hold of the lower boom and pulled himself aboard.The crowd cheered, and a junior officer told him not to report to the Captain until he was sent for.He got ten days in his room. (The uniform was the one specified for the party the night before in Hobart.) - 8 August En route to Wellington. Full power run for twelve hours. - 13 August dance at Evans Bay Yacht Club Wellington -15 August Dinner party on board. 18 August another dance at Evans Bay Yacht Club. Lots of balloons and a nice time - bottom 269- -from notebook 6 -l35 copy from lost notebook - Mar 24, l971 Dahlquist- Galapagos- not sure about this however. Other than this we saw no people at all. I believe a few went ashore and chased lizards for a while.We saw a great number of seals on the rocks.It seems that there is a cold current that hits these islands, and the seals apparently follow this current at certain times of the year and with all the fish I imagine they live pretty high. We anchored in several places while there and I recall the navigator saying that the main purpose of our visit to the Galapagos Islands was to look for suitable anchorages.Let me correct an assumption on your part where you wondered how we could hoist on board a whaleboat with such a heavy load of fish. I thought I said that we went out in a motor launch. Anyway, that is what it was- a forty foot motor launch-and we unloaded the personnel in the gangway before we hoisted the boat on board, and I recall that the Chief Boatswain wrung his hands and moaned and groaned about us breaking his boat. it did bend in the middle all right, but it held together, and no great harm done. I remember quite well the winter in Boston. We lived at 52 Fosket Street, West Somerville, during the latter part of my time in the MARBLEHEAD (about l928).There was one more officer whom you may remember.He was Lieutenant W. M. Thompson, the assistant engineer. I don't think he was on the ship at the time of commissioning but came later.I saw a lot of him afterwards. He was a Captain and industrial manager at the Norfolk Navy Yard during the first part of World War II and later went to Bremerton navy Yard, where he was a Commodore.He died perhaps seven or eight years ago. It was probably in August l942 at a littlke party at the Norfolk Navy Yard that I met Captain and Mrs. Thompson. Then he left her with me while he went off on some table hopping mission, and we talked (Mrs.Thompson and I) about her two boys who were../. -( foregoing fills in several gaps in previously typed l924-l927 MARBLEHEAD narrative). Harold Fultz letter from pages 508-510 Sophie memoir #12 Commander Harold Fultz, who was Jack's friend on the cruiser MARBLEHEAD in l926-l927 and also saw Jack frequently at PEARL HARBOR and in Waikiki during World War II wrote from Glen Ridge New Jersey where he lives in retirement at age eighty-one: On April l7, l970 he wrote, "Dear Sophie, Your letter has come. I got out my scrap book, and there was the picture of Jack and me bedecked in leis. Taken 3 pm 25 March l927 as we sailed out of Honolulu for China. I shed a tear or two.Jack was a good officer and a loyal and esteemed friend. How well I remember your hospitality to me (Waikiki. You had a good home that Jack looked forward to returning to. And John what an appealing fine boy he was. He must be a real asset to you now.On the MARBLEHEAD I was assistant engineer and for a time communications officer. The run to China was a record, because of the anti-foreign trouble there.- eight and a half days, I believe - still stands We burned 450,000 gallons fuel oil, and our turbines revolved l9,584,000 times. - Six hundred miles per day - four thousand five hundred miles.The MARBLEHEAD had a superb engineering plant. Assuming you want details- One officer in the Engineering department decided he didn't want to go way off to China- so he resigned. After the ship sailed, he tried to withdraw his resignation and got turned down cold.We all chuckled and decided he got just what he deserved when he turned chicken at a time of international crisis.On 3 April l927 we steamed into the Whangpoo and moored along the Standard Oil Company at Shanghai.You would go ashore until ten PM in civilian clothes but steer clear of the native city.The people were excitable - easily influenced and there had just been a strike in the mill - in the melee a Chinese had been shot by the police, - and the hue and cry went out that foreigners were mowing everyone down.Miss Madge Ashley, Secretary to the Standard Oil boss, entertained us in her home.Born in China and having always lived there, she was well informed.She now lives nearby here in Ridgewood, New Jersey and lectures on China (Mickey Ashley and her sister Maimie were Jack's good friends in l927, and I met them later in l93l in Shanghai, with a resulting good friendship.Sophie Barrett note). I recall doing the following, and it must have been in the MARBLEHEAD (Jack left June 4, l927 to New York duty via Japan and Seattle). We went six hundred miles up the Yangtze to Hankow - the extreme limit for a ship- and sailed out of there in emergency in the night because the river was near low stage, which might have trapped us half way down. The populace were not frightened by our armament.They said our guns were of course wood, or we would sink.I recall going up the coast to Tientsin and entraining for Peking.October l9 we crossed to Nagasaki, Japan, and in the Inland Sea conducted our annual full power test, to the dismay of small craft. On November 2 we went to Manila. On May 26, l928 we anchored in Heavenly Honolulu (no longer that way). On 23 June we took fuel at San Pedro - left 6 July for Boston where we arrived 26 July and cut up our "Homeward Bound" Pennant (chiffon silk $250) It did me good to think about you all again. If we journey to Boston, we'll man the 'phone. Sincerely yours, -Harold Fultz. P.S. don't recall the White Russian friends or Ah Sing or Cockeye the Tailor." p. 520 On July 29, l970 Commander Harold Fultz wrote again from Glen Ridge New Jersey: "I was Executive Officer of the REPUBLIC at the beginning of the war- the big transport.We evacuated civilians from Honolulu. Had to give many of them a drink to get them aboard. No sane soul would leave Honolulu for the USA. Some of the kids we evacuated had never worn shoes. Oner of my jobs was to play the piano in the large theatre space to quiet passenger nerves. Our warning to mothers that in event any child got overboard we would not stop was not exactly a happy prospect.And I was skipper of the hospital ship COMFORT for ten months. She was bombed when I was skipper but not hit.The navigational problems of a hospital ship in wartime were amazing.Except in rare places all navigational coastal lights were extinguished, and we had to "grasp at a straw" to get around,because we were on the move day and night.Without forest fires and moonlight and lightning we would often have been in difficulty And in the October 20 typhoon the COMFORT came through by the grace of God. Forty nurses that night were scared to death, but not one even let their helpless patients know it. Seventy craft were lost that night." A lost letter of Harold Fultz recounts in his early years, when he was navigating on the east coast of Ireland, he was confident he knew the exact location of all the Lighthouses, but his skipper called his attention to regulations that required him to consult the books each time for latitude and longitude as a safety procedure and not rely on his memory.It was a lesson he never forgot.He often came to 2415 Ala Wai for swim and supper. Forrest Close#71- #7l MARBLEHEAD with Forrest Close letter--B8-25 Forrest Close Hotel Castellana Spain 4 Feberuary 1972 Dear Mrs. Barrett,I reported to the MARBLEHEAD in Boston in June 1926 and was detached in June 1930, having spent the full four years on that very good cruiser with many delightful shipmates and pleasant memories.Jack Barrett, then a Lieutenant, was on board when I reported, and I believe he was detached before our return from the Asiatic Station in 1927.Jack was always a very good friend of mine.I believe that he waw Senior Watch Officer when I came aboard.I was a stranger to New England, and Jack, being a native of those parts, took me on various pleasant excursions to Marblehead [town], Swampscott, and the various environs of Boston. At one time Jack and I had a visionary prospect of joining an expedition to the South Pole.He had picked out a job for himself in the commmand echelons, and I was going to be Navigator.We talked about it a lot, but nothing ever came of it - for one reason, because the MARBLEHEAD was constantly on the move,as you will recall. On one occasion we were absent from our home Port, Boston, for eighteen months, during which time the ship was in Nicaragua, China,the Philippines, and all ports on the Asiatic Station.I lost contact with Jack after he left the ship in China. However, we were always the [26] closest of friends,and I have happy memories of the many hours we spent together.I hope that the foregoing may be of some use to you in compiling Jack's biography. I wish you every success in this undertaking and the best of health and happiness in the future. Sincerely, Forrest Close


 


Grainger 85-1337 I-R-E-L-A-N-D {I}

 

Quarry Murphys were from Rathcullen B8:73 Mary Buckley born about 1810 married Protestant William Granger and had 12 or 13 children. First son William 1835-1913 was born at Curraclogh, Kilmurry, and his recent tombstone in Irish is at Kilmurry churchyard. Eldest daughter Catherine born about 1836 resided in Milford, Mass in 1858 and married James Lenihan of neighboring Hopkinton. Large family included Brigadier General Michael Lenihan born Hopskinton 1865. Gerard and francis Sweeney of Milford are descended from Catherine Granger through their mother.The elder William Granger and his wife Mary Buckley moved from Curraclogh to Lackareigh, Kilmichael, where most of their large family were born.There is a strong tradition that the Graingers were closely related to the Moskeigh Buckleys. Loretto's father Pat and his brother Michael and their sister Mrs. Kate O Mahony [at]The Lake, Castle Lack all spoke repeatedly of the close relation. I believe Mrs. Mary Buckley Granger was a sister of my great great grandfather John Buckley of Moskeigh and of his brother Cornelius.If the names of her second son and daughter can be learned, they may provide clues as to the baptismal names of her parents. One of her daughters, Mary, married Steven Buckley of Grandbeg. the [74] Grandbeg Buckleys are related to Mrs. Hallahan of Moskeigh and to Mrs. Margaret O Sullivan through their common grandmother, a Grandbeg Buckley who became Mrs. O Sullivan. There is no proof of relationship between the original Grandbeg Buckleys and the Moskeigh Buckleys.However, a large group of descendants of Steven Buckley, senior, are related to the Moskeigh Buckleys through their mother Mary Granger and her mother Mary Buckley of Lackareigh.Steven Buckley,junior, has four daughters, Mrs. Neville,Mrs. Leary, and two Mrs. Barrys married to brothers. Steven Buckley, junior had two brothers in Australia, two sisters who were nuns, and perhaps one more sibling.Mary Buckley has two grandchildren in St. Mary's home Montenotte Cork City[1972]. Miss Sarah Grainger is eighty-six years and grew up near Lackareigh. Her grandmother was a Murphy Derbh [pronounced 'Deriv'] related to ninety-eight-year-old John Murphy of the Whiteboys whose funeral Sarah attended in 1896.Sarah's late brother Michael was the father of Dr. Dermot Grainger now in practice at Cloughduv and his sister Miss Sheila Grainger of Kilbarry Road, Dunmanway. we were [75] assisted in our research by Mr. Richard Halloran, now of Ballincollig.His mother was a sister of Sarah Grainger.He has two brothers in England who are friendly with the Ilford Buckleys. Two more brothers are in Dublin and one in Cork.Richard Halloran himself often heard Mrs. Kate O Mahony Castle na Lact speak of the close Buckley-Grainger connection.He formerly lived east of Crookstown and went to school with Loretto {Buckley] and Jack [Sheehy].He is a carpenter, and his wife has two sons and three daughters.Hr referred us to his cousin Jerry Kelliher of Knockavadra,Aherla, whose mother was another sister of Sarah Grainger.Mr. Kelliher lives with his sisters Julia Kelliher and Mrs. Norah Leary.Another sister Mrs. Cotter lives elsewhere with four children. Mrs. Norah Leary was the first person to state positively that her great-grandmother was Mary Buckley.She gave accurate information about her own grandfather William Grainger and his sister Catherine, who became Mrs. James Leniham in USA and was the mother of Brigadier General Michael Lenihan.She states that the Lenihans came from Mallow in northern County Cork.The Massachusetts records show James Lenihan and his wife both twenty-two years old in 1858.He was a bootmaker. His parents were Pat and Ellen [76]Some of Mary Buckley Grainger's younger children went to San Francisco. Her sons included Henry and Edward - names said to have originated in the Protestant Granger family of Inchegeela in West Cork. This 'Ned' Grainger moved east to the Ballinhassig-Knockavilla region.He had a daughter Margaret. Another daughter was originally Catherine, but when she joined the Presentation order, her name in religion was Sister Margaret Mary Grainger.For many years she was at the same convent in South Dakota with Loretto's aunt, Ellen Mary Buckley.They were second cousins.Years ago Mary Ellen O Mahony Castle-na-Lact visited them in USA. They returned to Ireland in 1932 for the Eucharistic Congress in Dublin, at which time Ellen Mary Buckley was home in Cork for a week, and Loretto saw her.It is because of these two nuns that the Moskeigh Buckleys often heard about Grainger relations.Loretto also remembers that during World War I her grandfather Michael Buckley was proud of a photograph of U.S. Brigadier General Michael Lenihan -second cousin of John's grandmother.The third and youngest of Ned Grainger's daughters is Mrs. Nan Grainger O Mahony who had a career as a nurse after leaving a convent in France where she was dissatisfied with manual chores and grasping financial practices. She was giving a pound to her father when it was snatched away by an exceptionally tyrannical senior nun, and she soon left the Order. She knew a Mrs. Mary Meskill and Mrs. Lena O Brien in Ballinhassig, whose maiden name was Buckley. It is thought they were second cousins of Loretto's father. and that their mother was a Scartnamuck Sullivan related to Mrs. Dan O Halloran.. I think Nan had three brothers one perhaps in USA. Another was William with a son Liam who was a lumber dealer in Blackrock south of Cork city. Somewhere on this line is a young Theresa Grainger who married Tom Buckley. Nan pointed out this young couple to Loretto one day at Montenotte, They were leaving as she arrived.Nan's other brother (John?) had an only son John who lived at Grainger's Cross, Ballyheedy. He died of skin cancer aged fifty leaving a widow the former Mary Barrett of Killeady and five young children. She is related to Sean O Farrell through her eighty-eight year old mother and the large Hurley clan. She told us in 1971 about her husband's aunt Mrs. Nan Grainger O Mahony in Montenotte, and Loretto called there in September 1971,and has become very friendly with Nan because of the long association of Loretto's aunt with Nan's sister in South Dakota. There is a property in northern Moskeigh and the adjoining part of Scariff [78] which was owned in 1833 by Simon Punch.At some date it came into the possession of Loretto's grandfather Michael Buckley who moved there about 1910 building a cottage for himself and his unmarried daughter Mary.He relinquished the main farm to Loretto's father.Then he relinquished the [north] property to Loretto's uncle Michael,whose youngest son Leslie was born at the hill farm 1914 or 1915.The property was sold by the Buckleys by 1920. The [north] cottage is owned by the Lynches and the [north]farm by Con Brady.The oldest neighbors there are Jim Hallahan (81) Paddy Horgan (87?) Mrs. Lynch (95) and Eugene O Riordan.They say no one was living there in 1890, and Michael Buckley built the present Lynch cottage. Some stones from the long-abandoned Simon Punch cottage were used in building Eugene O Riordan's house [near main road in Moskeigh].Newcestown parish records show a Cornelius Buckley married to Johanna Punch. They had a daughter Julia in 1835. I believe this Cornelius Buckley was a brother of my great great grandfather John Buckley of Moskeigh. I think his wife was a daughter of Simon Punch, and they had a son Simon [Buckley] born betwen 1832 and 1835. He came to Boston by 1855 and appears [at Boston Wharf at north end of A Street South Boston in 1855 Massachusetts State Census] in the same house with my great grandfather Daniel Buckley in the State Census of 1855. They would be first cousins.There was a Jerry Buckley older than Simon and a Dennis younger at the same house perhaps brothers of Simon.Dan and Simon appear together in the Boston City Directory for the year 1856 only at Boston Wharf, which runs [ran] north of A Street,South Boston [then at water's edge prior to filling.]


 


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Chapter X Duty on "The Newest Ship in the Navy" the USS M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D 1924 to June 1927 original main text "Red Headed Stepchild" [1999 note Experiments are being made with edited drafts that are more chronological and group letters and sources by date and subject.See website] MARBLEHEAD [M'260] In July 1924 after completing the Junior Course at the Naval War College in Newport Rhode Island, Jack reported for duty in Philadelphia putting in commission the new light cruiser MARBLEHEAD at the William Cramp Company and the Naval Shipyard. Chauncy Shackford was Captain of the ship and Alex Sharp the Executive Officer, while Jack was the Construction and Repair Officer with additional shore patrol duties,ship's service and later mess treasurer in addition to watch, patrol,and court and hull board duties.The MARBLEHEAD was commissioned on 8 September l924, and Jack remained on board until June l927, when he was detached and left her in Shanghai, China. The ship had covered in excess of eighty thousand miles. I am giving here the entire Itinerary of the MARBLEHEAD to clarify just where Jack was on specific dates: p260 MARBLEHEAD itinerary departed Philadelphia l5 September l924 - arr.Sep l6 Newport RI dep.l7 Sept. -arr.l8 Sep.Navy Yard,New York dep.5 November-Arr.. 7 November Bermuda Islands dep Nov 2l arr.23 Nov.Navy Yard Norfolk Virginia dep. 28 Nov.-arr.6 December Southampton England dep 12 Dec. -arr. l7 Dec Marseilles France dep 24 Dec.-arr.24 Dec Villefranche France dep 25 Dec - arr. 27 Dec. Algiers,Algeria dep.31 Decem-1924-arr. 1 January l925 Gibraltar dep. 5 Jan- arr. 7 Jan. Funchal, Madeira dep.9 January -arr. l7 Jan. Navy Yard Boston dep l0 February -arr. l0 Feb. Boston Light dep.l3 Feb.-arriv l8 Feb. Hampton Roads Virginia dep. l9 Feb.- 23 Feb.arr.Colon,Canal Zone DEP 23 FEB.- arr. 23 Feb Panama Bay dep 25 Feb.arr. 12 March San Diego California dep l6 March arrive l7 March San Pedro Cal.depart 3 April - arr. 5 April San Francisco California dep. 15 April [RADIOSILENCE] -#40 MARBLEHEAD itinerary 25 Apr.l925 arr. Molokai Territoy of Hawaii dep. 25 Apr. -arr .27 Apr.Honolulu dep 30 Apr.-arr. 30 Apr. Pearl Harbor dep l May - arr. 1May Honolulu dep.7 May - arr.9 May Lahaina,Maui dep.28 May-arr. 29 May Hilo,island of Hawaii dep.29 May - arr. 1 June Honolulu dep. lJun-arr. 1 June Pearl Harbor dep 2 Jun -arr. 2 Jun Lahaina dep 6 June-arr. 6 June Honolulyu dep.l5 June -& l July- crossed equator 6 July l925 - arr.l0 July Pago Pago Samoa dep.11 Jul -arr. 23 Jul Melbourne,Victoria, Australia dep 4 August - arr. 5 August Hobart Tasmania dep 7Augu -arr. 11 Aug Wellington New Zealand dep.24 Aug- arr 30Aug..Pago Pago Samoa dep 3 September -arr. 8 September Papeetee Tahiti dep.ll Sep -arr. 22 Sep Galapagos Islands, Ecuador dep 24 Sep-arr.25 Sep Balboa Canal Zone dep 2 October -arr. October 4 Guantanamo Bay, Cuba dep -dep 12 Oct-arr. 12 Oct Gonaives Gulf Haiti dep. l6 Oct.-arr.l6 Oct. Guantanamo Bay Cuba dep.26 Oct.- arr.26 Oct. Gonaives Haiti dep.30 Oct. -arr.30 Oct. Gonaives Gulf Haiti-dep 2 Nov- arr. 2 Nov Guantanamo Bay Cuba dep.20 November arr. 23 Nov Hampton Roads Virginia dep ? - arr30 Nov.North river New York dep30 Nov.- arr. 1 December Navy Yard Boston dep 8 January l926-arr. 9 Jan Hampton Roads Virginia dep. 10 Ja. page 262- ... arrived Bluefields Nicaragua ll January l927- Puerto Cabezas on l3 January. Jack Barrett received ribbons in l927 for being in combat areas in Nicaragua in January & Shanghai China April-June during the civil war there. He was scheduled to lead a landing force at Bluefields, but the MARBLEHEAD was shifted to the Pacific. He encountered marine writer John Thomason this time in Nicaragua & later l943 arranged his transportation to the mainland.In February in Honolulu he receieved a letter from "Chesty" Puller - who later commanded Maines in the Inchon Korea landing September, l950 -the letter stolen l993 concerned an informal evening party.-continuing chronology: M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D arrived Puerto Cabezas Jan. l3, l927 left Nicaragua29 January = spent some time in Honolulu February-March departed 24March to make record eight & a half day cruise to Shanghai with hundreds of Marines, who came under command of Gen. Smedley Butler,survivor of the Boxer rebellion in Peking l900. MARBLEHEAD arrived Shanghai april 2, 1927.Jack admired Butler,who was very sucessful in China l927-9 & was slated to become Marinecommandant but for the personal animosity of Herbert Hoover, who had worked in the Kailin mining operaztions in North China & objected to remarks Butler had made condemning the dictatorial actions of Benito Mussolini.Butler in l930's retirement condemned over-use of Marines to serve commercial interests in foreigncountries where national security was not threatened. Chaing kai-shek took the offensive against the communists at Shanghai speing l927, & both sides were strongly anti-foreigner & business interested were threatened. Jack had a number of friends from l927 at Standard Oil co.Shanghai.He was detached June 4 at Shanghai & traveled Tokyo to Seattle on the same ship as General Leonard Wood, retired l920's US governor of the Philippines.Jack traveled by rail from Seattle to his home in Boston & next duty in New York June l927-l929. 3333 On Feb. 8, 1971 from Eugene Oregon Commander Philip C.Dahlquist wrote to me,"Yes, I was on the MARBLEHEAD at that time and made the trip across Tasmania with the group (Jack Barrett was one of twenty officers from the five cruisers). I have a rather bulging file of that entire trip to Australia, and I shall soon give you as much as would be pertinent for your purposes.I knew your husband quite well although I don't suppose we cold have been considered clsoe friends. I did like him, however." On Feb 9 he wrote: "To answer your question: Yes I was in that group of twenty officers nd a hundred men who made the train trip crossing Tasmania.Your husband was one of the officers from the MARBLEHEAD who made the trip with me. I remember the then Lieutenant Barrett as the First Lieutenant or Construction Officer of the ship.I was on the MARBLEHEAD detail while she was being readied for commissioning, and on board when she was commissioned.I remained on the MARBLEHEAD until I was detached on December 15, 1929. On the first trip ashore in Melbourne I met a p44444 young couple who were on practically all the parties we were listed for.There just weren't enough hours in any one day to do all the things we were supposed to do. I find the Australians very nice.The New Zealanders were a bit more 'British'.The Australians liked Americans and American ways- particularly American cars. In New Zealand I had a most enjoyable time in Wellington, and they have a large share of the fiest scenery in the world. On September 25 we arrived at Charles Island, Galapagos Islands. We went fishing and caught thirty-two fish.On the next day we left for Tower Island.We went fishing, and in two hours fishing we caught three hundred sixty-two fish- weight about five thousand pounds--great spirit and lots of hard work- about six people at a time were fishing from a motor launch." USS MARBLEHEAD "On the fifth of August l925 we arrived at Hobart,Tasmania after a run up a river for a few miles.There was plenty of water,but the river banks were so low we had to reduce speed considerably so as not to create waves that would damage shorelines and property.Tied up at the dock.Twenty officers and one hundred men were detailed to go by special train across Tasmania to Launceston.Jack Barrett and phil Dahlquist were among the party.They arrived in the late afternoon and there was an official p5555 greeting at the railroad station. The officers were quartered at a hotel. In the evening there was a big official dinner for the officers at the Brisbane Hotel.The Lord Mayor made a speech of welcome.There were no alcoholic drinks served at the dinner. A lady rendered a solo 275 but there was a loud crunching noise made by a Lieutenant from the TRENTON who had imbibed too freely on the train. He would take a walnut from a bowl and gently crack it with his fingers, making a noise disturbing to the singer. Someone suggested he could use some fresh air. Jack thoroughly enjoyed his July-August 1925 visit to Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand, and he kept up lifelong friendships he made there.His special friendships in Australia were the entire family of Dr. William Bannerman Craig of Melbourne.In Melbourne life was one party after another- ashore and return parties given by the ship. In New Zealand one special friend was Haskell Anderson, wounded at Gallipoli who Jack had befriended in Virginia or Washington DC while Anderson was convalescing and returning home.Anderson was General Motors automobile dealer in Wellington and Napier in 1925, and he telegraphed to Jack prior to the MARBLEHEAD's arrival August 3, "Motor car at your disposal during stay." Anderson made sure Jack saw Napier and the North Island Thermal District and was entertained extensively. The Rainey family were new friends from the 1925 visit, with whom Jack kept in touch.To give someidea of the Australian, New Zealand days, I am giving here verbatim an account Jack wrote at the time [Mrs. Marjory Rainey enjoyed reading a copy we sent in 1970]"Turned out early Sunday morning,had some breakfast. AARD car called for me about 7:45 AM. Rode in front seat so had good view--went around to Masonic Hall to join other car and receive some additional passengers.There were two American women,tourists coming down from Rotorua,in the other car, which led the way out p6666 247= of Napier. This leading car was an old Hudson touring car, the driver of which claimed he had driven it more than three hundred thousand miles. Snapped a few pictures of it later at Palmerston north.Had a very interesting trip-fortunately the Manawatu Gorge was open till five pm so we got through it, saving time by avoiding detour and also giving view of gorge.Second car only went as far as Danvenirk? where some of the passengers left us.Driving through the gorge was very nasty in some places, but we had no mishaps.We arrived at North Palmerston at 12:45, had lunch there -some changes of passengers were made.We changed cars for Wellington.My companion in the front seat for this stage of the trip was Captain John.B. Rainey,General Manager of Cunard Shipping Lines in Wellington,New Zealand.He had spent some time in the United States when a young man and had served in the Texas Rangers,the expert riding and shooting Texas group that enforced law and order in early days. We talked and were fairly well acquiainted by the time we reached Wellington.I went to the Midland Hotel and had dinner - happened to be seated at table with a Captain Lochner, Thirty-First Lancers Retired, now in business in Auckland, and we spent an interesting evening till 10:30 discussing strategy, economics and our past experiences straight from the shoulder like old friends.Then parted- I returned to ship and at last got a real night's sleep.Routine work next day.I was detached to Rotary reception in Kirkaldie at 8:00 pm Monday.Met some people that had been in Nice last Christmas (l924) when the ship was at Villefranche, a nearby port, and after a pleasant evening was invited to dinner with them for Wednesday.The next afternoon Tuesday I drove about town considerably to arrange =p7777 to bring some materials including one half-ton of soap for ship's laundry, then around to railway station to meet Napier train.{I] finally decided that Napier people had been unable to come,- then went to see Captain Rainey. He took me to the Wellesley Club afterwards remained there to nearly seven when the Marine Superintendant for Commonwealth and Dominion Captain West invited Captain Rainey and me to go out home to dinner with him and take pot luck. Did so. General Beers drove us out.Captain West showed us medals he got for saving lives in North Atlantic winter gales while in the White Star line.Also a piece of China salvaged from wreck [of the] old USS TRENTON wrecked at Apia Samoa l888? Then went to Barclay Smith's and played roulette till one AM. Returned to ship in TRENTON boat.Captain Rainey and I were partners in the roulette, so I didn"t have much to bother about. Next evening I had dinner with folks I had met at the Rotary Club reception Monday Mr. and Mrs. Launcelot Moore and Miss Leslie Taverner. Had a very pleasant quiet evening. Next day I went ashore early, went to races at Trentham,saw many people that I knew. Captain West,Captain Rainey had a very interesting day picked three or four winners actually netted a slight loss finally and returned to Wellington about five pm went out to ship slipped into uniform evening dress and went to Navy League Ball. Fared poorly on program as boat was late leaving ship,as dinner for guests dragged slowly. The next day while going ashore in ten am boat it backfired and took fire - serious.Assistance came from ship's boats,nearby ships, and harbor tow boat. I shifted to another boat and had lunch with the Raineys - young Rainey and his fiancee Miss Flux, Mr. and [249] Mrs. Ritchie At 3:30 we went out to the ship.At 4:30 we went ashore again to the CLUB then back to the ship. Instead of taking the duty I was ordered to join Commander and party to represent the wardroom at a dinner at the Wellesley Club that was being given by Mr. Martin Leicky,Mr. Fowler, Mr. Ardlow, and some others.There were six of us.Elaborate dinner, wines, good luck Tiki for each of us then adjourned for services stories to upstairs compartment to about ten PM Refought Jutland, talked politics -Then we separated, drove to dock missed Commander so returned to Club to look for him s when young McNally came into club looking for Naval personnel for a dance at Mr. and Mrs. Tansley's we went & danced. missed the auto going to dock,got into car with local crowd,so missed one am boat and slept on the SEATTLE till 7 am then out to the ship on MEMPHIS boat. Busy till 2:30 then ashore to pay bills for ship's activities- laundry etc- had Mr.and Mrs. Launcelot Moore and Miss Taverner off to ship for dinner there by boat with John Higgins to farewell ball on PENNSYLVANIA. This was a very well managed affair enormous expanse of deck was used with three and sometimes four orchestras in use in different parts of the ship.Supper below decks in cabin and wardroom.Tremendous crowd but by reason of large deck space everybody had room enough although I believe there were at least three thousand people present. Next day Sunday I expected Captain Rainey, West DeGrunchy,and wives out to lunch on ship, but windy weather set in, OMAHA dragged anchor, and fouled our bow about 1000 AM,[p9 was duplicate] p10,10,10- damaged stern and adjacent plating somewhat, and when I finally succeeded in getting a boat ashore, I was late, and because of the heavy wind and rainstorm the party was "off." Had lunch at Midland- another Naval officer and a man from Dunedin at my table. The latter ordered Burgundy Sparkling and insisted on my having some of it with him instead of the stout. I had previously called Captain Rainey,and he and his son took me out to their home, Bloomfield Terrace, Lower Hutt,for the afternoon and evening tea. Ended by winning fifteen shillings at card game I do not even know the name of. John Rainey and (his fiancee) Miss. Flux drove me in to the dock. I caught the midnight boat back to the ship.Another boat hit us on way out and dented side about twelve inches abaft where I was sitting on port side. Then after trying to find boat that hit us, I went aboard and slept. Next day Monday we were under way at 9:30 AM for Samoa." On the 28 of November l924 the MARBLEHEAD left Norfolk Virginia for her European shakedown cruise.On the sixth of December they were in Southhampton England.The young pay clerk Philip Dahlquist took a boat to take a walk on shore but the fog came up after the boat left the ship and was so thick that they got lost and landed some distance from Southampton. They had to remain there for two days before they could find their way back to the ship. Jack was taken for an Englishman at his hotel on Leave in London and when he bought a suit, the clerk offered to "sent it around to your rooms."Even in the subway he was asked directions. Christmas even they were in Marseilles and Christmas Day in Villefranche, France.They spent four days at Algiers and four days p ELEVEN M251 at Gibraltar. At Algiers he investigated the possibility of selling International Harvester tractors in Siberia, but nothing came of it. He also bought some very interesting photos of outdoor scenes in Algiers and the surrounding desert. From Marseilles he took leave to visit friends in Lyon.He was very fond of the onion soup served in a well known restaurant in Marseilles where he had visited 1909 or 1911 with ITASCA.They spent two days in Funchal, Madeira before sailing for the Navy Yard, Boston. WAR GAMES HAWAII 1925 #1099 #38MARBLEHEAD Lahaina l925 After Panama & the West Coast, where Jack saw his second cousin Robert Fahrbach & Fahrbach's father Emil Fahrbach,they arrived under radio silence in Hawaii April l5,l925, when the MARBLEHEAD took part in the very important war games in which the attacking "Blue" Forces defeated the defending "Black" Forces & captured the Hawaiian Islands.Admiral MacDonald in collaboration with the Army,had the defense of the Hawaiian Islands.The story is well told in the New York Times article headed "MARBLEHEAD at Hawaii War Maneuvers",Sunday,May l0,l925.Story of the swift triumph of Blue Forces on Hawaiian Defenses forced to anchor because the capital ships could enter Pearl Harbor only with difficulty because of the lack of anchorage space inside.After the War Games many departed with General Hines including Major General Neville, who commanded the Blue Mai??col Forces (some material illegible will be checked against original article when available)the senior Black umpire,a general & Lieutenant Colonel Kruger,who was the chief Army assistant to Admiral Coontz & General Hines.Several thousand persons went to the pier decorating the officers & other passengers with leis.The ship was tied to the pier with paper streamers that cracked when the ship pulled away to the strains of "Aloha Oe" & other Hawaiian tunes.252Major General Lewis,the Hawaiian Department Commander,declined to comment on the statement attributed to Chairman Butler of the House Naval (Appropriations) Committee(Philadelphia Congressman & father of the great Marine general Smedley Butler) to the effect that appropriations would be asked to make Hawaii the strongest military outpost in the world.The General admitted that there are serious deficiencies in the defenses as they exist.General Lewis said,"I am naturally very much interested in any proposal for developing the defenses of Hawaii as they have constituted my most earnest study since my arrival in the Territory.I can assure you that it has been for some time the conservative opinion of our trained officers that these defenses are insufficient even for a reasonable security against unfortunate eventualities.And I concur in that opinion." General Lewis was asked to comment on the prevalent belief that Army garrison here should be from five to ten thousand men stronger than at present,that the air forces should be greatly increased & provided with modern equipment to enable the Army to resist successfully such landing as that simulated in the recent maneuvers- that there should be additional modern eighteen inch guns in the Coast Defenses-that the Construction program has been seriously neglected & that the local naval protection in the form of submarines & mines is seriously deficient. Some officers wanted one hundred thousand men.The General replied that there were serious shortages in all of these respects.The details from the flagship Pennsylvania to the New York Times,April 27,l925:Now that the struggle is ended between the Blues & the Blacks for the control of the Island of Oahu-keystone in the Hawaiian Arch of the American Structure of National Defence,the story of the campaign plan of the pictors & vanquished may be told (Jack Barrett was on the MARBLEHEAD of the victors,the Blue Forces-SMB note)- it is clearly evident 253 it is evident from the progress of this major peacetime conflict that the Naval & Marines forces comprising the Blues would now be camping in Pearl Harbor after having taken the Island by direct assault in today's operation.The mission of the Blues was to recover from the Blacks possession of Honolulu & Pearl Harbor as Naval Operating Bases.That mission was certain of achievement when the umpires called a halt on the contest.The action of the umpires was founded in the conviction that the Blue forces had been able to land & advance on the north shore of Oahu,- a superior military force of Marine Sl...? troops & maneuver them in a position where the Blacks were unable to halt or defeat the advance of the khaki-clad invaders.The defeat of the Blacks does not mean that the Hawaiian Islands are not strongly defended.Both Nature & Washington with liberal hands have contributed toward the defense of the Islands against attack by enemy forces.The mountain ranges along the east & most of the west coast of Oahu are absolutely impossible for armed forces landing along these particular stretches of the shoreland.After a twelve day voyage of 2600 miles from San Francisco to the Hawaiian group, the Blue Fleet arrived off the northern & southwestern coasts of Oahu at midnight of April 26.The armada traveled in special screening formation en route to protect the sixteen vessels of the Fleet train (constructively representing transports) against enemy submarine attack. This formation consisted of a series of concentric circles of warships.The battleships were in the center,with the train of transports.Around the battleships steamed the smart & speeding destroyers.Beyond the -254-steamed the light cruisers (JBB in MARBLEHEAD-SMB note)& beyond that were the submarines-the furthermost outpost of the Fleet formation,which was 42 miles in diameter.Not a mishap marred the voyage.All ships that left San Francisco Harbor on April l5 in an aggregation of one hundred twenty-seven of all types of warships arrived at their appointed positions at the Islands of Oahu & Molokai in safety & good condition.The battleship MARYLAND,which left Puget Sound at a later date joined the main body of the battle fleet several hundred miles north of Oahu.Somewhere out in the Pacific the Blue Scouting Fleet headed by the battleship WYOMING was detached from the main formation & sent ahead so as to be able to carry out the operation of establishing an air base on the island of Molokai April 25, two days before the scheduled of Admiral Robinson for the main expedition attack on Oahu.The rest of the fleet continued on a direct route to Kaena Point at the northwestern corner of Oahu,maneuvering from day to day in th execution of Battle Problems. Radio silence was established on the second day out from San Francisco & was not lifted until arrival of the vessels within sight of Diamond Head late this afternoon after the execution of the mission involved in the War Games.At twelve o'clock last night when the bulk of the main battle fleet moved into position off the northern coast of Oahu,mighty searchlights from the interior & along the northern coast flashed seaward.Under cover of darkness the vessels were in position for the attack,six miles out when several minutes after midnight a bombardment of the beach was inaugurated preliminary to the landing 255-(#39) MARBLEHEAD P.255 preliminary to the landing of the first wave of Marines at twelve o'clock this morning,exactly twelve hours after the bombardment began. During these twelve hours the main force made the landing on the north coast.Some of the battleships-with destroyers -were detached & sent around to the southwestern coast to carry to carry out a similar landing of Marines- this was only a secondary operation.The attack on the north was the primary one.Meanwhile the Scouting Fleet under the command of Vice ADMIRAL MCKEAN which had gone with the AIRCRAFT carrier LANGLEY to establish a temporary air base at Molokai Island slipped westward to the southern coast of Oahu & endeavored to delude the Blacks into the belief that a landing force was about to be put into east of Diamond Head.It was a successful manoeuvre & in combination with the secondary landing of the Marines on the southwest coast caused the Blacks to think that the main landing was being made on the south coast.In this assumption the blacks made a fatal mistake & were not in a position to meet the shock of the primary landing of the expeditionary force when it was shoved forward on the north coast.Ideal weather conditions favored the Blues when it (the Blue Force) emerged from the long spell of radio silence & lowered the boats in which the Marines were sent through the surf to the beach.While the heavens sparkled with thousands of starts,the region between shore & coast was blanketed with that particular form of tropical semi=mist & near rain which Americans in Hawaii have come to regard as 'liquid sunshine'.It was difficult for the powerful searchlights of the Blacks to distinguish the faint shadows of the hulls (hulks?)in the darkness that enveloped the arrival of the Fleet.The Fleet had been darkened & traveled with M256 '16'no lights showing above decks long before reaching Oahu.When morning broke magnificently over the island,the main section of the expeditionary force began landing on the northern & southwestern coasts,& feinting operations were progressing east of Diamond Head.On the north coast especially where no ships had stood the night before,morning disclosed the presence of a strong naval force.The big guns of seven dreadnaughts were trained on the shore.Beyond them were the transports between boats filled with Marines,& destroyers were protecting the formation against submarine attack while seaplanes were being catapulted from the decks of battleships & spinning off into the air for reconnaisance of the enemy positions ashore.The sea was as smooth as glass & the breakers not as heavy as usual over the coral reefs.The first wave of Marines sent ashore were met with heavy machinegun attack & suffered heavy casualties,but the defense cordon of Blacks on the north coast was weak & the second wave were pushed through so far that the succeeding waves had soon charged the beachhead & soon had driven six miles from the beach.The operation was accompanied by a spectacular aircraft operation in which there were thrilling battles between enemy bombing & fighting planes & the fighting planes & scouters of the Fleet.Had not the Blues completely outgunned the Blacks in the north of the principal landing shore,it would have been difficult for the invader to have made such easy headway in pushing their Marines forward in the northern coast.Part of the time the Fleet steamed with darkened lights.& for nearly ten days it steamed the Pacific with all wireless switches pulled so as to ensure complete radio silence.Not a single letter was flashed by radio from any of the ships.The radio silence was a complete success-a real simulation of actual war conditions as near as it could be achieved in time of peace.Should the United States as a nation ever be faced with the problem of defending Oahu in time of war,it would be infinitely better [foregoing is Sophie p.256 or @@@@SIXTEEN @16] p257 @SEVENTEEN: able to convey and assist the Marine Corps Expeditionary Force that would be entrusted with so great and important a task." OnJuly 1, 1925 he MARBLEHEAD left Honolulu for the Australian cruise to last through 24 August 1925. On the return trip In the Galapagos Islands they were surprised to see a large number of seals-hundreds of them.A rather cold current runs through them,& it seems strange to see the seals where only tropical animals would be expected.But the seals were there. At Samoa Pago Pago the chief put on a native dance because one of the cruiser's officers had had duty there before. The MARBLEHEAD subsequently cruised in Panama, Guantanamo,and Haiti along with east coast tours of Boston, New York, and Virginia.Jack had a lot of Shore Patrol duty in addition to being the assistant to the Executive Officer and the Construction and Repair Officer. On 11 January the MARBLEHEAD arrived at Puerto Cabezas in Nicaragua when revolution was said to threaten American lives and property there.There was real concern about him among his friends as Jack was slated to lead a landing party on the beach near Bluefields, Nicaragua.They were anchored out in very rough water, but three days later the MARBLEHEAD sailed for Pearl Harbor, as concern developed over tensions around Shanghai, China. In the 1960s Jack would show his family the two campaign ribbons he received from 1927 when MARBLEHEAD personnel were in a war zone first in Nicaragua and then in China.A September 1926 letter of Ora Waterman from Camaguay, Cuba indicates the MARBLEHEAD underwent a considerable period of training for landing force operations.]M257 He encountered Marine writer John Thomason this time in Nicaragua & later l943 arranged his transportation to the mainland.In February 1927in Honolulu Jack receieved a letter from "Chesty" Puller - who later commanded Maines in the Inchon Korea landing September, l950 -the handwritten letter stolen l993 concerned an informal evening party.-continuing chronology: M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D arrived Puerto Cabezas Jan. l3, l927 left Nicaragua 29 January = spent some time in Honolulu February-March departed 24March to make record eight & a half day cruise to Shanghai with hundreds of Marines, who came under command of Gen. Smedley Butler,survivor of the Boxer rebellion in Peking l900. Jack admired Butler,who was very sucessful in China l927-9 & was slated to become Marine Commandant but for the personal animosity of Herbert Hoover, who had worked in the Kailin mining operations in North China & objected to remarks Butler had made condemning thedictatorial actions of Benito Mussolini. Butler in l930's retirement condemned over-use of Marines to serve commercial interests in foreign countries where national security was not threatened. Chaing kai-shek took the offensive against the communists at Shanghai spring l927, & both sides were strongly anti=foreigner & business interested were threatened.


 


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257At Pago Pago, Samoa the Chief put on a native dance because he was friendly with one of the cruiser officers who had been there before.On ther return trip In the Galapagos Islands they were surprised to see a large number of seals-hundreds of them.A rather cold current runs through them,& it seems strange to see the seals where only tropical animals would be expected.But the seals were there. In late 1925 and 1926 the MARBLEHEAD cruised in Panama, Guantanamo, and Haiti along with East Coast calls at Boston, New York, and in Virginia.In June 1926 the Boston Post reported the ship's visit at the town of Marblehead on the Massachusetts North Shore, in honor fo which the shipwas named.In August 1926 at Newport, Rhode Island Jack saw several former South Boston friends who came to see the ship- his second cousins Gertrude and May Hartigan, then living at 80 Brown Avenue, Roslindale,and former East Fourth Street neighbors Mrs. Charles Curtaz (Molliie Manning) and her sister Anna Manning, who had moved to West Roxbury.Jack Barrett received ribbons in l927 for being in combat areas in Nicaragua in January & Shanghai China April-June during the civil war there. He was scheduled to lead a landing force at Bluefields, but the MARBLEHEAD was shifted to the Pacific. He encountered marine writer John Thomason this time in Nicaragua & later l943 arranged his transportation to the mainland.In February in Honolulu he receieved a letter from "Chesty" Puller - who later commanded Maines in the Inchon Korea landing September, l950 -the letter stolen l993 concerned an informal evening party.-continuing chronology: M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D arrived Puerto Cabezas Jan. l3, l927 left Nicaragua29 January = spent some time in Honolulu February-March departed 24 March to make record eight & a half day cruise to Shanghai with hundreds of Marines, who came under command of Gen. Smedley Butler,survivor of the Boxer rebellion in Peking l900. Jack admired Butler,who was very sucessful in China l927-9 & was slated to becomeMarine commandant but for the personal animosity of Herbert Hoover, who had worked in the Kailin mining operations inNorth China & objected to remarks Butler had made condemning the dictatorial actions of Benito Mussolini.Butler in l930's retirement condemned over-use of Marines to serve commercial interests in foreign countries where national security was not threatened. Chaing-kai-shek took the offensive against the communists at Shanghai spring l927, & both sides were strongly anti=foreigner & business interests were threatened. Jack had a number of friends from l927 at Standard Oil co.Shanghai.He was detached June 4 at Shanghia & traveled Tokyo to Seattle on the same ship as General Leonard Wood, retired l920's US governor of the Philippines.Jack traveled by rail from Seattle to his home in Boston & next duty in New York June l927-l929.Jack Barrett received ribbons in l927 for being in combat areas in Nicaragua in January & Shanghai China April-June during the civil war there. He was scheduled to lead a landing force at Bluefields, but the MARBLEHEAD was shifted to the Pacific. He encountered marine writer John Thomason this time in Nicaragua & later l943 arranged his transportation to the mainland.In February in Honolulu he receieved a letter from "Chesty" Puller - who later commanded Maines in the Inchon Korea landing September, l950 -the letter stolen l993 concerned an informal evening party.-continuing chronology: M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D arrived Puerto Cabezas Jan. l3, l927 left Nicaragua29 January = spent some tiome in honolullu February-March departed 24March to make record eight & a half day cruise to Shanghai with hundreds of Marines, who came under command of Gen. Smedley Butler,survivor of the Boxer rebellion in Peking l900. Jack admired Butler,who was very sucessful in China l927-9 & was slated to become Marinecommandant but for the personal animosity of Herbert Hoover, who had worked in the Kailin mining operaztions inNorth China & objected to remarks Butler had made condemning thedictatorial actions of Benito Mussolini.Butler in l930's retirement condemned over-use of Marines to serve commercial interests in foreigncountries where national security was not threatened. Chaing-kai shektook the offensive against the communists at Shanghai speing l927, &both sides were strongly anti=foreigner & business interested werethreated. Jack had a number of friends from l927 at Standard Oil co.Shanghai.He was detached June 4 at Shanghia & traveled Tokyo toSeattle onthe same ship as General Leonard Wood, retired l920's USgovernor of the Philippines.Jack traveled by rail from Seattle to his home in Boston & next duty in New York June l927-l929.--257.5--[while there word came to proceed to Shanghai, China at great speed because of the civil war there. It was a all top secret, but the MARBLEHEAD made the trip in eight and a half days-the fastest on record up to that time.She arrived in Shanghai on A-April 2, 1927.] --258--Part of the time the MARBLEHEAD was at the Standard Oil dock, and the offcers were entertained by some of the executives and their secretaries.Jack got acquainted with the manager's secretary, Miss Madge Ashley, who later became our friend both in China and in the United States.Mickey Ashley lived in the French sector with her sister Maimie and her brother, who worked for a British steamship company or some such outfit. Maimie kept house and helped to look after their adopted Chinese daughter Topsy, whom Jack liked and whom I met in 1931.Mickey still remembers a dance and dinner she attended on the MARBLEHEAD when Jack was aboard.It was a sad day for Mickey because her boss's son had died that day of cholera. Jack saw the Ashleys again in 1929-1930 when he was in China on the TRUXTUN,-again because of civil war there.The conditions in which the Ashleys lived in the Japanese-Chinese war of 1937 appear in a letter sent to us by Mickey around Christmas 1937, which appears later in this account.Jack was ordered to shore duty in New York city, so he was detached from the MARBLEHEAD 4 June 1927 and proceeded via Japan on the PRESIDENT MADISON along with his shipmate "Shorty" Milner, who was an outstanding baseball player for the MARBLEHEAD.Jack was often mistaken for an Englishman when he was in London.On one occasion he was asked, "Is Piccadilly Circus up here?" After he said "yes" and the person had gone off in the direction they both pointed,Jack feared he had been mistaken ninety degrees. On the MADISON he mey Mrs. Weesner from Indiana and her mother, - kept up the friendship many years by Christmas cards, and in 1955 the three Barretts attended the Radcliffe baccalaureate when Mrs. Weesner's daughter Brenda Haram was a graduating senior. The MARBLEHEAD was a hard-working, happy ship, staffed with officers outstnding academically and athletically. A substantial number remember Jack and have-#56-# 56 Fradd letter Marblehead l927 Shanghai page M 259 responded magnificently to our letters of inquiry: John F.Fradd wrote from Florida: Your two very nice letters awakened nostalgic memories of the first cruise I ever had in my thirty-five years in the Navy.Whenever MARBLEHEAD sailors get together,all we talk about is our cruise to China & back,which covered nineteen months.The MARBLEHEAD was my first ship.I joined her in June of l926 & served four years in her.I can't vouch for the correctness of dates,& l927 was a long time ago. You mentioned that Jack Barrett was mess treasurer, & so was I shortly afterward.I had the job for about three months during our cruise up the Yangtze River & after. I recall the mess bill at that time was thirty dollars a month. It was near Christmas time in l926 when we returned to Boston, her home port, from Guantanamo,Cuba.In January l927 we were ordered to proceed to Norfolk,& load our torpedoes & two scout planes & continue on to Nicaragua,where trouble was brewing.We put a company of our landing force ashore to join our Marines, who were protecting the holdings of United Fruit company from some bandit who was trying to start an uprising. The name of the place was Puerto Cabezas on the east coast.Our flagship was the USS RICHMOND, another six inch gun cruiser. We were ordered to Pearl Harbor.At the time very few of us knew about what was going on in China.We spent a month or so in the Hawaii area practicing gunnery, torpedoes,& operations,-when suddenly we were ordered to Shanghai,China.I can recall returning from liberty with Lieutenant Close to find the navigator & chief engineer figuring out how fast we could make the trip without running out of fuel. M260. We got under way in the morning & completed the (Shanghai) run in the shortest time ever up to that time (eight & a half days).Our sister ship the CINCINNATI had some propellor trouble & arrived twenty-four hours later.At this point we were getting reports of civil war in China, & the names of Chiang kai-shek & Chaing Tso-lin & (Michael) Borodin were in the news.We also received a report of the Communist attack on the "foreign" embassies in Nanking,in which the USS NOAH was involved.When we arrived at Shanghai,the Whangpoa river near town was loaded with ships, so we went downstream to the juncture of the Whangpoa & Yangtze & anchored for a week or so.While there we witnessed the first naval battle many of us had ever seen. The Wonson fort at the juncture of the two rivers was held by South Chinese forces & was to be attacked by the North Chinese fleet.The commander of the fort came aboard to ask if we would move off to an anchorage to the west,as he was expecting an attack by the northern forces & did not want us in the way. So we moved.Sure enough,at 11:30 Saturday morning four gunboats appeared,standing upriver right after our Saturday inspection.They opened fire on the fort,which returned the fire.The accuracy of both left much to be desired,but we had to admire the tactics of the commander of the ships afloat.It happened an English warship was anchored in the stream-& the Northern commander took full advantage of this fact.His ship would steam within range of the fort,fire & then swing around in columns behind the English warship while they reloaded their guns. this continued for a hour, until a burst from the fort M 261 appeared to hit the bridge of the leading gunboat.This signalled the end of the battle.Shortly after this we steamed up river to just south of Shanghai & moved to the Standard Oil docks.In the city the Southern forces had taken Shanghai & moved north,although barbed wire entanglements & bunkers were still in place on the streets.The city quickly returned to normal,but brigands were active. While on liberty,most of our officers were robbed at one time or another.I relieved "Shorty" Milner as head of the baseball team,& MARBLEHEAD not only won the Shanghai league championship but had the opportunity of playing with five other teams including the Japanese. One of these was the team representing Japan in the eastern Olympics.We also played later for the championship of the Phillippines.The next episode concerned our trip up the Yangtze River to Nanking. The CINCINNATI went up first for a stay of a month,& we followed later.She was fired on by small arms from the banks & an officer was wounded,so we placed boiler plate around the bridge & other exposed positions for protection- nobody fired at us, but all guns were at the ready.The navigator measured the fall of the river every morning so we would know when we had to return down river in order to cross over some sand bars safely.Otherwise we would have had to remain upstream for months before the river rose again.The ship visited Tsingtao & Chingwantao later. In July a number of us took a trip to Peking.We got there aboard a Chinese troop train.Upon arrival we saw an armored train furnished by the Japanese & tried to take snapshots of it,-but guards with fixed bayonets prevented that. I did ask one of the M262 guards if I could take his picture-& he was quite pleased- we got good pictures of him -& the train! (notes on photos).- John E Fradd, Rear Admiral USN Retired."-#58 -#58 Dahlquist MARBLEHEAD l927 Commander Phil Dahlquist in commentary on Admiral Fradd's letter wrote from Eugene Oregon: "The MARBLEHEAD did not stop at Nanking, as he intimated but went on up the Yangtze River for another couple of hundred miles to Hankow.I'm sure he would recall this if he remembered all the golf he played on the course there,which was surrounded by a ten foot high (or higher) stone wall. It wasn't unusual to hear shots on the other side of the wall as we played.I think one of the sad days of that era was when "Eva" Brant was lost overboard.He was an excellent young oficer & probably one of the most popular on board.Brant went back to the after part of the ship-which was very low.The seas were coming up from astern & breaking over the deck very heavily.Brant went out to help an enlisted man & held the man with a scissors hold in his legs until others could pull him back-but a following sea washed Brant overboard.It was a very heroic act on Brant's part & typical of what one would have expected of such a man.On our trip to Australia we stopped off at Samoa going & coming.I was swimming in at the dock & missed the last boat back to the MARBLEHEAD.I waited,& the Captain's gig came in fromthe MARBLEHEAD to pick up a guest for dinner with the Captain.He was a Samoan gentleman of about fifty years.He seemed very dignified & wore a black dinner jacket,black tie, & studs in his shirt. Instead of trousers he wore a sort of wrap-around garment of excellent quality material-very neatly pressed.coming down to his kneecaps.Riding out to the ship I said I had been at a nautical school at Norfolk about three years before, & we had a Samoan classmate who acquitted himself very well- he had graduated well up in his class & had been well thought of.The man was Chief of Police in American Samoa, & we was very pleased by my story,as the boy was his son.It was the l927 Nanking incident that took the MARBLEHEAD to China in the first place.Trouble had been anticipated apparently-& we were already out as far as Honolulu on a standby basis.Then the Nanking thing happened,& we went out the rest of the way.I think the NOAH was in on it. The american destroyer NOAH had been sent up to Nanking on a plea from some missionares who were in danger from bandits overrunning the area.The American destroyer skipper went over to call on his counterpart on an English destroyer -they agreed & laid down a barrage above the mission-then the missionaries could come out & down to the dock under cover of the barrage.This was successful,& the destroyer took them to safety.In April l97l Rear Admiral James McNally wrote,"I cannot add too much to your wonderful job of research work.Jack loved papers & kept all kinds of papers & notes.That in fact is one of the strongest memories I have of him.I remember sitting in his stateroom & he pouring through a wicker hamper full of notes to locate a paper that would settle a wardroom argument. Jack was very thoughtful & kind to us junior officers.Phillips,Brant,Van Nagell,Florence, & McNally all reported to the MARBLEHEAD at Pearl Harbor after Naval academy graduation l925. I notice you have not mentioned John E.Florence.He lives in Charleston,South Carolina. You will have to excuse this new automatic typewriter.It writes faster than I can think, & it cannot spell.We all made the Australian cruise together.Then after leave & recreation in New York after we got back we went to the West Indies- Guantanamo & Haiti. I served on the MARBLEHEAD 23 June l925 to 25 June l926. I was first division junior officer. In that job I had lots of contact with John(Jack).John read a lot & had a good grasp of what was going on in the world.Some of his statements were prophetic.(Executive officer)Commander Alex Sharp would ask,"What has the saber-rattler to say today?" The next contact I had with John was at Pearl.Marjorie & I called on you- young John was only a baby.I was stationed at the Navy Yard & was machinery-electrical planning officer.After the attack I became the Salvage Planning officer & was in charge of preparing the plans for raising & repairing the sunken ships.John helped me get the family off to Long Beach,California.Later he assigned me transportation so I could go to Newport News Virginia to fit out & be chief engineer of p.266M-- YORKTOWN. The "Fighting Lady" was another wonderful ship just like the MARBLEHEAD.I feel that I had a lot to do with it as I wrote the organization as Outfitting Officer and put a lot of MARBLEHEAD ideas into the ship.After the raid on Marcus and Wake [Islands] I was transferred to the MASSACHUSETTS. I was on her for twenty-three months. I ended up with eleven stars on my South Pacific ribbon. It was John again [at Pearl Harbor Overseas Transportation Office] who wrote my orders for transportation on a destroyer to Efate to join the MASSACHUSETTS. Even John did not know where the MASSACHUSETTS was and could only write me as far as Espiritu Santo..I actually had to locate the MASSACHUSETTS by 'grape vine telegraph'. I had heard the MASSACHUSETTS was at Efate, and to join her a made a war patrol on a PBY going there after its patrol.That was the last time I saw John. I have always felts my life was richer for having known him", [end Amd. McNally-Adm Evenson follows]. MARBLEHEAD.#57-#57 Phillips letter MARBLEHEAD l925Lactoris #57 Rear Admiral George L.Phillips of Maine wrote: Dear Mrs. Barrett,I well remember your husband Jack (sometimes known as "Red") from the MARBLEHEAD,which I joined in June,l925 & served in until July l926. I used to stand watches with him in station for several months until I qualified as a top watch stander.I remember the trip he arranged with a New Zealand friend of his (Haskell Anderson of Wellington & Napier) for a party (of which I was one) to spend a few days in Napier.NZ.I believe that Jack & the New Zealander had met in Newport News Virginia at the end of World War I when the latter was on his way home was on his way home from service in Europe(wounded at Gallipoli).We had a splendid cruise to Australia & New Zealand & a wonderful voyage through the south Pacific islands.I remember seeing Jack at Pearl Harbor in late l944 when I was on my way out to Ulithi for the attack on Iwo Jima & Okinawa.I called on him at his office & well remember being at your house for dinner some time in November or December,l944. I brought out a jug of maple syrup to give you.My wife came from Australia where I met her on the cruise in l925.We were married in Montreal,Canada in l928, & Jack was one of two sponsors for her entry permit into the United States.The other was Frank Maeihle (spell?) who was also on the MARBLEHEAD with Jack.I was in occasional touch with Captain Shackford before his death in Jamestown a few years ago." M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D from R2 and Arroyo letters from B4 M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D


 


M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D 266-277 p 85-1340 {m}

 

--266.5--On the thirtieth of April 1971 Rear Admiral Evenson ("Chick") wrote from California: "I remember Lieutenant Barrett well and we were all fond of him and very much impressed with him.He was a very intelligent man with a ready wit and never at a loss for the good word."Of course he was very senior to me - I was a fresh-caught Ensign in 1926. I was a member of the part of [Naval Academy] 1926 that was assigned to "Aviation Summer" after graduation.And I had a bad accident - caught a crack of a Liberty engine mounted on F-5-L Flying Boat right in the mouth. When the plastic surgeons had finally fixed me up,I decided that I didn't want anything more to do with aviation,-and was assigned to MARBLEHEAD.One of the things I will never forget on the MARBLEHEAD was when Captain 'Jocko' Miller rammed the wharf at Pearl Harbor as we went to come alongside. I was on the bridge at the time, and I can still see that knife bow slicing into the solid concrete!!! Another of my memories of Honolulu was the beach picnic we all went on during which 'Boney' Close got into a fist fight --267-- with 'Tough Bill' a gigantic Hawaiian beach boy.What a battle - ended as I remember in a draw.The fast trip to Shanghai I remember very well. I was Signal Officer of the MARBLEHEAD then.I remember the trip to Peking Fradd wrote you about.I bought a Chinese rug from Shoemaker.I still have it - the Jewel Tree pattern.I remember also when Lieutenant Barrett left the ship in Shanghai with "Shorty" Milner and Paul Coloney.I was transferred in the fall of 1927 to the USS PITTSBURG.In 1929 I decided to give aviation one more try and was a Naval Aviator until my retirement in 1956." [121 Dahlq-Shackford-Tasmania-M-A-R-B-L-E-H-E-A-D --267.4--In May 1971 Commander Dahlquist wrote:"You asked me to comment on Captains Shackford and Miller and (Executive officer) Commander Sharp. I think that Captain Shackford had more than he bargained for in the MARBLEHEAD. It was a fast ship- much faster than most. After almost two years it seemed to tell on him, and the strain was there. However, I believe he was a good skipper. He did retire, however, soon after leaving the ship. Captain Miller was also a good Captain "Jocko" and handled the ship well out in China while we were there.The Executive officer, Commander Alex Sharp I knew quite well and admired him in about evey way a man can admire a completely good Naval officer.He was an excellent ship handler, a fine Executive officer in every way, completely competent and well liked by officers and men alike.This is borne out by the fact that he became a Vice Admiral while the other two did not advance beyond Captain.' In l971 as a result of our correspondence Commander Dahlquist wrote his "Log" which he sent (a copy) to me. On the title page he wrote that I had "nudged" him into writing it.Iam entering here some excerpts from that Log which relate to the MARBLEHEAD when Jack was aboard.: The MARBLEHEAD was commissioned on September 8, l924 Commanding offcier Captain Chauncey Shackford --end267--.268- from Dahlquist log-Executive Officer Commander Alexander Sharp, Gunnery Officer Lieutenant Commander George Hull, Engineer Officer Harry Badt (remained Jack's good friend for many years)Supply Officer Walter A. Beu?le? Pay clerk Philip C.Dahlquist. Nov 7, l924 arrived Bermuda from New York Navy Yard Anchored in Gra?issey Bay and almost got caught in there by a hurricane. Managed to get out, and the Captain wanted to see what his ship could do in rough weather.So we rolled as much as fifty-five degrees at times. Most unconfortable.Nov 23 Arrived Norfolk Navy Yard for repaires to storm damage. It was mostly broken insulators in the rigging of the masts. (John Barrett note: Jack Barrett used to quote an old saying about hurricanes "June too soon - July Stand by -August Look out you must - September Remember - October, All OVER-" but contrary to the verse he also recollected this November l924 hurricane mentioned by Phil Dahlquist.)..6 Dec. l924 Very heavy fog when they landed in Southampton, England. ..16 April l925 En route to Hawaiian Islands MARBLEHEAD in Scouting Fleet in advance of Battle Fleet. -24 April Scouting Fleet assembled for attack. 25 April Sent landing force from Scouting Fleet- MARBLEHEAD to island of Molokai- Captured airplane landing field and radio station-Established base for air force.Left to join attack on Oahu. Apr 26, l925 Attacked and broke up railroad communications in three different places. Proceeded to attack Honolulu at night. First attack unsuccessful. Second attack proved very disastrous for enemy. Earlier in the day enemy bombing planes were destroyed by sixty of our planes operating from Molokai.Apr. 27, l925 At daylight attacked beach to cover landing of our forces. Attack successful and went on in to Honolulu. Anchored in the afternoon. & May l923 Underway this morning. Maneuvers. Whole fleet is out. 9 may arrived Lahaina, Maui. - 17 May Played baseball Lost 13 to 10. - 18 May At Sea for tactical exercises.=2 June at Honolulu.Ball game. Scouting Fleet 10, Battle Fleet 7. - 4 June very nice dance at Alexander Hotel Roof, Honolulu. 6 June MARBLEHEAD took Admiral Koontz, Senator Hale,and Governor of Hawaii Farrington to -269-Lahaina. Back again to Honolulu. Speed 32 knots. June 12 To sea for SRDP rehearsals. Back again.June 18 Went to Pearl Harbor for drydocking.June l9 Dinner party on board MARBLEHEAD. June 23 Left dry dock. July 5 En route to Pago Pago (Samoa). July 6 Held Neptune party. big time. July 10 arrived Pago Paho Samoa. Fueled from SAPELO. -July 28 Star Spangled Ball at Maison Deluxe in St.Kilda, Melbourne.August 4, l925 Underway for Hobart, Tasmania Speed 25 knots. Quite rough. Aug 5, l925 Arrived Hobart Tasmania. The ship at dock. Went to Launceston twenty officefs and one hundred enlisted men made trip in private train (Jack Barrett was one of the officers, and Walter Buck and enlisted Phil Dahlquist of the MARBLEHEAD) Big official dinner given officers that evening.- 6Aug l925 Returned from Launceston. 7 August Left Hobart Tasmania for Wellington New Zealand.Received kangaroo mascots. As the flagship Richmond was pulling away from the dock, there was a huge crowd to watch the departure of the ships.The crowd made a passageway for an officer in his frock coat uniform. He caught hold of the lower boom and pulled himself aboard.The crowd cheered, and a junior officer told him not to report to the Captain until he was sent for.He got ten days in his room. (The uniform was the one specified for the party the night before in Hobart.) - 8 August En route to Wellington. Full power run for twelve hours. - 13 August dance at Evans Bay Yacht Club Wellington -15 August Dinner party on board. 18 August another dance at Evans Bay Yacht Club. Lots of balloons and a nice time - bottom 269- -from notebook 6 -l35 copy from lost notebook - Mar 24, l971 Dahlquist- Galapagos- not sure about this however. Other than this we saw no people at all. I believe a few went ashore and chased lizards for a while.We saw a great number of seals on the rocks.It seems that there is a cold current that hits these islands, and the seals apparently follow this current at certain times of the year and with all the fish I imagine they live pretty high. We anchored in several places while there and I recall the navigator saying that the main purpose of our visit to the Galapagos Islands was to look for suitable anchorages.Let me correct an assumption on your part where you wondered how we could hoist on board a whaleboat with such a heavy load of fish. I thought I said that we went out in a motor launch. Anyway, that is what it was- a forty foot motor launch-and we unloaded the personnel in the gangway before we hoisted the boat on board, and I recall that the Chief Boatswain wrung his hands and moaned and groaned about us breaking his boat. it did bend in the middle all right, but it held together, and no great harm done. I remember quite well the winter in Boston. We lived at 52 Fosket Street, West Somerville, during the latter part of my time in the MARBLEHEAD (about l928).There was one more officer whom you may remember.He was Lieutenant W. M. Thompson, the assistant engineer. I don't think he was on the ship at the time of commissioning but came later.I saw a lot of him afterwards. He was a Captain and industrial manager at the Norfolk Navy Yard during the first part of World War II and later went to Bremerton navy Yard, where he was a Commodore.He died perhaps seven or eight years ago. It was probably in August l942 at a littlke party at the Norfolk Navy Yard that I met Captain and Mrs. Thompson. Then he left her with me while he went off on some table hopping mission, and we talked (Mrs.Thompson and I) about her two boys who were../. -( foregoing fills in several gaps in previously typed l924-l927 MARBLEHEAD narrative). .--270-- August 21 Navy Grand Farewell Ball at Adelphi. It was a big time enjoyed by all. August 24 Left Wellington New Zealand for Pago Pago. People in Wellington apparently very sorry to seee us go.September 9 Papeete Tahiti Chief Engineer Harry Badt made a Commander. September 23 Galapagos Islands Tower Island Captain had instructions to test various possible places for suitable anchorages. They crossed the equator some twenty times while cruising the islands.Wonderful fishing - five thousand pounds. October 18, l925 Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Anchored. MARBLEHEAD beat TRENTON baseball 4 to 0. No runs, no hits, no man to reach first base. October 24 Played TRENTON. Won 7 to 2. October 25 beat TRENTON 3 to 2 and won the flag. October 29 At Gonaives Gulf Haiti MARBLEHEAD fired SRBF score 76.3. Five "E"'s including after twin mount.RICHMOND score 69. MEMPHIS 55. 25 March l927 Departed Pearl Harbor en route to Shanghai as a direct result of the Nanking incident. Made record run in about 8 1/2 days. Chief Carpenter O'Brien of the MARBLEHEAD was on duty in Cavite Navy Yard when the Japanese attacked and captured it. He got away and went to Corregidor and later was in the Bataan Death March [1942]. Later again he was being shipped to Japan in a prison ship, which was torpedoed by an American submarine, and he was lost. - While on the MARBLEHEAD in Manila in December l927 Commander Dahlquist golfed a lot always had the same Filipino caddy and was pleased to shoot an 82. He asked the caddy if he ever played the game. The caddy did play on Mondays. When Dahlquist asked him what he shot, he said,"a 67!" --271--After the Battle of Coral Sea Dahlquist learned that the MARBLEHEAD had been badly damaged by the Japanese in battle in Southwestern Pacific,and had put in at South Africa. In May 1971 we received a letter from Mr. Frank M Maichle, Vice President of Conley Associates, Chicago "I have read your letter with great interest as it recalled names of old shipmates on the USS MARBLEHEAD.My orders to the MARBLEHEAD were dated 28 July l924, and I left the MARBLEHEAD 7 January l926.I made the shakedown cruise and the cruise to Australia etc and in total was aboard about one and a half years.Then my orders were to Naval Academy to teach Ordnance and Gunnery and act as assistant wrestling coach.I resigned from the Navy in March l928 due to what I considered lack of opportunity. I remember Jack well- was very fond of him and considered him a fine efficient officer and gentleman.Sorry I can't be of more help." (Maichle and Jack were the two sponsors for Phillips's Australian bride to enter the United States after they were married in Montreal in l929 (8?). On June 8, l97l Captain John E.Florance of South Carolina wrote "I reported aboard the MARBLEHEAD in Honolulu on June 29, l925 along with the other '25ers and on the following day we left on the Australian cruise. Eddie Arroyo was my Division officer when I first reported aboard. On the trip from Honolulu to Melbourne I stood my sea watches as your husbands J.O.O.D. My principal memory of him at that time has to do with his interest in the wildlife of Australia.. I don't know where he got his information but I remember every time we had a night watch together he would tell me something new about it. Jack's path and mine crossed --272-- momentarily in August of l936. I had just reported aboard the TAYLOR as "Exec" and we were carrying Second Classmen from the Naval Academy on A Midshipmen's cruise to Easthampton, Long Island. Jack was the senior captain of the five destroyers and hence commander of the group. The last time that I saw Jack was while he was in Pearl (Harbor) during the war.I was returning from the Pacific, and he arranged my transportation to San Francisco.I always found him to be most friendly and most interested in the careers of the young officers about him."(Jack always stressed the importance of personnel.He said, "You can always replace materiel, but not personnel. Always take care of the personnel first."-Sophie note) Commander Harold Fultz assistant Engineer officer on the MARBLEHEAD from l926 wrote in June l97l from New Jersey:"I remember the day Harlow Hull our navigator was killed in a car - didn't make a curve.Eva Brant who was washed overboard I remember well."Shorty" Milner was our baseball star - really a top player. I got quite a kick out of the fact that I commanded nine ships and never damaged one of them." On November 21, l971 Commander Dahlquist wrote:"I think this was just after Jack left the MARBLEHEAD, but maybe not. We got an extra slug of ensigns from the Acadmey, and they immediately became incensed because the mess treasurer (I think it was the doctor at the time) put a lock on the refrigerator to keep the kids out.They were enjoying glasses full of fresh orange juice.So they got together and were going to vote in one of their kids as mess treasurer.The Executive Officer got wind of it and immediately issued a statement to the effect that all ensigns with less than--273-- two years service would be rated as having only a one-half vote. There were cries and howls from all sides, but it stuck,and they did not get their man in.There was a question as to whether or not he could do this but it died down when they got their mess bill - and it was more than they expected as it was. It could easily have been double this if action hadn't been taken. As indicated earlier in this chapter Jack had been Mess Treasurer of the MARBLEHEAD and had kept the mess bill down by serving two fresh vegetables in addition to potatoes at the evening meal. This reduced the consumption of meat - the most expensive item on the menu. Captain Kenneth Walker, who was a junior officer on the MARBLEHEAD with Jack wrote from California on February 6, l971:"Dear Mrs. Barrett: I liked your letter and what you are doing about the MARBLEHEAD.I also liked duty aboard her.The junior officers in the mess were fun- very outgoing - and almost all were team captains at the Academy, and some were Participants in the Olympics. - By far the sharpest group in my experience. "Shorty" Milner (Edward Joseph) was baseball captain and a joy to watch play. He frequently practiced with the Philadelphia Phillies.I joined the ship in San Francisco just before leaving for Honolulu as signal officer and ship secretary. I remember your husband well.My duty was quite confining since I was on the signal bridge from sunrise to late at night while underway.And in port I was busy in the Captain's cabin office.He (Shackford) was a real sharp skipper, demanding but fair.Ashore in Honolulu I was busy escorting my boss's lady relatives , so I still didn't --274-- get around much on my own.Wherever we went in Melbourne we went to parties under orders.I don't remember a single name there-they were fun though. The only memory I carried away from Tasmania was our speedy crossing and choppy seas and the beautiful streams and woods in the high country.The trip you mention is pretty dim in my memory - in the hotel waking up before dawn with a maid giving me a cup of tea and my being surprised that I did not have to break the ice in the wash stand pitcher - it was that cold. Of course the harbor in Tutuila, Samoa I will never forget - also Tahiti was a lovely place.I should remember people there, but the names have slipped.I have dug in my memory and have not been helpful,but I wish you luck." [End WALKER- next paraphrase of Dahlquist] From papers in our possession we read:"USS MARBLEHEAD 5 August l925 arrived at Hobart Tasmania after a run up a river for a few miles.There was plenty of water,but the river banks were so low we had to reduce speed considerably so as not to create waves that would damage shorelines and property.Tied up at the dock.Twenty officers and one hundred men were detailed to go by special train across Tasmania to Launceston.{For refreshment the enlisted men were given beer- a lot of it- and the officers were given several cases of whiskey.} Jack Barrett and Phil Dahlquist were among the party.They arrived in the late afternoon and there was an oficial greeting at the railroad station. The officers were quartered at a hotel. In the evening there was a big official dinner for the officers at the Brisbane Hotel. The Lord Mayor made a speech of welcome.There were no alcoholic drinks served at the dinner. A lady rendered a solo --275-- ,but there was a loud crunching noise, made by a Lieutenant from the TRENTON who had imbibed too freely on the train.He would take a walnut from a bowl and gently crack it with his fingers, making a noise disturbing to the singer.Someone suggested he could use some fresh air." Forrest Close#71- #7l MARBLEHEAD with Forrest Close letter--B8-25 Forrest Close Hotel Castellana Spain 4 Feberuary 1972 Dear Mrs. Barrett,I reported to the MARBLEHEAD in Boston in June 1926 and was detached in June 1930, having spent the full four years on that very good cruiser with many delightful shipmates and pleasant memories.Jack Barrett, then a Lieutenant, was on board when I reported, and I believe he was detached before our return from the Asiatic Station in 1927.Jack was always a very good friend of mine.I believe that he waw Senior Watch Officer when I came aboard.I was a stranger to New England, and Jack, being a native of those parts, took me on various pleasant excursions to Marblehead [town], Swampscott, and the various environs of Boston. At one time Jack and I had a visionary prospect of joining an expedition to the South Pole.He had picked out a job for himself in the commmand echelons, and I was going to be Navigator.We talked about it a lot, but nothing ever came of it - for one reason, because the MARBLEHEAD was constantly on the move,as you will recall. On one occasion we were absent from our home Port, Boston, for eighteen months, during which time the ship was in Nicaragua, China,the Philippines, and all ports on the Asiatic Station.I lost contact with Jack after he left the ship in China. However, we were always the [26] closest of friends,and I have happy memories of the many hours we spent together.I hope that the foregoing may be of some use to you in compiling Jack's biography. I wish you every success in this undertaking and the best of health and happiness in the future. Sincerely, Forrest Close. After detachment June l927 he traveled to his next assignment in New York via Tokyo and Seattle. Former Philippines Governor General Leonard Wood was aboard the same ship with Jack, as was Mrs. Weesner, who corresponded with the Barrett family up until the l950's.She invited the Barrett to attend her daughter Brenda Haram's graduation Baccalaureate from Radcliffe in Cambridge June l955.=p299= Captain Shackford usually ordered his cabin or the gangway painted when he knew his wife was coming aboard. One day only two hours before noon he told Jack, the Construction and Repair officer to have the railing and gangway painted before his wife came aboard for lunch.Jack tried to dissuade him,as it was a wet day, and the paint could not possibly be dry by 12:30 noon. But Shackford was adamant, and the gangway and railing were painted.Mrs. Shackford came to the ship in white shoes and a flowing summer dress. She was distressed when paint got on her dress, gloves, and shoes.-247


 


LATIN Moneo-Du-co-Capio-Audio- Subjuntive p 85

 

Moneo-Du-co-Capio-Audio- & Subjunctive Remember [Latin future imperative MEMENTO!] PRESENT ACTIVE INDICATIVE moneo- mone-s monet mone-mus mone-tis monent du-co- du-cis du-cit du-cimus du-citis du-cunt capio- capis capit capimus capitis capiunt audio- audi-s audit audi-mus audi-tis audiunt IMPERFECT mone-bam mone-ba-s mone-bat mone-ba-mus mone-ba-tis mone-bant du-ce-bam du-ce-ba-s du-ce-bat du-ce-ba-mus du-ce-ba-tis du-ce-bant capie-bam capie-ba-s capie-bat capie-ba-mus capie-ba-tis capie-bant audie-bam audie-ba-s audie-bat audie-ba-mus audie-ba-tis audie-bant FUTURE mone-bo- mone-bis mone-bit mone-bimus mone-bitis mone-bunt du-cam du-ce-s du-cet du-ce-mus du-ce-tis du-cent capiam capie-s capiet capie-mus capie-tis capient audiam audie-s audiet audie-mus audie-tis audient PERFECT monui- monuisti- monuit monuimus monuistis monue-runt,or monue-re du-xi- du-xisti- du-xit du-ximus du-xistis du-xe-runt or du-xe-re ce-pi- ce-pisti- ce-pit ce-pimus ce-pistis ce-pe-runt or ce-pe-re audi-vi- audi-visti- audi-vit audi-vimus audi-vistis audi-ve-runt or audi-ve-re PLUPERFECT [past perfect]monueram monuera-s monuerat monuera-mus monuera-tis monuerant du-xeram du-xera-s du-xerat du-xera-mus du-xera-tis du-xerant ce-peram ce-pera-s ce-perat ce-pera-mus ce-pera-tis ce-perant audi-veram audi-vera-s audi-verat audi-vera-mus audi-vera-tis audi-verant FUTURE PERFECT monuero- monueris monuerit monuerimus monueritis monuerint du-xero- du-xeris du-xerit du-xerimus du-xeritis du-xerint ce-pero- ce-peris ce-perit ce-perimus ce-peritis ce-perint audi-vero- audi-veris audi-verit audi-verimus audi-veritis audi-verint SUBJUNCTIVE ACTIVE-- Present moneam monea-s moneat monea-mus monea-tis moneant du-cam du-ca-s du-cat du-ca-mus du-ca-tis ducant capiam capia-s capiat capia-mus capia-tis capiant audiam audia-s audiat audia-mus audia-tis audiant IMPERFECT subjunctive [formed from stem of present active infinitive] mone-rem mone-re-s mone-ret mone-re-mus mone-re-tis mone-rent du-cerem du-cere-s du-ceret du-cere-mus du-cere-tis du-cerent caperem capere-s caperet capere-mus capere-tis caperent audi-rem audi-re-s audi-ret audi-re-mus audi-re-tis audi-rent PERFECT subjunctive monuerim... du-xerim... ce-perim... audi-verim... PLUPERFECT -past prefect subjunctive [formed from stem of perfect active infinitve] monuissem ... du-xissem... ce-pissem... audi-vissem... IMPERATIVE present mone- mone-te du-c du-cite cape capite audi- audi-te IMPERATIVE FUTURE mone-to- du-cito- capito- audi-to- mone-to-te du-cito-te capito-te audi-to-te PRESENT PARTICIPLE mone-ns du-ce-ns capie-ns audie-ns FUTURE ACTIVE PARTICIPLE monitu-rus ductu-rus captu-rus audi-tu-rus PRESENT ACTIVE INFINITIVE mone-re du-cere capere audi-re PERFECT monuisse du-xisse ce-pisse audi-visse Future monitu-rus esse ductu-rus esse captu-rus esse audi-tu-rus esse GERUND monendi-monendo- monendum monendo- du-cendi- du-cendo- du-cendum du-cendo- capiendi- capiendo- capiendum capiendo- audiendi- audiendo- audiendum audiendo- SUPINE monitum, monitu- ductum, ductu- captum,captu- audi-tum, audi-tu- NEXT LESSON PASSIVES including participles and infinitives gerundives. USES of SUBJUNCTIVE: VOLITIVE Cum volet,congredia-tur. When he wishes, let him come on.Uses NE - Ne- diu-tius manea-mus let us not remain longer. PURPOSE CLAUSES introduced by UT or NE Di-mi-sit igitur nu-ntio-s ut causam itineris doce-rent.Therefore he sent out messengers to explain the reason for the journey. Mi-lite-s missi- sunt ne- urbs capere-tur.Soldiers were sent that the city might not be captured. Sometimes purpose clause is introduced by a relative promoun especially after mitto-,renlinquo- Pueram mittam qui- te- adjuvet. I will send a gril to help you [who shall help you]. A purpose clause which conains a comparative adjecive or adverb is usually introduced by QUO- rather than UT ...Castella mu-nit quo- facilius eo-s prohibe-re posset ne- transeant.He forified strongholds by which he could more easily prevent them from crossing.SUBORDINATE RESULT CLAUSES introduced by UT or UT NO-N Est nemo- tam sapie-ns qui- numquam erret ..There is no one so wise he never errs.Tempesta-te-s tantae erant ut ex portu- profici-sci- no-n aude-re-mus. The storms were so great that we did not dare to set out from the harbor. SUBSTANTIVE CLAUSES OF DESIRE Mi-litibus impera-vit ne- saxa jacerent..He ordered the soldiues not to throw stones. SUBSTANTIVE CLAUSES OF FACT Itaque fi-e-bat ut minus la-te- vaga-rentur. So it came about that they wandered about less widely. Expressions of fear Re-gulus time-bat ne- cibus uxo-ri- ac li-beri-s de-esset.Regulus feared food for his wife and children might be lacking.ANTICIPATORY SUBJUNCTIVE Ve-nit ut tempus extraheret dum novae co-piae ex A-frica- adveni-rent.He came that he might gain time until fresh troops might arrive from Africa.CLAUSES OF PROVISO ..RELATIVE CLAUSES OF DESCRIPTION with subjunctive Pauci- erant qui- arma ferre no-n possent.There were a few who could not bear arms. CUM CAUSAL CLAUSES Fe-lix es qui- tot ami-co-s habea-s You are fortunate, whoo have so many friends. CUM CONCESSIVE CLAUSES.. CUM DESCRIPTIVE CLAUSES OF SITUATION-- EXPRESSIONS OF DOUBT No-n dubito- qui-n Belgae forte-s sint. I do not doubt that the Belgians are brave. INDIRECT QUESTIONS Ja-so-n de-mo-nstra-vit quam ob causam ve-nisset. Jason explained for what reason he came. SUBJUNCTIVE BY ATTRACTION where verb is closely dependent. INFORMAL- IMPL IED INDIRECT DISCOURSE ..CAUSAL CLAUSES with QUOD, QUIA, QUONIAM.. IMPERATIVE MOOD.. NEGATIVE COMMANDS No-li- hi-c mane-re Do not remain here Perfect subjunctive with NE- Ne- hi-c ma-nseri-s Do not remain here


 


Korea July 1950 East Timor September 1999

 

PROOF-READING APPRECIATED. This is from an October 3 letter of mine to former Law Dean Robert F. Drinan now at Georgetown University Law School in human rights, with corrections. Anyone may make copies or excerpts.Comments will be helpful. John Barrett TEXT: September 30, 1999 I read shocking news that in July 1950 American troops coldbloodedly massacred hundreds of women and children refugees as United Nations forces were pushed into a narrow defensive pocket near Pusan in south-east Korea.Claims for compensation of Korean survivors have reportedly met apathy, stonewalling, and injustice.Now a small number of courageous American former servicemen are speaking out - blowing the whistle-and there is a prospect after forty-nine years of compensation of families of victims and prosecution of perpetrators if they can be identified.This may be politically unpopular as American veterans now in their seventies are exposed and punished for crimes of their youth, as happened to many in Europe in the aftermath of World War 2.Racism is clearly a factor,and it has played into the hands of communists in Asia.I believe in the righteousness of American intervention in Korea in 1950, and I am deeply saddened that a glorious moment in our history has been tarnished in this way. A nephew of my mother's the late Lt. Col. Arthur Meranski 1919-1995 served in tanks both in the Inchon, Korea landing September 1950 and the Normandy invasion France June 1944. A family connection of my father's Rev. James Murphy of county Cork, Ireland has served in the Columban Fathers about forty years in Seoul, Korea.I have head that Korea and the Philippines have the highest percentages of Christians in all of Asia. Especially in California, tens of thousands of persons with Korean roots are now American citizens, including leaders in science, business and education. I was fourteen years of age when the Communists invaded democratic Korea. With others of my generation, the prospect of the military draft focused my attntion.Luckily, Stalin's Soviet representative was boycotting the United Nations Security Council and not present to veto the United Nations force in Korea.Those were the early days of television news broadcasts, and the strong support of the British Sir Gladwyn Jebb in the Security Council debate on Korea made a deep impression.President Truman had the support of Michigan Senator Vandenberg and others in a bipartisan foreign policy, and the American Security Council representative was the former Vermont Senator Warren Austin. In the intervening forty-nine years Soouth Korea has evolved to real democracy despite episodes of corruption and military rule, and South Korea has been one of the economic "tigers" with explosive growth and advanced technology.Meanwhile a barbaric family dynasty has exposed the North Korean people to starvation in a society more like the vision of George Orwell than anything Karl Marx contemplated. Could the United States have done anything to prevent this? Has there been a lack of imagination-initiative-outreach-charity? This is not a simple question to answer, but a militarist in North Korea could note that the "DMZ" Demilitarized Zone between the Koreas is the most heavily mined zone anywhere on earth, and it is generally believed that the United States for many years kept nuclear weapons on South Korean soil, without officially announcing the policy.When I was active in 1983 on the board of Boston Chapter of Lawyers Alliance for Nuclear Arms Control, I was approached by the late Gregory Henderson of Medford, Massachusetts (a nephew of Mrs. James B. Conant). He had been State Department "Desk Officer" for Korea in 1958 and called to the attention of the Lawyers Alliance the strong feelings on this subject in Korea.Today in 1999 vital interests of Americans are threatened by North Korean nuclear weapons and intercontinental missles. Perhaps our past arrogance is contributing to our present problems. There is a saying 'the world is a mirror' reflecting "do unto others as you would have them do unto you." American relations with Korea need careful attention today, with examination of past American policy, omissions,and actions.Training of military personnel in international law and human rights needs greatly increased emphasis, including the Service Academies.The future of the military as an honorable profession needs support and re-examination. A second Pearl Harbor has occurred in East Timor, where American prestige in East Asia has suffered gravely as thousands of lives have been lost. Defense and National Security Agencies must be prepared for human rights emergencies and cannot leave planning to a few specialists in the State Department. In recent months Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has articulated American human rights goals very well, but Defense agencies have been unprepared and have even "turned their blind eye to the telescope"- as in their collaboration with the corrupt and brutal Indonesian Army.The United States cannot "wash its hands" of East Timor- American actions have led directly to bloodshed, starvation and mass murder with American complicity- notably in 1975 under Henry Kissenger and Gerald Ford, and with the continued involvement of the American military and petroleum and copper mining interests. More people should know about East Timorese heroes like Gusmao, Bishop Belo, Dr.Ramos Horta, Constancio Pinto, -& the commendable support of the new democratic Portugal and the writings of Noam Chomsky, Alan Nairn, Matthrew Jardine, Charles Scheiner, Mark Salzer, and the East Timor Action Network.---- by John Barrett


 

 

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