Red Headed Stepchild
(The Barrett family memoir of Navy Life)
by Sophie Ruth Meranski with photos

 

1359.
88-1359 hockey team 1947-1948 Roxbury Latin School from 1948 Year Book

 

This 1948 Year Book turned up among materials in storage with Ben Maleson and Bob Godino when John Barrett visited massachusetts november 1999 (R) www.historyoftheuniverse.com/eukaryot.html-- From: "Philip Brown" | Block address To: "John Barrett" Subject: Your comment has been published... Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 10:28:13 +0100 Add Addresses Your comment has been published on the History of the Universe web site. Your comment has been given the title Summary of earth history Your comment was: The age of the earth is estimated fairly precisely by uranium half-life a little over 4.6 billion years. In 1950s Elso Barghoorn found bacterial fossils over three billion years old. Molecular evidence suggests that archaeobacteria are quite different from common ones - they include thermophiles occur in extreme envirnoments such as hot deep sea vents and Yellowstone hot springs-- other archaebacetria excrete methane or live in extreme salt environments. Lynn Margulis about 1970 did research to support an old hypothesis that a large host bacterium engulfed smaller eubacteria, which survived in symbiosis leading to mitchrondia and chloroplasts of eukaryotic organisms, which have complex nuclei usually with more than one chromosome and a shield against ultraviolet radiation. Among the earliest eukaryote fossils presently known are red algae resembling the Bangiales order from Canada described by Nick Butterfield and Andrew Knoll. In 1998 Harvard-Canadian earth scientist Paul Hoffman and colleagues published evidence that between 730 and 580 million years ago, ocean surfaces worldwide froze to the equator, but life survived in oases such as near volcanoes, - carbon dioxide accumulated from volcanic action,while photosynthesis was greatly reduced, and warm conditions returned. About 544 million years ago at the Cambrian epoch calcium skeletons appear suddenly in the fossil record, and familiar phyla including arthropods, molluscs, and vertebrates can be recognized. The Burgess shale in Yoho National Park British Columbia has exceptional preservation of soft parts of these Cambrian animals because specimens were buried alive suddenly by turbidity currents. For decades this was the only such site known, but others have been discovered 1990s in China and Greenland. Since the Cambrian there have been five major extinctions. The largest was at the end of the Permian and Paleozoic around 250 million years ago, before the Traissic and Mesozoic - heyday of reptiles and conifers. Other susbtantial extinctions occurred in Ordovician, Upper Devonian [age of fish about 360 milllion years ago] end Triassic [about 225 million years] when mammal-like reptiles lost out to dinosaurs and end Cretacrous-Mesozoic 65 million years ago, when ammonites and dinosaurs and many other groups suddenly became extinct, probably because of a large comet hitting Chicxulub, Yucatan. an iridium layer is important evidence here at the "K-T" boundary. It was sent by John Barrett on 06 Apr 2000 This comment is published on the following page(s) Eukaryotes( http://www.historyoftheuniverse.com/eukaryot.html )----2222- From: "Philip Brown" | Block address To: "John Barrett" Subject: Your comment has been published... Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 10:27:28 +0100 Add Addresses Your comment has been published on the History of the Universe web site. Your comment has been given the title First photosynthetic organisms Your comment was: Cyanobacteria were probably not the first photosynthetic organism, as there are very ancient green and purple groups of bacteria, which, however, do not release substantial amounts of oxygen the way cyanobacteria "blue-greens" do. The purple photosynthetic bacterial group are believed by molecular evidence to include the free-living ancestor of mitochondria of higher organisms. The term "blue green algae" is NOT incorrect in a ECOLOGICAL context. Cladistically blue-greens are prokaryotes, but they are included in nearly all major texts on ALGAE, including Bold and Wynne's, and they are a central portion of the ecology and paleobiology of ALGAE. It is not absolutely certain that all early STROMATOLITES were formed by blue-greens, but they resemble those that blue-greens form today in high salt environments such as coastal Australia, where animal disturbance is lowered. Blue-greens were very widespread in the Proterozoic, but they have been crowded from many habitats since the Cambrian epoch around 540 million years ago. Blue-greens have contributed to the oxygen of the atmosphere, though much comes from volcanoes. Between three and 2.1 billion years ago, the oxygen continued to be removed from the atmosphere by chemical reactions that formed major iron ore deposits. About 2.2 or 2.1 billion years ago the oxygen level of the atmosphere increased greatly, and during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic epochs between about 540 and 250 million years ago, oxygen levels were probably much higher than today's twenty per cent of air. This led to great fires in fern forests and may have assisted evfolution of flight in insects, pterodactyls and birds. It was sent by John Barrett on 13 Apr 2000 This comment is published on the following page(s) Blue Green Bacteria( http://www.historyoftheuniverse.com/bluegree.html )


 

1360.
88-1360 Roxbury Latin Student Council 1947=1948

 

left to right-back row: - John Connors -Jim Gustavson, ....., John Corcoran, Peter Ulin, George Stebbins,Hamilton Pierce. Front Row: Frank Basius, David Wyman, Roger Sullivan, ...., John Barrett [sixth class] (R) futueart--Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 10:28:23 +0100 Your comment has been published on the History of the Universe web site. Your comment has been given the title Earlier end to Earth predicted Your comment was: There is another scenario that was published in NATURE Magazine in 1992 by Ken Caldeira and James Kasting of Pennsylvnnia State. They cite the faint early sun 1972 hypothesis of Carl Sagan- and cite literature suggesting sun is getting about ten per cent warmer every billion years, in the normal aging pattern of main sequence stars, as helium and heavy elements accumulate. Pressure of gravity causes hotter core temperatures, and nuclear reactions occur faster in a small core region. In a relatively short time - a hundred million years, researchers say the atmosphere will reach 50 C. or 120 F. , and most of the carbon dioxide will be fixed by chemical reaction with silicate rock, forming huge amount of limestone and dolomite. MOST PLANTS will be unable to continue photosynthesis, but the Pennsylvania State group found that certain tropical grasses that have "C4" metabolism can continue photosynthesis at very low levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere - ten parts per million. It is important we find ways to slow the warming of the sun. Around 120 million years ago the atmosphere had much higher levels of both oxygen and carbon dioxide. The high oxygen may have aided development of flight in birds. The decline in carbon dioxide especially last 20 million years has made grass dominate one third of earth's surface. Grass is the major source of human food - rice, wheat. corn, sugar, sorghum, millet, barley, oats, rye - and animal fodder. It was sent by John Barrett on 08 Apr 2000 This comment is published on the following page(s) Future of Earth( http://www.historyoftheuniverse.com/futueart.html )


 

1361.
88-1361 (R)

 

Web page 87 A. Genealogy article West Roxbury Transcript 1984 B Thomas Jefferson School fifth grade class of Mrs. Agnes Davidson 1946 C & D Beth and Dwight Benedict and daughters Gallaudet University E-F-G Lactoris fernandeziana photos of Delbert Wiens H Roxbury Latin Yearbook photo 1948 Web Page 88 - A Robury Latin 1948 B Roxbury Latin 1948 C Roxbury Latin 1948 D roxbury Latin 1948 E. Sophie at Mount Holyoke 25th reunion 1948 F Father Edward Hartigan G Kaiulani banyan Waikiki H 1923 Mount Holyoke classamtes at 1973 reunion Web Page 89 A Jack Barrett at Chelsea Naval Hospital 1968 B. Sophie and John at 2415 Ala Wai with film twelvepack C Bellevue Hill West Roxbury 1966 color Sophie and Jack D.Kaiulani banyan Waikiki E. Tientsin funeral 1931 F. Sophie Panama G. Peggy Dahlquist Alaska cruise 1973 H. South Pacific Web Page 90 A.Sophie reading Brooklyn 1941 B. Kaiulani banyan Waikiki C. Boyds' dog Mischief Panama 1934 D. Sophie on ship E. Sophie reading 2415 Ala Wai Boulevard Waikiki F front of 2415 Ala Wai Boulevard G. Nathalie, Sophie and Gertrude Rice standing Tientsin 1931 H. Gertrude and Nathalie Rice 1931 Tientsin Web p 91 A.,Sophie Panama B. Sophie at bed Panama C. Phil and Peggy Dahlquist Alaska cruise 1973


 

1362.
88-1362 Roxbury latin classs Six 1947-8

 

left to right back row John Watson, David Rosenbaum, Fred Martin, Don Gray, Bob Ash, Peter Banks, Clifford Ronan Robert Stikeleather, Jack Banton, James Sullivan Second row Joe Bonarrigo, Henry Haeberle, Herbert Cronin, Paul Kavanaugh, Ronald Havelock, Randy Hare, Gilbert Hoag, Robert Macdonald, Doug Meeker, Ken Sanderson, Paul MacNeese Front row Bob McLaughlin, David Markell, Edward Galvin, Larry Cummings treasurer, John Sweeney president, John Barrett Student Council, Don McIntosh, James Kipp


 

1363.
88-1363 Sophie at Mount Holyoke 25th reunion in 1948

 

Betty Gilman Roberts, Sophie Meranski Barrett, Connie Hasbrouck, Betty Giles Howard of Mount Holyoke class of 1923 at twenty-fifth reunion 1948 in South Hadley, Massachusetts. Another photo destroyed by thieves 1993 showed Sophie Barrett as Sergeant-at-Arms holding the silver trophy cup presented to the class that year for high participation in Alumnae Fund.


 

1364.
88-1364 Father Edward M. Hartigan 1889-1978 ordained 1917 jubilee photo 1967 fifty years.

 

Father Edward Hartigan and his sisters Mary and Gertrude and their brothers Jeremiah, James, and John were second cousins of Commander John Barrett 1888-1969. They grew up at corner D and Third Streets South Boston where Jack Barrett often saw them.Jack was very close with their mother and their older brother James, a journalist who died of spinal tuberculosis 1912. After graduation from Boston College 1911 Edward Hartigan accepted appointment at West Point Military Academy and was a classmate of future Army Generals Dwight Eisenh0ower, Omar Bradley, and James Van Fleet, but when his older brother James died, he felt needed at home and resigned and entered the priesthood 1917. He was in North Weymouth a number of years and 1953-1970 pastor of Immaculate Conception Church in Everett.HAbout 1924 he founded Camp Cedar Crest for boys and girls in Green Harbor, Marshfield, on the Massachusetts South Shore, and his family retired there in the 1970s. His mother adopted a considerably younger girl Dorothy, who became Mrs. James Dunn and whose family were very close with the Hartigans. The youngest of the Hartigan brothers, John, also had a family of four or five who were in the Green Harbor area. Father Hartigan met O Farrell second cousins at Kilbarry, Bandon county Cork while touring 1929, and his sister May was very helpful when Sophie and John Barrett traced Jack's mother's relatives 1970-1971. Sean O Farrell and his sisters Sheila Hennessy and Joan Collins remembered Father Hartigan's 1929 visit and identified scenes in photos he took there. Jack Barrett attended Father Hartigan's 1967 golden jubilee- fifty years a priest, where Boston Cardinal Richard Cushing officiated. Jack was re-united on that occasion with two of his Buckley first cousins in Melrose, Gertrude and Alice Buckley, daughters of his uncle John Buckley and Jenny Cain, born in Warrington near liverpool England.Sophie Barrett enjoyed many visits with the Hartigans at Green Harbor Marshfield. May Hartigan taught mathermatics at Washington Irving School, Roslindale and lived with her mother and sister Gertrude at 80 Brown Avenue near Sacred Heart Church.


 

1365.
89-1365 Kauilani's Banyan on Tuisitala Street near Kauilani Street, Waikiki (**){H} {R)

 

This banyan was one block from the Barrett 1941-1947 home at 2415 Ala Wai Boulevard.A stone seat remained where in 1890 the Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson 1850-1894 used to read to the young Hawaiian Princess Kaiulani, who lived close by in a palace near modern Cleghorn Street named for members of her family. This photo was obtained for us in 1970 by our 1946 Ala Wai neighbor Margaret Gage Bronson, a 1935 Mount Holyoke graduate, who kept in touch with the Barrett family until the l980s. She grew up in Marlboro, Massachusetts, married entomologist Harry Bronson, in the 1970s in Ojai, California, often saw Sophie's 1923 classmate Kathryn Trufant [whose family grew cranberries on Cape Cod] and Sophie's Economics-and-Sociology colleague Helen Demond of class of 1925.


 

1366.
89=1366 Fiftieth Reunion 1973 Mount Holyoke class of 1923

 

Betty Gilman Roberts, Betty Giles Howard, ...{Connie Hasbrouck ??], Ruth Peck Doyle (8){R} futueart--Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 10:28:23 +0100 Your comment has been published on the History of the Universe web site. Your comment has been given the title Earlier end to Earth predicted Your comment was: There is another scenario that was published in NATURE Magazine in 1992 by Ken Caldeira and James Kasting of Pennsylvnnia State. They cite the faint early sun 1972 hypothesis of Carl Sagan- and cite literature suggesting sun is getting about ten per cent warmer every billion years, in the normal aging pattern of main sequence stars, as helium and heavy elements accumulate. Pressure of gravity causes hotter core temperatures, and nuclear reactions occur faster in a small core region. In a relatively short time - a hundred million years, researchers say the atmosphere will reach 50 C. or 120 F. , and most of the carbon dioxide will be fixed by chemical reaction with silicate rock, forming huge amount of limestone and dolomite. MOST PLANTS will be unable to continue photosynthesis, but the Pennsylvania State group found that certain tropical grasses that have "C4" metabolism can continue photosynthesis at very low levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere - ten parts per million. It is important we find ways to slow the warming of the sun. Around 120 million years ago the atmosphere had much higher levels of both oxygen and carbon dioxide. The high oxygen may have aided development of flight in birds. The decline in carbon dioxide especially last 20 million years has made grass dominate one third of earth's surface. Grass is the major source of human food - rice, wheat. corn, sugar, sorghum, millet, barley, oats, rye - and animal fodder. It was sent by John Barrett on 08 Apr 2000 This comment is published on the following page(s) Future of Earth( http://www.historyoftheuniverse.com/futueart.html )


 

 

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